CI-2009 EAc1.2: Optimize Energy Performance—Lighting Controls

  • CI_EAc1-2_Type1_LightingControls Diagram
  • Three separate points to pursue

    In a marked change from LEED-CI 2.0, which only addressed daylighting, this credit addresses occupancy and daylighting sensorsA lighting feature that takes advantage of sunlight to cut the amount of electric lighting used in a building by varying output of the lighting system in response to variations in available daylight. They are sometimes referred to as "natural lighting control sensors " or "photocells."  . Three points are available, with each of the following strategies earning you one point:

    • Strategy 1: Install daylight controls or sensors within 15 feet of the windows or skylights in all regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space.
    • Strategy 2: Install daylight responsive controls for 50% of the connected lighting load.
    • Strategy 3: Install occupancy controls for 75% of the connected lighting load

    You can pursue any combination of these three separate points. Most projects have occupancy controls by code, but daylight controls are less common.  

    Daylight dimming controls

    Ideally, implementing daylight-sensitive controls should be part of your overall lighting strategy to maximize natural light, using electric light only as a supplement, dovetailing with IEQc8.1: Daylight and Views—Daylight. The goal is to combine natural and electric lighting seamlessly so that occupants won’t notice the difference. This is possible with automatic daylight sensors that supplement reduced daylighting by turning or stepping up electric lighting.

    Using daylight sensors for all regularly occupied areas works for most projects. But if your space is in a building without good daylight access, having 50% of the lighting load connected to daylight sensors may not be possible. Daylight sensors and controls add to your initial construction budget but can start providing savings from day one of operations, with a typical payback of six months to four years.

    You might imagine that having all fixtures within 15 feet of a window controlled by a daylight sensor would satisfy the credit requirements, but that’s not how it works. Instead, the credit requires that daylight sensors be installed within 15 feet of windows in all regularly occupied spaces. This approach may not work for all applications, especially those with deep daylight penetration (expanded height glazing with high ceilings) as sensor placement may need to be deeper than 15 feet to adequately control the fixtures in the space. 

    Occupancy sensors

    Occupancy sensors can reduce the lighting energy use up to 50% in non-regularly occupied spaces such as corridors and restrooms, often with a payback of less than one year. Many sensors can be adjusted for sensitivity to accommodate different occupancy situations.

    Mandatory requirements from ASHRAE 90.1-2007 that you have to carry out for EAp2 require projects larger than 5,000 ft2 to use occupancy sensors or timed switching when the space is not in use. It is important to recognize that this credit expands that requirement to all area sizes, even those smaller than 5,000 ft2

    Offices and retail environments are very different

    In office buildings, there are opportunities to incorporate both types of lighting controls into your overall lighting strategy. Control sensors are generally used for ambient lightingLighting in a space that provides for general wayfinding and visual comfort, in contrast to task lighting, which illuminates a defined area to facilitate specific visual work. rather than task lighting, but task lights and plug loads can be controlled with localized workstation occupancy sensors. 

    Generally, retail spaces utilize occupancy-sensitive controls only in private or “back of the house” spaces like offices and bathrooms. A retail project can incorporate daylighting controls in all public areas receiving ample daylight and may even benefit from increased sales in addition to energy savings.

    FAQs for CI EAc1.2

    Does decorative lighting need to be connected to daylight sensors?

    For EAc1.2 Option A, decorative fixtures within 15 feet of the building perimeter must have daylighting controls to comply with the requirements. The only exceptions are those defined by ASHRAE 9.2.2.3. Note, however, that task lighting can be excluded whether it meets exception "p" or not.

    What is included in the total connected lighting power?

    The total connected lighting power includes all hard-wired lighting within the interior project space. This does not include non-connected plug-in lighting that is not part of the overall lighting design.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

Expand All

  • Consider pursuing any or all of the following three strategies, each of which will earn a point under this credit. 


  • This credit allows three opportunities for energy reduction that can be pursued independently or in combination with each other. 


  • Consider which kinds of controls, sensors, and automation systems are applicable and useful for your project. Refer to the Whole Building Design Guide webpage, which lists different space types with their most applicable controls or sensors. (See Resources.)


  • Strategy 1: Daylight controls for daylit areas


  • Start thinking and talking about how daylight sensors will be used in different spaces. Introducing this topic before the schematic design is complete will help to optimize the design for daylighting and energy savings.


  • It makes sense to pursue this credit in open office applications with few interior partitions and access to exterior glazing that is between 2'6" and 10' in height. 


  • Spaces with glazing above 10 feet in height may have difficulty getting sensors placed within 15 feet of the windows to function properly because of increased glare and direct sunlight tracking on the floor.


  • Look to create a progressive lighting design that controls the fixtures closest to the windows separately from another set of fixtures that are deeper into the space.


  • “Closed loop” daylighting controls only control one set of fixtures. With “open loop” controls, multiple zones can be controlled from one sensor and each zone can be calibrated independently to the daylight available in that zone.


  • It generally makes sense to control the fixtures within 15 feet of the windows, but the credit requires that you place the sensors within 15 feet of the windows. Unfortunately, it can be counterproductive to dictate the location of fixtures in this way without looking at the specific site conditions.


  • Some spaces are more suitable for daylight sensors than others. For example, offices can function with sufficient daylight and daylight sensors, but storage spaces typically need artificial lighting. 


  • Strategy 2: Daylight controls for 50% of lighting load 


  • Review the credit requirements with the lighting designer and think about how you might address lighting controls based on the program. 


  • It makes sense to pursue this credit when glazing makes up more than half of the exterior wall area and the visible transmittance (Tvis) of the glazing is greater than 0.5.


  • Consider various strategies for harvesting available daylight—like adding light-shelves, reflective surfaces and light-colored finishes. Keep partitions low, especially those parallel to the windows. Alternatively, provide clear or frosted glazing in higher partitions to provide acoustic benefit while still allowing for daylight penetration. 


  • The credit requirement is to connect 50% of the project lighting load to daylight sensors. This does not mean connecting to 50% of the total number of fixtures, as some fixtures have higher power loads than others. If 30% of fixtures contribute to 60% of your lighting load, then you need fewer sensors to meet the minimum threshold for the credit. Or conversely, by adding more sensors, you can achieve the 75% Exemplary Performance threshold and earn an extra point through IDc1.


  • Strategy 3: Occupancy sensors for 75% of lighting load


  • Review the credit requirements with the lighting designer. Develop an estimated lighting load for the space.


  • Attempt to estimate the number of sensors and controls needed to reach a minimum of 75% of the lighting load. 


  • ASHRAE 90.1-2007 guidelines require occupancy-sensitive controls for buildings of 5,000 ft2 or greater, but this credit requires the use of occupancy-sensitive controls for all buildings, regardless of size.


  • Occupancy sensors (including passive infrared, ultrasonic, microphonic, and dual-technology) serve three basic functions:

    • turn lights on automatically when a room is occupied;
    • keeps the lights on continuously while the space is occupied;
    • and turn the lights off after the space has been vacated within a certain time period.

  • Some new sensors self-adjust and “learn” occupancy patterns in the space. Some systems allow the time-out delay to change depending on the time of day to adapt to changing occupancy patterns. This can save even more energy by providing short time delays at night for cleaning crews, and longer time delays during the day to avoid false “off” occurrences.


  • Spaces with daylight can save more energy in a “manual-on/auto-off mode” by forcing the user to turn on the lights. Many people will prefer to keep the lights off if they have good daylight.


  • ASHRAE-90.1 requires the installation of an automatic shut-off for spaces larger than 5,000 ft2. Both timers and occupancy sensors fulfill this requirement. 


  • According to the New Buildings Institute, occupancy sensors produce 25%-45% energy savings. Adding occupancy sensors is often a low-cost upgrade with payback period of less than one year. 

Schematic Design

Expand All

  • Work with your lighting designer, in collaboration with the architect, to determine the applicability of the credit requirements and their potential implementation to your project. 


  • Sketch a lighting layout that incorporates daylight sensors for the fixture types that are the most numerous and look to minimize fixtures that use the most power. 


  • Discuss with your project team the possibility of adding more windows. Windows of different sizes in various locations have different levels of daylight penetration. Skylights offer diffused light, clerestories can provide longer daylight hours, and vision glazing can be more suitable for desk work. Note that not all fenestrations are suitable for all space functions.


  • Select glazing that allows enough daylight on as many days, and during as much of the year, as possible. Typically, the visible light transmittance of daylight glazing should be above 60%.  


  • Stepping is a common approach to controlling lighting systems with daylight sensors. This systems works by turning off a group of fixtures (or ballasts within a group of fixtures) when the daylight in the space reaches a certain level. This system is usually cheaper than dimming, but the sudden switching of lights on and off can be disruptive for occupants.


  • A dimming system reads the amount of daylight in the space and automatically adjusts light levels to meet a certain threshold for light that works for the activities in the space. Getting this type of system to perform properly requires experienced contractors, as well as guidance from the manufacturer on fixture and sensor placement. Daylight dimming response should be slow and imperceptible so it isn’t distracting to occupants. 


  • Daylight and occupancy controls may be standalone or integrated into a central, intelligent lighting control system. It might take additional wiring and commissioning, but this type of integrated system is usually the most efficient.


  • Before the sensor system is designed, identify occupant lighting needs that can be met with daylight. Typical light levels in offices are 30–50 footcandles for most tasks. The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) prescribes footcandle levels for various project types, occupant types, and tasks. (See Resources.)  


  • Dimming systems often cost more than stepped systems, but also have better performance and are less distracting to occupants when the amount of daylight in the space changes. 


  • Make sure that the owner knows about ongoing maintenance requirements for controls. Daylight sensors should be calibrated every 3–5 years to maintain the performance of the lighting control system. 


  • Although integrated control strategies have additional cost up front, these systems can also tie into mechanical systems to significantly reduce energy use. 


  • Incorporate manual overrides on both occupancy and daylight sensors into your lighting system design only when necessary. Manual overrides must be used with caution, and should only be temporary. Otherwise, the sensors may be overridden and forgotten, negating potential financial and performance benefits. 


  • Strategy 1: Daylight controls for daylit areas


  • Identify regularly occupied spaces in your plans that have windows where daylighting sensors can be installed within 15 feet. These include open and private offices, conference rooms, and cafeterias.


  • Daylight-sensitive controls work only with ambient space lighting—not task lighting, art illumination, or other forms of lighting.


  • Strategy 2: Daylight controls for 50% of lighting load 


  • Develop a list of all lighting fixtures and associated power usage. Sum up the total power to identify a target for daylight sensor control: at minimum, 50% of installed lighting load has to be controlled with light sensors. 


  • Identify the highest power-consuming fixtures selected for your project. Target these to be connected to daylight sensors.


  • You can use the same lighting power calculations you completed for EAp2.


  • This credit addresses your project’s entire connected lighting load. It’s not limited either to spaces near windows or to daylit spaces. 


  • Pursue this point if your project space has sufficient available daylight to make a lighting control system that includes daylight sensors worthwhile. Have your lighting designer provide estimated annual energy savings and simple payback calculations and, if warranted, a daylight simulation to examine possible control strategies. 


  • Even if you implemented Strategy 1, daylight sensors within 15 ft of windows, you may be on your way to earning the point for this strategy, but you’re probably not all the way there. You’ll need to put more effort into creating a daylight-responsive space.


  • As each sensor costs $30–$150, develop a lighting layout that strategically combines similar tasks and exposure to daylight to reduce the number of sensors required.


  • Fixtures with integrated daylight sensors carry a small cost premium (5%–10%) and will qualify for the credit.  


  • Strategy 3: Occupancy sensors for 75% of lighting load


  • Picking the right sensors and putting them in the right places is the key to success. For your system to operate properly, each sensor must be able to detect motion at the entrance for non-regularly occupied spaces. Large, open offices usually need multiple sensors to detect movement throughout the space. Consult your lighting system manufacturer for appropriate sensor placement, especially for specialty occupancies. 


  • Occupancy sensors should be installed high on walls or ceilings, depending on the usage of the space and obstacles.


  • For spaces like hotel guest rooms—or even office spaces where the occupants may be stationary for long periods of time—you may find occupancy sensors counterproductive unless they are properly calibrated. 


  • Sensors can reduce the lighting energy use of infrequently used spaces by more than 50%. Places like bathrooms, pantries, and storage areas do not need constant lighting and automatic devices can save a lot of energy. Infrequently used stairways and hallways need only minimum safety-oriented lighting and should have occupancy sensors installed to avoid wasting energy when they are unoccupied. 

Design Development

Expand All

  • All Strategies


  • Installing additional sensor controls can make up a big portion of an electrical subcontractor’s fee, so make sure your contractor understands the credit requirements when providing a price quote and especially when installing your controls. 


  • Strategy 2: Daylight controls for 50% of lighting load


  • Make sure that the electrical contractor and controls contractor are working with the manufacturer to design and install daylight sensors and other lighting controls according to manufacturer’s recommendations. 


  • Place daylight-sensing controls within 15 feet of windows or skylights, but be careful not to place sensors within “sight” of direct sun shining on furniture or floors.


  • Have a daylight sensor control only the lights in a contiguous space that has uniform daylighting characteristics and a single solar exposure.  


  • Calculate the connected power load and the power load connected to controls to make sure that daylight sensors are connected to at least 50% of the load.


  • Add daylight sensors to increase the percentage connected to the lighting load to 75% to claim an exemplary performance point.


  • For maximum efficiency, develop a lighting layout that ties a daylight sensor to the fixtures closest to windows and another sensor to those deeper into the space. 


  • Develop your furniture layout and space design with sensors in mind. For example, if a space is divided by half-height partitions that block sunlight for occupants beyond, it makes sense to locate the daylight sensor on the daylit side of the partition. 


  • Strategy 3: Occupancy sensors for 75% of lighting load


  • Calculate the total connected power load and the power load connected to controls to make sure that occupancy sensors are connected to 75% of the load.


  • To earn an Exemplary Performance point via IDc1, add sensors to increase the percentage connected to the lighting load to 95%.


  • Select the best type of sensor for each occupied space. 

    • Infrared sensors are best used in small spaces such as enclosed offices, as they are triggered by a heat-emitting body that crosses the sensor’s line of sight.  
    • Ultrasonic-based occupancy sensors are triggered by a disruption in the inaudible sound pattern they emit. They are best suited for spaces where direct line of sight to the sensor is not always possible—an example would be restrooms. 
    • Microphonic is another technology that is used by some manufacturers in lieu of ultrasonic. These sensors listen to changes in sound and learn the background noises to distinguish building system sounds from sounds related to human occupancy.
    • Dual-technology sensors combine these two technologies and have fewer false readings of occupancy, but they are more expensive.  

Construction Documents

Expand All

  • All Strategies


  • Include in your lighting and electrical layout the location of sensors, connected lights, and appropriate wiring. Include a detailed control schedule in your drawings and specifications. 


  • Complete your documentation in LEED Online. This includes filling out a table with all of the lighting zones in the project and their corresponding sensors and lighting loads. Also upload a floor plan indicating lighting control zones showing each control device and the lighting equipment it controls. Remember to indicate which zones are regularly occupied and to include a scale.


  • To show compliance with daylight controls for daylit areas, use a diagram or plan that demonstrates the location of sensors that are within 15 feet of daylight openings and indicates which lights are controlled by each sensor.


  • In the lighting controls specification, clarify who is responsible for sensor calibration, contractor training, owner/facilities training, and commissioning/verification.


  • Arrange a pre-bid or pre-installation training session to be given by the controls manufacturer to the contractor.

Construction

Expand All

  • Be sure to include the sensor controls within the scope of building commissioning for EAp1 and EAc2. 


  • Lighting control systems need to be commissioned at start-up.  


  • Strategy 3: Occupancy sensors for 75% of lighting load


  • Optimal sensor settings vary depending on how the space will be used, its size, geometry, and the specific sensor specified. Have the controls designer coordinate closely with the sensor manufacturer to determine the best settings for the sensor type and space.


  • While each space will have its requirements for sensor placement, public hallways and bathrooms are often set to “high sensitivity”—to turn on the lights with the slightest movement—while private office spaces and conference rooms need to be set at moderate sensitivity levels. 

Operations & Maintenance

Expand All

  • Periodically check the calibration of the setpoints on daylight sensors, and adjust for seasonal daylight changes. Make sure that sensors are being used as intended, and not overridden by occupants.


  • Sensor surfaces need periodic cleaning and calibration to ensure proper operation. This is usually done every 3–5 years.


  • Poorly calibrated daylight sensors can result in little or no energy savings—and can also annoy occupants, so it’s worth it to calibrate the sensor settings regularly and confirm that the occupants are satisfied with the performance of the system. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    EA Credit 1.2: Optimize energy performance - lighting controls

    1-3 Points

    Intent

    To achieve increasing levels of energy conservation beyond the prerequisite standard to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.

    Requirements

    MANDATORY POINT MINIMUM: Project registered on or after April 8, 2016 must earn four points in this credit, but can come from any of the four sub-sections.

    Design the project to include 1 or more of the following independent strategies:

    • Daylight controls for daylit areas: (1 point)

      Install daylight responsive controls in all regularly occupied daylit spaces within 15 feet (4.5 meters) of windows and under skylights. Daylight controls must switch or dim electric lights in response to the presence or absence of daylight illumination in the space.1
    • Daylight controls for 50% of the lighting load: (1 point)

      Install daylight responsive controls for 50% or more of the connected lighting load and demonstrate that 50% of the connected lighting load is daylight responsive. Daylight controls must switch or dim electric lights in response to the presence or absence of daylight illumination in the space.2
    • Occupancy sensors: (1 point)

      Install occupancy sensors for 75% of the connected lighting load.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Design the lighting controls to maximize energy performance.

Software Tools

SkyCalc

SkyCalc is an Excel-based program developed by the Heschong Mahone Group that identifies the optimum skylighting design for a building, and compares the net energy cost savings using a variety of electric lighting control strategies. 

Web Tools

Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG)

This website lays out design process for developing an energy efficient building.


Electric Lighting Controls

Strategies and additional links to help on manufacturers' web sites are provided below the table.


Daylighting Dividends

Lighting design and fixture selection guidance.


Daylight Pattern Guide

This is a simple lighting guide for CI projects specifically. It has a wide range of daylight modeling scenarios for different building types and factors and provides a good general overview for the range and effectiveness of various strategies.

Organizations

Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE)

This database shows state-by-state incentives for energy efficiency, renewable energy, and other green building measures. Included in this database are incentives on demand control ventilation, ERVs, and HRVs.

Articles

Design Brief – Lighting Controls

Article describes the various uses and pitfalls of key sensors and controls.

Publications

Daylight in Buildings: A Source Book on Daylighting Systems and Components, Chapter 5, Daylight- Responsive Controls

This chapter includes general information on the nature of daylight and electric light and their integration, the application of shading and electric lighting control systems with daylighting systems, and the benefits from controlling daylight and electric light input.


Advanced Lighting Guidelines, Chapter 8, Lighting Controls (New Buildings Institute, Inc., 2001)

Includes instructional graphics and superior lighting design solutions for many typical building or space types, including private offices, open offices, conference rooms, grocery stores, big box retail, specialty/boutique stores, classrooms and gas station canopy lighting.


ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2007 online

This is the referenced standard for this credit.


Federal government guide on payback of occupancy sensors

DOE research on occupancy sensors, operations, costs and payback.


New Buildings Institute— Advanced Lighting Guidelines: 2003 Edition

This guide includes instructional graphics and superior lighting design solutions for varying types of buildings and spaces, from private offices to big box retail stores.

Lighting Controls Project Example

This project, the Audubon Society Headquarters, achieved this credit with the sensors and controls documented in the sample plan, specs, and narrative shown here.

CI-2009 LEED Online Sample Forms – EA

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CI-2009 EA credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED
Online
for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

102 Comments

0
0
Edgar Arevalo
Feb 22 2017
Guest
62 Thumbs Up

Documented floor plans with occupancy scale

Project Location: United States

Before I began uploading the floor plans showing the controls and lighting equipment on the LEED online template for EAc1.2, I noticed that the templates requests floor plans indicated which zones are regularly occupied and include a scale. How does one show an occupancy scale for each space?

1
2
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Feb 22 2017 Guest 4635 Thumbs Up

These are 2 separate requirements. They need to know which areas are regularly occupied as the credit applies to these areas.

Separately, they need to have a scale on the plans so that they can make measurements from the plans if necessary.

2
2
0
Edgar Arevalo Feb 22 2017 Guest 62 Thumbs Up

I understand now. They mean a dimension scale, I thought they were referring a different type of scale specifically used to determine the level of occupancy per space. Thank you for the clearing that up.

Post a Reply
0
0
Edgar Arevalo
Feb 17 2017
Guest
62 Thumbs Up

No mention of Private offices

Project Location: United States

Can we still include private offices that have occupancy sensor controls. Under the drop down space type menu, it only mentions shared office. Can I just classify it under "Other" and specify that it is a private office space?

1
1
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Feb 22 2017 Guest 4635 Thumbs Up

Yes, you can (and should) include these. I would probably classify them as "shared office" and (maybe) include a note in the SC box that there was no private office option. Other/private office specification is too much work unless you have a very limited number of private offices.

Post a Reply
0
0
Edgar Arevalo
Feb 17 2017
Guest
62 Thumbs Up

Spaces controlled by both daylight and occupancy sensors

Project Location: United States

I have a project that has spaces which are controlled by both an occupancy sensor and a separate daylight sensor that is installed within 15 feet of the windows. When i populate the data in the lighting loads table in the EAc1.2 template, how do i separate the lighting load between daylight sensors and occupancy sensors if both control the same lighting load in that space?

1
2
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Feb 17 2017 Guest 4635 Thumbs Up

Report the same loads in both columns for those spaces. The table sums the total for daylight separately from the total for occupancy so you need to "double report" the loads.

2
2
0
Edgar Arevalo Feb 17 2017 Guest 62 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much.

Post a Reply
0
0
Ciaran McCabe METEC Consulting Engineers
Jan 17 2017
LEEDuser Member
729 Thumbs Up

Decorative Lighting (Options B & C)

Should decorative lighting be included to Options B&C ? This decorative lighting is not within 15ft of windows and is independently controlled by occupancy sensors.

1
1
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jan 17 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70009 Thumbs Up

I would say that this is part of the connected lighting load so it would count in the calculations.

Post a Reply
0
0
Katie Peterschmidt Associate Director, CORE Steward Cooper Carry
Sep 27 2016
LEEDuser Member
251 Thumbs Up

Daylight controls / sensors vs Occupancy Sensors or Both?

Project Location: United States

Hello all - We have a CI project that has "Occupancy Sensors" around the perimeter of the space within 15' of the windows. The occupancy sensors have a "Low Light" option that controls the sensors to turn lights ON automatically ONLY in low ambient light conditions (10 LuxMeasurement of lumens per square meter./1fc); the sensor turns lights OFF automatically when occupants aren't detected. Does this meet the requirements for daylight controls/sensors under Option A (even though the manufacturer's cutsheet calls the device an "Occupancy Sensor" in lieu of a "Daylight Sensor"?

1
2
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 27 2016 LEEDuser Expert 70009 Thumbs Up

Maybe. It does sound like a daylighting control as defined in the credit language. You will need to address the issue of the control "option". Obviously this option must be engaged. It must also be permanently set to that option and changing it cannot be accessible to the occupants.

2
2
0
Katie Peterschmidt Associate Director, CORE Steward, Cooper Carry Sep 27 2016 LEEDuser Member 251 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the quick reply Marcus - we will look into how to permanently set it to the "Low Light" option and let you know if anything comes out of the LEED review.

Post a Reply
0
0
Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K
Sep 08 2016
LEEDuser Member
1200 Thumbs Up

Decorative blue light fixtures

Project Location: Poland

In our office project there are daylight sensors within 15 feet of the windows which are connected to all lighting fixtures in daylit areas except for a few decorative fixtures on the ceiling (providing decorative blue light). These additional decorative fixtures are separately controlled and are connected to movement sensors.
I would like to confirm if we can still get one point for Daylight controls in daylit areas. In the Bird's eye view it's written that "For EAc1.2 Option A, decorative fixtures within 15 feet of the building perimeter must have daylighting controls to comply with the requirements." however the point of the these few fixtures providing blue light is to work whenever there's someone in the room regardless of available daylight.

1
2
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 09 2016 LEEDuser Expert 70009 Thumbs Up

The purpose of these lights is unclear but it does not sound like they are exempt under 9.2.2.3. If they are just decorative then they must comply.

2
2
0
Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K Sep 09 2016 LEEDuser Member 1200 Thumbs Up

Thank you Marcus. There are elements on the ceiling that look like clouds and so these decorative fixtures will provide blue light around the clouds so it looks like sky. So according to what you wrote they have to be connected to the daylight sensors in order to receive one point for Option A.

Post a Reply
0
0
Jordan Kirrane Principal Consultant Hurley Palmer Flatt
Mar 22 2016
LEEDuser Member
233 Thumbs Up

Percentage of Light Output/Wattage Dimmed

Project Location: United Kingdom

Hi there,

For the daylight control point I was wondering by how much the group of lights need to be reduced by, and whether this percentage needs to be of the total wattage or light output? The intent is to control 3 rows away from the facade using a multi-sensor (occupant & daylight sensor in one) at varying reductions (25%, 50%, 75% of full) and then control the internal circulation lights to a lower reduction using a separate daylight sensor. Could the circulation zones be reduced by a minimal amount (e.g. 5% of full)?

1
5
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 70009 Thumbs Up

I do not think there is a required minimum reduction.

Hard to say anything about the circulation zones without seeing the plans.

2
5
0
Jordan Kirrane Principal Consultant, Hurley Palmer Flatt Mar 23 2016 LEEDuser Member 233 Thumbs Up

Marcus, many thanks for your response. The circulation areas are not physically separated to the open place office spaces (the regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space.). Therefore playing it safe I would see these as being the one space, and thus requiring some sort of dimming response to daylight.

However as these are are very deep in to the floor plate (10m/33ft) so I don't see the benefit of providing daylight dimming control. Even with high glazing the spaces are too deep for it to be beneficial.

Would you agree?

3
5
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 23 2016 LEEDuser Expert 70009 Thumbs Up

The rule of thumb for an effective daylit zone is 1.5 times window head height. So you would need about 20 foot tall windows to provide any kind of adequate daylight. If on the south side you can augment the depth of penetration to up to 2.5 times window head height with a light shelf.

Again hard to say with seeing it.

4
5
0
Jordan Kirrane Principal Consultant, Hurley Palmer Flatt Mar 23 2016 LEEDuser Member 233 Thumbs Up

Marcus, would it be possible to forward on a typical floor to get a better understanding of the implications?

Also the intent of EAc1.2 are for daylight controls where relevant, not to improve the daylighting levels. Therefore if the above rule of thumb holds true the circulation areas that are over this distance from the facade do not need any daylight controls as they will never received enough daylight to warrant this kind of control?

5
5
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 23 2016 LEEDuser Expert 70009 Thumbs Up

I answer questions here because it is in a public forum benefiting many. Sending me drawings crosses the line into my fee for service consulting practice.

I agree that if you have an area too farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). to receive effective daylighting then installing daylighting controls for that area makes no sense. Unfortunately this may be a case where chasing a LEED point makes no sense either.

Post a Reply
0
0
William Weaver LEED Fellow, WELL AP JLL
Jan 12 2016
LEEDuser Member
2521 Thumbs Up

Emergency Lighting within Daylight Zone

Project Location: United States

I have a scenario where the core is offset, and is tight to the building envelope on one side. As a result, the egress path around the core on this side falls within the 15' perimeter. We have 2 fixtures in the egress path on this side that are tied to the building's emergency circuit and therefore are not on the same circuit as those tied to the daylighting controls. All other fixtures within the 15' perimeter zone are on daylighting controls.

We received the following review comment: "Not all lighting within the daylit zones is being controlled by the daylight responsive controls. Emergency lightingA luminaire that operates only during emergency conditions and is always off during normal building operation. Emergency lighting is designed to supply illumination essential to the safety of life and property in the event of failure of the normal supply. fixtures adjacent to 2917 Files are on a separate circuit that is not controlled by the lighting control system. Provide additional information confirming that 100% of lighting in daylit zones within 15’ of windows and under skylights is controlled by daylight responsive controls."

I have never had a problem with emergency lighting conflicting with credit compliance for daylight controls. Thoughts / recommendations?

1
1
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 70009 Thumbs Up

If they are in a corridor that is not a regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use.. Dimming is only required in regularly occupied daylit spaces.

Post a Reply
0
0
James Keohane, PE LEED BD+C CxA CPMP Sustainability and Commissioning Consultant Sustainable Engineering Concepts, LLC
Dec 21 2015
LEEDuser Member
1078 Thumbs Up

Credit Form Problems

Project Location: United States

I am having difficulty demonstrating compliance for Option C Occupancy Sensors. The project has Occ sensors in every room regularly occupied and Non regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. such as File Storage. My problem is with rooms which have a space type "Other". "Other" shows up in the space type pull down but "Other" does not display in form after selected. The form remains blank under space type when I select "Other". When I check compliance Option C shows "No" and I get red boxes around space type which are blank. Am I missing something? Or do I have a broken form? Any wisdom or advice would be most welcomed!

1
2
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Dec 21 2015 Guest 4635 Thumbs Up

After selecting Other you need to type the room name into the box.

2
2
0
James Keohane, PE LEED BD+C CxA CPMP Sustainability and Commissioning Consultant, Sustainable Engineering Concepts, LLC Dec 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 1078 Thumbs Up

Such a simple solution and maybe it might be obvious to others! I think I am a typical too literal engineer sometimes! Thank You! I modified form as suggested, the summary data works and the points show up as expected!

Post a Reply
0
0
Eleftherios Zacharakis Environmental and Energy Consultant WSP Group Sweden
Nov 10 2015
LEEDuser Member
214 Thumbs Up

Excluding demand for occupancy sensors in retail sales area

I have a retail store that the sales area is always occupied and therefore not on occupancy sensor. The sales floor is on a time clock instead. The rest of the store is on occupancy sensor. Can we exclude the sales LPDLighting power density (LPD) is the amount of electric lighting, usually measured in watts per square foot, being used to illuminate a given space. from the total LPD? If that is the case then we make 100% of the credit requirement.

1
1
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 10 2015 LEEDuser Expert 70009 Thumbs Up

Sounds like you are not eligible to earn this credit.

Post a Reply
0
0
John Kitsalis Principal New England Engineering, Inc.
Oct 26 2015
Guest
227 Thumbs Up

Controls or lights within 15' of windows?? or both?

Do we need the daylight controls itself to be within 15' of a window/skylight

OR

Do we need to provide daylight controls FOR WINDOWS within 15' of a window/skylight.

OR

Do we need to provide daylight controls FOR WINDOWS within 15' of a window/skylight AND have the controls itself be within 15' of the window.

1
3
0
Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Oct 26 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1516 Thumbs Up

Option 2 if I understand your explanation correctly. If there is sufficient daylight within 15 feet of a window, the lights must be able to dim, regardless of where you put the controls.

2
3
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Oct 26 2015 Guest 4635 Thumbs Up

My understand was always that the controls needed to be within 15 feet of the windows - the form requires that you enter the distance from the windows to the control device in all "regularly occupied daylit areas." Regularly occupied areas which are more than 15 feet from the windows do not require daylight controls.

3
3
0
Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Oct 27 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1516 Thumbs Up

Then I defer to you. That's probably where they need to be in order to measure daylight at 15' from the window.

Post a Reply
0
0
PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS. INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ
Feb 13 2014
LEEDuser Member
1284 Thumbs Up

Occupancy Sensors may be replaced

Hi to everyone,
Is it possible to replace occupancy sensors by timers to be set for occupied hours, I don´t think so, but I would like to know what you think,
thank you

1
2
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Feb 14 2014 Guest 4635 Thumbs Up

I believe that your instinct is correct here. The goal is to reduce energy use by linking the lighting to occupancy. Timers are unlikely to be nearly as efficient - particularly in private offices and meeting rooms, although occupancy patterns in open office areas are increasingly variable for a wide variety of occupiers. If you believe you can make a strong case and you are relying on the points then you could submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide, but I wouldn't get my hopes up on this.

2
2
0
PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS., INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ Feb 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 1284 Thumbs Up

Thank you Michael, I thing we will review the lighting control design, Installing occupancy sensors makes sence in every way,

Post a Reply
0
0
Michael Archer Principal Engineer HSA Engineering
Jan 08 2014
LEEDuser Member
59 Thumbs Up

EA c1.2 form Space types

I was wondering why the EA c1.2 form doesn't include an option for Private Office under the Space Types column? Are we to assume all office type spaces are to be categorized as Shared Office? For reference, our project is a CI-2009.
Also, the form indicates one can hoover over column headers for more detail. This function doesn't appear for me. I am using IE 11 in compatibility view mode. Any ideas?

And another : How does one account for task lighting and rooms without one of the three listed sensor types on the EA c1.2 form? The form I see doesn't have an option for Other or On/Off under sensor type. Form is V 04.

1
1
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jan 17 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70009 Thumbs Up

Often the best way around form issues is to fill it out the best you can, then upload a narrative describing the issues and presenting the information how you think it should be presented.

Post a Reply
0
0
David ESPAGNET Green Building and Sustainability Project Manager Bureau Veritas
Dec 01 2013
Guest
113 Thumbs Up

Spaces with only occupancy sensors can't check reg. occ. box?

Hi, I currently have a CI-v2009 project to pursue this EAc1.2 credit, option 1 and 3. I am filling in version 4.0 forms in the clarification process. Some open workstations and conference rooms in the middle of the big office areas farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). away from windows (so basically they are not in the daylight areas) have occupancy sensors with daylight sensor functions. If I choose daylight & occupancy sensors for these spaces, distance would be more than 15 ft; and if I only choose occupancy sensors, I can't check the reg. occ. box and these spaces cannot be included in the regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. while these are indeed. This credit is now pending because GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). said these open spaces/rooms are not included in the calculations as regularly occupied. I wondered why and if there is someone who can help me out of this problem. Thank you very much!

1
1
0
MOHAMMED ISMAIL Executive, SGS India Pvt Ltd Dec 14 2013 Guest 36 Thumbs Up

Hi David,

You need to only check in box for Option 1 (Daylight controls provided within 15ft from windows) and need not marked for Option 3

Post a Reply
0
0
Jatuwat Varodompun Dr Green Building Soultion
Sep 17 2013
LEEDuser Member
2186 Thumbs Up

Daylight control in Kitchen

I am working on the restaurant project. For the kitchen with small windows, do I need to provide daylight sensor for this zone and how.

thanks

1
5
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 03 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

If it is considered daylit, then yes. You say "small" windows so is the implication that it is not truly daylit? In that case perhaps it can be excluded. I suppose a more clear definition this would be to check whether it meet the requirements of IEQc8.

2
5
0
Agnes Vorbrodt Principal, VvS | Architects & Consultants Nov 06 2013 Guest 356 Thumbs Up

Tristan,
Our kitchen designer (daylit kitchen) claims it's not safe to have lighting controls (occupancy, daylight sensors) due to dangerous tasks (like cutting, etc). Would it be possible to exclude those spaces? Based on ASHRAE yes: per section 9.4.1.1 "Exceptions: Lighting in spaces where an automatic shutoff would endanger the safety or security of the room or building occupant".The kitchen is classified as regularly occupied and is a workplace for full time kitchen staff.
thank you

3
5
0
Amy Rider Sustainability Manager, KEMA Services Nov 06 2013 Guest 2278 Thumbs Up

Hi Agnes,
I spoke with our lighting designer and she confirmed that if well designed and commissioned, safety should not be a concern. Here is what she said, "The fixtures in a daylight zone will only dim if there is adequate illuminance from daylight contribution. The photosensors can be calibrated for a high illuminance level. For example, if they require 50 footcandles for the task, the photosensor can be set for a minimum of 40fc of contribution before the fixtures even begin to dim (just an example). Multiple zones are recommended to be sure that only fixtures within the area of contributing daylight are dimmed.
"As for occupancy sensors, a combination of PIR (heat), ultrasonic (sound waves) and microphonics (noise) can be specified to be sure that occupancy is detected and there are no false-offs."

4
5
0
Dane Sanders Principal, Clanton Associates Nov 06 2013 Guest 744 Thumbs Up

Jatuwat,
If your small windows are not providing much daylight, you would only be installing the daylight sensors to get a LEED point. If you are not getting enough daylight in this space, you should write a narrative describing why you have excluded this space.

Since you are submitting under Commercial Interiors, you should be able to visit the space and take daylight measurements. If the measured daylight is insufficient, you should include these in your narrative. If daylight is providing a significant contribution, then you should probably include it in the credit.

Regarding occupancy sensors, Amy's comment above is good, and may be useful. But you need to be sure that your client agrees. If your client does not agree, then I think you have a good case to make about safety. Also, you only need 75% of the total installed lighting load to be controlled by occupancy sensors to get the point.

I hope this helps.

5
5
0
Agnes Vorbrodt Principal, VvS | Architects & Consultants Nov 06 2013 Guest 356 Thumbs Up

Amy and Dane - thank you both so much!!!

Post a Reply
0
0
Heather Dorer
Aug 27 2013
Guest
33 Thumbs Up

Vacancy sensors in place of occupancy sensors

Can vacancy sensors be used in place of occupancy sensors in appropriate spaces? Vacancy sensors, like occupancy sensors, will turn the lights off when the room is deemed vacant. Unlike occupancy sensors, they require the user to turn the light on when entering the room (occupancy = automatic on/automatic off; vacancy = manual on/automatic off). This could result in potentially more savings as compared to occupancy sensors because they require the user to turn the lights on, which the user may not choose to do in some situations (say, walking into his/her office briefly to grab something).

1
1
0
Dane Sanders Principal, Clanton Associates Aug 29 2013 Guest 744 Thumbs Up

Vacancy sensors will certainly be acceptable. They are basically occupancy sensors with a setting for manual-on/auto-off, rather than auto-on/auto-off. Both settings are available in some occupancy sensor products.

Post a Reply
0
0
Saju Varghese SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Aug 07 2013
LEEDuser Member
5023 Thumbs Up

Lighting Load synergy EAp2 and EAc1.2

Total lighting load for project space under EAc1.2 would be the same as connected lighting load under EAp2? What if we took Occupancy sensor credit under EAp2 would that affect the input on EAc1.2?

1
1
0
Dane Sanders Principal, Clanton Associates Aug 29 2013 Guest 744 Thumbs Up

EAp2 and EAc1.1 deal with actual connected lighting loads. The LPDLighting power density (LPD) is the amount of electric lighting, usually measured in watts per square foot, being used to illuminate a given space. cannot be reduced by using occupancy sensors or daylight dimming. The lighting controls are documented under this EAc1.2 credit.

Post a Reply
0
0
Robert Calloway President Global Facility Solutions, LLC
Jun 25 2013
LEEDuser Member
275 Thumbs Up

Accounting for common/shared areas

This question is in regards in to LEED CI 2009 - Credits EAc1.1 & EAc1.2 for lighting power density and light controls.

Do tenants have to account for common areas and spaces for lighting power density and light controls credits? Such spaces include elevator lobbies and common lobbies. A specific example would be when there are two separate tenant spaces on the floor and the elevator lobby and general lobby are a shared space. Or does this come down to the lease agreement and the spaces it entails?

Thanks in advance for the help!

1
1
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Jun 25 2013 Guest 4635 Thumbs Up

As a general rule, if it is not in the LEED project boundary you will not have to account for it.

Post a Reply
0
0
Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer Skanska Sweden
May 20 2013
LEEDuser Member
3445 Thumbs Up

Daylight controls in ALL daylit areas within 15 ft?

Can we exclude conference rooms that have multi-scene controls? We don’t want daylight sensors here; we want to be able to dim for presentations etc. In ASHRAE (9.4.1.2) this space is excluded for other reasons…

1
2
0
Dane Sanders Principal, Clanton Associates Aug 29 2013 Guest 744 Thumbs Up

Sorry to be posting a reply so late! From my experience, the LEED reviewers would interpret that a conference room with windows should be included in this daylight credit. If you want to exclude it, you will need to write a narrative describing why daylight is detrimental. This may be difficult if you have windows in the space, unless they are intended to be blacked-out most of the time. There are control systems that can combine daylight dimming and scene control. If you do not have a centralized, networked lighting control system, then you may look at the Lutron Grafik Eye that has both occupancy and photosensor inputs as well as scene controls.

I hope this helps and is not too little too late.

Dane

2
2
0
Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer, Skanska Sweden Sep 16 2013 LEEDuser Member 3445 Thumbs Up

Dane,
We were denied credit because of these couple of rooms. There are windows, but they are shaded by a bridge and neighboring buildings (on bottom floor). There are presence detectors, but when the rooms are occupied they will be mainly used for presentations etc. So daylighting controls in these rooms (where very little daylight falls in) is just complicating matters according to my lighting engineer. We did explain this to the reviewers in second submittal but they didn't agree with our arguments…

Post a Reply
0
0
ADRIENN GELESZ LEED AP ABUD Engineering Ltd.
Apr 11 2013
Guest
1993 Thumbs Up

Daylit area

For Option 1, do you think a space that does not have an external wall, but is within 15feet of the perimeter wall should be included in the credit requirements? We have a 3m corridor attached to the facade that has some windows, and a regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use. on the other side of the corridor also having some glazed surfaces facing the corridor.

1
2
0
Dane Sanders Principal, Clanton Associates Apr 11 2013 Guest 744 Thumbs Up

If there is enough daylight available for controls to be useful, then this space should have daylighting control. I would guess that a LEED reviewer would consider this to be included in this credit, unless daylight is detrimental to the activities in the space.

2
2
0
ADRIENN GELESZ LEED AP, ABUD Engineering Ltd. Apr 11 2013 Guest 1993 Thumbs Up

Thanks Dane,
The space is a huge manufacturing area, with only a small glazed ratio on one side. As an engineer I would not consider it useful to have these controlls.
Has anyone received maybe comments regarding this form USGBC?
Thanks.

Post a Reply
0
0
Carlton Ross
Feb 28 2013
Guest
25 Thumbs Up

Vehicle Maintenance Facilities - Lighting

For lighting levels which have been established by the American National Standard A11.1-1965, R1970, Practice for Industrial Lighting would this qualify as an exception as listed by ASHRAE 90.1 2007 Exception C "ordinance or regulation"? The lighting is for the maintenance bayA bay is a component of a standard, rectilinear building design. It is the open area defined by a building element such as columns or a window. Typically, there are multiple identical bays in succession. areas in a bus maintenance facility.

Post a Reply
0
0
Alex AC
Nov 19 2012
Guest
318 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 Table G3.2 and occupancy sensors

Hi everybody,

My team and I are working on a CI project (office floor) where the tenant has installed occupancy sensors for up to 75% of connected lighting load. In that sense, I would appreciate if someone would tell me if that means that we get the 15% reduction in lighting power as shown in Table G3.2. (Yes, the office floor is less than 1500 ft2) If not, how much reduction in lighting power do we get? and how do we perform such calculation?
In other words, what is the correlation among the amount of sensors that are in place and the percentage of reduction in lighting power?

1
1
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Nov 20 2012 Guest 4635 Thumbs Up

Sorry, but you can't get a reduction in lighting power for using the occupancy sensors. There's a separate point for that (EAc1.2) so applying the lighting power reduction would be double counting.

Post a Reply
0
0
Carolina Vergnano LEED AP Concremat
Oct 25 2012
Guest
1836 Thumbs Up

Daylit sensors for windows and glass roof

For compliance with the "Daylit Controls" we are placing sensors in all perimeter of the offices within 4,5m of the windows, at the high of the ceiling. There's also this terrace where we have a glass roof at 4,5m high. So where should I place the light sensors at the terrace? At the lights high, within 4,5m of the windows?

Post a Reply
0
0
Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Sep 23 2012
LEEDuser Member
3578 Thumbs Up

Occupancy sensor in retail shop area

In retail project, it's difficult to incoperate occupancy sensor in retail shop area. Most of floor area in our project is retail shop area, and less than 5% of floor area is back office. Is it impossible for our project to earn 1 point under this credit option 3?

1
1
0
Scott Adams Architectural Standards Specialist, Starbucks Coffee Company Sep 24 2012 Guest 478 Thumbs Up

Unfortutnately yes. I find it very odd that this requirement is the same in the Retail module as it would be nearly impossible to achieve in any retail environment but it is what it is at this point.

Post a Reply
0
0
Grace Ming Senior ESD Consultant
Sep 05 2012
LEEDuser Member
932 Thumbs Up

Gym with Daylight Provision

We have a LEED-CI project with a small Gym.
The gym has the daylight provision with full height window. Do we need to provide the photo cell sensors at the gym as well? Thanks.

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 05 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Grace, according to USGBC's space type classification doc, a gym in a school would not be considered regularly occupied for the purposes of IEQc8. That's the closest guidance I can think of that applies here, indicating that the sensors are not required under Strategy #1.

However, I don't see this as a black and white, and there may be other interpretations. Photo sensors may be a good idea from a design and energy point of view.

Post a Reply
0
0
Susan M Kaplan Director of Specifications and Sustainability HLW
Aug 14 2012
LEEDuser Member
899 Thumbs Up

Decorative Fixtures

I know the 'Birds Eye' says that decorative fixtures are not required to be connected to the daylight controls, but I recently received a review comment stating that they must to meet this credit requirement.

Has anyone else run into this? Can anyone point me to reference language for this topic?

Thanks!

1
2
0
Yury Lui WW LEED Practice Lead, US Mechanical Department Lead, EYP Mission Critical Facilities, Inc, a wholly-owned subsidiary of HP Aug 23 2012 Guest 139 Thumbs Up

I am receiving similar comment saying I need to exclude emergency lightingA luminaire that operates only during emergency conditions and is always off during normal building operation. Emergency lighting is designed to supply illumination essential to the safety of life and property in the event of failure of the normal supply. fixtures in the calculation!

I think any lighting fixture for safety should be excluded. This is clearly listed on 90.1, section 9.1.1, "Exceptions: lighting that is specifically designated as required by a health or life safety statute, ordinance, or regulation. and 90.1, section 9.4.1.1 "Exceptions: Lighting in spaces where an automatic shutoff would endanger the safety or security of the room or building occupant." This is not explicit indicated on EAc1.2. But it does reference to EAc1.1, And EAc1.1 do reference back to 90.1 .

For your case, exception under 90.1 section 9.2.2.3 and 9.4.5 should apply under the same fashion. Good Luck!

2
2
0
Scott Adams Architectural Standards Specialist, Starbucks Coffee Company Sep 24 2012 Guest 478 Thumbs Up

I have run into this a few times and have recieved rulings both ways. What I have found is that in general, if a fixture is decorative, a display feature in and of itself, then it will need to be put on the daylight sensor. Where I have been able to to exclude fixtures is when they are 'display' fixtures. The fixtures themselves are not decorative rather they are used to highlight artwork or displays. Unfortunatly there is nothing concrete in the reference guide nor are there any credit interpretations that address this issue so you are really at the whim of the individual reviewer.

Post a Reply
0
0
Marco Abdallah
Mar 13 2012
Guest
972 Thumbs Up

Central daylight control applicable?

Hello,
there are also systems on the market which measure the daylight amount at a central weather station on the roof of the building and then calculate the shadow and control each lamp with a software for each of the rooms of the building.
The credit says to install "controls in all regularly occupied daylit spaces within 15 feet of windows and under skylights." As the sensor of this central solution is naturally not within 15 feet of windows I am not sure if this technology can be used for LEED certification.
Has anyone respective experiences?
Thanks in advance!

Start a new comment thread

Jun 24 2017
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2017 – BuildingGreen, Inc.