CI-2009 EAp2: Minimum Energy Performance

  • CI_EAp2_Type1_EnergyOptimization Diagram
  • Not always standard practice

    This prerequisite can be a major hurdle for LEED-CI projects. When challenges arise, it’s most often because project teams don’t review the requirements early enough in the process to incorporate them into the design. Some teams assume that these requirements follow standard practice—but in some cases they do not. 

    Prescriptive and performance measures

    The prerequisite demands that teams comply with a number of prescriptive measures, along with requirements for lighting power density reductions and meeting performance thresholds for equipment efficiency based on the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 standard. 

    Only applies to the interior fit-out

    The LEED-CI project scope includes only the systems being installed within the scope and budget of the interior fit-out of the project. Base building systems that are not part of the leasable area occupied by the interior space are not addressed here. 

    This credit usually falls under the responsibility of the mechanical engineer, but the lighting designer, architect, and owner all must contribute to designing an energy-efficient project that meets the owner’s goals as well as the LEED requirements.

    The applicable standard

    This prerequisite refers to ASHRAE 90.1-2007, Sections 5–10, for mandatory provisions and energy-efficiency requirements via a prescriptive or performance-based approach for the project’s envelope, HVAC, service water heating, power, lighting, and other equipment as defined by ASHRAE. In addition, it mandates installation of Energy Star-labeled equipment and appliances.

    Projects in California may use Title 24-2005, Part 6 in place of ASHRAE 90.1-2007.

    The energy-use breakdown

    This credit addresses four components of energy use in reference to ASHRAE 90.1–2007.

    1. Mandatory provisions for energy systems in sections 5–10 of ASHRAE 90.1–2007 
    2. Minimum energy-efficiency specifications for the envelope, HVAC, and hot water, measured by compliance with prescriptive or performance requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2007
    3. Lighting power density reduced by 10% from ASHRAE 90.1-2007
    4. For new purchases, at least 50% Energy Star-labeled appliances and plug-load equipment, as measured by installed rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. (in watts).

    All ASHRAE requirements can be documented using ASHRAE compliance forms. 

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • General approach


  • This prerequisite establishes the project’s energy performance so that the project can demonstrate a commitment to energy efficiency. The energy use of a LEED-CI project, in terms of the ASHRAE 90.1–2007 standard, must meet four distinct requirements: 

    • ASHRAE 90.1-2007 – Mandatory Requirements 
    • ASHRAE 90.1-2007 – Prescriptive Option or Performance Option 
    • Lighting Power Density Reduction of 10% 
    • Energy Star-labeled Equipment and Appliances - 50%

  • Identify the elements of the project that fall under this prerequisite: space cooling, space heating, lighting, ventilation, pumping, and domestic hot water. Do this by reviewing the requirements in ASHRAE 90.1-2007 and developing a building systems narrative for equipment and lighting.


  • LEED-CI energy systems relate to only those building systems within the construction or remodeling scope of the project. They do not address base building systems outside the interior fit-out. Applicable systems typically include lighting, HVAC distribution, service water heating, and equipment and appliances. The envelope is usually completed as part of the base building. It is only when the envelope is altered in the tenant scope that a CI project must address the requirements listed in the prerequisite. 


  • The owner and project team should determine the project’s energy efficiency goals and include them as part of the owner’s project requirements (OPR) and Basis of Design. 


  • Having the owner take an active role in developing and maintaining energy efficiency goals for the project can be helpful to the project team. Stating goals in terms of a “minimum acceptable level” and a “specified payback period” is an effective way to articulate goals. For example: “Our goal is a minimum 30% reduction in lighting and HVAC energy usage” or “to implement efficiency measures with paybacks of less than 5 years.” 


  • Consider integrating high-efficiency HVAC equipment into your design.


  • Efficient design can have synergistic benefits. For example, low lighting power density (LPD) translates to a smaller cooling load, which results in a smaller cooling system size and lower energy bills for lighting and cooling, which are the largest demands in most office buildings. 


  • Many local incentive programs offer rebates for efficiency measures. Identify any available incentives at this time to inform your design decisions for equipment selection. Also look for incentives for energy optimization during the design process, like utility-funded energy modeling programs. (See Resources for help finding incentives.)


  • ASHRAE 90.1–2007 - Mandatory Requirements


  • The prerequisite includes meeting the mandatory requirements for each of the six sections of ASHRAE 90.1-2007.


  • These six sections include all major energy-using components of a building project:

    • Section 5: Envelope – Walls, roof, floor insulation and window thermal performance including fenestration sealing and window performance. 
    • Section 6: HVAC – Minimum-rated efficiency for zones, pipe insulation, and minimum equipment efficiency.
    • Section 7: Service Water Heating – Tank insulation and minimum boiler efficiency in regard to both domestic and commercial usage.
    • Section 8: Power – Relates to additional power-using equipment.
    • Section 9: Lighting controls, wiring, sensors – Examples are automatic light shutoff controls, wiring, exterior lighting.
    • Section 10: Other equipment – Electrical motors. 

  • The MEP team should become familiar with the minimum efficiencies required for heating, cooling, and hot water equipment listed in ASHRAE 90.1-2007, Tables 6.8.1 and 7.8.


  • If you are installing doors and windows, have the architect check required leakage rates and thermal characteristics of assemblies in Section 5.4. 


  • Lighting control requirements can present a problem if they are not properly understood early in the design stage. Have your lighting designer become familiar with section 9.4, which spells out the requirements for lighting controls and automation systems.


  • Mandatory provisions of ASHRAE 90.1-2007, Sections 5–10, can be stricter than local codes and should be understood at the beginning of the design phase.


  • Non-compliance with any of the requirements disqualifies the project from LEED certification. All projects, including remodeling projects, must meet the requirements for all components and systems within the scope of the fit-out. Exemptions include buildings designated “historically significant” by a recognized authority (such as the U.S. Dept. of the Interior), 24-hour facilities, equipment and portions of building systems that use energy primarily to provide for industrial, manufacturing, or commercial processes.


  • The mandatory provisions (Section x.4) are separate from and in addition to the prescriptive requirements (Sections x.6) of ASHRAE 90.1. The two are commonly but incorrectly used interchangeably. None of the mandatory provisions can be compromised; prescriptive requirements, however, provide a way to meet the minimum efficiency requirements of this prerequisite and offer multiple options for doing so. 


  • ASHRAE 90.1-2007 – Prescriptive Option or Performance Option 


  • In addition to meeting the mandatory requirements, the project must demonstrate that the energy use of the project is equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1-2007. This can be demonstrated by complying with the prescriptive checklist or simulating whole-building energy use with an energy model, also known as the performance option.

    • Option 1) Prescriptive: The four components of energy use (below) must meet every requirement on the predefined checklist.  
    • Option 2) Performance: Create an energy model for the space to determine the percentage savings on the total design as compared to a minimally code-compliant space.
    • Refer to credit EAc1.3: Optimize Energy Performance—HVAC, for a more detailed description of the performance option and credit achievement.

  • The four components of energy use under this prerequisite—envelope, lighting, HVAC and hot water—include only those components that are within the scope of CI work. So, if the hot water boiler is owned by the base building, and the tenant is installing a pipe and pumps to deliver hot water to the bathrooms, the prerequisite covers only the delivery method. So the pipe and the pumps must meet ASHRAE requirements for minimum pipe insulation and pump efficiency—the efficiency of the hot water boiler need not be accounted for. 


  • Developing a simulation model is an added expense and you may need it to provide a demonstrable payback if you’re going to use it as part of your compliance path. It can be well worth the cost, however, especially on larger projects with greater scope. If the scope of the project is larger (>100,000 ft2) and includes a central plant in addition to HVAC distribution and lighting, it can make sense to develop an energy model to assist in system selection and lighting design.


  • Most CI projects find it cost-effective to pursue the prescriptive option because of a limited design scope in HVAC systems and the building envelope, making the energy model of limited use as a design tool. 


  • Selecting a performance-based approach using an energy model solely for LEED compliance is not recommended. Equal opportunities are available with either the prescriptive or performance approaches for LEED compliance. 


  • Lighting Power Density Reduction of 10% 


  • Refer to the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 standard for lighting power density allowances. The prerequisite requires your project’s lighting power density (in watts/ft2) to be 10% lower than the standard. ASHRAE lists allowable LPDs in the reference standard of Section 9.5.1 for building types, and in Section 9.6.1 for individual space uses.


  • Lighting power density is defined as the amount of total lighting power in watts used for a given floor area in ft2 (watts/ft2).


  • The calculation addresses total lighting power use, although it can be determined in two different ways: the building area method or the space-by-space method. Review the ASHRAE LPD allowances and space-type definitions. Consider which approach is most appropriate for your project to demonstrate compliance. 


  • Refer to EAc1.1: Optimize Energy Performance—Lighting Power for a more detailed description of these methods and credit achievement.


  • The building area method is simple and it is an easy one for projects that include only a few space types and can be easily classified as one of the building types listed in ASHRAE, Table 9.5.1. The table refers to a single lighting power allowance for each building type. To determine your project’s performance, compare the total allowable LPD for the building type to the installed LPD of your project. 


  • The building area method allows trade-offs to accommodate for increased LPD in specialized spaces. This is done by intentionally reducing LPD in other areas to meet the whole building LPD allowance. The LPD of those specialized spaces may exceed the allowed LPD as long as the whole building LPD is in compliance. 


  • The space-by-space method is a good option for projects that do not fit into one of the building type categories or that require increased LPD allowances for either decorative or merchandise lighting. These types of spaces are allowed higher LPDs, but these increases can only be counted to the extent that they are actually used. ASHRAE allowances are listed in Table 9.6.1 for each space type. 


  • The ASHRAE standard refers to “installed” LPD, so all the light fixtures installed during design and construction must be included in the calculation. Often, designs will provide two fixtures to supplement each other at different times. For example, task lights may be designed to be used only intermittently, but for LPD calculation purposes, you should assume that all lights are switched on. 


  • In a remodeling project, if new lighting is replacing less than 50% of the total installed wattage, the project is exempt from reducing LPD 10% from the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 standard. However, you still must comply with all mandatory requirements for controls and wiring.


  • Research the exemptions in ASHRAE 90.1-2007, Section 9.2.2.3. Many types of performance and high-powered performance lighting (such theatrical lights) are exempt from the calculations. Refer to the additional lighting allowances for artwork, decorative lighting, and display lighting listed in Section 9.6.2. 


  • LEED only refers to ASHRAE 90.1-2007, Sections 9.4 and 9.5. Other sections are not applicable to LEED certification requirements. 


  • Provide independent controls for all task lights. (This can also contribute to earning EAc1.2: Optimize Energy Performance—Lighting Controls and IEQc6.1: Controllability of Systems—Lighting.  


  • Energy Star-labeled Equipment and Appliances – 50%


  • Based on new purchases that are planned, develop a list of appliances and equipment that must meet the Energy Star requirement for your project. If it is Energy Star-labeled, then it must be included in the list. At a minimum, this should include office equipment such as computers, fax machines, printers, scanners, and monitors, as well as appliances such as refrigerators, dishwashers, clothes washers and dryers.


  • Check the Energy Star website for an up-to-date listing of Energy Star-labeled products and appliances. 


  • HVAC, lighting, and building envelope products are not included for this purpose, because they are addressed in other parts of EAp2 and EAc1. 


  • Refer to credit EAc1.4: Optimize Energy Performance—Equipment and Appliances, for a more detailed description of these methods and credit achievement.


  • This prerequisite requirement is typically easy to meet. Most office computers and equipment are Energy Star-labeled and usually at little or no cost premium. Carrying out the calculations early on will tell you if the owner should specify more Energy Star-labeled equipment for the new spaces. 

Schematic Design

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  • Explore opportunities to reduce energy demand by identifying all large, energy-using systems in the project. In a typical office, lighting can contribute 30%–50% of a space’s total energy use, with HVAC at 20%–30%, and the rest for equipment and power loads. If your project’s scope allows envelope modification, explore window size and performance, shading systems, and daylight optimization. 


  • If the owner has identified a percentage reduction in energy-use goals—over code or per square foot—the design team should identify measures to achieve them by optimizing mechanical and lighting design, plug-load equipment, and any other energy-using systems. 


  • ASHRAE 90.1-2007 – Mandatory Requirements  


  • Review ASHRAE equipment requirements before system selection as applicable to your project. These are critical and often-overlooked decisions. 


  • Seek synergy in design disciplines. For example, the layout of interior partitions can have an impact on meeting the mandatory provisions for lighting controls. 


  • ASHRAE 90.1-2007 – Prescriptive Option or Performance Option


  • Decide on your compliance path—Option 1: prescriptive or Option 2: performance—early in the schematic design phase. 


  • Prescriptive Option 


  • Have your mechanical engineer become familiar with all the requirements of the prescriptive sections of ASHRAE 90.1, especially section 6.5. Because this is a prerequisite, noncompliance with any of the provisions disqualifies the project from LEED certification.


  • Complying with the prescriptive method may require some additional time on the part of the design team to review and update compliance with each requirement. The mechanical engineer, architect, and lighting designer need to walk through the checklist to track the status of each requirement. 


  • Use the ASHRAE compliance forms to update the status of your prerequisite compliance. Typical prescriptive requirements may include a certain heat-pump efficiency rating and the installation of economizers. Building owners may perceive these to be high-cost items, so keep the owner involved in your prescriptive requirement review.


  • Performance Option 


  • Contract the modeler by the schematic design phase. Have them provide a high-level review of energy-efficiency opportunities, including HVAC system alternatives, lighting power density targets, and proposed envelope assemblies, if applicable.


  • Lighting Power Density Reduction of 10% 


  • Develop the lighting layout and identify fixtures so that the design LPD target will be 10% lower than the ASHRAE standard. Use calculation tools and ASHRAE compliance forms to run preliminary lighting power density calculations. 


  • Lighting loads can be reduced through the use of indirect lighting design, lower ambient light levels with increased task lighting, and efficient fixtures such as LEDs, T5 fluorescent lighting, and compact fluorescent lighting.  


  • Use halogen and incandescent lamps with high power density sparingly or not at all, as they can prevent you from meeting the prerequisite.


  • With early design direction and energy-efficient fixture selection, lighting power density can easily be reduced by 10% with little or no additional cost. 


  • Energy Star-labeled Equipment and Appliances – 50%


  • Add the rated power for each piece of new equipment to the list of appliances and equipment that you began during the predesign phase. When the rated power is not easily available from product data sheets, refer to the Energy Star website. 


  • “Rated power” refers to the maximum amount of power that can be drawn by a piece of equipment at any given time. Be sure to use this for each appliance and piece of equipment to be consistent in your documentation.


  • From your list of appliances and equipment, create a table that includes power rating for each entry, and whether each is Energy Star-labeled. Add the power usage for each piece of equipment on your list, including Energy Star-labeled equipment. The percentage of total power usage from Energy Star-labeled equipment should be at least 50%.  

Design Development

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  • Confirm that the established energy-efficiency measures are incorporated into your design. Identify any questions left open or strategies not included and analyze the potential long-term energy savings before ruling out a strategy that the team or owner is considering eliminating because of its perceived high cost. 


  • Using an integrated design process, the team can easily reduce energy usage below ASHRAE 90.1-2007 thresholds. When designing the lighting layout, the team can take into account the daylighting design of the space in order to reduce the number of fixtures and lower the wattage. The architect can finish the interior space to further enhance lighting efficacy and reduce dependence on mechanical cooling and heating. If appropriate, the mechanical designer should evaluate underfloor air distribution or radiant heat instead of ducted air for higher efficiency. 


  • The mechanical system design often includes the distribution of air and a refrigerated or heated medium. Pumps and fans are large components of energy usage. Use variable-frequency drive pumps and a variable-air-volume distribution system to address fluctuating demand. Install sensors and controls to maintain air volumes and reduce energy waste during low-occupancy periods.


  • The mechanical team should meet with the base building’s engineer or manager early in the process to get detailed information on the potential to add controls, outside air intakes, and to make efficiency modifications to base building systems. 


  • ASHRAE 90.1-2007 – Mandatory Requirements 


  • Continue to verify that the mandatory and minimum requirements of ASHRAE 90.1–2007, Sections 5–10, are being met throughout changes in the design development phase.  


  • ASHRAE 90.1-2007 – Prescriptive Option or Performance Option


  • Constant communication among project team members throughout the design process is important for minimizing construction and operational costs and meeting the project’s goals. For example, changing a specification, such as the solar heat gain coefficient of glazing, affects mechanical system sizing. These opportunities should be discussed with the team and incorporated into the design.


  • Prescriptive Option


  • Continue to verify that the prescriptive requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2007, Sections 5–10, are being met throughout changes in the design development phase.  


  • All ASHRAE compliance forms should be completed during the design phase to track status and compliance whenever changes are made. 


  • The compliance forms are not required by LEED Online, but it is a good practice to complete them during design development to use as a checklist for the project team and keep them until the project receives LEED certification. 


  • Performance Option 


  • The energy modeler should begin the modeling now, and continue to update it whenever design changes are made to ensure that the project maintains the prerequisite requirements. 


  • Work on an energy model typically takes three to four weeks before it can provide reasonable results and recommendations, so be sure to start this early in design development. 


  • The model is a great design tool that should be utilized to its full potential during design development. Use it to assist in design development for interior mechanical fit-out spaces, comparison of alternative systems, determination of lighting loads, and selection of fixtures. Simulate alternative strategies or designs to provide a true cost-benefit analysis of energy-saving features, along with long-term energy savings and lower maintenance costs for the tenant and building owner. 


  • The energy model can also demonstrate potential savings on the whole building level. While the base building may have existing energy constraints, take the opportunity to encourage future upgrades such as a new central plant, more controls in the base system, end-user ability to set temperatures and reduce energy use, a more efficient air-distribution system—improvements that will benefit the whole building.


  • The documentation for the performance approach is the same as for EAc1.3: Optimize Energy Performance—HVAC, Option 2 – Energy Cost Reduction, 15-30%. 


  • Lighting Power Density Reduction of 10% 


  • The prerequisite is dependent on the baseline allowance of lighting watts/ft2. Run preliminary calculations, using the building area method or space-by-space method, and determine which option provides the greater allowance for your project. 


  • If your project develops an energy model, you can use it not only to optimize the lighting design but also to demonstrate that lighting power density is 10% less than the ASHRAE baseline case, per Appendix G.


  • Check Section 9.6.2 for potential additional allowances for decorative or display lighting. This additional power density is a function of the type of merchandise and the space area. 


  • Although daylight and occupancy sensors help to keep energy costs low, they cannot be used in calculations for lighting power density. However, if your project develops an energy model to demonstrate HVAC and lighting compliance, occupancy and daylight sensors can be used to reduce design-case energy use, per ASHRAE 90.1-2007, Appendix G, Table G3.1, Section 6. 


  • Energy Star-labeled Equipment and Appliances – 50%


  • Using the table of appliances and equipment that you developed previously, confirm the rated power of products listed and compliance with the requirement that 50% of the total rated power be Energy Star-labeled. 


  • The calculations are based on the rated power of each appliance or piece of equipment.  So a single large power-using appliance, like a refrigerator, may have a higher rated power than dozens of computer monitors. Investigate if those large appliances are Energy Star-labeled, especially if they are to be purchased new for the project, to increase the project’s percentage of rated power that is Energy Star-labeled. 

Construction Documents

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  • Identify unique or unfamiliar energy-efficiency strategies in the construction documents and confirm expectations and requirements for installation. Outline standards and requirements in bid packages so that they are clear to the general contractor and subcontractors.


  • Apply for rebates and incentives based on actual system selection. 


  • ASHRAE 90.1–2007 – Mandatory Requirements 


  • Revisit all prerequisite requirements to confirm compliance after any value engineering has been completed.


  • ASHRAE 90.1-2007 – Prescriptive Option or Performance Option


  • As the prerequisite energy target goes beyond code compliance, some members of the construction team may not be familiar with the additional requirements. Integrate equipment selections in drawings and bid documents.


  • Refer to the ASHRAE compliance form to check if measures such as controls, sensors, wiring, equipment efficiency, window specifications, and pipe insulation are included in drawings and bid packages.


  • Discuss efficiency upgrades with the bidding teams to clarify any questions about new systems. 


  • Lighting Power Density Reduction of 10% 


  • Ensure that the specified lighting system and controls are installed. 


  • Do not replace high-efficiency lighting to reduce costs. 


  • Energy Star-labeled Equipment and Appliances – 50%


  • Update the table of appliances and equipment after the construction documents are complete to track any reduction or increase in the amount of Energy Star-labeled equipment and appliances. If the Energy Star-labeled systems do not make up 50% of the total rated power, revisit the list to identify which appliances and equipment can be upgraded to meet the threshold. 

Construction

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  • ASHRAE 90.1-2007 – Mandatory Requirements 


  • Install the systems as specified. Have the mechanical engineer and the commissioning agent visit the site to ensure that the correct systems are being installed. 


  • Confirm that the system components and system efficiency are the same as that specified. 


  • Develop the compliance documentation. Compliance can be demonstrated with ASHRAE 90.1-2007 compliance forms, or the LEED Online form may be signed by the registered architect and design engineer. 


  • ASHRAE 90.1-2007 – Prescriptive & Performance Options 


  • Demonstrate compliance using the ASHRAE forms or a sign-off by the registered architect and engineer. 


  • Lighting Power Density Reduction of 10% 


  • Demonstrate LPD compliance using ASHRAE compliance forms— or if your project developed an energy model, use the outputs from the model to fill in the forms. Compliance forms are available on the ASHRAE website for free download.


  • ComCheck may be used to demonstrate compliance with LPD requirements.  


  • Energy Star-labeled Equipment and Appliances – 50%


  • Complete the table of equipment and appliances in LEED Online and verify that 50% of the rated power is Energy Star-labeled.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Have the MEP engineer and controls contractor develop an operations manual in collaboration with facility management and the commissioning agent to aid in maintaining and correctly operating all energy-efficient equipment.


  • Energy-efficient design strategies may be new to the users and operating staff. It is helpful to develop training and an O&M manual. Occupants and facility staff should be aware of any automatic controls and refrain from changing settings and controls during the initial months of occupancy. 


  • Energy-efficiency measures often offset their own cost by providing large savings on operational energy bills. These prerequisite requirements are directly tied to the benefit of efficient, low-cost operations.


  • The lease or sale agreement may include a fixed utility rate such that energy-efficiency measures do not provide a direct payback to the client. In these cases, the tenant or buyer may want to renegotiate the lease with the landlord so that utilities are not included in the agreement and are paid directly by the tenant.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    EA Prerequisite 2: Minimum energy performance

    Required

    Intent

    To establish the minimum level of energy efficiency for the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. systems to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.

    Requirements

    Design portions of the building as covered by the tenant’s scope of work to comply with ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2007 (with errata but without addenda1) and complete the following:

    • Compliance with the mandatory provisions (Sections 5.4, 6.4, 7.4, 8.4, 9.4, and 10.4) of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2007 (with errata but without addenda1). Projects outside the U.S. may use a USGBC approved equivalent standard2.
    • Achieve the prescriptive requirements (Sections 5.5 or 5.6, 6.5, 7.5 and 9.5 or 9.6) or performance requirements (Section 11) of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2007 (with errata but without addenda1) or USGBC approved equivalent.
    • Reduce connected lighting power density 10% below that allowed by ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2007 (with errata but without addenda1) or USGBC approved equivalent using either the Space-by-Space Method or by applying the whole building lighting power allowance to the entire tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space..
    • Install ENERGY STAR®–qualified equipment for 50% (by rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw.) of ENERGY STAR–eligible equipment installed as part of the tenant’s scope of work. This requirement includes appliances, office equipment, electronics, and commercial food service equipment. Equipment that meets the same requirements as ENERGY STAR qualified products but does not bear the ENERGY STAR label is acceptable. Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ENERGY STAR. Excluded are heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC), lighting, and building envelope products.

    Projects in California may use Title 24–2005, Part 6, in place of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2007.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Design the systems impacted in the tenant’s scope of work to maximize energy performance. Use a computer simulation model to assess the energy performance and identify the most cost-effective energy measures. Quantify energy performance compared with a baseline building.

    If local code has demonstrated quantitative and textual equivalence following, at a minimum, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) standard process for commercial energy code determination, then the local code may be used to satisfy this prerequisite in lieu of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007. Details on the DOE process for commercial energy code determination can be found at http://www.energycodes.gov/implement/determinations.

    FOOTNOTES

    1. Project teams wishing to use ASHRAE approved addenda for the purposes of this credit may do so at their discretion. Addenda must be applied
    consistently across all LEED credits.

Organizations

Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE)

This database shows state-by-state incentives for energy efficiency, renewable energy, and other green building measures. Included in this database are incentives on demand control ventilation, ERVs, and HRVs.


Architecture 2030

Non-profit organization aiming at design community to increase collaboration for designing energy efficient buildings.


IBPSA

International association of energy modelers with various national and local chapters. 


Low Impact Hydropower Institute

The Low Impact Hydropower Institute is a non-profit organization and certification body that establishes criteria against which to judge the environmental impacts of hydropower projects in the United States.

Web Tools

National Resources Defense Council

Explore this website to find out how building green can boost your bottom line. Get tips for streamlining design and construction. Learn which strategies deliver the biggest paybacks.


Advanced Energy Design Guides

Free download of AHSRAE energy savings guide, use for Option 2.


Lawrence Berkeley Lab: Building Technologies Department

Research warehouse for strategies and case studies of energy efficiency in buildings.


Advanced Buildings Technologies and Practices, Core Performance Guide

A prescriptive program to achieve signifi cant, predictable energy savings in new commercial buildings.


Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG)

This website lays out design process for developing an energy efficient building.


Efficient Windows Collaborative

An online window selection tool with performance characteristics.


Advanced Buildings Technologies and Practices

This online resource, supported by Natural Resources Canada, presents energy-efficient technologies, strategies for commercial buildings, and pertinent case studies.


AIA Sustainability 2030 Toolkit

This website discusses ways to improve design for lower energy demand as they relate to the AIA 2030 challenge.


Windows for High-Performance Commercial Buildings

This website includes discussion of design issues, materials and assemblies, window design decisions and case studies. 


California Integrated Waste Management Board: Environmental and Economic Assessment Tools

This site lists multiple web-based and downloadable tools that can be used for energy analyses.


DEER: Database for Energy Efficient Resource

This database is maintainted by the California Energy Commission and lists resources related to energy use and efficiency. 


Energy Design Resources - CA

Energy design tools are available to be used for free online or available to download.


Building Materials Property Table

This website lists performance characteristics for various envelope materials. 


One Building

This is an online forum of discussion for energy efficiency, computer model software users.

Publications

Building Energy Performance News

This website offers information on energy efficiency in buildings, highlighting success stories, breakthrough technology, and policy updates.


GreenSource magazine

Bimonthly publication on case studies and new technologies for energy efficiency in commercial buildings. 


Journal of Building Information Simulation

Computer modeling for building energy use.


AIA Local Leaders in Sustainability: Green Incentives

AIA publication highlighting local and state green building incentives.


Federal Research and Devlopment Agenda for Net-Zero Energy, High-Performance Green Buildings

2008 guidelines and performance goals from the National Science and Technology Council.

Software Tools

Building Energy Software Tools Directory

DOE tools for whole building analyses, including energy simulation, load calculation, renewable energy, retrofit analysis and green buildings tools.


MOIST

This is a tool available to download for envelope moisture analysis tool.


WUFI-ORNL/IBP

WUFI-ORNL/IBP is a menu-driven PC program which allows realistic calculation of the transient coupled one-dimensional heat and moisture transport in multi-layer building components exposed to natural weather.


Autodesk

Autodesk BIM software facilitates an improved way of working collaboratively, using a model created from coordinated, consistent design information.

CI-2009 LEED Online Sample Forms – EA

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CI-2009 EA credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED
Online
for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

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Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

LEED-CI Silver Office – EAp2

Complete documentation for achievement of EAp2 on a LEED-CI 2009 project.

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Librarian Librarian Librarian Lord, Aeck & Sargent
Jul 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
94 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE 90.1 2007 Section 9.4.1 Automatic Lighting Shutoff

Hello!

We're working on a TI office project of less than 5,000 sf in a building that is larger than 5,000 sf. I had a question about ASHRAE 90.1 2007 sections 9.4.1.1 and 9.4.1.2 about automatic lighting shutoff and space control.

As a TI space in the scenario described above, do we need to comply with 9.4.1.1 given our <5,000 sf size of our space?

Also, is Section 9.4.1.2 b. describing manual switching as an option?

Thanks for your help.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jul 16 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

9.4.1.1 - Applies to the building as a whole, not just your space.

9.4.2.1 - Yes manual switching is an option in most spaces. Automatic controls are required in the spaces listed under "a".

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy
Jun 19 2014
LEEDuser Member
1324 Thumbs Up

Energy Star

Hello!

If we choose the performance option (Section 11), do we still have to comply with the 50% rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. Energy Star??

Thanks!!

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 19 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

Yes all four items are independent of each other.

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LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy Jun 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 1324 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your answer, Marcus!

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant CSV Architects
May 13 2014
LEEDuser Expert
1900 Thumbs Up

No change in HVAC?

I have a client investigating LEED-CI for a upcoming project.

Interior fit up, but no change in HVAC system for a building built in the 1980's.

Does this prerequisite subscribe to existing HVAC or only new equipment?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 19 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

For a CI project it is the scope of work which determines what applies. So typically only new equipment.

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Stacey Olson Associate, LEED AP, ID+C, CID Gensler
May 05 2014
LEEDuser Member
155 Thumbs Up

Consistent SF throughout project

I've recieved comments on a past project that said all square footages must be consistent throughout the project - so the SF documented in MPR 2 must be the same as EAp2 and WEp1.

I'm working on another project - TI - where the entire building is our LEED boundary, however the MEP engineer had limited scope of work. (They did not design air conditioning for the stairwells, for example).

What's the best solution here? Will a narrative justifying a smaller SF be accepted, or should we adjust our SF - thereby lowering our lighting power reduction?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group May 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

Provide a narrative.

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Apr 01 2014
LEEDuser Member
2259 Thumbs Up

Audio Visual Equipment part of prerequisite?

Does audio visual equipment need to be included into the appliances requirements including projectors, speakers, led display, interactive displays, etc?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Apr 01 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

If it is included in the list of Energy Star rated appliances then it must be included. See http://www.energystar.gov/certified-products/certified-products?c=produc...

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator, JALRW Eng. Group Inc. Apr 01 2014 LEEDuser Member 2259 Thumbs Up

How about Lab equipment like microscopes and hot plates?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Apr 02 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

Same answer as before - if it is rated by Energy Star it must be included. I do not think either one is rated by Energy Star.

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Catalina Caballero Sustainable Designer, JALRW Apr 03 2014 Guest 117 Thumbs Up

What if there is some lab specialty equipment that is not clear if it would be part of the Energy Star list or not? Like Explosion Proof Freezer, Explosion Proof Refrigerator, Autoclave, Canopy Hood for Autoclave, Lab Glassware Washers.

Thanks

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Apr 03 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

I do not think the Energy Star addresses any of the items you mention.

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Steve Gross Interface Engineering
Mar 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
56 Thumbs Up

Section 11 or Appendix G?

Does this credit require the use of Section 11, or can Appendix G be used? I previously asked this about EAc1.3, but this credit does state section 11 in the language. Any input would be appreciated.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

Section 11 can be used to demonstrate 90.1 compliance. Appendix G cannot be used to demonstrate 90.1 compliance. This prerequisite requirement is related to 90.1 compliance. EAc1.3 is not about compliance but is about relative improvement. So for the prerequisite you must meet the prescriptive requirements or follow the performance path (section 11), for the credit you can use either modeling methodology.

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Yaser Al Sharif
Mar 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
61 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE forms for vrv systems

Our System is VRV , and the hvac Ashrae forms - part 1 and 2 - does not comply with vrv system - how we could comply with them and many of them does not comply with vrv system ???????????

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE 90.1-2010 added VRV systems so the HVAC form with that version would deal VRV systems if you are looking to find out the minimum best practice for those systems.

Since VRV systems are not covered by 90.1-2007 there are no provisions to comply with specific to them. In essence they are exempt from any specific mandatory provisions such as minimum efficiency.

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Kalyan Nishtala Mar 13 2014 Guest 112 Thumbs Up

Marcus, correct me if I am wrong, but there is an addendum (Cp) to ASHRAE 90.1 - 2007 which deals with VRV systems. Can this be used?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 13 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

Not sure about the addendum that added these systems but in general you can use addenda to 90.1-2007 as long as you apply them in their entirety.

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Yaser Al Sharif
Mar 04 2014
LEEDuser Member
61 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE forms

for commercial interior rating system The LEED template requires to upload interactive forms of ASHRAE. Also, it says it is optional. I would like to know if I need to fill these forms.
is there another option other than fill this forms and if there is another forms for leed projects located outside USA

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 04 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

Optional is optional.

Someone signs the form stating that the mandatory provisions have been met. The forms are intended as a way to document that what you are saying is true. These forms come with 90.1 so you should have them. Not sure how you could sign off on compliance or correctly implement your design if you do not have the standard and the forms that come with it. I am not aware of another option beyond creating your own forms.

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Yaser Al Sharif Mar 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 61 Thumbs Up

The system we have installed Is (VRV) system, and Ashrae forms does not comply with our system , can we write a narrative instead of filling the Ashrae forms ??????

Thanks

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Mar 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 2097 Thumbs Up

You have to fill out the lighting compliance form. The others are optional. There should be a link on the LEED-Online form that points you in the direction of the downloadable ASHRAE forms.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE 90.1-2010 added VRV systems so there is a form which would deal them if you are looking to find out the minimum best practice for those systems.

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Sunayana Jain
Feb 19 2014
LEEDuser Member
203 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE Forms in LEED Template v4

Hi,

The LEED template requires to upload interactive forms of ASHRAE. Also, it says it is optional. I would like to know if I need to fill these forms let say for HVAC if I have minor HVAC scope of work (only for ductwork and diffusersIn an HVAC context, diffusers disperse heating, cooling, or ventilation air as it enters a room, ideally preventing uncomfortable direct currents and in many cases, reducing energy costs and improving indoor air quality (IAQ). In light fixtures, diffusers filter and disperse light.).

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 04 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

There are mandatory provisions in 90.1 associated with the installation of ductwork (insulation and air leakage) so the form would still apply. Submitting the forms for HVAC, hot water and building envelope are optional however.

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Nandana Kumar LEAD Consultancy & Engineering Services
Feb 18 2014
Guest
193 Thumbs Up

UPS equipments for energy star

Hi,

Is it mandatory that Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS) which is installed in the project space is also Energy Star Rate? Since the UPS is also part of the energy star list of products in the website.

Regards
Nandana

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 18 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

Yes, all new Energy Star rated equipment must comply.

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John Burnett FAC-LEEDership Feb 21 2014 LEEDuser Member 377 Thumbs Up

Making reference to LEED Reference Guide for Green Interior Design and Construction with Global ACPs p30 in the table under "The following equipment is included in the scope and must be accounted for in the credit calculation:" UPS is not listed under Computers and Electronics!

I would agree with excluding UPS based on the logic that a UPS conditions the power supply to equipment, and the only energy consumed is the energy associated with the UPS losses. E.g. a 100 kVA @ 0.8 pf iand 95% efficient consumes only 4 kW, not 80 kW.

It is also worth checking the ES specifications for a given item, as some items, say a display unit may be of a size outside the sizes covered by ES.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 21 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

John, I can't find your reference above. Page 30 in the ID+C Reference Guide falls within SSc1. Page 30 in the ID+C Rating System is MRc2. In any case I do not think that because it is not on a list means that it is not included.

UPS falls under office equipment within Energy Star and the Reference Guide and Rating System documents clearly state that all Energy Star eligible equipment is included within EAp2 and EAc1.4.

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John Burnett FAC-LEEDership Feb 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 377 Thumbs Up

Hi Marcus, I refer to page 30 of the ACP document. http://www.usgbc.org/sites/default/files/LEED%202009%20RefGuide_CI_Globa...

You may be right about the UPS but then I would ask if the power rating is the full rating (80 kW in my example), although losses (4 kW) seems more logical. Encouraging the use of ES rated equipment and appliances is to reduce electrical load and, where used, cooling load. Assuming UPS rating is used, and the equipment its serves is not ES rated, then the power rating would often be much larger than other equipment and appliances, yet the actual equipment power may be relatively small, likewise the contribution to heat gain and cooling requirement.

As I mentioned, a range of IT equipment may be under ES, but if the particular item is outside the ES specification for obtaining the label then I believe that ES should not apply. I do not think LEED intends to dictate all equipment needs for a project, rather to encourage selection of ES rated equipment when it is available.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 22 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the link - too many documents to keep track of!

I see your point and am not sure what would be the power rating. To the forum - Any other thoughts?

I agree that if ES specification does not apply then it does not count toward this credit.

I think LEED intends to save energy and project teams should strive to do so.

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Yasuhito Koike LEED AP, Green Building Consultant Izumi System Planning
Feb 13 2014
LEEDuser Member
49 Thumbs Up

Scope of EAp2 we must include to meet the compliance

We are planning to renovate an existing building which is used as an office, aiming for LEED CI certification. The office is a two-story building standing alone and the entire building is leased by one company. Basically, we cannot do anything with parts of the owner’s property such as the envelope, HVAC, service water and lighting besides the interior space leased as a tenant. However, our client wants to add some LED lighting fixtures and a couple of HVACs to the existing ones getting permission from the owner(we are also not supposed to renovate the envelope of the building).

We recognize that we only need to apply this prerequisite to the interior fit-out within the scope and budget, however, in this case, is it all right that we don’t need to address the existing HVAC and lighting? We are not sure whether or not all we have to do is to calculate the additional ones and to comply with them except the existing ones.

Thank you in advance.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Feb 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 2097 Thumbs Up

I've recently done research on lighting for a CI project - the lighting that serves the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. must meet the EAp2 prerequisite. Unless your lighting design is unusual, this would typically mean you will need to replace all the lighting in the leased area to meet the lighting power density requirement (and perhaps some of the finer points of the standard.) Lighting in common areas not leased by the tenant (if any) are exempt.

I haven't looked into the IEQp1 options as the base build of all my CI projects have met the standard, hopefully someone else will chime in with that information.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 13 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

For HVAC you only need to address what is in your scope. For lighting I think you must show the 10% reduction, so compliance depends on the combination of already installed lighting and any being added.

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Yasuhito Koike LEED AP, Green Building Consultant, Izumi System Planning Feb 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 49 Thumbs Up

Hi Michael and Marcus,

We appreciate your answering the question and giving us helpful advices. As to the lighting, I understand what we have to do, that is to say, we must include all the lightings both already installed and being added to meet the compliance. With regard to the additional HVACs intended to install, there is still a question left for us. Our scope of the work in this project regarding the HVAC is only the ones that our client wants to add, and the existing HVACs are not regarded as our scope.

In this case, is it all right that we need to make the added ones complied with ASHRAE 90.1–2007? Or are we required to comply with all the HVACs as well as the lighting?

Thank you in advance again.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 14 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

Since it is a matter of minimal compliance and not overall performance improvement relative to minimal compliance, I think you only have to meet the requirements for the new HVAC equipment within the project scope.

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Yasuhito Koike LEED AP, Green Building Consultant, Izumi System Planning Feb 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 49 Thumbs Up

Hi Marcus,

We can make it clear. Thank you very much for your advice.

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Yasuhito Koike LEED AP, Green Building Consultant, Izumi System Planning Feb 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 49 Thumbs Up

We have found that uploading Interactive Compliance Forms of Building Envelope, HVAC and Service Water Heating at the EAp2 Scorecard is "optional", and there is no such form for Power at all. That brought us back here.
Does it mean we do not have to submit the HVAC form if we do not intend to take EAc1.3 credit?
Aren't we expected to submit anything but signiture at the EAp2 Scorecard for Section 8: Power for any project even if the project has alternation on it?

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Gaston Michaud Mechanical Engineer CTS
Jan 15 2014
Guest
172 Thumbs Up

Relocated UPS

We are currently working on a project that includes a 120 kVA UPS that is not Energy Star rated. This equipment was brought from another facility; should we include this in our EAp2 calculations? If we do, our ES rated percentage drops significantly and would actually impede us from the certification.

We already went through the initial review, and since the floor plan shows a UPS room, the reviewers are asking for it. Should we just clarify that this equipment was relocated? What evidence should we submit? Is this path even possible?

Thank you for the help!

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jan 15 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

I believe that you only need to count new equipment so this should not hurt you. So clarify that it was relocated. Is there a drawing or other documentation indicating that this equipment was not new and would be provided?

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Gaston Michaud Mechanical Engineer, CTS Jan 15 2014 Guest 172 Thumbs Up

We do not have any additional documentation indicating that. Could a letter from the owners indicating the origin of the UPS suffice?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jan 15 2014 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

Sounds like the next best thing. If the owner makes a claim it is accepted by the reviewer as fact unless there is any evidence to the contrary.

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RICARDO HERNANDEZ LEED PM SPACE
Dec 12 2013
Guest
21 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE 90.1-2007 - 6.4.3.1.1 COMPLIANCE CRITERIA

Does anyone know how stringent is the criteria to achieve compliance with the 6.4.3.1.1 Zone Thermostatic Controls for a Commercial Interiors? I have a Project which HVAC system in the open office is not divided or separated, what I mean is that the open office area have VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas.'s that control the whole open office and is not divided in a perimeter system and an inside system, does this comply with the requirements of the mandatory provisions or how stringent is the compliance with this point. Do I strictly need to have a VAV with a thermostatic control to offset only building envelope loads and another to offset inside loads even tough there are no floor to ceiling divisions? It's an open office.

The credits for efficiency are not being pursued only the compliance with the prerequisite

Thanks a lot

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Dec 31 2013 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

Not the way I read it.

The separation of a perimeter/interior space is listed as an exception so it is not required. 6.4.3.1.1 requires a thermostatic control for each zone. Perimeter systems meeting the criteria in the exception can also have a control but this does not mean they are required to do so.

It sounds like your design is fine.

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Michele Helou Principal Sage Design & Consulting
Dec 05 2013
LEEDuser Member
782 Thumbs Up

LEED CI EAp2 - ASHRAE 90.1 building envelope compliance

Can anyone tell me if the addition of interior storm windows without a change in existing fixed windows would trigger having to meet either the prescriptive requirements or the ECB ch. 11 model requirements?
It seems to me, the storms only make it better.

I see that ASHRAE 5.1.3 makes an exception for storm windows as well as other envelope 'improvements'.
.
does this prerequisite allow all of the exceptions in ASHARE 5.1.3?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Dec 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

It would not require you to meet the prescriptive requirements. That is the exception under 5.1.3.

For the Section 11 model the baseline would be the prescriptive requirements and the proposed would be the installed windows with storms.

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Michele Helou Principal, Sage Design & Consulting Dec 05 2013 LEEDuser Member 782 Thumbs Up

and on insulating an existing mass wall - assuming we need to comply with section 5 for insulation values - ASHRAE section 5.5.3 would send us to Normative Appendix A for an allowable calculation?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Dec 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

If you are adding insulation to an existing wall then it is my understanding that you would need to bring it up the prescriptive value or follow the performance path in Section 11. Yes Appendix A is a allowable methodology for determining the whole assembly performance of various construction assemblies.

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Graham Langton Building Services Engineer PM-Group
Nov 19 2013
LEEDuser Member
114 Thumbs Up

AHU's serving process spaces

If we have AHUs serving rooms with low temperature and humidity below the requirements for human comfort, can these be excluded from the mandatory and prescriptive requirements of ASHRAE 90.1 2007 as they are serving a process function rather then a human comfort function?– Then can a project comply with the minimum energy performance prerequisite by complying with the mandatory and prescriptive requirements for all other AHUs excluding this process AHU?
Or would you have to go through the section 11 route for all AHUs?

Again, Thanks in advance

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 25 2013 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

If you can make the case that the equipment is exclusively for process then it could be exempted.

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Graham Langton Building Services Engineer PM-Group
Nov 14 2013
LEEDuser Member
114 Thumbs Up

Process Energy

All,

How does LEED CI and section 11 modelling view process energy? For an industrial / manufacturing facility with new process equipment in particular. In 90.1, process energy is not dealt with. Advanced energy modelling for LEED says model process energy identically to proposed, but exclude from cost calculation. If process cost savings were being sought, do we have an ECMEnergy conservation measures are installations or modifications of equipment or systems intended to reduce energy use and costs. like usual? If savings are not be sought, model identically in section 11 model? If they are not being sought, there is then no reason to establish an industry standard baseline for comparison etc?

Thanks in advance.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 14 2013 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

When doing a section 11 model you include the process energy, as it affects heating and cooling loads in the building, then you post-process it from the results. Process is modeled identically. A section 11 model is simply about determining 90.1 compliance through the performance (as opposed to prescriptive) path. It is not intended to be a methodology used to determine savings. There would be no need within CI to do any ECMEnergy conservation measures are installations or modifications of equipment or systems intended to reduce energy use and costs. unless you were pursuing an ID credit for energy savings not covered by the credits. Then I would follow the same guidelines used for ECMs in the BD+C version of LEED.

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Matthew Catterall Cotera+Reed Architects
Nov 05 2013
LEEDuser Member
29 Thumbs Up

More Stringent Local Code Questions

Regarding lighting power density, our jurisdiction has a more stringent local code than ASHRAE 90.1-2007 (our local code is IECCInternational Energy Conservation Code 2012). Our Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. authority has told us that EAp2 states: 'Any local code (or provision in it) that is more stringent becomes part of the prerequisite requirement'

So do our baseline values for energy use (including lights) need to be in accordance with IECC 2012 instead of ASHRAE 90.1 –2007 and do the LEED credits the become based on improvements above IECC 2012?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

It would be helpful for the Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. to note where it says this. It is not in the credit requirement.

As far as I know you use 90.1-2007.

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Matthew Catterall Cotera+Reed Architects Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Member 29 Thumbs Up

They found it in their CI 2009 reference guide on page 139 under '4. Implementation' there is a paragraph titled 'More Stringent Local Code'. Even after reading that paragraph, it still seems to me that the baseline would stay ASHRAE 90.1-2007 and that you just need to make sure that you also meet your more stringent local code, would you agree? Otherwise a project might receive less credits just because it is in a more stringent locality...

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

I agree. This just means that you still need to comply with your local code if it is more stringent but 90.1-2007 remains the baseline for comparison.

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Kalyan Nishtala
Sep 23 2013
Guest
112 Thumbs Up

EAp2 and EAc1.3

Hi,
I am new to LEED CI and am confused about a couple of things. Is it allowed to choose to meet the requirements of section 11 through an energy model for the prerequisite and use option 1 for EAc1.3 or should an energy model be used for both the prerequisite and the credit? Our plan is to use an energy model for the prerequisite since we are the design team and will put together a model for load estimates and use option 1 for the credit since we are not sure if we can achieve 30% savings which seems like a tall order for a CI project.

Thanks a lot!

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Sep 23 2013 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

You do not have to use the model created for EAp2 in the pursuit of EAc1.3. You can pursue option 1 for that credit.

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Kalyan Nishtala Sep 23 2013 Guest 112 Thumbs Up

Thanks Marcus!

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Anthea Ng
Sep 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
130 Thumbs Up

Server/ Computers in Data Centre

We have an interior renovation of works in a datacentre aiming for LEED-CI certification. The project area is managed and owned by the same client. Within the project area, part of the computer racks shall be rent for tenant's equipment in the future and part of the racks belong to owner. Do tenant's equipment need to be Energy Star labeled? Would the credit includes only equipment under applicant's scope?
Or if tenant's equipment is not newly purchased but relocating from other data centres, could it be excluded from the rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. calculation?

Many thanks

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John Burnett FAC-LEEDership Sep 20 2013 LEEDuser Member 377 Thumbs Up

Hi Anthea,

We have LEED-CI certification on a DC where the owner provides facility for others (tenants) to install equipment, a so-called colocation data center. No need to be ES compliant, so excluded. The consideration is whether the owner's equipment meets ES. If relocated it is not new, so no ES requirement, so also excluded.

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Aditya Chemburkar
Aug 26 2013
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

CI project modeling with central building HVAC plant system

Hi,

I am modeling a CI project for which we are going to replace all the lighting and low side Indoor HVAC units. The high side HVAC system is a central plant common for the complete building.

The indoor HVAC unit of this CI project will be connected to the common central HVAC plant of the building. Please guide how to model the HVAC system for the analysis and how we can claim points under EA CR 3.0- Optimize Energy Performance HVAC.

Thanks

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Aug 26 2013 LEEDuser Expert 41642 Thumbs Up

I would suggest that you should read the information above and the LEED Reference Guide for general guidance on how to do this modeling.

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Christine Robbins-Elrod Studio Director 5G Studio Collaborative,llc.
Aug 07 2013
Guest
296 Thumbs Up

ENERGY STAR equipment in medical clinic finish-out

Our LEED-CI project is fitting within a shell space of a much larger LEED-NC hospital project (while the hospital also owns the clinic that is pursuing LEED-CI, GBCI has already confirmed that LEED-CI would be the most appropriate rating system in this particular case). I have a couple of questions regarding the 50% minimum requirement (and relevance for EAc1.4 depending on which equipment and appliances we include in our calculations) for ENERGY STAR qualified equipment and appliances:

1) The initial specifications called for the same refrigerator/freezers that were being used in the rest of the hospital, but many of these are not ENERGY STAR. The larger refrigerators/freezers (mainly for breakrooms) for the scope within our LEED-CI project are being substituted so that they will be ENERGY STAR, but the under-counter refrigerator/freezers for medical spaces such as laboratories would be more difficult to substitute - the hospital's preferred manufacturer does not provide a ADA-compliant ENERGY STAR model with nearly the same capacity as what was previously specified. Is it possible that we could exclude the refrigerators/freezers that will be used only for medical purposes?

2) Some of the office equipment (e.g. computers, monitors) will be moved from the clinic's old facility. Can we exclude office equipment that the hospital already owns and only include newly-purchased office equipment in the ENERGY STAR calculations?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Aug 08 2013 LEEDuser Expert 14196 Thumbs Up

For #1, you'll have to show that you can not provide that grade of under counter fridges to be able to exclude the preferred unit from this credit by claiming it to be a process unit. Typically, we find these half height units to be of general use grade and getting an ES unit is not a problem. But once you're in a lab the units can be more specialized. If it is a matter of the manufacturer having a non ADA half unit with ES but not a non ADA unit, can you adjust your design for the taller unit?

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Christine Robbins-Elrod Studio Director, 5G Studio Collaborative,llc. Aug 08 2013 Guest 296 Thumbs Up

I feel relatively confident with that argument for the compact medical-grade refrigerator and freezer that were specified (Summit models FF28LMED and FS62ADA) since Summit doesn't manufacture any ENERGY STAR models for these product types. I'm less certain about whether we could exclude the two general use grade under-counter refrigerator/freezer units since Summit does manufacture ENERGY STAR ADA under-counter units (we do need the ADA height), although the decreased capacity of the ENERGY STAR units would not meet the hospital's needs. The AL-650 and AL-750 units which have been specified have capacities of 5.1 cu. ft. and 5.6 cu. ft., and the largest ADA-height ENERGY STAR under-counter refrigerator-freezer that Summit manufactures has a capacity of 3.6 cu. ft. (all of the ENERGY STAR models have less width).

I found the answer to my second question under EAc1.4 (sorry, I should have read up on this yesterday!), although I have another relevant question...the hospital has already purchased ice machines for the entire hospital, including the clinic. Although they didn't use these ice machines in their previous facility, would it be reasonable to exclude these if we are also excluding all of the office equipment from the clinic's previous facility?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Aug 08 2013 LEEDuser Expert 14196 Thumbs Up

Do be careful about arguing that one manufacturer doesn't make anything energy star for the function. Ensure that you're looking at other manufacturers and finding a deficit in the industry. It is like saying that you went to all the Safeway stores and there were no apples, therefore, no one is selling apples. Meanwhile, over at the Giant they have apples.

You're likely right about the general use half height fridges. I'm better at parsing out the medical equipment than modelling, however. Hopefully someone else will chime in.

I would say the ice machines are part of the process equipment for the building. And I'm assuming you mean the big ice machines in the nourshiment / pantry rooms.

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Sep 01 2014
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