CI-2009 EAc1.4: Optimize Energy Performance—Equipment and Appliances

  • CI_EAc1-4_Type1_Equipment Diagram
  • Buying Energy Star equipment is easy…

    EAp2 requires that 50% (by power rating) of new equipment and appliances purchase for the LEED-CI scope of work be Energy Star labeled. Projects that go beyond the 50% requirement can achieve up to four additional points under EAc1.4 by specifying 70%, 77%, 84%, or 90% Energy Star equipment.

    …But keeping track of the wattage is a chore

    Completing the rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. listing for each appliance and piece of equipment is the most time-consuming part of this credit. The LEED documentation requires not just checking a box to confirm that equipment is Energy Star; you will also need to assign a rated power to each model of appliance, computer, monitors, etc., which sometimes requires pulling the specification sheet or looking on the device’s nameplate.

    In the past GBCI has allowed a shortcut: you could use standard rated power values from Table 2 in the LEED Reference Guide, but LEEDuser has found that this is no longer allowed.

    Rated power is not the amount of power a piece of equipment will actually use, but simply the “nameplate power.” It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. The actual power used by equipment or appliances is often less than half the rated power. Rated power is what you have to use for the calculations for this credit.

    CopierPay attention to types of equipment to include

    Calculations for achieving this credit have to include all of the following, provided they are available in an Energy Star labeled model and are in your project's scope of work to purchase or install new: 

    • appliances
    • office equipment 
    • electronics 
    • commercial food service equipment.

    If an entire product type is not Energy Star labeled, that equipment is excluded from your calculations. Conversely, equipment outside the four categories that is Energy Star labeled must be included in your calculations. HVAC, lighting, and building envelope products are excluded from calculations for this credit.

    Any categories added to the Energy Star list as the program grows may be used in the project team’s calculation. You can check out the Energy Star website for updates to product categories.

    Understand how old vs. new equipment is treated

    When LEED 2009 was released in June 2009, the LEED Reference Guide described this credit as referring to all equipment used on the project, whether new or existing. However, as clarified in the April 2010 LEED addenda from USGBC, the credit is only applicable to equipment installed or purchased new for the scope of work covered by the LEED-CI project. This clarification, which also applies to EAp2 means that project teams have neither an incentive or a disincentive to replace older equipment. Teams may choose to purchase newer, more efficient equipment, or preserve older equipment that still has useful life.

    Projects still may include used equipment in their credit documentation, but if they do, they must include all the older equipment being used, not just some of it.

    FAQs for CI EAc1.4

    Does my piece of equipment qualify for Energy Star? Is there an Energy Star label for my piece of equipment? Where can I find out more about Energy Star and how it relates to my equipment type?

    For all questions related to qualifying Energy Star equipment, please refer to the Energy Star website products section.

    There is not an Energy Star category for a very specific type of an appliance that fits within a broader appliance category. Can I exclude my product?

    Details for each qualifying product are given in specifications on the Energy Star website under each product category. If your equipment type is not eligible for Energy Star, you should be able to exclude it from your calculations. However, make sure the product type is actually not eligible if you are excluding it from the calculations. If there just aren’t enough models on the market yet, but the product is eligible, you have to include it in your calculations.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • First identify which appliances and equipment are eligible for an Energy Star rating in your project. Check the Energy Star website for up-to-date listings of products and appliances that are available as Energy Star-labeled and create a project-specific list of these items. At minimum, the equipment list will include office equipment such as computers, fax machines, printers, scanners, multi-function devices, and monitors, as well as appliances such as refrigerators, dishwashers, washers and dryers, etc. (See the LEED Reference Guide EAc1.4, Table 2 for the minimum category of appliances to be included.)


  • Your list has to include only equipment that is installed new or purchased within the LEED-CI project scope; existing equipment may be excluded (note that this is a change from the original 2009 release of the rating system—see the Bird's Eye View for more detail).


  • HVAC, lighting, and building envelope products are excluded from calculations for this credit.


  • There are new equipment types earning the Energy Star label on a regular basis. Any equipment type that fits into the LEED categories for equipment addressed by the credit should be included in credit calculations.


  • Be sure to refer to the Energy Star website on a regular basis as the website is updated several times a year.

Schematic Design

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  • Add the rated power of all equipment and the rated power of Energy Star labeled equipment for your project to your equipment list. The rated power is usually imprinted on the equipment (in watts or kilowatts, i.e., kW) or you can use the standard values in the LEED Reference Guide, EAc1.4 Table 2 for equipment and appliances listed there.


  • The rated power can also be derived from listed ratings in volts and amps, which you multiply to obtain watts. Use the equation Watts = Amps x Volts. 


  • Sum the two columns and calculate the percentage of rated power that comes from Energy Star labeled equipment. It has to be at least 50% of total project equipment rated power to achieve the prerequisite, and 70%, 77%, 84%, and 90% for 1-4 points.  


  • If an Energy Star product is purchased as a replacement for older, less efficient equipment, you can assign it the higher rated power of the original product for the purposes of your calculation. Doing that gives these replacement products more weight in the calculations. The replacement must be purchased between project registration and when the project is submitted for certification. 


  • Identify and prioritize the equipment with the highest rated power, because those are the items that will help you most. Your credit calculations will be based on the rated power of the equipment, not the number of individual Energy Star labeled machines. For example, the rated power of a copier is much higher than a laptop. If you buy only one of each, an Energy Star labeled copier will contribute more to the overall Energy Star labeled power percentage. 


  • Performing your calculations early on will tell you if the project owner needs to specify more Energy Star labeled equipment for the new spaces. 


  • In most product categories there is a wide range of Energy Star labeled products to choose from. Energy Star sets a minimum performance level, but some options are more efficient than others. As much as possible, choose the most efficient equipment. If doing that means getting equipment with a lower power rating, use the power rating from the LEED Reference Guide or from older equipment you are replacing to avoid being penalized in the credit calculation.


  • If used equipment was labeled Energy Star at the time it was purchased, but is not in the current list anymore, it can be listed as an Energy Star product. However, all new products purchased at the time of construction should be Energy Star labeled. 


  • Most Energy Star office computers and equipment carry little or no cost premium, and bring operational cost savings. 


  • Involve the facilities manager, operations personnel or procurement staff in conversations about energy-efficient equipment. They should be able to provide a list of specified and existing equipment to help with your calculations. 


  • You can get a bonus by claiming the original power consumption of the piece of equipment that is being upgraded to more efficient Energy Star equipment.


  • It is no longer required to track existing reused equipment. Refer to the following LEED Addendum posted on 4/16/10. “Only new appliances and equipment purchased as part of the scope of work for the project need to be included in the credit for EA Credit 1.4. Equipment and appliances must meet the Energy Star criteria current at the time of purchase. Any items that are purchased after the item's category has become ENERGY STAR eligible must meet the Energy Star rating. Any items already covered by the ENERGY STAR program that are purchased after new criteria have been issued must meet the new criteria. Items purchased before the category is ENERGY STAR eligible do not need to meet the ENERGY STAR rating; similarly, items purchased before new criteria are issued do not need to meet the new criteria.”


  • Energy Star labels are not permanent, and Energy Star criteria get stricter over time. If your piece of equipment no longer has an Energy Star label, but you can prove that it did when you bought it, you can still count it.

Design Development

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  • Make sure to update your Energy Star list with all known appliances and equipment included in the project, with associated rated power for each and indicate whether it is Energy Star labeled. Sum the rated power of your equipment list, including Energy Star labeled equipment. 


  • Not all products need to be Energy Star labeled to get the credit, you just need to reach your chosen threshold of Energy Star labeled equipment for your project: 70%, 77%, 84%, or 90% for 1-4 points.


  • Check the Energy Star website to update your list of appliances and equipment that must be Energy Star labeled to make sure that all have been accounted for.


  • To meet the next point threshold, identify power-hungry appliances that are in need of replacement within the next year, like copiers, printers, and refrigerators and target them for replacement or efficiency upgrade before project completion. 


  • Note that Energy Star rates the power usage of “sleep,” “standby,” and “hibernate” modes for computers, which may be lower than the computer’s power rating. Use the rated power for the active mode and be consistent in your documentation.


  • Establish an Energy Star purchasing policy for all future equipment. Although a purchasing policy is not required to earn this credit, it can help ensure that the project continues efforts to achieve cost-effective energy conservation.

Construction Documents

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  • Once the construction documents are complete, update your equipment list to track any changes and confirm that specified equipment is included in final construction documents.


  • Complete your documentation on LEED Online. List each piece of equipment, with its rated power, and indicate if it is Energy Star labeled. The calculator built in to LEED Online automatically sums up the eligible wattage to confirm compliance and points achieved. If you prefer, you can upload your list, as long as it is in spreadsheet form and calculates the Energy Star labeled power percentage properly.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Purchase new equipment and appliances that are Energy Star labeled, to the greatest extent possible.  


  • See the Operations and Maintenance section of the Reference Guide or LEED-EBOM for guidance on continued purchasing and replacement of Energy Star equipment after initial project specification. Work this guidance into procurement policies for future purchases. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    EA Credit 1.4: Optimize energy performance - equipment and appliances

    1-4 Points

    Intent

    To achieve increasing levels of energy conservation beyond the prerequisite standard to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.

    Requirements

    For all ENERGY STAR® eligible equipment and appliances installed as part of the tenant’s scope of work, achieve one of the following percentages (by rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw.). Equipment that meets the same requirements as ENERGY STAR® qualified products but does not bear the ENERGY STAR® label is acceptable. Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ENERGY STAR®.

    Percent Installed ENERGY STAR Qualified Equipment of ENERGY STAR Eligible Equipment Points
    70% 1
    77% 2
    84% 3
    90% 4



    This requirement applies to appliances, office equipment, electronics, and commercial food service equipment. Excluded are HVAC, lighting, and building envelope products.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Select energy-efficient equipment and appliances, as qualified by the EPA’s ENERGY STAR Program (http://www.energystar.gov).

Web Tools

Energy Star appliance list

This website lists all the equipment and appliances that are labeled Energy Star. Each category has a downloadable list of labeled products, updated every few months. 

Organizations

Energy Star

ENERGY STAR is a government-industry partnership managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy. The program’s website offers energy management strategies, benchmarking software tools for buildings, product procurement guidelines, and lists of ENERGY STAR–qualified products and buildings.


Department of Energy, Energy Information Agency

This website links to EIA’s Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey. 

Product Data and Energy Star

To earn and document this credit, you'll need to track down product data, including rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw., from cut sheets like the example shown here. You can also use Energy Guide labels like the example given to confirm that a product has earned the Energy Star label, and confirm the rated power of the equipment or appliance.  

Enery Star Compliance Calculator

Use this calculator to track and log the percentage of your project's equipment that qualifies for Energy Star. Note: this calculator lists typical equipment for an office and may a model, but not a suitable tool, for other project types.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

CI-2009 LEED Online Sample Forms – EA

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CI-2009 EA credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED
Online
for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

LEED-CI Silver Office – EAc1.4

Complete documentation for achievement of EAc1.4 on a LEED-CI 2009 project.

260 Comments

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R G
Aug 11 2014
LEEDuser Member

Energy-Star equivalent products

For one of our overseas project we needed appliances that were 50 Hz; 220-240V. We did not find any Energy Star Products for this specific voltage but made sure that we use “A” energy rated products. Is there any documentation that I can submit to earn this credit?

Many Thanks!

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Aug 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41110 Thumbs Up

I think that there has been a number of posts in the forum related to demonstrating equivalency between Energy Star and other standards, you should attempt to do so. Focus on energy use.

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Aug 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

You didn't say which appliance categorty, but....IF it is commercial kitchen equipment, most manufacturers will have 50 cycle spec sheets available. Those, combined with the LEED Prescriptive information on Fisher Nickel's website which has the standards per appliance, should help. This page would have the most up to date Energy Star Standard information. There are a few recent categories and some updates.
http://www.energystar.gov/certified-products/detail/commercial_kitchen_p...

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R G Aug 12 2014 LEEDuser Member

Thanks Marcus & Suzanne.
Also, Suzanne do microwaves have a similar rating; did not find it.

Thanks again!

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Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal ecocentric cc
Jul 01 2014
LEEDuser Member
1604 Thumbs Up

fitness centre equipment

We are busy with a fitness centre project and looking to confirm which appliances/equipment we typically would have to include in this credit.

Standard and necessary equipment - in addition to some office equipment - is gym equipment (treadmills etc) and hair-dryers and similar appliances that are owned and supplied by the fitness centre.

Would anyone have experience on a project of this nature and can assist which equipment we will typically have to include?

Many thanks!

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Jul 01 2014 LEEDuser Member 5007 Thumbs Up

Hi Jutta,
No, fitness equipment is not eligible for Energy Star rating, neither are hair dryers. Vending machines however are eligible. The best place to look is the energystar.gov website where you can see the categories of appliances that are eligible.

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BEE Bisagni Environmental Enterprise
Mar 26 2014
LEEDuser Member
13 Thumbs Up

HK Equivalent of Energy-Star qualified products

Hi,

We are sourcing local equivalent of Energy-Star qualified products in Hong Kong and have found most products are certified by HK Energy Label. Could anyone please tell me what the mechanism is to prove 'HK Energy Label' is the local equivalent of 'Energy-Star label'? Was it that if a certain product with HK Energy Label fulfills all the requirements in the corresponding Energy-Star qualified product type, such product can be considered as local equivalent of E/S qualified product?

However, if it is on a product-by-product basis, it will be complicated and time-consuming to compare every product with E/S requirements. Is there any quick ways to do so like 'HK Energy Label Grade 1' = 'Energy Star rated'?

Thanks!

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John Burnett FAC-LEEDership Mar 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 371 Thumbs Up

Unless USGBC or GBCI have provided further information there is no blanket equivalance for HK Energy Label v ES Label. The LEED REFERENCE GUIDE FOR GREEN INTERIOR DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION WITH GLOBAL ALTERNATIVE COMPLIANCE PATHS 2009 p30 provides guidance on demonstrating equivalence, on a appliance basis. So no quick way only to compare ES appliance and HK EL appliance labels.
You can obtain the ES calculation method and HK EL calculation method from the respective websites.
Fridge-freezers are fairly easy to compare but I have not had the need to compare for other appliances.

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Mar 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

See Fishnick.com for the prescriptive measures listing and it may yield standards that match up with the standards for HK, particularly if the ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services test methods used are the same. Link below may help because you can compare these baselines/prescriptive measures to manufacturer specifications for your HK EL products. This was the basis for the listing in the reference guide. www.fishnick.com/.../LEED_suggested_baselines_and_presriptive_measures _FSTC_2011_06_03.xlsx
This link may also have what you are looking for. http://www.itc.gov.hk/en/quality/hkas/about.htm, because there are links to standards, which hopefully are for the products you seek.

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BEE Bisagni Environmental Enterprise Mar 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 13 Thumbs Up

Hi John,

Thank you for your advice! Now I can confirm with my client that there is no quick way to compare ES appliance and HK EL appliance labels. We might have to consider the cost benefit of continuously pursuing on this credit.

Thank you again for your great help!

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BEE Bisagni Environmental Enterprise Mar 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 13 Thumbs Up

Hi Suzanne,

Thank you for your advice! The integrated information in the excel will definitely save me a lot of time! We will proceed to compare HK EL products and the standards in the prescriptive measures list right away.

Thank you again for your kindly help!

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MM K Mar 28 2014 Guest 1250 Thumbs Up

Thanks Suzanne,
I think the fishnick link is broken. I am getting a File not Found error. Could you please send it again?

Many thanks

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Mar 28 2014 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

To reach the Prescriptive Measures file, www.fishnick.com. In the search bar on the upper right, type in "prescriptive" and it will take you directly to the download. Glad to help!

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MM K Apr 01 2014 Guest 1250 Thumbs Up

In order to compare an appliance that is not ENERGY STAR and to prove it is as efficient as ENERGY STAR appliances, do we compare its rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. to the ones listed under the 'Prescriptive efficiency' column in the spreadsheet?

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MM K
Mar 21 2014
Guest
1250 Thumbs Up

Gas powered equipment

Is equipment that is powered by gas (such as gas cookers, fryers, ovens) to be included in the list as well or should we just include electrical equipment?

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Mar 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

Yes, there is such a thing as gas-powered equipment that is also Energy Star. Please feel free to use this link which will take you to a really great spreadsheet that shows all of the baselines/prescriptives as well as what the basis of the standard is. I never leave home without it. And don't forget to consider induction (ranges) as an alternative to gas because then, you have the added bonus of lower cfm requirement & less energy usage for make up air.

www.fishnick.com/.../leed/LEED_suggested_baselines_and_presriptive_ measures_FSTC_2011_06_03.xlsx

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BEE Bisagni Environmental Enterprise
Mar 18 2014
LEEDuser Member
13 Thumbs Up

Task Lighting included?

Hi,

We are working on an office project outside the US and recommending the client install desk lamps as task lighting to increase controllability of lighting and reduce ceiling lighting energy loads. It is mentioned that lighting is not generally included in the energy star calculations but we're wondering if desk lamps are considered plug loads and be should included in the energy star office appliance percentage?

Also does anyone know how to go about proving equivalency between an international energy efficiency system, such as the Hong Kong energy efficiency label, and Energy Star certification?

Thanks!

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 18 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41110 Thumbs Up

Task lights are lighting and not included in the ES calculations.

I think equivalency at the project level would have to be demonstrated on a product by product basis not necessarily for the entire program.

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Mar 18 2014 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

EPA has an international list of their recognized international bodies. It can be accessed here. Good luck!

http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=partners.epa_recognized_accreditat...

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BEE Bisagni Environmental Enterprise Mar 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 13 Thumbs Up

Hi Marcus/Suzanne, thank you so much for your helpful advice which has done a great help to my project!

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Yasuhito Koike LEED AP, Green Building Consultant Izumi System Planning
Mar 05 2014
LEEDuser Member
49 Thumbs Up

Energy Star-labeled but outside the target products

We are going to purchase a new Energy Star-Labeled TV for the office. We can find TVs available as Energy Star-qualified in the categories shown in the Energy Star website. However, the Energy Star program of Japan only approves the equipment related to PCs such as computers, monitors, printers and like that. It seems that TVs are outside the scope of the target products in Japan.

We are not sure whether or not we can include it in the calculation under such conditions. Even if choosing to purchase a Energy Star one, are we not able to earn points under EAc1.4 (as well as EAp2), not complying with the local regulation?

Thank you in advance.

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Mar 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

Good question. While I'm a commercial kitchen equipment person not TV, the way I've seen it work is regardless of whether E/S is recognized or to what degree, in another country, the 'intent' is to meet or exceed the Energy Star published baselines for the appliance. The E/S standards do have power consumption limits based on various modes of operation, so it seems to me that a TV that meets/exceeds should count in the rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. calcs. Here is a link to the Version 6.0 DRAFT version, and underneath info on Ver. 4 & 5. Noticed that there is also a "most efficient" distinction coming around too. Hope it helps.

http://www.energystar.gov/?c=revisions.television_spec

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&ved=0CFAQ...

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Yasuhito Koike LEED AP, Green Building Consultant, Izumi System Planning Mar 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 49 Thumbs Up

Hi Suzanne,

Thank you very much for giving us helpful advice. I am sorry if my understanding is wrong, but is it acceptable to choose energy efficient products (not Energy Star labeled ones) as long as they meet or exceed the Energy Star published baselines and prove to be equivalent to the baselines or more?

Thank you in advance again.

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Graeme Smith Director MMoser Associates
Mar 02 2014
Guest
27 Thumbs Up

UPS - Excluded or Included in Energy Star calculation

I have two questions regarding the inclusion of UPS in the 'Energy Star' calculation for EAc1.4 in LEED v2009.

Q1. To Include UPS or not for Energy Star calculation?
I understand that ENERGY STAR rated appliances purchased prior to the publication of the current ‘criteria’ and complying with the previous criteria can meet the intent and requirements of LEED-CI EAc1.4… and that all equipment purchased after the new ‘criteria’ have been issued need to meet the new specification.
For example, Refrigerator was a ‘category’ in Energy Star when LEEDv2009 was released… and new ‘criteria’ has been published in Energy Star.

However, my question is regarding the language on p180 that states… "Any new ‘categories’ added to the Energy Star list in future may (not MUST) be used in the project team’s calculation’.
Since UPS was NOT a ‘category’ listed in Energy Star when LEEDv2009 was released... I would assume that the project team can choose to include the UPS or not based on the guidance given in the sentence above.
Is that correct?
Note, we've NOT included UPS in recent submissions and have never been queried in the Review!?

Q2. What is the ‘Rated Power’ for a UPS?
Notwithstanding the above... IF it is required to include the UPS in the Energy Star calculation... then what is the correct 'Rated Power' for inclusion in the LEED Online table?
The UPS mostly stands idle... but (potentially) has a huge 'Output Rated Power' say 200,000 Watts for a short period of time from the battery back-up power… while the maximum power drawn by the UPS is a much lower number... say 2,000 Watts!
My understanding is that we would use the maximum 'draw power' of the UPS rather than the maximum 'power output' of the UPS for input to the Energy Star calculation.
Is that correct?

Thanks in advance... Any advice is much appreciated.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 03 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41110 Thumbs Up

Q1: I think that "category" is not referring to a specific product. UPS is a product under the Office Equipment category so I do not think the sentence you quote applies. The Reference Guide clearly states on page 180 as well that "The credit applies to all installed equipment and appliances listed by the Energy Star program."

In these situations the general practice is to require project teams to follow the guidance in place when the project was registered. So if your project was registered before this product was included in ES then I would say you do not have to include it. Also note that previous reviews do not establish precedence.

Q2: That would make sense to me.

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Sunayana Jain
Feb 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
186 Thumbs Up

CPU

Are CPU's also need to qualify Energy Star rating? In my case, monitors have Energy Star label.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41110 Thumbs Up

Yes computers are Energy Star rated.

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Sunayana Jain Feb 17 2014 LEEDuser Member 186 Thumbs Up

Hi Marcus, in your above response, by computers do you mean monitors and CPUs have to separately Energy Star rated?
Thank You!

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41110 Thumbs Up

Yes they are rated separately.

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Geoffrey Brock Lend Lease
Feb 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
8 Thumbs Up

hot water heaters

Do domestic hot water heaters fall into this category? They aren't listed in the reference manual, nor can I find mention of them on this site. Energy Star does have a bunch of rated models, but only for gas or propane. The few electric models they have rated are only 50 gallons or larger. Can hot water heaters be excluded from these calcs altogether, and furthermore do they belong in calcs for EAc1.3 instead?

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Feb 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

This credit specifically excludes hot water heaters because they fall under "regulated," even though there is an Energy Star rating and most Energy Star appliances are 'process.' The key with Energy Star is not to look for the actual listing but the STANDARD, then compare the standard against what you are specifying. Does that help? Here's a link to the standard. http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=water_heat.pr_crit_water_heaters

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Geoffrey Brock Lend Lease Feb 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 8 Thumbs Up

If the answer is "yes, they are excluded," then yes, thank you!

I do see the distinction between regulated and process load in table 1, but it wasn't clear to me elsewhere in the section where the distinction was made, and the only CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide I could find on the topic was from way back in 2009 before water heaters were even rated in Energy Star. Do you have a source for this answer? Thanks!

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Mahmoud Elgarhy Project Manager / Manager of Architectural & Interior Design Saudi Binladin Group - ABCD
Nov 26 2013
Guest
7 Thumbs Up

regulated loads and unregulated process loads

What is the difference between regulated loads within offices and unregulated process loads ?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 26 2013 LEEDuser Expert 41110 Thumbs Up

Regulated loads are ones covered by 90.1 (envelope, lighting, motors, HVAC, hot water, etc.). Unregulated process loads are items not covered by 90.1.

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Feb 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

Of note, under LEED V4, process loads have more impact in all tracks as opposed to only Retail/Hospitality/ID&C. Simplest way to help clients understand this is that the "process" is case-specific and normally doesn't run 24/7, like commercial cooking & warewashing equipment, as well as office equipment. But if the building was a frozen food warehouse, process loads would likely be the largest impact on the project. However, in the case of commercial ware washing, water usage of that piece can affect the (regulated) hot water heater sizing since it has to supply incoming water at usually 110 degrees & up. Here is a link to the specifics about hot water heaters and Energy Star standards.
http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=water_heat.pr_crit_water_heaters

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Vivien Fairlamb
Nov 04 2013
LEEDuser Member
915 Thumbs Up

Production lighting as equipment?

Hi,
Would anyone know if production lighting (for video conferencing spaces) would have to be included under this credit (EAc1.4 - OEP equipment and appliances)? Or should it be considered under the lighting credits? They would only be used sporadically.

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Daniel LeBlanc Senior Sustainability Manager, YR&G Dec 16 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1030 Thumbs Up

Under the lighting credits. It's possible that this type of lighting would be exempt from the lighting power density calculations. See section 9.2.2.3 Interior Lighting Power in ASHRAE 90.1-2007.

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MM K
Oct 04 2013
Guest
1250 Thumbs Up

Equivalents in Europe

Has anyone ever used local equivalents instead of the Energy Star rating?
ID#1492 states that we can use local equivalents.
The EU energy rating is the local standard here whereby equipments are rated by A++, A+, A, B, C ... How can we determine which rating would GBCI deem equivalent to Energy Star?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 03 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

I don't know, but perhaps this might help: Energy Star aims to capture about 20% of the market in a certain product area. If more than 50% of the market starts to be compliant with Energy Star, the program raises the bar. Perhaps this rough benchmark of the Energy Star mission, along with specifications on specific equipment that you are looking at, could be helpful.

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Kevin Sullivan Director, Leap Sustainability Design Consulting Jan 08 2014 Guest 216 Thumbs Up

Hi, in relation to the point discussed above I have a query. We are doing a project in India and most of the products available there are BEE Star Rated, an energy efficiency rating standard implemented by the Indian government. Wanted to know how can BEE star rating be compared with the Energy Star rating and how to document these products?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jan 08 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41110 Thumbs Up

I would create a table that contains the Energy Star, BEE Star and actual kWhA kilowatt-hour is a unit of work or energy, measured as 1 kilowatt (1,000 watts) of power expended for 1 hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu./year value for each applicable item to enable a comparison. I would also reach out to the BEE Star folks to see if they could help you with a comparison.

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Jan 08 2014 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

Consortium for Energy Efficiency has Energy Star & standards information. PLEASE keep in mind that for some products, PART of Energy Star pertains to water usage too, since you are paying to heat or cool water with some appliances. Therefore, you may find what you need here:
http://www.cee1.org/content/cee-program-resources
You didn't say what the product category is, but if it is commercial kitchen equipment, Kim Erickson is a wonderful resource there. Also if commercial kitchen equipment, go to fishnick.com and look for the .xls LEED Prescriptive Measures. Hope it helps.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Jun 17 2014 LEEDuser Member 2046 Thumbs Up

We are choosing a dishwasher and a refrigerator for a project in Europe. This equipment uses the EU rating A,A+,etc.. According to the reply of Marc it is sufficient to compare kwhA kilowatt-hour is a unit of work or energy, measured as 1 kilowatt (1,000 watts) of power expended for 1 hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu./year, something we could do. But when I look at the ACPs it says a comparison is required using modified energy factor, water factor, product capacity, Energy Factor, Stanby Power, volume of water per cycle, energy use per year, Energy Efficiency ratio and Testing protocols. That seems a lot and not feasible. On the other hand in LEED V4, you need to compare the info that is on the Energy Star website. For refrigerators this is kwh/year. In the end we are not sure how to go about this. Anyone any experience with including the European certification to comply? Also, we have difficulty finding European models of refrigerators and dishwashers with Energy Star label since they only need to comply with the EU energy rating.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41110 Thumbs Up

Some of these factors only apply to certain appliances so you would need to include them if it applies. For example the only ones that apply to a refrigerator are capacity (you would obviously not compare a very large one to a very small one) and energy use per year. So for a refrigerator and many other appliance all you really do is compare equivalent product's kWhA kilowatt-hour is a unit of work or energy, measured as 1 kilowatt (1,000 watts) of power expended for 1 hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu./year.

More of the factors you list apply to the dishwasher because it also uses water. Some of them only apply to HVAC equipment. Some only to water heaters. In the ACP they are not asking you to compare all of these for each appliance, just the ones that apply.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Jun 18 2014 LEEDuser Member 2046 Thumbs Up

Thank you Marcus, that is very useful information. For the refrigerator we will compare size and kwhA kilowatt-hour is a unit of work or energy, measured as 1 kilowatt (1,000 watts) of power expended for 1 hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu./year which is also what the Energy Star website lists. Not sure if they will ask about the testing protocol to determine that consumption. I can imagine that the Energy Star testing protocol is not exactly the same as the European one. For the dishwasher we will look at energy and water consumption.

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Jun 18 2014 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

Dishwasher Energy Star Standards are based on IDLE energy plus water consumption per RACK, if a rack machine. NO E/S for flights. Sorting is done at the unload side for door/conveyor machines. Run time/day for permanent ware--take proposed #meals per peak meal period you are designing to, piece(dish) count per guest, and divide by 14, which will estimate #racks to be done. Don't forget trays and plate covers, plus utensils. A hospital would run a machine 10-12 hours/day and up, and casinos, 24 hours. Flatware (silverware) is 100 pieces/rack, run twice. Glassware is a toss up, as racks are made from 16-49 glasses. Then, divide (rated racks/hour x 70%) for the machine you've chosen by racks into total racks expected. Meiko is based in Germany and could potentially be of assistance. Machine will be idle during part of the dish run while workers scrap & load. At this time, booster heat is not considered in Energy Star, nor the credit. I have similar formulas for ice maker run time too. Good luck!

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Susan Walker-Meere Project Liaison Lakeland Community College
Aug 11 2013
Guest
39 Thumbs Up

Servers, routers, switches

Hi, Would you clarify if routers and switches should be included in the list?

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Aug 11 2013 LEEDuser Member 5007 Thumbs Up

Hi Susan,
My understanding is no. The best place to check is on the Energy Star.gov website under Business and Commercial products. If you click on the category and then on the small hyperlink "For Partners" you get the definition document. Make sure you scroll all the way down to Item 2 to see what is excluded before you examine the Item 1 definitions. Sometimes lots is actually excluded.

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Allen Cornett Sustainable Consultant, INSPEC Dec 18 2013 LEEDuser Member 131 Thumbs Up

Good morning Susan,

F.Y.I. The small network equipment category was added under the "For Your Home" tab with an effective date on September 3, 2013. The small network equipment category includes routers, switches and other equipment. I am not sure if this is applicable to commercial project but thought I would share what I found. See link below for additional information:

http://www.energystar.gov/certified-products/detail/small_network_equipment

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BKSK Architect BKSK Architects
Jul 31 2013
LEEDuser Member
743 Thumbs Up

A/V Equipment

We are compiling the equipment for a multi-floor office renovation. Dow e need to include A/V Equipment? Including ceiling speakers, projectors, projection screens, microphones, etc?

Thanks!

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Aug 02 2013 LEEDuser Member 5007 Thumbs Up

Hi BKSK,
We've done several projects with AV equipment. Per the Energy Star programming document for AV, the display elements are the focus of the eligible equipment, i.e., the monitors and TVs. And of course any CPUs that are running things.

Explicity excluded are projectors, battery powered portables, video conferencing, wireless microphones, and whole house audio or video and media servers.

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Vince Briones Sustainable Design Manager, Atkins Sep 12 2013 LEEDuser Member 82 Thumbs Up

Just a brief addition to Michelle's note- BKSK be sure the AV consultant/vendor is aware that the ENERGY STAR evaluation (and specs to include ENERGY STAR whenever possible) applies to the following in addition to displays (TV screens):

Home-Theater-in-a-Box Systems
Soundbars
MP3 speaker docks
Audio Amplifiers
AV receivers
Shelf systems
Blu-ray Disc players
DVD players

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Lara Schneider
Jul 17 2013
Guest
95 Thumbs Up

Vending Machine Rated Power

Does anyone know what the rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. is for vending machines?

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Michelle Cottrell President, Design Management Services Jul 18 2013 LEEDuser Member 689 Thumbs Up

Lara-
Check out the Energy Star website to download the spreadsheet to find the model # and corresponding rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw.
http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=find_a_product.showProduc...

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Jul 18 2013 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

A great spreadsheet to have on hand is this one, which is the LEED Prescriptive Baselines for water and energy because it shows qualifying equipment with standards other than Energy Star. As commercial kitchen equipment plays a more important role, it has gotten a lot bigger. LEED for Retail has an excerpt from this and Richard Young at Fisher Nickel is on the committee.

http://www.fishnick.com/design/resources/leed/

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Vince Briones Sustainable Design Manager, Atkins Sep 12 2013 LEEDuser Member 82 Thumbs Up

For context, the ENERGY STAR website indicates that this category currently only applies to new and rebuilt refrigerated beverage machines. So, exclude food/snack machines from your evaluation.

Generally the rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. is considered the maximum electrical/energy "draw" an equipment item can use. You'll need to locate the specific vending machines data...either a cutsheet or perhaps webpage listing technical data- if the specified unit's wattage isn't listed, you can determine it using the following: (watts = amps x volts). Be sure the use the voltage specified for the electrical design....or you could use the highest allowable voltage configuration listed on the equipment cutsheet as a "worst case".

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Lara Schneider
Jul 16 2013
Guest
95 Thumbs Up

New vs. Existing

Where in the 2009 CI LEED reference guide does it state that only NEW Energy Star appliances are to be included in the calculations? I see you all note that new equpment only is what is supposed to be included in the paragraph above and in comments, but I seem to be missing it in the LEED reference guide.

For example ... I have a client who is relocating all of their printers, monitors, laptops and desktops. Therefore the only new equipment are appliances and TVs. So all I would include are the appliances and TVs?

Please confirm. I just want to make sure I am understanding correctly.

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Jul 16 2013 LEEDuser Member 5007 Thumbs Up

Hi Lara,
Yes, Energy Star only applies to "new" and "eligible" pieces of equipment. Relocated equipment is excluded, so yes only include TVs and appliances and makes sure you explain in Special Circumstances that the office equipment is relocated.

Look at the 4/16/2010 addendum to see where this is stated. It's very difficult to keep up with all the ever changing requirements. You'll need to watch quarterly addenda in addition to CIRs and on-line credit forms to capture all the nuances. Unfortunately, you cannot rely on the reference manual to contain everything anymore. It's a continuing lament.

Welcome aboard.

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Lara Schneider Jul 16 2013 Guest 95 Thumbs Up

Thank you so much! This is exaclty what I needed and was searching everywhere for. Looks like I need to catch up on my addenda ...

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Jul 16 2013 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

We run into this all the time with commercial kitchen equipment. Schools take very good care of their equipment, as an example, so there's potentially a lot of "existing, relocate'. But the consequences real world can be wicked if the actuals are far from the models. And they could be with dishwashers and ice makers because the water and energy has dropped so drastically. Utilities often give rebates on both so an energy audit factoring that in might be prudent. Then, use the template to calculate.

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Christopher Shaw Seeberger Architecture Feb 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 123 Thumbs Up

I hate to be dense but ours is a small office remodel, and there are only three pieces of equipment bought FOR the remodel a refrigerator, a TV, and a dishwasher all energy star compliant therefore we are 100% compliant four points! & an EP! - but that hardly seems right. What am I missing?

I say FOR the remodel, because it's been going on for a year and some new PC's have been bought that would have been needed anyway; I could include them I guess, but it doesn't change the strange total compliance.

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Suzanne Painter-Supplee, LEED AP+ID&C Director, Consultant Sales, Vollrath Feb 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 765 Thumbs Up

Yes, it is what you buy, not what you use. But if I recall correctly, if the PC's used are within a year old, they count. Don't forget copiers, printers, monitors, routers, servers, various phone systems, & modems. Since smaller offices often use "residential" products, the "oh yeah" list can be found here, & USGBC statement below that, which is good since while there are Energy Star light strips, air conditioners, etc., they don't apply here. Hope it helps!

http://www.energystar.gov/certified-products/certified-products?c=produc...

http://www.usgbc.org/node/1731058?return=/credits/commercial-interiors/v...

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Vitorio Lepiane Sustentech
Jun 06 2013
Guest
18 Thumbs Up

No-break (UPS - UPS - Uninterruptible Power Supplies)

I am trying to determine if we need to include " No-break (UPS - Uninterruptible Power Supplies) " in our Energy Star documentation for this credit.

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Vince Briones Sustainable Design Manager, Atkins Aug 23 2013 LEEDuser Member 82 Thumbs Up

Hi Vitorio- Any luck on this?

I thought I recalled an GBCI issued addenda that stated new categories were to be included in the same general categories already required for evaluation (Office equipment, food service, etc) but cannot locate it....may be falsely remembering that. UPS and Enterprise servers are both new categories under "Computers" in the ENERGY STAR website, which is part of a broad classification of "Office Equipment" so I would expect they need to be included in LEED calcs. They can represent a LOT of wattage so best to catch them and ensure they are ENERGY STAR rated in the planning/specifications stages of a project.

Thoughts?

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John Burnett FAC-LEEDership Feb 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 371 Thumbs Up

I am not sure if this is still a question or condfusion in LEED User but it does crop up on current projects.

Making reference to LEED Reference Guide for Green Interior Design and Construction with Global ACPs p30 in the table under "The following equipment is included in the scope and must be accounted for in the credit calculation:" UPS is not listed under Computers and Electronics!

I assume the logic is that a UPS conditions power supply, and only energy consumed is the energy associated with losses. E.g. a 100 kVA @ 0.8 pf iand 95% efficient consumes only 4 kW, not 80 kW.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 21 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41110 Thumbs Up

John, I can't find your reference above. Page 30 in the ID+C Reference Guide falls within SSc1. Page 30 in the ID+C Rating System is MRc2. In any case I do not think that because it is not on a list means that it is not included.

UPS falls under office equipment within Energy Star and the Reference Guide and Rating System documents clearly state that all Energy Star eligible equipment is included within EAp2 and EAc1.4.

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Alejandro Rivera Rivera Sustainability Coordinator Studio Domus
Apr 25 2013
LEEDuser Member
482 Thumbs Up

To include rented vending machine?

Hi,

My client is thinking of renting a vending machine for his office pursuing LEED-CI certification. Would we have to include the vending machine in the calculations even though vending machines don't fall under any of the Energy Star categories specified for this credit (appliances, office equipment, electronics, commercial food service equipment)?

Also, I don´t know if the fact that the vending machine is being rented makes a any difference? Technically, it is not being purchased or installed new within the LEED-CI project scope.

Thanks for your help!

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Apr 25 2013 LEEDuser Member 5007 Thumbs Up

Hi Alejandro,
Yes, you are obliged to include all eligible equipment in this credit. Vending machines are eligible for Energy Star rating. The "new" part is an issue but not with respect to leasing, only with respect to re-using. In other words, leased equipment is included as if it's newly purchased. Only eligible equipment moved from another location for reuse can be excluded.

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William Weaver Sustainability Practice Lead, JLL Apr 25 2013 LEEDuser Member 1260 Thumbs Up

Hi Alejandro,

I concur with Michelle, as I've always included vending machines whenever they're within the project scope whether purchased or leased. The following is a link to more information about Energy Star for vending machines:

http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=find_a_product.showProduc...

The following is a link to a listing of all ES qualified vending machines:
http://downloads.energystar.gov/bi/qplist/Vending_Machines_Product_List.pdf

Hope that helps. If your client hasn't already rented the machine, they can always make Energy Star a requirement of the rental agreement - just a thought.

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Alejandro Rivera Rivera Sustainability Coordinator, Studio Domus Apr 25 2013 LEEDuser Member 482 Thumbs Up

Thanks!

Just one more question: According to the document "Vending Machines Program Requirements Version 3.0" developed by Energy Star, only products that meet the definition of a Refrigerated Beverage Vending Machine as specified in such document are eligible for ENERGY STAR qualification.

Does this mean that if my client is leasing a vending machine for snacks (i.e. non-refrigerated, non-‘‘sealed beverage’’ merchandise), it does not have to be included in the calculations for this credit?

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