CI-2009 IEQc8.2: Daylight and Views—Views for Seated Spaces

  • Easy credit for most buildings

    Buildings that provide views to the outdoors have proven to enhance productivity, testing performance, and overall occupant comfort and well-being. This credit is easy to achieve if you also plan to design for open space planning, placing occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. near exterior windows with large glazing areas. and design  spaces to use furniture that does not block views from a seated position, such as low or transparent partitions between workstations.  If there is a standard design for every floor or standard spaces that are repeated throughout the design, this credit calculation may be relatively easier as calculations can be duplicated for each floor. Designing for compliance with this credit will likely be complementary with IEQc8.1: Daylight and Views—Daylight. Expect some tradeoffs associated with increasing window area, such as heat loss and gain through larger windows, increased glare, and privacy issues with open space planning and low furniture partitions.

    Documentation can be time-consuming

    The documentation for this credit does not involve complicated formulas. You are simply figuring out the floor area that has access to views and comparing it with the floor areas that do not have access to views.   However, the larger the project the more time-consuming the documentation will be, especially if spaces are varied.

    FAQs for IEQc8.2

    For Exemplary Performance, what is a View Factor?

    View Factor has been determined per the Heschone Mahone Group Study "Windows and Offices: A Study of Office Worker Performance and the Indoor Environment," page 47 (see Resources). A component to achieving Exemplary Performance for IEQc8.2 is having 90% of project's regularly occupied spaces achieve a View Factor of 3+. View Factors are assigned 1–5 and are based on Primary View and Break View. See the study for further detail, including a visual depiction of View Factors 1–5.

    Does furniture need to be included in floor plan when completing views calculations?

    No. According to a 5/9/2011 addendum, movable furniture and movable partitions are not included in the scope of this credit calculation. Movable furniture and partitions are those that can be moved to provide access to the view by the user without the need for tools or assistance from special trades and facilities management.

    If views are accessible from a seated position, yet above 42”, can these contribute to the views calculations?

    Yes. LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 10254, made on 10/1/2012, allows sloped view lines starting at 42 inches in IEQc8.2 and specifically states that the view line is not required to be horizontal: "To determine direct lines of sight in section, provide one or more representative sight lines from a point at eye height (42 inches) in the regularly occupied space to perimeter vision glazing between 30 inches and 90 inches above the finished floor of the building. The direct line of sight may be slope from 42 inches at the seated area to any unobstructed area of the vision glazing. The direct line of sight is not required to be horizontal at 42 inches only."

    Why does the LEED Reference Guide call for vision glazing between 30 and 90 inches, but I have to show compliance at 42 inches?

    The standard eye height for an adult while seated is 42". Depending on the use of the space, the eye height may be at 5’9” or lower. The idea is that the occupant should not have to move their head significantly to view outside. Also, with having access to view at this height, the peripheral vision is not affected. Occupants still receive glimpses of the outside.

    What is considered a regularly occupied space?

    The latest definition for a regularly occupied space (per a 2011 addendum) is “an area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building."

    What can I do if my prescriptive method calculation results in a value less than 0.150?

    Recalculate zone floor area (ZFA) = (WA xVLT)/0.150. So if, for example, you have a window area of 120 ft2 and a VLT of 0.4, ZFA = (WA xVLT)/0.150 = (120 x 0.4)/0.150 = 320. There is one caveat and that is that your ZFA must be equal to or greater than your zone width. Otherwise you must enter 0 for this ZFA.

    What can I do if my prescriptive method calculation results in a value greater than 0.180?

    None of this area qualifies. You should take is as a cue that your area is likely to have glare issues, and consider either lowering your glazing visual light transmittance, or reducing your window size.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Analyze building orientation and site selection for opportunities to provide access to views to the outside.


  • Too much glazing, particularly east- and west-facing glazing exposed to low-angle morning and afternoon sun, may cause glare and overheating. Use overhangs, energy-efficient glazing, and daylighting designs that control glare, such as interior shades or lightshelves.


  • High performance glazing and increased glazing area may add additional costs unless they can be offset by integrated design solutions like right sizing of mechanical equipment, or in some cases the elimination of perimeter heating.


  • When selecting windows for maximizing views, consider also using operable windows for natural ventilation. This can contribute to credits IEQp1: Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance and IEQc2: Increased Ventilation.


  • While LEED does not dictate the quality of the view outside the window, considering this can help a project achieve exemplary performance. Also, occupants will likely prefer view of interesting objects, views with movement (though not too busy), and views of nature. In other words, a view of a brick wall may meet the letter of the LEED requirement, but not the spirit.

Schematic Design

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  • Determine which spaces in a project are “regularly occupied” (per LEED definition) and need to be included in the views calculations.


  • Some spaces can be exempt from being considered “regularly occupied” due to the nature of their use. Previously published CIR’s offer some guidance. Provide a narrative explanation of why a given space should be exempt based on use of the space as views and daylight may negatively affect the use of the space, not the frequency or time that the space is actually used. For example, museum gallery spaces, high security and privacy areas, dark rooms for photo development, and others can all be exempt from the calculation.


  • The calculation of regularly occupied space can be fine-tuned as decisions for “fixed” (attached to a wall) counters with overhead cabinets and equipment are integrated into the design. The square footage where the cabinets and equipment are located is not considered occupiable space, and therefore is not included as part of the view or the daylight calculation. For example, if an office is 500 ft2 in total, but fixed counters and cabinets occupy 100 ft2, the regularly occupied space of the room is only 400 ft2.


  • Ensure that the spaces identified as “regularly occupied” are consistent across credits, especially for IEQc8.1: Daylighting and Views—Daylighting.


  • Enter the names of the regularly occupied spaces in the LEED credit form along with the total floor area for each regularly occupied space.


  • Hold an integrated design meeting with the architect, interior designers, mechanical engineer, lighting designer, contractor, cost estimator and the end user to explore and resolve possible benefits and tradeoffs that increased glazing and access to views strategies could have on daylight, glare, heat gain and loss, furniture design and layout, and other design decisions.


  • Place regularly occupied spaces such as offices, classrooms and conference rooms near exterior glazing and perimeter windows to increase opportunity for access to views and daylight.


  • When considering office space layout and workstations, consider partitions and moveable furniture that are equal to or less than 42 inches high on all sides or incorporate transparent surfaces in upper sections to allow access to views while seated.


  • Window-to-wall ratios may be fixed if your project is pursuing a prescriptive compliance path for EAp2: Minimum Energy Performance and EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance. These fixed ratios will impact access to views and glazing areas. Check the ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guide and the Advanced Buildings Core Performance Guide for required window-to-wall ratios. If a building envelope window-to-wall ratio is over 40% there will be a penalty in the energy model for EAc1. The same is true if skylight-to-roof ratio is more than 5%. These requirements are based on ASHRAE 90.1.

Design Development

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  • Explore a combination of strategies that increase views such as low-partition furniture, space-planning techniques, and interior glazing.


  • Identify available products and furniture that combine glazing and building elements for optimum access to views while maintaining privacy—for example, workstations with low partition heights and interior perimeter glazing.


  • By increasing glazing and designing for natural light, projects can reduce the number of ambient light fixtures or the frequency with which they are used, reducing the cost of electric lighting both upfront and for ongoing operations.


  • Ensure that glare controls are factored into the design of daylighting and views.

Construction Documents

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  • Plan View Direct Line of Sight to Perimeter Glazing Calculations:


  • Calculate the floor area with direct-line-of-sight to perimeter vision glazing for each regularly occupied space. Moveable partitions must be included in your calculations.


  • Direct-line-of-sight is determined by visibility between the vision glazing (between 2’6” and 7’6” inches above the floor) without obstructions such as full-height partitions or solid doorways. 


  • Direct-line-of-sight can pass through two interior glazing surfaces before reaching exterior glazing, but not through solid doors, walls, or partitions taller than 42”. 


  • Create a floor plan showing areas with access to views as distinct from areas with no access to views.


  • Include more than one sight line if necessary to meet the requirement for all spaces.


  • Total the square footage with access to views and enter it in the LEED credit form.


  • Section View Direct Line of Sight Height Confirmation:


  • Create a representative building section for each type of area included in the calculation.


  • For each section, draw a line originating from 42” above the floor (typical eye height) to the perimeter glazing demonstrating access to vision glazing and views to the outside.


  • Show typical furniture heights in the sections if applicable.


  • Total the areas of regularly occupied spaces that have both direct-line-of-sight to perimeter glazing and access to views while seated (at 42”). Divide this value by the total area of regularly occupied spaces to confirm if the design provides greater than 90% of occupied areas with access to views. This is done in the LEED credit form. Upload plans to LEED Online.


  • Private offices where more than 75% of the floor area has a direct-line-of-sight to views can include the entire square footage in the calculations.


  • Include columns as obstructions when calculating the access to views in open floor plans.


  • Include columns as obstructions when calculating the access to views in open floor plans.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    IEQ Credit 8.2: Daylight and views - views

    1 Point

    Intent

    To provide building occupants a connection to the outdoors through the introduction of daylight and views into the regularly occupied areas of the building.

    Requirements

    Achieve a direct line of sight to the outdoor environment via vision glazing between 30 inches and 90 inches above the finish floor for building occupants in 90% of all regularly occupied areas. Determine the area with a direct line of sight by totaling the regularly occupied square footage that meets the following criteria:

    • In plan view, the area is within sight lines drawn from perimeter vision glazing.
    • In section view, a direct sight line can be drawn from a point 42 inches above the floor (typical seated eye height) to perimeter vision glazing.

    The line of sight may be drawn through interior glazing. For private offices, the entire square footage of the office may be counted if 75% or more of the area has a direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazingThe approach used to determine the calculated area of regularly occupied areas with direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing. The area determination includes full height partitions and other fixed construction prior to installation of furniture.. If less than 75% of the area has a direct line of sight, only the area with the direct line of sigh count toward meeting the credit requirement. For multi-occupant spacesMulti-occupant spaces are places of egress, congregation, or where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks. Multi occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces., the actual square footage with a direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing is counted.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Design the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. to maximize daylighting and view opportunities. Strategies to consider include lower partitions, interior shading devices, interior glazing and automatic photocell-based controls.

Publications

The Biophilia Hypothesis (Stephen R. Kellert, ed.)

This collection of papers on elements of biophilia includes consideration of daylighting's effects on people.


Windows and Offices: A Study of Office Worker Performance and the Indoor Environment

The Heschone Mahone Group Study "Windows and Offices: A Study of Office Worker Performance and the Indoor Environment" defines “View Factor” criteria related to Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. compliance.

Articles

New York City Audubon

This Audubon chapter takes a leadership role in reducing bird collisions with buildings.  The chapter publishes Bird-Safe Building Guidelines, conducts monitoring, and, through its Project Safe Flight, promotes bird-friendly design.

Organizations

Fatal Light Awareness Program

Initiated the Bird-Friendly Building Development Program for the City of Toronto, FLAP monitors and promotes bird-friendly design.

Web Tools

Sight Line Simulator

Technologists at LMN architects have created a tool to calculate sightlines and views in a performing arts theater.

Views Documentation

These samples of views documentation demonstrate how to sucessfully document access to views via plan drawing, section drawing, and spreadsheet. Depending on the rating system and version, not all of these may be required. Samples generously provided by LEEDuser guest expert Allison Beer McKenzie.

LEED Online Forms: CI-2009 IEQ

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

77 Comments

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Jonathan Weiss
Jan 05 2017
LEEDuser Member
2616 Thumbs Up

Layers of Glazing?

OK, I may be crazy, but I recall the requirement limiting the number of layers of internal glazing that can be "viewed" through. I do not see it now in the rating system or reference materials - did it change? Am I missing it?

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Annalise Reichert Project Manager stok
May 28 2015
LEEDuser Member
528 Thumbs Up

Eye Height above 42" for Standing Desks?

I am working on a project that plans to install cubicles with partition heights approximately 5 feet high, likely blocking views from seated height of 42" aff. However, the project plans to install standing desks in these cubicles. Is there any LEED interpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. that states standing desks may use an eye height higher than 42" aff?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group May 29 2015 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

A standing workstation such as in a manufacturing facility or warehouse , is acceptable. You will need to provide a section showing the line of sight from a standing person to the view glazing. Include the cubicles and a narrative explaining these standing workstations. If there is any desk area within these cubicles where a person has the option to sit down you won;t be able to include these cubicles.

One option that we have personally used is having a clear glazing panel on top of the partition. This provides a view for the person seated through the panel to view glazing.

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Kristopher Croghan Senior Associate OPX
Aug 18 2014
LEEDuser Member
26 Thumbs Up

local installation in DC

I have a few open offices where multiple occupants work in the same space, our workstation panels are just above the 42" height so we won't be able to qualify as 100% in these areas. However, the workstation by the perimeter windows qualify for the credit as these people do get views. How shall I calculate the "no view" area? or the entire sq of the room is not account for?
thanks.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Aug 18 2014 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

Are you workstation panels fixed? Moveable partitions can be excluded in you calculations.

Use your line of sight plan to determine the areas that have views. Refer to the reference guide for a sample line of sight plan. Any area with a line of sight to the perimeter counts.

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MM K
Aug 13 2014
Guest
2653 Thumbs Up

Circulation spaces

Can circulation spaces be included in the Views calculations if they have access to views?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Aug 13 2014 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

Yes, depending on the type of circulation and if included consistently in EQc8.1.

Hallways that are nothing more than hallways might be questioned especially if you are clearly using the square footage to earn the point. Circulation areas in open office spaces and similar spaces typically are not questioned since they are within a regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use.. This would be the area between desks or workstations. Since furniture does not have to be included in the line of sight drawings, these types of circulation are never really defined.

Technically they should not be included. The debate as to what is and is not regularly occupied and what should and should not be included has raged on for years. With the introduction of LIs and the regularly occupied space matrix, the areas that should be included has gotten a lot clearer. On that note, GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). is more stringent on spaces that are not regularly occupied and are only included for credit achievement. Its goes against the "intent" and requirement of the credit.

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Dennis Park Perkins + Will
Jul 21 2014
Guest
40 Thumbs Up

EP - Measure 4

Is this measuring that 90% of spaces simply have access to views with a view factor of 3? For instance you will get credit if you are able to walk to a position in the room that allows you to have a view factor above 3. Am I understanding this correctly? Thanks for any help!

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jul 22 2014 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

In simplest terms, yes. Any location within a space that provides an occupant a view factor of 3 or greater count. Exactly how this is done is not really spelled out anywhere.

I would break a space down into a 3'x3' gird. Basically the space occupied by a person. if the center of that space offers a view factor, it counts.

When it comes to documenting the exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. for this credit, i would recommend waiting till construction is complete and you can take pictures. Especially if you are going to have some real small view angles where a reviewer could question the legitimacy of the area having a claimed factor.

Hope this helps.

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Jul 22 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6625 Thumbs Up

Just want to clear up what looks like might be some miscommunication. Dennis, there is no walking involved. The occupant has to be able to see the special view as they are seated at their desk. They may have to turn their head or chair around, but if they have to get up and walk to the view it doesn't count. Is this how you understand it, Todd?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jul 22 2014 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

Yes, its only from a stationary position, work station, regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use.. So a worker having to get up and move into the aisle would not be acceptable.

So if you did not have a view factor of 3 from your workstation, that area is not compliant. You should only consider the areas considered regularly occupied. So circulation areas, which are not used in the regular credit, would also not be used in the exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements..

Dennis's question was a little confusing, so that is why i noted to break the space into a grid and analyze each space in the grid.

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Dennis Park Perkins + Will Jul 22 2014 Guest 40 Thumbs Up

Thanks everyone!

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MM K
May 30 2014
Guest
2653 Thumbs Up

Blinds

If blinds are installed, are the views calculations affected?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group May 30 2014 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

As long as they can be opened and closed, they do not effect the views calculation.

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MM K
May 08 2014
Guest
2653 Thumbs Up

Views through atrium

If an office project space has a glazed atrium in the middle of the floor plate, do the views of the office from one side of the atrium to the other side count in the Views credit?
Would they fall under views on human activity as the occupants of one side of the atrium would be able to see the occupants on the other side?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group May 08 2014 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

No, views must be to the exterior,

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Rebecca Hart
Dec 03 2013
Guest
175 Thumbs Up

Currently scoring 85%

Hi,

I'd appreciate any tips or suggestions there may be from previous projects about how to score a few extra percentage points. We're currently on 85.5%, so close and yet it seems so farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters).. I'm checking we have included all relevant spaces and assessed them correctly. Is it correct to include the restaurant kitchen (the project is a LEED CI office renovation)? There are meeting rooms called 'think tanks' intended for short meetings, can we exclude those? Any tips or guidance would be gratefully received!! Thank you.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Dec 03 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

Refer to the LEED Regularly Occupied SpaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use. Matrix dated October 2013 for a list of spaces that can be excluded. A kitchen in a restaurant should be included. I'm not sure the think tanks could be excluded because they could also be used for longer meetings or have the potential to be used for longer time frames other than a few minutes.

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Rebecca Hart Dec 03 2013 Guest 175 Thumbs Up

Thanks Todd, that's useful. Albeit, it hasn't helped me find some more points... Some of the rooms are deliberately closed off as they will be dealing with very confidential projects - does that provide us with any leeway? I am a little desperate as you can see!

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Dec 03 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

If you have spaces that have been specifically designed to not allow light or views into the space due to security or other reasons, then i would suggest that you do not include them in your calculations. You will have to provide a narrative explaining the reason for the exclusion of those spaces. These will be reviewed on a case by case basis.

It seems you have done all the work to this point and the calcs are done. So you might as well as submit and see whether or not the reason for their exclusion is accepted.

Not every project can earn every credit and it may just be that way. Putting the requirements of the credit into the DNA of the design can help ensure credit achievement.

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Alicia Wilgus Interior Designer Harrison French & Associates
Jun 26 2013
LEEDuser Member
34 Thumbs Up

Conference rooms - Regularly occupied space?

I'm seeing a lot of comments about conference rooms being considered a regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use.. The work being done in our project building would not see workers spending more than an hour per day per person on average in a conference room. Do i still need to include them?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jun 27 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

Yes,

The regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use. matrix dated April 2013 considers conference rooms that are for meetings as regularly occupied. Conference rooms soley dedicated to just video conferencing can be excluded.

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Alicia Wilgus Interior Designer, Harrison French & Associates Jun 27 2013 LEEDuser Member 34 Thumbs Up

That stinks, because we designed in several small "huddle rooms" for 15-minute meetings and private phone calls into the areas that have no view, purposefully. These will technically count as conference rooms.
I also see in the LEED book that it says "regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. include office spaces conference rooms and cafeterias", but the discussion thread here determined that "breakrooms" don't count toward spaces with views. We designed ours in an area that does have views and while it is a loungy type space, does not have prepared food for employees to qualify it as a cafeteria. Can i count the breakroom? i know the employees will be more likely to spend "more than one hour per person per day on average" in that space. Especially since the owner plans to use it for meeting spaces during non-lunch hours.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jun 27 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

Sounds like these huddle rooms are more like quick break out rooms if they are only large enough for a few, less than five people. Anything larger and it would be hard to argue that these spaces are quick break out rooms and have the potential to hold long meetings.

You can count the break rooms in your calculations. Just because it is not considered regularly occupied and does not have to be included in the calculations does not mean that it can;t. You have gone above what is typically done by specifically providing the occupants the opportunity to relax and enjoy the views of nature, which it the intent. Never makes sense as to why the break room is usually a closet sized area hidden somewhere. It should be what it is labeled as, a break from the task of work, which means being able to view something other than a pin up board with labor laws hung up.

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Breeze Glazer Research Knowledge Manager: Healthcare Sustainability Perkins+Will
Jul 23 2012
LEEDuser Member
622 Thumbs Up

Double Skin

Hello - I am working on an interiors project within a new tower, 1 Bligh St, in Australia. The tower features a double skin facade envelope system.

My question is around the requirement that the line of sight to determine credit achievement can pass through a maximum of 2 interior glazing surfaces.

Does the double skin count as 1 exterior glazing surface, or does the interior glass plane constitute an interior glazing surface?

The answer is critical to credit achievement as our project features fully glazed interior conference rooms.

Thank You

Breeze Glazer

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Steve Khouw Principal, DNA GreenDesign Jul 24 2012 Guest 2499 Thumbs Up

Now this is interesting, I came across a similar project in Shanghai. I tend to think the interior glazing to be equivalent to 1 borrowed light already. Each glazing barrier will cause transmission deterioration to the quality of daylight and view.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jul 24 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

The double skin facade is the facade and would not be counted as an interior partition, since its not. It would be the same if you had glass exterior shading devices.

If questioned, provide images showing that they are views to the exterior.

Now if the double skin facade really does obscure the view and not really provide a quality view for the occupant, then this would be going against the intent of the credit.

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Breeze Glazer Research Knowledge Manager: Healthcare Sustainability, Perkins+Will Jul 24 2012 LEEDuser Member 622 Thumbs Up

Thank you both for the speedy and thoughtful responses. Unfortunately I tend to agree with both your opposing opinions, if only a 3rd person weighed in....

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Steve Khouw Principal, DNA GreenDesign Jul 24 2012 Guest 2499 Thumbs Up

Guys, I am not sure now, Todd has a point indeed. Gents, are you aware of the new Shanghai Tower being built? Designed by Gensler in collaboration with local architects, it has a double skin but the space between the exterior and interior glazing, is actually usable space, for public usePublic or public use applies to all buildings, structures, or uses that are not defined as private or private use.. Beezer, is your project of similar application? Todd, in this instance will the interior skin counted as internal glazing therefore deemed to be borrowed light for occupants in inner core? What is the difference between a private cell adjoining a core wall with glazing partition facing the external skin?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jul 24 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

Steve, if the space between the two faces of glass is occupied, then the interior layer would be considered an interior partition of glass and not the double facade. Typically, a double facade is not occupied. So with the Shanghai Tower it would not be considered the facade.

Not sure what you are asking in your second question.

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Susan M Kaplan Director of Specifications and Sustainability HLW
Jul 12 2012
LEEDuser Member
898 Thumbs Up

Partition height at 46"

Herman Miller has given me a diagram showing that 46" high partitions are ok for achieving this credit as long as there is a direct line of sight (not on the horizontal) at 42". Has anyone else seen this diagram? The Reference Guide somewhat contradicts itself with Figure 1 on page 408 saying 'Horizontal ViewThe approach used to confirm that the direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing remains available from a seated position. It uses section drawings that include the installed furniture to make the determination. at 42 inches" but has an arrow at an angle.

Anyone have insight on this issue?

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Steve Khouw Principal, DNA GreenDesign Jul 24 2012 Guest 2499 Thumbs Up

I have no problem getting thru' with systems furnitureSystems furniture includes panel-based workstations comprising modular interconnecting panels, hang-on components, and drawer and filing components or a free-standing grouping of furniture items designed to work in concert. having panels greater than 42" so long as it is lined up perpendicular to the source of daylight. Thus in application, am talking about the centre spine only, not the side panels. Of course we always specify reasonable height just sufficient to screen out visual distraction, never installed high panel.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Jun 22 2012
LEEDuser Moderator

movable furniture not in scope of credit

I was reviewing the LEED addenda and noticed an interesting one for this credit. As of 5/11, "Movable furniture and partitions are not included in the scope of this credit calculation"—in a reversal of the previous methodology.

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Lisa Marshall Sustainability Manager, DNV KEMA Energy & Sustainability Jun 25 2012 Guest 782 Thumbs Up

Hi Tristan, can you show me where it states that movable furniture is not included in the scope. This is directly impacting one of my current projects.

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow, WELL AP Principal, Ecoworks Studio Jun 25 2012 LEEDuser Expert 3667 Thumbs Up

Hi Lisa, Tristan is correct - this revision is found under the ID+C IEQc8.2 Addenda dated 5/11/11 found on the USGBC website: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=2200#ID+C

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 25 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Lisa, it's in the LEED addenda spreadsheet.

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Lisa Marshall Sustainability Manager, DNV KEMA Energy & Sustainability Jun 27 2012 Guest 782 Thumbs Up

I now have futher clarification from GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)., workstations ARE included in this calculation, even though the addenda states that "moveable" furniture is NOT included. The following is from the GBCI reviewer: For IEQc8.2, if the question is whether workstations taller than 42" will prevent a direct line of sight to the outdoors, the answer is that they will and they must be included in the calculations. The 2009 LEED Reference Guide for Green Interior Design & Construction is a little confusing, but please refer to Figure 4 at the bottom of page 411.

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Lisa (Elisabeth) Simmons Interior Designer, AP+I Design Jun 27 2012 Guest 59 Thumbs Up

I was told the exact opposite directly from the USGBC TAGLEED Technical Advisory Group (TAG): Subcommittees that consist of industry experts who assist in developing credit interpretations and technical improvements to the LEED system. - about sytems furniture.

"You are correct in your interpretation. LI 1646 also confirms this applicability for 2009 projects.
I have one additional clarification that may or may not impact this project--
Movable furniture and partitions are not included in the scope of this credit calculation.
Movable furniture and partitionsMovable furniture and partitions are those that can be moved to provide access to the view by the user without the need for tools or assistance from special trades and facilities management. are those that can be moved to provide access to the view by the user without the need for tools or assistance from special trades and facilities management."

Please see below from the IEQ TAG, confirming that clear furniture partitions are not part of the “two panes of interior glazing surfaces” for IEQc8.2 compliance.

Yes, the clarification was addressed through addenda. It is located in the LEED Interpretations and Addenda Database (https://www.usgbc.org/leedinterpretations/lilanding.aspx) or through our addenda page https://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=2200.

This specific addenda is ID# 100000895 for NC if you are using the database (https://www.usgbc.org/leedinterpretations/lilanding.aspx).
In the future, my suggestion is to review the addenda release schedule that is listed on the addenda page https://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=2200, and then to review the addenda tables for all items recently released, or search by credit in the LEED Interpretation and Addenda Database.

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Lisa Marshall Sustainability Manager, DNV KEMA Energy & Sustainability Jun 27 2012 Guest 782 Thumbs Up

I guess the point of the matter is that you do need a tradesman to move systems furnitureSystems furniture includes panel-based workstations comprising modular interconnecting panels, hang-on components, and drawer and filing components or a free-standing grouping of furniture items designed to work in concert.. You need an electrician to move the spine of the furniture. Either way, it it totally confusing in the reference guide and addenda. To me "movable furniture" would include systems furniture, therefore the addeda would exclude systems furniture in the calculation. I was surprised by the verdict on this case.

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Jamie Brown Architect Interactive Resources
May 06 2012
Guest
123 Thumbs Up

Maximum angle of incidence?

This question is a little difficult to describe in writing- is there a maximum angle of incidence from perimeter glazing for a “direct line of sight?” If you are directly in front of the window looking out, it could be considered perpendicular or 90 degrees; as you move laterally away from the window the angle of your view would become more incidental. At what point does it no longer constitute a “direct line of sight?” I can test it out in our 3D model by checking with perspective views, but I’m wondering if there’s an official cutoff.

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company May 08 2012 Guest 9886 Thumbs Up

Jamie,

To document this credit you need to show a straight line in section from a seated person's line of sight out a window. If you can do that you're set.

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Joel Peterson Associate Goshow Architects
Apr 03 2012
LEEDuser Member
304 Thumbs Up

Views and window coverings

Can you still achieve the views credit if you have a commercial interiors space meeting all of the requirements of the credit except that due to security purposes the horizontal blinds need to be kept closed at a 45 degree angle?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Apr 04 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

Technically, you are providing glare control devices, the blinds, and as long as they are provided it meets the requirements. Now if these are installed and cannot be operated by the occupants, then i would say no on this or that you have to provide some images.

In all honesty it does not meet the intent, there will be no views with the blinds at 45 degrees. Again, you cannot control the occupants and what they do. But you can educate them on this. I would say something to owner that by doing this you truly do not meet the intent of the credit, nor are you providing your employees and occupants the benefits of the views to the exterior and all the other aspects that come with a good connection to the environment.

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Apr 04 2012 LEEDuser Expert 6625 Thumbs Up

I agree. This does not meet the credit intent or letter. I am curious about this situation, though. Is this true for all regularly occupied areas on all floors?

Technically, I think glare control is required for the daylighting credit, not the views credit, but glare control is always a good idea.

There are other ways to protect the interior from view from the exterior other than blinds. For example, reflective glazing would prevent people from seeing in but allow views out.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Jan 29 2012
LEEDuser Member
3550 Thumbs Up

dimension calculation methodology

When we calculate "regulary occupied space" for EQc8.2, is it supposed to be inside of wall or "center on center" ?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 29 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Noriko, if I understand your question correctly—the space is the square footage of the room(s) in question.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. Jan 30 2012 LEEDuser Member 3550 Thumbs Up

Tristan, thank you for your prompt response.
My question is which area should be used net or gross for area calculation in EQc8.2.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jan 30 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

It would be the space on the inside of the walls. There has been confusion on this issue because of the information required information i believe PLF 2 which requires the overall floorplate size, which will be a different number then that used in EQc 8.1 and 8.2. The table 8.1 in PLF 3 asks for the regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use. which will only be used for those two credits.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Jan 29 2012
LEEDuser Member
3550 Thumbs Up

Can a smoking room be regarded as regulary occupied space?

The definition of "regulary occupied space" is described as following;
Regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building.
Our project scope includes a smoking room which has a large fenestration and we would like to count this space for EQc8.2 credit. We estimate total 25-35% of FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
(might be less) uses this space for smoking several times a day. Is it difficult to count it as "regulary occupied space"?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 29 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Noriko, I would not count a smoking room as regularly occupied space—I would consider smoking more of a leisure activity, not study, work, or "other focused activities."

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jan 30 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

Initially i would go with Tristan and say that the smoking room would not be considered regularly occuppied. It is similar to a break room, which can be excluded.

However, you are providing windows for the space, and if the design intentA written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. was to provide occupants a space where they could smoke and enjoy views and daylight, then include in your calculations.

I don;t think a reviewer would question your decision either way with this one as long as the inclusion of thsi space determines credit achievement or not.

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Jan 30 2012 LEEDuser Expert 6625 Thumbs Up

It is my understanding that break rooms are explicitly called out as non-regularly occupied and MUST be excluded. This is a break room. Many break rooms are provided with views and daylight and this does not change their classification as regularly occupied or not. I would caution using this as ROS. If you do, I would include a detailed narrative of your argument for it and please, report back here on how it went!

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jan 30 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

As long as you are consistent with the inclusion and exclusion of spaces they should not be any issues. I've never had any issues when including non-regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. in the calculations. I have not read that you MUST not include these spaces. If you are consistent and providing views and daylight to more spaces then required, you are going above the intent and requirements in my opinion. I don;t a reviewer would question this, as long as you are consistent.

I've always wondered why break rooms have been allowed to be excluded from the calculations. Here is a space that is provided to workers to rest or eat lunch so why wouldn't you provide them daylight and views. This would especially be significant in buildings where workers live in cubicle land and may not have any relevant eye relief from their computer screens except when on break.

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Feb 02 2012 LEEDuser Expert 6625 Thumbs Up

I agree. I think it's strange that break rooms are not considered in the daylight calculations, but it does say that regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. are where people are working. And, I guess if you are working in an office that has daylight and views, you don't necessarily need daylight and views in your break room. Still, it seems counter intuitive.

I see what you are saying about including non-regularly occupied spaces. It is a good argument. Glad to hear that you have not had issues with it.

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Truex Cullins Architect Truexcullins
Oct 05 2011
Guest
88 Thumbs Up

Frosted Glazing?

We are attempting IEQ 8.2 for LEED CI. Would a 49" tall frosted glass panel partition comply with the intent of this credit? i.e.: Can the interior glazing surfaces be transLUCENT or must they be 100% transPARENT?

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Lida Lewis Director of Sustainability, OTJ Architects Oct 20 2011 Guest 508 Thumbs Up

The intent is to provide a clear line of sight, and translucent glass would obstruct the view.

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Steve Khouw Principal, DNA GreenDesign Dec 03 2011 Guest 2499 Thumbs Up

However, if you programmed the panels of the workstations to be positioned perpendicular to the window, there be still clear Line Of Sight for all, right?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Dec 06 2011 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

Steve,
Only if the partition panel that ran parallel to the window wall was clear glass from 42" up or the panel was shorter then 42".

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Steve Khouw Principal, DNA GreenDesign Dec 06 2011 Guest 2499 Thumbs Up

Todd, you are right, actually we are both right. I was referring to the systems furnitureSystems furniture includes panel-based workstations comprising modular interconnecting panels, hang-on components, and drawer and filing components or a free-standing grouping of furniture items designed to work in concert. panel being perpendicular to the window wall, not parallel. If perpendicular, all occupants should have access to daylight view. If parallel, any panels above the 42" plumb must be in clear glazing.

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Lisa (Elisabeth) Simmons Interior Designer, AP+I Design Jun 04 2012 Guest 59 Thumbs Up

Can anyone clarify if clear glass panels on furniture can be used for the line of site - when there are more than 2. Figure 2 under item 6 - calculations in the 2009 NC and ID+C book states that the line of site can pass through 2 interior glazing surfaces. I would interpret this as NO for the systems furnitureSystems furniture includes panel-based workstations comprising modular interconnecting panels, hang-on components, and drawer and filing components or a free-standing grouping of furniture items designed to work in concert. panels when there are more than 2.

Also, may I have film on a conference room below 36" and above 48" leaving a clear transparent area and still recieve the credit as long as I have a direct line of site?

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Joel Register Webmaster, Perkins+Will Jun 04 2012 Guest 324 Thumbs Up

One more clarification question here for systems furnitureSystems furniture includes panel-based workstations comprising modular interconnecting panels, hang-on components, and drawer and filing components or a free-standing grouping of furniture items designed to work in concert.: do both parallel and perpendicular panel heights have to be clear and below 42"? I have low panel heights that run parallel to the windows, but a taller panel "spine" with overheads that is perpendicular to the window wall (higher than 42").

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jun 05 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15253 Thumbs Up

Elisabeth, the answer would be no. The reason as stated in the reference guide is basically the quality of view i s greatly diminished by having to look through multiple panes of glass. Reflections become the biggest issue. Also, the placement with the film below 36 and above 48 would be acceptable based on the 42" line. I would say that actual quality of view is poor but technical would meet the credit requirements.

Joel, the answer is no. They do not have to be clear below the 42" line, as long as its and office with adults. If this where say a middle or elementary school, the occupants height would require them to be clear.

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Rubén M. R. Codirector CIVITA
Sep 14 2011
LEEDuser Member
1068 Thumbs Up

View outside vision glazing, LEED CI 2.0 project.

Hi all,

Since I couldn't find a LEED CI 2.0 forum, I allow myself to write here (my apologies):

The vision of a multi-occupant office goes directly to a terrace which has a high wall located 10 feet outside the vision glazing. Would this be an inconvenient if the project is following the credit EQ8.3 Daylights and Views-Views for Seated Spaces in LEED for Commercial Interiors 2.0?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 20 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Ruben, I would say that although the view you describe isn't a "quality view" in the words of a proposed LEED 2012 credit, it is a view to the outdoor environment, and should qualify.

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Gail von Staden Principal von Staden Architects
Apr 08 2011
Guest
253 Thumbs Up

IEQc8.2_Views for Exemplary Performance - Documentation

Dear Leeduser Forum :-)

I'm working on a commercial interiors project that I hope can acheive the EP points. But, I'm still not sure about some of the criteria descriptions and how to document them. The project is located in a downtown urban area - for the 2nd set of criteria, what exactly would "human activity" and "objects at least 70% from exterior glazing" include?

For all 4 sets of crtieria, what kind of documentation is required, other than the "Table" provided on the Online Form? Also, would I need to provide separate sets of floor plans that are specifically designated for each set of criteria (which would be similar to the basic uploads for achieving the minimum credit)? Also again, for the "view factor" criteria , I was thinking of providing a rubric photo-sample from our project space that follow the Heschong-Mahone Group Study to support this EP credit - would this be okay...?

I had not seen any conversations that could help me, let me know if I may have overlooked any important threads. Any input is greatly appreciated! Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 22 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Gail, I have not heard of a lot of projects documenting EP for this credit, and with those who have done so, it seems to bring up just the sort of challenges you are facing. I have looked around before and not found expert resources who were on top of these questions.

Please post back here to share your knowledge as you go!

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Lauren Fakhoury Research Assistant, Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC Aug 12 2011 Guest 2066 Thumbs Up

Hi Gail,

I am in the process of documenting this credit for the first time as well. Have you looked at the LEED Online form yet? It says you can either submit separate floor plans for each measure or submit them all in one drawing. I'm doing them separately to make it easier. For the first measure I drew multiple view lines to show which areas have them and hatched the areas that did not have multiple view lines. For the second measure I plan on doing the same, keeping the initial view lines and then just hatching the areas that don't have views to human activity, vegetation, etc. I'm hoping this will be enough to show compliance!

For the actual definition of human activity, I think it just means you have a view of people walking/doing things outside?? I'm not quite sure and the reference guide doesn't have a clear definition. Also it says "70 feet from exterior glazing" not "70% of exterior glazing" which probably means you need to be able to see objects 70 feet from the windows.

I took a look at the view factor measure but don't really understand it and feel it would be the most difficult to document. Sorry I can't help with that part! After the design review hopefully I can give you some more feedback.

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Sue Barnett Principal Sue Barnett Sustainable Design
Dec 22 2010
Guest
1225 Thumbs Up

Courtyard

Our project is repurposing a portion of an academic building interior Everything inside a structure's weatherproofing membrane.(1100 sq ft) as well as the same sq ft of an exterior courtyard, we anticipate the courtyard to be used most days as it will have wi-fi, seating, tables as well as educational component for use by classes. Our spaces function as one. Can this square footage be considered for both Daylight and Views credits in CI?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 28 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

You're asking whether the exterior SF can be considered for this credit?

Conventionally speaking I would say not, because it wouldn't normally be counted as occupied space according to LEED. If you wanted to cout it, I think that would hinge on whether it's considered "regularly occupied."

What is the view from the courtyard? It would have to be a view outside to count.

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Sue Barnett Principal, Sue Barnett Sustainable Design Dec 30 2010 Guest 1225 Thumbs Up

It is common on this campus that exterior spaces are used on all but the most inclement days. It serves as outdoor classroom, student study and lounge as well as reception area. So I'm thinking it WOULD be considered regularly occupied area. What do you think?

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