CI-2009 EAc1.4: Optimize Energy Performance—Equipment and Appliances

  • CI_EAc1-4_Type1_Equipment Diagram
  • Buying Energy Star equipment is easy…

    EAp2 requires that 50% (by power rating) of new equipment and appliances purchase for the LEED-CI scope of work be Energy Star labeled. Projects that go beyond the 50% requirement can achieve up to four additional points under EAc1.4 by specifying 70%, 77%, 84%, or 90% Energy Star equipment.

    …But keeping track of the wattage is a chore

    Completing the rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. listing for each appliance and piece of equipment is the most time-consuming part of this credit. The LEED documentation requires not just checking a box to confirm that equipment is Energy Star; you will also need to assign a rated power to each model of appliance, computer, monitors, etc., which sometimes requires pulling the specification sheet or looking on the device’s nameplate.

    In the past GBCI has allowed a shortcut: you could use standard rated power values from Table 2 in the LEED Reference Guide, but LEEDuser has found that this is no longer allowed.

    Rated power is not the amount of power a piece of equipment will actually use, but simply the “nameplate power.” It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. The actual power used by equipment or appliances is often less than half the rated power. Rated power is what you have to use for the calculations for this credit.

    CopierPay attention to types of equipment to include

    Calculations for achieving this credit have to include all of the following, provided they are available in an Energy Star labeled model and are in your project's scope of work to purchase or install new: 

    • appliances
    • office equipment 
    • electronics 
    • commercial food service equipment.

    If an entire product type is not Energy Star labeled, that equipment is excluded from your calculations. Conversely, equipment outside the four categories that is Energy Star labeled must be included in your calculations. HVAC, lighting, and building envelope products are excluded from calculations for this credit.

    Any categories added to the Energy Star list as the program grows may be used in the project team’s calculation. You can check out the Energy Star website for updates to product categories.

    Understand how old vs. new equipment is treated

    When LEED 2009 was released in June 2009, the LEED Reference Guide described this credit as referring to all equipment used on the project, whether new or existing. However, as clarified in the April 2010 LEED addenda from USGBC, the credit is only applicable to equipment installed or purchased new for the scope of work covered by the LEED-CI project. This clarification, which also applies to EAp2 means that project teams have neither an incentive or a disincentive to replace older equipment. Teams may choose to purchase newer, more efficient equipment, or preserve older equipment that still has useful life.

    Projects still may include used equipment in their credit documentation, but if they do, they must include all the older equipment being used, not just some of it.

    FAQs for CI EAc1.4

    Does my piece of equipment qualify for Energy Star? Is there an Energy Star label for my piece of equipment? Where can I find out more about Energy Star and how it relates to my equipment type?

    For all questions related to qualifying Energy Star equipment, please refer to the Energy Star website products section.

    There is not an Energy Star category for a very specific type of an appliance that fits within a broader appliance category. Can I exclude my product?

    Details for each qualifying product are given in specifications on the Energy Star website under each product category. If your equipment type is not eligible for Energy Star, you should be able to exclude it from your calculations. However, make sure the product type is actually not eligible if you are excluding it from the calculations. If there just aren’t enough models on the market yet, but the product is eligible, you have to include it in your calculations.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

Expand All

  • First identify which appliances and equipment are eligible for an Energy Star rating in your project. Check the Energy Star website for up-to-date listings of products and appliances that are available as Energy Star-labeled and create a project-specific list of these items. At minimum, the equipment list will include office equipment such as computers, fax machines, printers, scanners, multi-function devices, and monitors, as well as appliances such as refrigerators, dishwashers, washers and dryers, etc. (See the LEED Reference Guide EAc1.4, Table 2 for the minimum category of appliances to be included.)


  • Your list has to include only equipment that is installed new or purchased within the LEED-CI project scope; existing equipment may be excluded (note that this is a change from the original 2009 release of the rating system—see the Bird's Eye View for more detail).


  • HVAC, lighting, and building envelope products are excluded from calculations for this credit.


  • There are new equipment types earning the Energy Star label on a regular basis. Any equipment type that fits into the LEED categories for equipment addressed by the credit should be included in credit calculations.


  • Be sure to refer to the Energy Star website on a regular basis as the website is updated several times a year.

Schematic Design

Expand All

  • Add the rated power of all equipment and the rated power of Energy Star labeled equipment for your project to your equipment list. The rated power is usually imprinted on the equipment (in watts or kilowatts, i.e., kW) or you can use the standard values in the LEED Reference Guide, EAc1.4 Table 2 for equipment and appliances listed there.


  • The rated power can also be derived from listed ratings in volts and amps, which you multiply to obtain watts. Use the equation Watts = Amps x Volts. 


  • Sum the two columns and calculate the percentage of rated power that comes from Energy Star labeled equipment. It has to be at least 50% of total project equipment rated power to achieve the prerequisite, and 70%, 77%, 84%, and 90% for 1-4 points.  


  • If an Energy Star product is purchased as a replacement for older, less efficient equipment, you can assign it the higher rated power of the original product for the purposes of your calculation. Doing that gives these replacement products more weight in the calculations. The replacement must be purchased between project registration and when the project is submitted for certification. 


  • Identify and prioritize the equipment with the highest rated power, because those are the items that will help you most. Your credit calculations will be based on the rated power of the equipment, not the number of individual Energy Star labeled machines. For example, the rated power of a copier is much higher than a laptop. If you buy only one of each, an Energy Star labeled copier will contribute more to the overall Energy Star labeled power percentage. 


  • Performing your calculations early on will tell you if the project owner needs to specify more Energy Star labeled equipment for the new spaces. 


  • In most product categories there is a wide range of Energy Star labeled products to choose from. Energy Star sets a minimum performance level, but some options are more efficient than others. As much as possible, choose the most efficient equipment. If doing that means getting equipment with a lower power rating, use the power rating from the LEED Reference Guide or from older equipment you are replacing to avoid being penalized in the credit calculation.


  • If used equipment was labeled Energy Star at the time it was purchased, but is not in the current list anymore, it can be listed as an Energy Star product. However, all new products purchased at the time of construction should be Energy Star labeled. 


  • Most Energy Star office computers and equipment carry little or no cost premium, and bring operational cost savings. 


  • Involve the facilities manager, operations personnel or procurement staff in conversations about energy-efficient equipment. They should be able to provide a list of specified and existing equipment to help with your calculations. 


  • You can get a bonus by claiming the original power consumption of the piece of equipment that is being upgraded to more efficient Energy Star equipment.


  • It is no longer required to track existing reused equipment. Refer to the following LEED Addendum posted on 4/16/10. “Only new appliances and equipment purchased as part of the scope of work for the project need to be included in the credit for EA Credit 1.4. Equipment and appliances must meet the Energy Star criteria current at the time of purchase. Any items that are purchased after the item's category has become ENERGY STAR eligible must meet the Energy Star rating. Any items already covered by the ENERGY STAR program that are purchased after new criteria have been issued must meet the new criteria. Items purchased before the category is ENERGY STAR eligible do not need to meet the ENERGY STAR rating; similarly, items purchased before new criteria are issued do not need to meet the new criteria.”


  • Energy Star labels are not permanent, and Energy Star criteria get stricter over time. If your piece of equipment no longer has an Energy Star label, but you can prove that it did when you bought it, you can still count it.

Design Development

Expand All

  • Make sure to update your Energy Star list with all known appliances and equipment included in the project, with associated rated power for each and indicate whether it is Energy Star labeled. Sum the rated power of your equipment list, including Energy Star labeled equipment. 


  • Not all products need to be Energy Star labeled to get the credit, you just need to reach your chosen threshold of Energy Star labeled equipment for your project: 70%, 77%, 84%, or 90% for 1-4 points.


  • Check the Energy Star website to update your list of appliances and equipment that must be Energy Star labeled to make sure that all have been accounted for.


  • To meet the next point threshold, identify power-hungry appliances that are in need of replacement within the next year, like copiers, printers, and refrigerators and target them for replacement or efficiency upgrade before project completion. 


  • Note that Energy Star rates the power usage of “sleep,” “standby,” and “hibernate” modes for computers, which may be lower than the computer’s power rating. Use the rated power for the active mode and be consistent in your documentation.


  • Establish an Energy Star purchasing policy for all future equipment. Although a purchasing policy is not required to earn this credit, it can help ensure that the project continues efforts to achieve cost-effective energy conservation.

Construction Documents

Expand All

  • Once the construction documents are complete, update your equipment list to track any changes and confirm that specified equipment is included in final construction documents.


  • Complete your documentation on LEED Online. List each piece of equipment, with its rated power, and indicate if it is Energy Star labeled. The calculator built in to LEED Online automatically sums up the eligible wattage to confirm compliance and points achieved. If you prefer, you can upload your list, as long as it is in spreadsheet form and calculates the Energy Star labeled power percentage properly.

Operations & Maintenance

Expand All

  • Purchase new equipment and appliances that are Energy Star labeled, to the greatest extent possible.  


  • See the Operations and Maintenance section of the Reference Guide or LEED-EBOM for guidance on continued purchasing and replacement of Energy Star equipment after initial project specification. Work this guidance into procurement policies for future purchases. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    EA Credit 1.4: Optimize energy performance - equipment and appliances

    1-4 Points

    Intent

    To achieve increasing levels of energy conservation beyond the prerequisite standard to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.

    Requirements

    For all ENERGY STAR® eligible equipment and appliances installed as part of the tenant’s scope of work, achieve one of the following percentages (by rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw.). Equipment that meets the same requirements as ENERGY STAR® qualified products but does not bear the ENERGY STAR® label is acceptable. Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ENERGY STAR®.

    Percent Installed ENERGY STAR Qualified Equipment of ENERGY STAR Eligible Equipment Points
    70% 1
    77% 2
    84% 3
    90% 4



    This requirement applies to appliances, office equipment, electronics, and commercial food service equipment. Excluded are HVAC, lighting, and building envelope products.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Select energy-efficient equipment and appliances, as qualified by the EPA’s ENERGY STAR Program (http://www.energystar.gov).

Web Tools

Energy Star appliance list

This website lists all the equipment and appliances that are labeled Energy Star. Each category has a downloadable list of labeled products, updated every few months. 

Organizations

Energy Star

ENERGY STAR is a government-industry partnership managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy. The program’s website offers energy management strategies, benchmarking software tools for buildings, product procurement guidelines, and lists of ENERGY STAR–qualified products and buildings.


Department of Energy, Energy Information Agency

This website links to EIA’s Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey. 

Product Data and Energy Star

To earn and document this credit, you'll need to track down product data, including rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw., from cut sheets like the example shown here. You can also use Energy Guide labels like the example given to confirm that a product has earned the Energy Star label, and confirm the rated power of the equipment or appliance.  

Enery Star Compliance Calculator

Use this calculator to track and log the percentage of your project's equipment that qualifies for Energy Star. Note: this calculator lists typical equipment for an office and may a model, but not a suitable tool, for other project types.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

CI-2009 LEED Online Sample Forms – EA

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CI-2009 EA credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED
Online
for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

LEED-CI Silver Office – EAc1.4

Complete documentation for achievement of EAc1.4 on a LEED-CI 2009 project.

308 Comments

0
0
Kalyan Nishtala
Jan 28 2016
LEEDuser Member
148 Thumbs Up

Old to be reused equipement

Project Location: United States

Hi,
I am currently working on an office building which is aiming for LEED Silver under CI (2009). Although there are a number of computers etc, on the site, all of these are going to be reused and hence do not fall under the "new" category. That left us with a refrigerator that will be purchased new. This was included in the form, however, we have been asked to include all the appliances. Is this just a matter of clarifying that all the other equipment is existing and hence is not part of the scope, or do we have to replace all the computer with new energy star ones?

1
4
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jan 29 2016 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

You are not required to include any of the old equipment unless you have included some of it. If you only included the new then just tell the reviewer that everything else is used.

2
4
0
Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Jan 29 2016 LEEDuser Member 929 Thumbs Up

If purchased within the same year, and reuse, you can count it but I'm not clear on whether you "have to". The oddity of this credit is that it doesn't matter what you USE. It matters what you BUY. So you can reuse all the energy hogs you want as long as you don't buy any in a category where an Energy Star standard exists.

3
4
0
Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Jan 29 2016 LEEDuser Member 929 Thumbs Up

If purchased within the same year, and reuse, you can count it but I'm not clear on whether you "have to". The oddity of this credit is that it doesn't matter what you USE. It matters what you BUY. So you can reuse all the energy hogs you want as long as you don't buy any non-Energy Star equipment in categories where an Energy Star standard exists.

4
4
0
Kalyan Nishtala Jan 29 2016 LEEDuser Member 148 Thumbs Up

I think if no new purchases are being made in a particular category of appliances, then they aren't consider part of the scope of the project and hence are exempt. However, I agree that older equipment can be energy hogs but it comes down to the cost when the owner or tenant considers this option. It would hard to make them agree to replacing inefficient older equipment that can be reused instead of purchasing new equipment when they can meet the credit requirements without the later.

Post a Reply
0
0
Shuchita Gupta Architect , LEED AP | BD+C Space Matrix Architects and Planners
Jan 26 2016
LEEDuser Member
38 Thumbs Up

Water Heater and Water Coolers

Project Location: Singapore

Hi ,

Are Water Heaters ( under a separate Water heater category ) and water cooler ( under others category ) under energy star website require energy star compliance , since the categories listed in guide book are appliances , Electronics , Office Equipment and commercial food service equipment and these dont fall under any of these categories just going by the way energy star has listed it on their website .

Thanks ,

1
2
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jan 29 2016 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

Water heaters are not addressed by this credit. Water coolers should be addressed by this credit. Technically they may not be covered as they are in the other category. I would always encourage everyone to not seek exceptions in situations like this, instead act in alignment with the credit intent.

2
2
0
Shuchita Gupta Architect , LEED AP | BD+C, Space Matrix Architects and Planners Feb 05 2016 LEEDuser Member 38 Thumbs Up

Thanks Marcus.

Post a Reply
0
0
Shuchita Gupta Architect , LEED AP | BD+C Space Matrix Architects and Planners
Jan 20 2016
LEEDuser Member
38 Thumbs Up

Idle energy rate for energy star equivalency calculations

Project Location: India

Hi ,

We have an interior project specifying kitchen appliances like electric fryer , which are not energy star labelled so we are checking the equivalency for which we require idle rate and cooking energy efficiency for which the product manufacturer does not have this data , Is there any LEED guidance or way we can calculate idle energy as a percentage of rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw.. Similarly for cooking energy efficiency .

Thanks in advance,
Regards,
Shuchita Gupta

1
2
0
Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Jan 20 2016 LEEDuser Member 929 Thumbs Up

That would be nice but for Energy Star, equipment is tested to ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services test methods piece by piece rather than calculated. LEED Prescriptive Measures V3 on Fisher Nickel's site. www.fishnick. com. All cooking whether it is Energy Star with a standard or another agency standard are in there, but I believe in all cases, the equipment was tested. Other cooking: 6 burner ranges: PG&E with Fisher Nickel did a study where induction (ranges) vs. gas vs. electric were measured during 'ready to cook', boil, covered/uncovered saute, etc. griddle standard used. Make up air/ventilation impact also calculated. I hope someone out there knows how to calculate what you mention for fryers & all cooking. It will be useful if accurate. Cooking equipment sits idle a lot because of the tendency to turn on everything in the morning and leave it, regardless of when it will be used.

2
2
0
Shuchita Gupta Architect , LEED AP | BD+C, Space Matrix Architects and Planners Jan 26 2016 LEEDuser Member 38 Thumbs Up

Thanks Suzanne

Post a Reply
0
0
David Hryvniak Research Assistant Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC
Jan 08 2016
LEEDuser Member

Custom Walk-In Freezers and Refrigerators

Project Location: United States

I am working on a project with commercial food service equipment. The equipment includes a few custom walk-in freezers and coolers. Commercial refrigerators and freezers are eligible for ENERGY STAR. However, given the fact that these items are custom walk-in equipment, do they still fall into the category of ENERGY STAR-eligible equipment? Are they required to be included in the calculations?

1
1
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jan 08 2016 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

Walk-in refrigeration equipment is not Energy Star eligible and therefore does not have to be included.

Post a Reply
0
0
James Keohane, PE LEED BD+C CxA CPMP Sustainability and Commissioning Consultant Sustainable Engineering Concepts, LLC
Dec 23 2015
LEEDuser Member
862 Thumbs Up

Tenant Installed Equipment and Appliances

Project Location: United States

I am working on a project wherein the equipment and appliances are installed by the tenant AFTER completion. I can get date from tenant/agency on proposed equipment. Question: Given these circumstances is the project eligible for EAcr1.4 given that equipment/appliances are not to be installed prior project completion??

1
1
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Dec 23 2015 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

Sure it is still eligible based on what gets installed. Doesn't matter who does the installation.

Post a Reply
0
0
Gail Napell AIA Gensler
Oct 11 2015
LEEDuser Member
26 Thumbs Up

data center equipment not listed in DOE Energy Star categories

Project Location: United States

Servers are listed on the Energy Star website, but not receivers. Is it safe to assume they are still not Energy Star eligible? Does anyone have an experience of GBCI interpreting these components as being 'servers'?

1
1
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Oct 12 2015 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

If they are not listed they are not eligible. You can usually get a pretty thorough description of the items covered by Energy Star by digging a little on the web site.

Post a Reply
0
0
Michele Helou Principal Sage Design & Consulting
Sep 18 2015
LEEDuser Member
1024 Thumbs Up

the coffee pot and the refrigerator

Project Location: United States

After hours of struggling with the absurdity of this credit on a project with a handful of new appliances and equipment - some that run continuously, some that don't, I decided to walk around the house and look at the nameplate stickers of some familiar appliances.

My refrigerator is not energy star (I know, I know) - the sticker has 115 Volts AC at maximum 7.9 Amps. This equals 905.50 Watts.
My Energy Star coffee maker is clearly marked 920 Watts, no high school physics required.

So great, I have 50% Energy Star Appliances - by Maximum Wattage.
But of course that is silly - because the refrigerator cycles on full about 1/3 of the day so that the daily usage is about 7268 KwhA kilowatt-hour is a unit of work or energy, measured as 1 kilowatt (1,000 watts) of power expended for 1 hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu./day.
The coffee maker, on the other hand, is used for 1/2 hour each morning, so its load is only 450 Kwh/day.
So really, only 5% of my total energy load is 'efficient'.

It seems to me, that the intent of the credit is to save energy, and we can't do that if the measure of a coffee maker is equal to the measure of a refrigerator. And the official intent of the credit?
'To achieve increasing levels of energy conservation beyond the prerequisite standard to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.'

As I look through all of these comments on everything from ice-makers to panini grills, it seems we are all missing that basic point.

So, is there an alternate method of calculation that would be more appropriate for mixing refrigerators and coffee makers - one that is based on actual usage in kwH and therefore rewards energy performance of the most energy intensive items?

1
5
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 21 2015 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

I have not seen an alternative compliance path. Using this rated nameplate power is even misleading when calculating energy use. Your calculations are significantly higher than the actual consumption (I think you are calculating Wh, not kWhA kilowatt-hour is a unit of work or energy, measured as 1 kilowatt (1,000 watts) of power expended for 1 hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu.). A typical refrigerator uses less than 1000 kWh/year.

I am not sure of the full justification for using rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. other than calculating kWh/yr is often not a simple and straight forward calculation. There are variables introduced mostly replaced to operating schedules. Some equipment cycles part or all of its load which would need a schedule. I suppose we could create fixed schedules but often it is not easy to find how much wattage is drawn by the parts of an appliance. For example, a laser printer has a heating element it that cycles plus all of the other parts that can independently use energy.

I think you make a good point, just not sure how to fix it. I am guessing that the EA TAG at USGBC had the same struggle since this metric did not change for LEED v4.

2
5
0
Michele Helou Principal, Sage Design & Consulting Sep 23 2015 LEEDuser Member 1024 Thumbs Up

yes, high school physics was a while ago. it was wh and Max amps times 3 is probably not right for the fridge and the coffee doesn't brew for 30 minutes. But working backwards - say its a typical fridge at 500 kwhA kilowatt-hour is a unit of work or energy, measured as 1 kilowatt (1,000 watts) of power expended for 1 hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu./yr against the typical coffee maker at 100 kwh/yr - you get the issue.
My opinion is that the way to fix this problem is to measure appliances and equipment by kwh/yr against the Federal Standard kwh/yr (which obviously includes estimate hours of usage as a default). Kwh/yr is a much easier number to find also. (no reading the nameplates). If someone wants to argue you need more than one pot of coffee and increased (or decreased) usage, they should be able to alter the default with an explanation. Eventually, there could be standard defaults for different occupancy types the way there are for Water Efficiency credits.

What is your opinion, Marcus, if I presented this alternate calculation method on a spreadsheet for my small CI project with 5 new appliances to see if LEED reviewers accepted it?

3
5
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 23 2015 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

What you propose makes perfect sense to me.

Anyone else know why rated wattage is the metric for this credit?

You could certainly give it a try and submit the rated wattage in the final if it is not accepted.

4
5
0
Christopher Schaffner Principal & Founder, The Green Engineer, Inc. Sep 23 2015 LEEDuser Expert 8388 Thumbs Up

I agree with Marcus. An alternative approach with weighted usage makes sense and would be consistent with other calculations in LEED (WEc2 for example).

My only guess is that the credit authors were trying to keep things simple.

5
5
0
Rubén M. R. Codirector, CIVITA Dec 03 2015 LEEDuser Member 942 Thumbs Up

Hi, Michele. I definitely agree with you. Were you able to present this alternative compliance path four your project? Did the reviewers accepted it?

Post a Reply
0
0
Annalise Reichert LEED Project Coordinator Environmental Building Strategies
Jun 09 2015
LEEDuser Member
230 Thumbs Up

90" Flat Screen TV

I am working on a project that is using 90" flat screen TVs. The Energy Star product database currently does not offer any 90" Energy Star certified flat screen products (largest is about 80"). Are we technically allowed to exclude the 90" flat screens from our calculations because there are no 90" Energy Star certified flat screens? Or do we still need to include them?

1
1
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 09 2015 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

Since TVs are covered by Energy Star I think you need to include them.

Post a Reply
0
0
Michelle Rosenberger Partner ArchEcology, LLC
Jun 08 2015
LEEDuser Member
7135 Thumbs Up

Residential Equip in a Commercial Context

My CI project has a full blown café. In addition to a huge list of commercial kitchen equipment, they have also included numerous Miele products including refrigerators, dishwashers and convection ovens. These Miele products appear to be residential and are not Energy Star rated. My question revolves around the ovens. Residential ovens are not Energy Star eligible. Do I need to include the power draw of the ovens as non-ES in my calc because they are being used in a commercial context even though residential ovens are technically eligible? What governs in this case the residential non-eligible category or the commercial use?

1
5
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 08 2015 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

These appear to be residential and therefore not included.

Look at the criteria for the commercial ovens to see if they qualify - http://www.energystar.gov/products/certified-products/detail/commercial-...

2
5
0
Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Jun 08 2015 LEEDuser Member 7135 Thumbs Up

Hi Marcus,
I agree they appear residential, but the fact that you included the second sentence is my concern. Though these convection ovens otherwise would appear eligible, "Ovens designed for residential applications cannot qualify for Energy Star" per the program document.

So that means we can use residential ovens in a commercial café operation and not worry about Energy Star? Even though they might otherwise, and elsewhere in the same facility, use commercial equipment for similar purposes?

The ovens are high energy users, and I don't want to appear to be skewing the calculation as a work around for not meeting Energy Star. So just looking for confirmation, thanks.

3
5
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 08 2015 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

I think you found a little grey area. The conservative approach which would definitely be accepted would be to include them in the calculations. If you exclude them you may be asked for justification.

My opinion is that whether you include them or not is dependent on the piece of equipment, not whether its use is residential or commercial.

4
5
0
Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Jun 08 2015 LEEDuser Member 7135 Thumbs Up

Okay Marcus, that is the judgment that I am looking for. Thank you for the prompt responses.

5
5
0
Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Sep 28 2015 LEEDuser Member 929 Thumbs Up

Curious: In a commercial cafe, is there a reason why residential equipment was chosen over commercial equivalents with published standards such as those listed in the LEED V3 & 4 retail areas, which other tracks use? The standards for UL and NSF are substantially different, particularly when it comes to sanitation, cord lengths, compressor run times, etc..

Post a Reply
0
0
Yaser Al Sharif
May 25 2015
Guest
144 Thumbs Up

Energy star

I am working on cl commercial project , when we resisted to the leed certificate we didn't have any energy star equipment's in our building , but to achieve more points we decided to replace our equipment's like laptops , printers and pc's , the question :

in the online form there are table required from me to fill it with energy star and non energy star equipment , should i fill it with energy star equipment only that i bought it in this case because they are new equipment i bought it after i registered to the leed certificate ?????????

another question :

what is the documentation should i provide it with the leed online form to achieve minimum energy performance and this credit ?? is the sheet for laptop and printer is enough ??????

another question : i took the rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. for our laptops in the company , i read it on nameplate about 90 watt , and 450 watt for printer , is that okay right or wrong ??? and for desk computer should i enter the case and monitor together or i entered them separately ????

Post a Reply
0
0
Susan Di Giulio Project Manager Zinner Consultants
Jan 31 2015
LEEDuser Member
1531 Thumbs Up

Low-temperature chemical dishwashers

Project Location: United States

The kitchen consultant on our project has specified a Hobart LT-1 LOW-TEMP CHEMICAL DISHWASHER. While most Hobart products are E-Star, this one is not. Is this type of dishwasher exempt as it functions somewhat differently?

1
2
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 01 2015 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

I don't think it is exempt. According the the Energy Star page -

High and low temp stationary rack machines (undercounter; single tank door type; pot, pan, and utensil; and glasswashing) and conveyor machines (rack and rackless/flight type, single and multiple tank) are all eligible for the ENERGY STAR.

This sounds like a low temperature dishwasher to me.

2
2
0
Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Feb 02 2015 LEEDuser Member 929 Thumbs Up

The LT1 is a "fill and dump" machine and requires 120-140 degree water to it because it has no tank heater. LT stands for Low Temp. While not calculated, it affects sizing/recovery for the hot water heater that feeds it and puts chlorine into the sewer system. A component of Energy Star is idle energy, which is tank heat, but chemical machines typically have higher water usage and longer cycles as a substitute for tank heat. Water usage is also part of Energy Star and unless something has changed in its water usage, the LT1 would not be exempt because there are plenty of low temp dishwashers on the market that DO have tank heaters which allows for water to be re-used, (final rinse water becomes wash water) and qualifying water/energy usage. The LT1 is often selected due to either price, or the need to have a 120 v. machine. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&u...

Post a Reply
0
0
Susan Di Giulio Project Manager Zinner Consultants
Jan 31 2015
LEEDuser Member
1531 Thumbs Up

More on UPS s

Project Location: United States

Hi, I understand all the previous discussion UPSs but our situation is just a tad different,
The project in question is intensely tech related, and the UPS needed as backup is a 3 phase, 50,000 kVA model. There is nothing this heavy-duty on the Energy Star website. There are a few that range up to 40,000 KVA.

The model that was installed (I think the electrical engineer may have been unaware that UPSs had been included in the E-Star list) is NOT Energy Star. The max rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. that it can provide is about 45,000W and max input about 49,000W.

So question 1, can I exempt it because there is no Energy Star equipment of adequate capacity?

Question 2, if I have to include it, I figured I would calculate rated power as rated input minus rated output, which would give me the maximum draw of the device. I do not know much about electronics: is this reasonable? Is there any (nightmare) scenario where the reviewer would force us to count the entire input rated power? This would drop us below 50% energy star and we would be ineligible for LEED-CI certification.

Thanks!

1
1
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 01 2015 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

1. I think that if this type of equipment is Energy Star eligible then it counts and would not be exempt.

2. I am not sure how this gets reviewed but it would certainly makes sense to isolate the draw of the equipment itself and not everything connected to it.

Post a Reply
0
0
Izumi Takayama Arup
Jan 14 2015
LEEDuser Member
16 Thumbs Up

Water Heater

Project Location: Japan

We saw discussions for the water heater, but am still not sure if the hot water heater applies to the calculation for this credit.

According to the reference book, “The credit applies to all installed equipment and appliances listed by the ENERGY STAR program. Any categories added to the ENERGY STAR list in the future may be used in the project team's calculation.”

It seems that “Water Heaters” are added as a new category to the Energy Star website, and they are not HVAC, lighting systems, and building envelope products.

So, water heaters should be included to this credit. Is my understanding correct?

If so, you need to demonstrate the water heater installed is equivalent to the Energy Star-qualified product. However, our water heater is an electrical instantaneous type without tank and we could not find any such type in the Energy Star web site. In that case, it does not need to be included in the calculation as it is not classified by Energy Star (CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide #10044)?

In general, if the subject equipment and appliances are classified by Energy Star, should they be included to the calculation even though no product is available locally or they are custom-made?

Our project is a tenant fit-out in an office building and the water heater is used for a shower.

1
2
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jan 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

If it was a new category then it appears you have the option to include it or not. I am not certain it was a new category however but it is odd that it is not included in the list of categories. In any case it is not listed so I would think you have the option of listing it or not. The conservative approach would be to include it.

You are correct. If there is not an Energy Star designation available for the product then it is not included. So it sounds like you do not need to include the water heater in your situation.

Yes all equipment/appliances classified by Energy Star should be included in the calculation. Another approach would be to seek a Japanese version of Energy Star and make the case for equivalency.

2
2
0
Izumi Takayama Arup Jan 16 2015 LEEDuser Member 16 Thumbs Up

Hi Marcus,

Thank you very much for your description. Very helpful.
Energy Star in Japan has standards only for office equipment such as comupters and displays, so it is always hard to earn this credit.

Thanks again!

Post a Reply
0
0
Carla Lopez Director of Valuation & Advisory CBRE
Nov 19 2014
Guest
50 Thumbs Up

ENERGY STAR UPS - 160KW and 480V

Hi,

It is of my best understanding that the UPSs are included as "eligible equipment" for both EAp2 and EAc1.4 as stated on the LEED for Commercial Interiors v2009 Reference Guide since they fall under the Office Equipment Category - Uninterruptible Power Supplies.

Our project's conditions demand several UPSs of 160KW and connected to a 480V rated output voltage. There are no UPSs certified ENERGY STAR in the market, based on the following link:

http://www.energystar.gov/productfinder/product/certified-uninterruptibl...

We are analyzing different alternatives to find other UPS equiment that meet the requirement (reducing the Wattage on the equipment, thus adding the amount of units needed to satisfy the project's demands), but we were wondering if there is scope for a solution such as an excemption to the UPS certified equipment for the aforementioned conditions to meet the requirements of the EAp2 and EAc1.4

Thank you in advance for your help.

Carla.

1
5
0
John Burnett FAC-LEEDership Nov 20 2014 Guest 511 Thumbs Up

Hi Carla,
Our view is that UPS' are not included under this credit. Unless this has been superseeded the LEED-CI ACP Supplementary Guide (LEED Ref_IDC_ACP_0.pdf) there is a table which lists the Energy Star categories, excluding UPS systems.

Logically EAc1.4 seeks to reduce internal heat gains from user equipment. Your 160 kW UPS is likely to be 95%+ efficient, meaning less than 5% or 8 kW is heat load when the UPS is operating at full load.

If LEED wants to include UPS systems it would need to be based on power conversion loss 8kW not on power throughput 160 kW, else W/ft2 would be several multiples of the typical office power figures(see CI Guide p179).

2
5
0
Carla Lopez Director of Valuation & Advisory, CBRE Nov 20 2014 Guest 50 Thumbs Up

Hi John,

Thank you for your rapid response. We have found this LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. (10044) at usgbg.org Data Base:

Ruling

Equipment that is not classified by Energy Star does not need to be included in the calculation; however, equipment that is classified by Energy Star, but an Energy Star certified version was not chosen, should be included in the calculation as non-Energy Star. Applicable internationally.

Since UPSs are considered under the "Office Equipment" category of ENERGY STAR products and based on previous LEED CI projects we have worked with, UPS were accepted as ENERGY STAR eligible equipment.

In addition, I just checked that Marcus Sheffer posted this answer to a related question on this very same web page:

"UPS falls under office equipment within Energy Star and the Reference Guide and Rating System documents clearly state that all Energy Star eligible equipment is included within EAp2 and EAc1.4."

We have already found equipment with the Watts and Volts that we need that meet the ENERGY STAR criteria, but I just want to make sure I need to include it on the list. Ours is a very large project and the reviewer may notice that a UPS is included and may ask for its addition on the template of this credit.

Thank you in advance for your help!

3
5
0
John Burnett FAC-LEEDership Nov 20 2014 Guest 511 Thumbs Up

Good you find the solution.

Whilst USGBC/GBCI rules on any interpretations, we find it illogical to include the UPS nameplate power rating in the counting towards EAp2/EAc1.4 compliance.

A large UPS complying with Energy Star 'swamps' all other equipment in the project so you probably get most of the points!

For illustration, a 160 kW UPS supplying 150 kW of Energy Star listed equipment, but which is not complying with ES, fulfills the 50% requirement, yet only accounts for less than 5% of the total equipment load. If the UPS is excluded, or only the rated losses are included, then it is necessary that the connected equipment complies to meet at least 80 kW of total load. QED?

4
5
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 21 2014 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

I agree John. The rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. for a UPS includes all of the stuff attached to it. I am not sure on how to break out just the power used by the UPS. Anyone have any thoughts?

5
5
0
John Burnett FAC-LEEDership Nov 23 2014 Guest 511 Thumbs Up

Hi Marcus. Looking at Energy Star's 'UPS Key Product Criteria' it could be the 'average loading-adjusted efficiency' (which is based on 25 to 100% load profiles), which accounts for UPS performance at part load, but is dependent on the type of UPS. If 95% efficient then 5% of the power rating is included in the calculation.
We feel it is for USGBC/GBCI to rule on this so that projects do not either exclude the UPS from the calculation or achieve compliance based on the nameplate rating.

Post a Reply
0
0
R G
Aug 11 2014
Guest
35 Thumbs Up

Energy-Star equivalent products

For one of our overseas project we needed appliances that were 50 Hz; 220-240V. We did not find any Energy Star Products for this specific voltage but made sure that we use “A” energy rated products. Is there any documentation that I can submit to earn this credit?

Many Thanks!

1
4
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Aug 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

I think that there has been a number of posts in the forum related to demonstrating equivalency between Energy Star and other standards, you should attempt to do so. Focus on energy use.

2
4
0
Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Aug 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 929 Thumbs Up

You didn't say which appliance categorty, but....IF it is commercial kitchen equipment, most manufacturers will have 50 cycle spec sheets available. Those, combined with the LEED Prescriptive information on Fisher Nickel's website which has the standards per appliance, should help. This page would have the most up to date Energy Star Standard information. There are a few recent categories and some updates.
http://www.energystar.gov/certified-products/detail/commercial_kitchen_p...

3
4
0
R G Aug 12 2014 Guest 35 Thumbs Up

Thanks Marcus & Suzanne.
Also, Suzanne do microwaves have a similar rating; did not find it.

Thanks again!

4
4
0
Geraldine Assmus Sustentator Aug 21 2015 Guest 15 Thumbs Up

Microwaves are not included in Energy Star.

Post a Reply
0
0
Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal ecocentric cc
Jul 01 2014
LEEDuser Member
1826 Thumbs Up

fitness centre equipment

We are busy with a fitness centre project and looking to confirm which appliances/equipment we typically would have to include in this credit.

Standard and necessary equipment - in addition to some office equipment - is gym equipment (treadmills etc) and hair-dryers and similar appliances that are owned and supplied by the fitness centre.

Would anyone have experience on a project of this nature and can assist which equipment we will typically have to include?

Many thanks!

1
1
0
Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Jul 01 2014 LEEDuser Member 7135 Thumbs Up

Hi Jutta,
No, fitness equipment is not eligible for Energy Star rating, neither are hair dryers. Vending machines however are eligible. The best place to look is the energystar.gov website where you can see the categories of appliances that are eligible.

Post a Reply
0
0
BEE Bisagni Environmental Enterprise
Mar 26 2014
LEEDuser Member
58 Thumbs Up

HK Equivalent of Energy-Star qualified products

Hi,

We are sourcing local equivalent of Energy-Star qualified products in Hong Kong and have found most products are certified by HK Energy Label. Could anyone please tell me what the mechanism is to prove 'HK Energy Label' is the local equivalent of 'Energy-Star label'? Was it that if a certain product with HK Energy Label fulfills all the requirements in the corresponding Energy-Star qualified product type, such product can be considered as local equivalent of E/S qualified product?

However, if it is on a product-by-product basis, it will be complicated and time-consuming to compare every product with E/S requirements. Is there any quick ways to do so like 'HK Energy Label Grade 1' = 'Energy Star rated'?

Thanks!

1
7
0
John Burnett FAC-LEEDership Mar 26 2014 Guest 511 Thumbs Up

Unless USGBC or GBCI have provided further information there is no blanket equivalance for HK Energy Label v ES Label. The LEED REFERENCE GUIDE FOR GREEN INTERIOR DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION WITH GLOBAL ALTERNATIVE COMPLIANCE PATHS 2009 p30 provides guidance on demonstrating equivalence, on a appliance basis. So no quick way only to compare ES appliance and HK EL appliance labels.
You can obtain the ES calculation method and HK EL calculation method from the respective websites.
Fridge-freezers are fairly easy to compare but I have not had the need to compare for other appliances.

2
7
0
Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Mar 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 929 Thumbs Up

See Fishnick.com for the prescriptive measures listing and it may yield standards that match up with the standards for HK, particularly if the ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services test methods used are the same. Link below may help because you can compare these baselines/prescriptive measures to manufacturer specifications for your HK EL products. This was the basis for the listing in the reference guide. www.fishnick.com/.../LEED_suggested_baselines_and_presriptive_measures _FSTC_2011_06_03.xlsx
This link may also have what you are looking for. http://www.itc.gov.hk/en/quality/hkas/about.htm, because there are links to standards, which hopefully are for the products you seek.

3
7
0
BEE Bisagni Environmental Enterprise Mar 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 58 Thumbs Up

Hi John,

Thank you for your advice! Now I can confirm with my client that there is no quick way to compare ES appliance and HK EL appliance labels. We might have to consider the cost benefit of continuously pursuing on this credit.

Thank you again for your great help!

4
7
0
BEE Bisagni Environmental Enterprise Mar 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 58 Thumbs Up

Hi Suzanne,

Thank you for your advice! The integrated information in the excel will definitely save me a lot of time! We will proceed to compare HK EL products and the standards in the prescriptive measures list right away.

Thank you again for your kindly help!

5
7
0
MM K Mar 28 2014 Guest 2020 Thumbs Up

Thanks Suzanne,
I think the fishnick link is broken. I am getting a File not Found error. Could you please send it again?

Many thanks

6
7
0
Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Mar 28 2014 LEEDuser Member 929 Thumbs Up

To reach the Prescriptive Measures file, www.fishnick.com. In the search bar on the upper right, type in "prescriptive" and it will take you directly to the download. Glad to help!

7
7
0
MM K Apr 01 2014 Guest 2020 Thumbs Up

In order to compare an appliance that is not ENERGY STAR and to prove it is as efficient as ENERGY STAR appliances, do we compare its rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. to the ones listed under the 'Prescriptive efficiency' column in the spreadsheet?

Post a Reply
0
0
MM K
Mar 21 2014
Guest
2020 Thumbs Up

Gas powered equipment

Is equipment that is powered by gas (such as gas cookers, fryers, ovens) to be included in the list as well or should we just include electrical equipment?

1
2
0
Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Mar 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 929 Thumbs Up

Yes, there is such a thing as gas-powered equipment that is also Energy Star. Please feel free to use this link which will take you to a really great spreadsheet that shows all of the baselines/prescriptives as well as what the basis of the standard is. I never leave home without it. And don't forget to consider induction (ranges) as an alternative to gas because then, you have the added bonus of lower cfm requirement & less energy usage for make up air.

www.fishnick.com/.../leed/LEED_suggested_baselines_and_presriptive_ measures_FSTC_2011_06_03.xlsx

2
2
0
Jonathan Weiss Mar 11 2015 LEEDuser Member 2400 Thumbs Up

This spreadsheet is very informative, especially for energy modeling, but to ask a more basic question, exactly how do we enter the value for Rated PowerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. (in watts) in the LEED template from a piece of Gas Equipment, energy star or not? The cut sheet shows electrical requirements, but those are for auxiliary functions such as fans or starters, not the gas energy usage.

Post a Reply
0
0
BEE Bisagni Environmental Enterprise
Mar 18 2014
LEEDuser Member
58 Thumbs Up

Task Lighting included?

Hi,

We are working on an office project outside the US and recommending the client install desk lamps as task lighting to increase controllability of lighting and reduce ceiling lighting energy loads. It is mentioned that lighting is not generally included in the energy star calculations but we're wondering if desk lamps are considered plug loads and be should included in the energy star office appliance percentage?

Also does anyone know how to go about proving equivalency between an international energy efficiency system, such as the Hong Kong energy efficiency label, and Energy Star certification?

Thanks!

1
3
0
Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 18 2014 LEEDuser Expert 56947 Thumbs Up

Task lights are lighting and not included in the ES calculations.

I think equivalency at the project level would have to be demonstrated on a product by product basis not necessarily for the entire program.

2
3
0
Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Mar 18 2014 LEEDuser Member 929 Thumbs Up

EPA has an international list of their recognized international bodies. It can be accessed here. Good luck!

http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=partners.epa_recognized_accreditat...

3
3
0
BEE Bisagni Environmental Enterprise Mar 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 58 Thumbs Up

Hi Marcus/Suzanne, thank you so much for your helpful advice which has done a great help to my project!

Post a Reply
0
0
Yasuhito Koike LEED AP, Green Building Consultant Izumi System Planning
Mar 05 2014
LEEDuser Member
103 Thumbs Up

Energy Star-labeled but outside the target products

We are going to purchase a new Energy Star-Labeled TV for the office. We can find TVs available as Energy Star-qualified in the categories shown in the Energy Star website. However, the Energy Star program of Japan only approves the equipment related to PCs such as computers, monitors, printers and like that. It seems that TVs are outside the scope of the target products in Japan.

We are not sure whether or not we can include it in the calculation under such conditions. Even if choosing to purchase a Energy Star one, are we not able to earn points under EAc1.4 (as well as EAp2), not complying with the local regulation?

Thank you in advance.

1
2
0
Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Mar 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 929 Thumbs Up

Good question. While I'm a commercial kitchen equipment person not TV, the way I've seen it work is regardless of whether E/S is recognized or to what degree, in another country, the 'intent' is to meet or exceed the Energy Star published baselines for the appliance. The E/S standards do have power consumption limits based on various modes of operation, so it seems to me that a TV that meets/exceeds should count in the rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. calcs. Here is a link to the Version 6.0 DRAFT version, and underneath info on Ver. 4 & 5. Noticed that there is also a "most efficient" distinction coming around too. Hope it helps.

http://www.energystar.gov/?c=revisions.television_spec

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&ved=0CFAQ...

More replies to "Energy Star-labeled but outside the target products" on next page...

Start a new LEED comment thread

Feb 08 2016
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2016 – BuildingGreen, Inc.