CI-2009 IEQp1: Minimum IAQ Performance

  • CI IEQp1 Credit Reqs diagram
  • Baseline for outdoor air ventilation

    This prerequisite establishes a baseline for providing a minimum amount of outdoor air to buildings in order to maintain good indoor air quality and keep occupants comfortable and healthy. The prerequisite references ASHRAE 62.1-2007 (with errata but without addenda) and is often more stringent than local building codes, although it is not likely to entail any added costs.

    Two cases, and you might need them both

    The compliance paths for mechanically ventilated and naturally ventilated spaces, Case 1 and Case 2, are somewhat different and you may need to follow both paths for the same project on a space-by-space basis. Spaces served only by natural ventilation must follow the distinct requirements set out in Case 2, even if other spaces in the same building are mechanically ventilated and are following Case 1. Mixed-mode spaces which alternate between natural or mechanical ventilation must follow the compliance path for mechanical ventilation, Case 1.

    Any ventilation systems serving the project are covered

    Commercial interior projects will need to confirm that any ventilation systems serving the project meet the ventilation rates required by ASHRAE 62.1-2007, even if the ventilation system design itself is outside the scope of the project. If base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). systems cannot be modified to meet the standard’s requirements, you will need to provide detailed analysis documenting the constraints and explaining why the base building systems cannot be upgraded. Systems must be able to provide at least 10 cfm per person to meet this prerequisite.

  • FAQs for IEQp1

    A building has fan-assisted ventilation and no mechanical cooling system. Does this qualify as natural ventilation?

    If the building relies on the fans for daily ventilation, it is considered a mechanically ventilated building.

    Is outdoor air quality testing required in a space using natural ventilation?

    Testing in naturally ventilated spaces is not required per 62.1-2007 Sections 4-7 if the outdoor air quality adequately meets 62.1-2007, Table 4-1.

    For a space designed to be naturally ventilated, can operable windows or vents be used to satisfy the 62.1-2007 requirements?

    Both operable windows and vents can be used, but only the operable area within those elements can be counted towards the minimum percentage (4%) of net occupiable area.

    What options are available to projects outside the US to meet this prerequisite?

    Local codes may be used to meet the prerequisite if the project team can show equivalency with Sections 7 through 7 of ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007. Projects outside the US can now also choose to comply with the minimum requirements of Annex B of CEN Standard EN 15251:2007 Ventilation for Nonresidential buildings.

    Can LEED 2009 projects elect to follow ASHRAE 62.1-2010 for this prerequisite?

    Teams may choose to substitute ASHRAE 62.1-2010, Sections 6.4.1-6.4.2, for ASHRAE 62.1-2007, Section 5.1.1, to document compliance with IEQp1 for naturally ventilated buildings. ASHRAE 62.1-2010 adds geometric requirements that extend the allowed naturally ventilated floor area based on ceiling height and opening configuration.

    Which units should be included in the calculations for this prerequisite?

    For CI projects, calculations must be done at the system level for any AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. providing outside air to the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space..

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Determine likely ventilation strategies during preliminary programming: natural, mechanical, or mixed-mode ventilation. This prerequisite is attainable with any of these strategies.


  • This prerequisite is paired with IEQc2: Increased Ventilation. If ventilation rates are targeted above the 30% ASHRAE requirement, projects can gain both the prerequisite and a point for EQc2. Projects pursuing IEQc2 may follow the compliance path for natural ventilation found in Chapter 2 of The CIBSE Applications Manual 10 (AM10) for both the prerequisite and for the credit.


  • Many of the strategies that contribute to meeting this prerequisite also support earning other indoor environmental quality credits and should be explored as integrated solutions. See LEEDuser's guidance on the rest of the IEQ section for ideas.


  • Natural ventilation strategies can reduce costs. Natural ventilation in particular can reduce the need for mechanical equipment as well as operational costs. Displacement ventilation, in which air is delivered at or near floor level at a low velocity, can also reduce ducting and improve equipment efficiency. In choosing a system, analyze life cycle cost tradeoffs.


  • Check local building codes to determine requirements. The project must either meet ASHRAE 62.1-2007, or local codes if they are more stringent. Since ASHRAE 62.1-2007 is often more stringent than local codes, be sure to review and be familiar with its requirements.


  • This prerequisite is not likely to require added costs.


  • Case 1: Mechanically Ventilated Spaces


  • Review the Ventilation Rate Procedure methodology in ASHRAE 62.1-2007 Section 6.2 and the associated Table 6-1.


  • ASHRAE 62.1 recognizes two procedures to prove IAQ compliance: the IAQ Procedure methodology and the Ventilation Rate Procedure. The Ventilation Rate Procedure is easier to apply and is the prescribed path for this LEED prerequisite. Documentation using the IAQ Procedure requires the quantification of contaminant source emissions rates and their reduction, and has historically not been accepted for this prerequisite because it is performance-based and difficult to compare across projects.


  • If you are pursuing IEQc5: Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control, you must incorporate MERV 13 filters into your filtration system. These relatively tight filters may affect the fan power and fan sizes necessary to provide the required quantities of air. Involve the engineer early if pursuing IEQc5. 


  • Demand-controlled ventilation can greatly reduce energy use while providing large amounts of fresh air to occupants.


  • Case 2: Naturally Ventilated Spaces


  • Determine whether natural ventilation is feasible based on the project type, use, and climate.  Study the natural conditions of the site, such as prevailing wind direction, and orient the building to maximize airflow.


  • Review the prescriptive requirements for natural ventilation in ASHRAE 62.1-2007 Paragraph 5.1 (with errata but without addenda).


  • An integrated design meeting will help determine whether natural ventilation is a high priority and should be a primary driver of the design process.


  • Airflow modeling early in the design process can help teams by evaluating which space planning and envelope design strategies will create effective natural ventilation. An airflow modeling professional may add some upfront costs, while likely improving system efficiency.

 Airflow modeling can also help to determine compliance for an engineered natural ventilation system outside the prescriptive measures of ASHRAE 62.1-2007.


  • Consider the cost implications of natural ventilation. Passive strategies may reduce or eliminate the need for fans and HVAC equipment, but they may also require high quantities of operable windows and a floor plan that is conducive to passive ventilation.  Natural ventilation often requires the cooperation of occupants, to open and close windows when appropriate, for example, be sure that your project is likely to succeed in this respect.

Schematic Design

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  • Determine the required ventilation rates for indoor spaces based on occupancy and space types.  ASHRAE 62.1-2007 tables 6-1 and 6-4 list minimum requirements for particular spaces.


  • Separately evaluate each space to determine air requirements and what type of ventilation will be best.  Metabolic rate of the space activities and the occupant density are factors that determine the amount of fresh air needed in a space.  For example, exercise rooms and conference rooms require more fresh air than offices.


  • An integrated design approach among the mechanical engineer, architects, owners and occupants will facilitate design decisions that impact the HVAC design. For example, space planning decisions will impact the architectural programming of the space as well as access to natural ventilation.


  • Increasing a project’s ventilation rate brings long-term cost benefits. Good indoor air quality can lower operational costs by increasing occupants’ health and productivity as well as the value and marketability of the building.


  • The mechanical engineer begins preliminary ventilation rate calculations during project programming in order to set ventilation quality goals for particular spaces and occupancies. The area of a given multi‐zone system should be broken down by ventilation zones, and all zones within that system must meet the minimum breathing zone ventilation air requirements as per ASHRAE 62.1‐2004. For a typical office space, the mechanical design consists of multiple ventilation zones for which compliance would need to be shown on an individual basis.


  • For mixed-mode and naturally ventilated spaces, the mechanical engineer should calculate the outdoor airflow rate and communicate the area requirements for operable wall or roof openings to the architect.


  • Case 1 Mechanically Ventilated Spaces


  • For mixed-mode ventilation, zone the plan into areas—mechanically ventilated and naturally ventilated—and follow separate compliance calculations for each area.


  • Case 2 Naturally Ventilated Spaces


  • Determine the applicable floor area for operable wall or roof openings according to ASHRAE 62.1-2007 section 5.1.


  • Consider using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling to determine proper opening sizes and ensure proper airflow. Some energy modeling programs also have CFD analysis capabilities.


  • Expect upfront modeling fees for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), but also consider the benefits of CFD modeling: a better-designed natural ventilation system that can bring short-term payback from reduced mechanical systems, and long-term operational savings.


  • At the first integrated design meeting during schematic design, develop a detailed natural ventilation strategy involving goals for windows, building orientation, space planning, use of atriums, and other access to natural ventilation. Natural ventilation systems may require a more robust and intense integrated design process, of several focused workshops analyzing several alternatives. Computer modeling may be necessary to test various design alternatives to determine which is most effective and efficient.


  • Hotel and multifamily projects may have difficulty achieving this prerequisite if they are naturally ventilated and have interior spaces that are further than 25 feet from an operable wall or roof opening. These projects might consider increased window areas, shallower floor plates, or using mixed-mode ventilation so that mechanically supplied outdoor air can support areas outside the 25-foot natural ventilation boundary.

Design Development

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  • The mechanical engineer continues to run ventilation rate calculations during the mechanical design process to inform design development and confirm compliance with this prerequisite. The ventilation rate procedure is explained in section 6 of ASHRAE 62.1-2007. See the attached 62MZ calculator.


  • Continuing to use an integrated design approach among the mechanical engineer, architects, owners and end users will facilitate design decisions that impact the mechanical design. For example, space planning decisions will impact the architectural programming of the space as well as access to natural ventilation.


  • Strategically locate air intakes for mechanical or natural ventilation systems to avoid taking in contaminants and odors like vehicle exhaust from parking lots or fumes from garbage storage areas.


  • Incorporating operable windows into the design for natural and mixed-mode ventilation can help with an additional LEED point for EAc6.1: Controllability of Systems—Thermal Comfort.


  • Case 1: Mechanically Ventilated Spaces


  • Continue running ventilation rate calculations during the mechanical design process to confirm compliance with this credit and to inform the design. The ventilation rate procedure is explained in section 6 of ASHRAE 62.1-2007. See the 62MZ calculator.


  • Implement energy recovery systems, economizers, low-pressure-drop design, and efficient fans as appropriate to support ventilation rates meeting or exceeding the referenced ASHRAE standard without compromising energy performance.


  • Avoid oversizing mechanical equipment. Oversized equipment will often increase operating costs and reduce operational efficiency. The correct equipment size will depend on a number of factors, including local climate, total building area, insulation levels, air filtration medium, number of windows and doors, and occupant comfort preferences.


  • Spaces served by the same VAV (variable air volume) controller can be grouped together in the 62MZ calculator, but grouped spaces should have similar exterior exposure. For example, you can group two perimeter spaces that share a VAV controller, but would want to separate a non-perimeter space even if it shares the same VAV controller.


  • Laboratory facilities generally require very high ventilation rates. Consider installing separate mechanical systems for lab spaces to maximize return-air mixing. Other strategies may include using a heat exchanger to capture energy from laboratory exhaust, using low-flow or variable-flow fume hoods, minimizing ventilation rates during unoccupied times, or using a dedicated outdoor air system.


  • Integrating building automation systems can control mechanical systems efficiently and maintain desired ventilation rates while minimizing unscheduled maintenance.


  • The Ventilation Rate Procedure calculation includes occupancy counts based on space types.


  • Case 2: Naturally Ventilated Spaces


  • Continue to run calculations and develop flow diagrams to inform the design process and confirm compliance. If you are using a natural ventilation modeler for the project, use the model as a tool to inform design development.


  • The calculation for operable openings will only apply to the floor area adjacent to the window—25 feet to either side and in front of the opening.


  • The surface area of window openings must, for compliance with ASHRAE 62.1, be equal to or greater than 4% of the occupied floor area that the design considers naturally ventilated. Multiple windows in aggregate can provide the operable area needed to meet the requirements.


  • In naturally ventilated multifamily buildings, air infiltration from a pressurized hallway or corridor can contribute to the Ventilation Rate Procedure calculation for areas that do not meet the requirements of ASHRAE 62.1, as long as the corridor is pressurized with outdoor air.

Construction Documents

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  • For mechanically ventilated spaces, run ventilation calculations to verify that the final design meets the minimum outside air rates equal to or exceeding the ASHRAE 62.1-2007 minimum.


  • For naturally ventilated spaces, confirm compliance with the requirements of ASHRAE 62.1-2007 section 5.1.


  • If natural ventilation strategies are integrated into the design, ensure that key elements of the natural ventilation system, such as operable windows, window actuators, controls, operable atrium elements, and solar chimneys, are not compromised during value engineering. Educate decision-makers about the natural ventilation design and the importance of maintaining all the key components. If these elements are altered in a way that compromises natural ventilation rates, the mechanical system may no longer be sized appropriately.


  • Fill out the LEED credit form and upload all supporting documents to LEED Online.


  • Use this checklist for naturally ventilated spaces prior to construction to review plans for prerequisite compliance:

    • Are all floor areas within 25 feet of an operable window?
    • Do all floor areas within 25 feet of an operable window appear have 4 ft2 of opening per 100 ft2 of floor area?
    • Is fresh outdoor air mechanically supplied and exhausted for all regularly occupied spaces beyond 25 feet of an operable window?
    • Do any corridors or entryways fall outside of these naturally or mechanically ventilated areas? If so, develop the design further to supply sufficient ventilation.

  • Use this checklist for mechanical systems prior to construction to check prerequisite compliance:

    • Using the mechanical equipment schedule, confirm that outside air is being supplied to mechanically ventilated spaces.
    • Do you have calculations showing the outside air required by ASHRAE 62.1-2007 for mechanically ventilated spaces separate from naturally ventilated spaces?
    • Do outside air rates meet or exceed the calculated ASHRAE minimums?
    • Are all regularly occupied spaces listed in the ASHRAE calculations?
    • What is the desired MERV filtration? If using a high level of ventilation to meet EQc5, has the mechanical system been sized accordingly?

Construction

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  • Coordinate the installation of ventilation systems with the project’s commissioning process.


  • Use commissioning to confirm that installed systems are providing the outside air rates specified in the design. 

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Monitor outdoor air delivery periodically to confirm that minimum ventilation rates are being maintained. Implement a maintenance program to ensure that mechanical system components are functioning properly.


  • Test all dedicated building exhaust systems including chemical areas, bathroom, shower, kitchen, and parking exhaust systems to confirm proper fan speed, voltage, control sequences, and set points as applicable. Provide operations and maintenance personnel with manuals and educate them about any atypical maintenance requirements.


  • Getting feedback on ventilation performance from occupants through surveys can help to identify potential problems that may become expensive if they go unnoticed.


  • A documented ventilation performance plan can help ensure that systems reach the expected ventilation thresholds.


  • In projects with operable windows, occupants may not know when conditions are best for opening the windows. Implement a system so that occupants are informed of when to open and close the windows to achieve designed performance and optimal comfort.


  • Maintain a building operating plan (BOP) that establishes operating schedules and set points and regularly review these parameters against actual building needs. When developing these parameters, consider both time-of-day and time-of-year variations in optimal temperature requirements and be careful to avoid over-conditioning the building spaces with more ventilation, heating or cooling than is necessary.


  • Adjust reset and setback temperature settings and calibrate controls and sensors. A Building Automation System (BAS) will allow building managers to adjust, monitor and control temperature set points and air volumes throughout the building from a central location. Direct digital controls (DDC) utilized by the BAS will function more efficiently than older pneumatic controls and help to avoid unnecessary use of HVAC equipment during non-business hours and holidays.


  • Develop and implement a comprehensive Indoor Air Quality Management Plan using the EPA’s “Indoor Air Quality Building Education and Assessment Model” (I-BEAM).

    • Assign an IAQ manager. This individual should be responsible for developing and managing the IAQ plan including managing contracts for IAQ related services and communication with building occupants about IAQ related issues.
    • Conduct an IAQ audit of the building and grounds to determine IAQ status. Use forms provided by I-BEAM to record the basic conditions of the building’s occupied spaces, mechanical systems, and building exterior.

  • Following the initial audit, the IAQ manager must make periodic inspections to uncover new IAQ issues and monitor the status of previous issues. The I-BEAM tool supplies inspection forms that can be tailored to the project building to facilitate this process.


  • Establish protocols to manage all significant pollutant sources referenced in I-BEAM that are applicable to the project building.


  • Ensure that procedures are in place for receiving and responding to IAQ complaints from building occupants. The I-BEAM tool provides sample forms and logs for fielding and recording occupant complaints as well as information about key principles for developing effective communication with building occupants regarding IAQ issues. Strategies for investigating and resolving the issues that trigger occupant complaints are covered by a variety of I-BEAM guidelines.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    IEQ Prerequisite 1: Minimum indoor air quality performance

    Required

    Intent

    To establish minimum indoor air quality (IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors.) performance to enhance indoor air quality in buildings, thus contributing to the comfort and well-being of the occupants.

    Requirements

    Case 1. Mechanically ventilated spaces
    Option 1. ASHRAE standard 62.1-2007 or non-U.S. equivalent

    Mechanical ventilation systems must perform according to the ventilation rate procedure.

    Modify or maintain existing building outside-air ventilation distribution system to supply at least the outdoor air ventilation rate required by ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 (with errata but without addenda1). Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 for breathing zoneThe breathing zone is the region within an occupied space between 3 and 6 feet above the floor and more than 2 feet from walls or fixed air-conditioning equipment. (AHSRAE 62.1–2007) minimum ventilation rates.

    OR

    Option 2. CEN standard EN 15251: 2007

    Projects outside the U.S. may modify or maintain each outside air intake, supply air fan and/or ventilation distribution system to supply at least the outdoor air ventilation rate required by Annex B of Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN) Standard EN 15251: 2007, Indoor environmental input parameters for design and assessment of energy performance of buildings addressing indoor air quality, thermal environment, lighting and acoustics.

    If the project team cannot meet the outside air requirements of the above standards, document the space and system constraints that make it not possible, complete an engineering assessment of the system’s maximum cubic feet per minute (cfm) capability toward meeting the requirements of the above standards, and achieve those levels, with a minimum of 10 cfm (0.28 cubic meters per minute) per person. All other requirements must be met.

    OR

    Case 2. Naturally ventilated spaces

    Naturally ventilated buildings must comply with ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, Paragraph 5.1 (with errata but without addenda1). [Europe ACP: Arbeitsstaettenrichtlinie ASR 5] [Latin America ACP: Engineered Natural Ventilation Systems]

    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    Europe ACP: Arbeitsstaettenrichtlinie ASR 5

    Projects in Europe may use Arbeitsstaettenrichtlinie ASR 5 as a local equivalent to ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, paragraph 5.1.

    Latin America ACP: Engineered Natural Ventilation Systems

    Projects in Latin America may follow the Verification Protocol for Engineered Natural Ventilation Systems in Equitorial Climates and receive a design review and approval from the Colombian Professional Association of Air-conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration (ACAIRE).

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Design ventilation systems to meet or exceed the minimum outdoor air ventilation rates as described in the ASHRAE standard. Balance the impacts of ventilation rates on energy use and indoor air quality to optimize for energy efficiency and occupant comfort. Use the ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 Users Manual (with errata but without addenda1) for detailed guidance on meeting the referenced requirements.

    FOOTNOTES

    1 Project teams wishing to use ASHRAE approved addenda for the purposes of this prerequisite may do so at their discretion. Addenda must be applied consistently across all LEED credits.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


ASHRAE 62.1-2007: Outdoor Airflow Monitoring Devices.

ASHRAE 62.1-2007 should be referenced when designing outdoor airflow monitoring devices.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

Organizations

CIBSE Applications Manual 10-2005

Located in London, this organization publishes a series of guides on ventilation, including natural ventilation.


American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)

ASHRAE publishes widely used standards and publishes the ASHRAE Journal.


Labs for the 21st Century (Labs 21)

Labs21 is a voluntary partnership program dedicated to improving the environmental performance of U.S. laboratories.


Indoor Air Quality Association

IAQA is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting the exchange of indoor environmental information through education and research.


Mechanical Service Contractors of America

MSCA is a national trade association that provides educational resources and training programs on sustainable service and maintenance practices for HVACR contractors.

Publications

Greening the Building and the Bottom Line

This Rocky Mountain Institute publication is a case study of the connection between worker productivity and indoor air quality.

Web Tools

Energy Cost and IAQ Performance

This website contains reports from an extensive EPA modeling study that assessed the compatibilities and trade-offs between energy, indoor air quality, and thermal comfort objectives for HVAC systems and formulated strategies to achieve superior performance.

Ventilation Rate Table

This example ventilation rate table from 23 High Line provides guidance when developing prerequisite compliance documents for your project.

Air Riser Diagram

This example air riser diagram from 23 High Line shows the mechanical ventilation supply for the building. It is the ducted diagram showing how air will be supplied to building occupants. Use this as an example for how to document ventilation effectiveness compliance.

Mechanical Systems Schedule

Use this example mechanical schedule created from 23 High Line for guidance when developing ventilation effectiveness compliance documents for your project.

LEED-CI Silver Office – IEQp1

Complete documentation for achievement of IEQp1 on a LEED-CI 2009 project.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

LEED Online Forms: CI-2009 IEQ

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

172 Comments

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Izabela Kwiecinska Gleeds Polska
Apr 28 2017
LEEDuser Member
13 Thumbs Up

IAQ calculator v03

The new calculator (v2009v4_Minimum IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Performance Calculator_v03) from the Resources tab, does not count the ‘Zone Outdoor Airflow’ (column N) and it shows 0,00 no matter what system and values we put into calculator. Is this me or the calculator to make mistake? Or maby we can use the v02 calculator version?

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Andrew Mitchell, P.E. Principal, Mitchell Gulledge Engineering, Inc. Apr 28 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4208 Thumbs Up

I have used that version multiple times and never had a problem. Are all of the columns to the left filled out? Can you post a link to a screenshot or the file?

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Izabela Kwiecinska Gleeds Polska Apr 28 2017 LEEDuser Member 13 Thumbs Up

Andrew, it's not the first time I'm working with the IEQp1. All columns ale filled. I have downloaded it from the usgbc' site. Screenshot here https://www.dropbox.com/s/gs9mhr9o6upjuuq/2017-04-28%2015_50_36-v2009v4_...
Hope it works.

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Andrew Mitchell, P.E. Principal, Mitchell Gulledge Engineering, Inc. Apr 28 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4208 Thumbs Up

The solution is simpler than I thought. In Europe, you use commas where we use periods and vice-versa. Replace your numeric commas with periods and your periods with commas and you will be fine.

Alternatively, for the excel calculator, only input whole numbers without commas or periods and it will work.

Hope that helped.

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Izabela Kwiecinska Gleeds Polska May 08 2017 LEEDuser Member 13 Thumbs Up

Yes, you are right. It works now! Thank you.

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Ronald Dean Sumac Inc.
Feb 07 2017
LEEDuser Member
1941 Thumbs Up

Minimum IAQ Performance Calculator - Multiple Zone and 100% OA

Project Location: Peru

I have difficulty filling out the Minimum IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Performance Calculator table for multiple zones. I am not sure which values use for the discharge of the airflow zone, the primary airflow zone and the secondary recirculation zone of the fraction for a single coil fan system.
How to calculate the efficiency of zone ventilation (Evz) and how it affects the amount of fresh air that is needed.

Please help me on that questions!

Thanks!

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Andrew Mitchell, P.E. Principal, Mitchell Gulledge Engineering, Inc. Apr 28 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4208 Thumbs Up

The zone discharge airflow is the design supply airflow. The zone primary airflow is the amount that comes from the AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. or central system. The secondary re-circulation has to do with local re-circulation within the space.

The Evz will be calculated by the spreadsheet. You should definitely study the ASHRAE 62-1 Standard.

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Edgar Arevalo
Jan 13 2017
Guest
62 Thumbs Up

Need help, using new v2009v4_Minimum IAQ Calculator_v03

Project Location: United States

After adding all the values for four floors I'm working on, I then input the design OA intake flow for each floor's AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork..

In the summary tab, 3 out of 4 of the Zone systems meet the required OA intake flow. But then on the bottom of the summary chart, there is a total of the required OA intake flow and a total of the design OA intake flow from each floor. From there it shows the total sum of design OA flow meets the total sum of required OA flow. Can LEED accept the total sum of design OA flow meets the total sum of required OA flow, or would LEED only accept OA requirements from individual floor?

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Andrew Mitchell, P.E. Principal, Mitchell Gulledge Engineering, Inc. Jan 24 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4208 Thumbs Up

You have to meet each individual floor requirement. For example, if you give the first floor double the OA flow, but give the fourth floor none, the IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. on the fourth floor is not helped by the first floor OA flow.

Post a Reply
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James Keohane, PE LEED BD+C CxA CPMP Sustainability and Commissioning Consultant Sustainable Engineering Concepts, LLC
Dec 21 2016
LEEDuser Member
1078 Thumbs Up

IAQ Procedure is NOT acceptable?

Project Location: United States

I recently received a Design Review comment advising that the IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. procedure included in Chapter 6 of the ASHRAE 62.1-2007 is not an acceptable tool to demonstrate compliance. The reference to Sections 4 though 7 was removed via revision.........so I get the mechanics of how USGBC triggered this change. But I don't get the reasoning behind why the change was made.
A couple of comments: First of all the LEEDUser graphic for IEQpr2 which states "meet minimum requirements of .....section 4-7" is incorrect! Secondly, can anyone provide an explanation as to why USGBC would prohibit the use of the IAQ Procedure to demonstrate compliance for IEQpr1? Is the USGBC asserting expertise surpassing a national standard ASHRAE 62.1? In the hands of a capable and experienced design professional the IAQ Procedure provides the opportunity to reduce OA required when compared to Ventilation Rate Procedure. Less OA has a added benefit of reduced energy required for managing and treating OA. Seems as if USGBC is unreasonable limiting the options available to Design Professionals with this change.

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Andrew Mitchell, P.E. Principal, Mitchell Gulledge Engineering, Inc. Jan 24 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4208 Thumbs Up

James, I understand your frustration. I have never used this method for LEED compliance, but I can imagine that they are not comfortable with assessing the application of this on your project. Also, the IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. method requires evaluation and is supposed to be enforced by the permitting agency. USGBC does not have the ability to do those, so it may be out of their comfort zone. I do not think that these are appropriate reasons, but they are my best guess as to your situation.

It is unfortunate because this is a prerequisite and I am sure that by now, it is too late (and unnecessary) to change the design.

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Michael Wahjudi ESD Consultant Kaer Pte Ltd
Aug 23 2016
Guest
252 Thumbs Up

Open Plan office served by 4 AHUs

Project Location: Singapore

Hi all, we received comments from reviewer that requesting the system computation should be separated for each system. Our development consists of few meeting rooms and open plan offices. The previous spreadsheet was combined since all the 4 AHUs is supplying fresh air to the same space volume. Anybody can help to explain?

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Jan 23 2017 LEEDuser Expert 9693 Thumbs Up

I would just give them what they want. Redo the spreadsheet w/ the 4 AHUs separate, estimate the space that each serve and cut some spaces if you have to. I don't necessarily agree with the response from GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)., but easiest to just go with it. You could also send them a question through your LEED Admin if need additional clarity.

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Jordan Kirrane Principal Consultant Hurley Palmer Flatt
Jul 27 2016
LEEDuser Member
233 Thumbs Up

IEQp1&c2 Documentation

Project Location: United Kingdom

Hello,
For my project building the mechanical engineer has provided me with his VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas. sizing calculation spreadsheets for all zones and all floors. I have taken this and edited to also perform the ASHRAE 62.1 VRP calculations. The floor plate of the building is quite large, with some floors being served via 4No. AHUs. The air is supplied via a common ring of ductwork on each floor, and as such cannot be separated per AHU, but per floor instead.

However the number of zones across the building is very large. Is it possible to use this calculation sheet for each floor to show that the design complies with EAp1&c2, or must I input the same data again either into the 62MZCalc or the online form (Appendix table)?

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Ciaran McCabe METEC Consulting Engineers
Jul 27 2016
LEEDuser Member
729 Thumbs Up

VRP Calculator

We have a central Air Handling Unit supplying 100% outside fresh air to all the rooms in a building, e.g offices, meeting rooms, conference rooms, etc This air will be tempered to say 18 degrees Celsius - provides min fresh air requirements.

This fresh air is supplied to the back of Fan Coil Units in each space, some spaces may have more than one Fan coil unit. The fan coil unit will supply the additional heating / cooling required. Its a constant volume system. Based on this my question is should this be considered as (1) Single Zone Unit, (2) 100% Outside Air or (3) Multiple Zone Unit in terms of the credit form.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Aug 02 2016 Guest 4635 Thumbs Up

This appears to be a 100% outdoor air system, we work with these a lot.

If the system distributes 100% outdoor air to the fan-coils which then deliver the air to the room, it is 100% OA. If the system delivers the outdoor air directly to the room and it circulates through the fan-coils, it is 100% OA.

If the system delivers 100% OA to the fan-coils which deliver it to the room together with air recirculated from the room (ie. the unit supply is greater than the OA supply) then you must use the single zone unit.

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Lorenna Lobo
Jul 15 2016
LEEDuser Member
72 Thumbs Up

Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance Calculator

Hello, I'm trying to use the Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance Calculator. I put the single zone option, but the Voz space is always 0, as well as the Vot space. Is there any problem with the calculator, or I am doing something wrong?

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Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores
May 02 2016
LEEDuser Member
1623 Thumbs Up

Transfer Air for IEQp1 achievement

Project Location: Portugal

Hello,

I'm currently working on a project of a huge supermarket. The building has warehouses and storage rooms.

1_Do these spaces need to be ventilated as per table 6.1 of ASHRAE 62.1 - 2007 ?

2_Do they only need to be ventilated if they are considered to be occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. as per v2009_IEQ_Space Matrix (IEQp1_IEQc2 columns) ?

3_May I use exhaust ventilators to ensure new air to these spaces? If so, can I use transfer air FROM OTHER SPACES (with air class 1) to ensure the renovation of air?

Thank you in advance!

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Ben Hollon Mechanical Engineer Lankford Fendler
Mar 21 2016
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13 Thumbs Up

Modification to base building systems

I feel like I've seen parts and pieces of this question in various posts but never asking it directly. This credit requires some assessment/modifications of the entire building, not just of the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space.. For most every building I've ever been in the OA has been shut, non-functional, etc. LEED certification should require a building to stand out in many ways, but requiring a 1,000 SF tenant build out in a 100,000 SF building to have to modify the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). mechanical systems to achieve certification seems like a tough sell.

I'm looking at a project that is about 6,000 SF TI in a 3-story, 20,000 SF plate building with 20 year old RTU's with min OA dampers and economizers. I know I can ask the tenant/building owner to hire a mechanical contractor to balance the unit, but after that I'm looking at upgrading the controls, adding actuators, probably replacing dampers and all that assuming the units can handle the increase in ventilation...

I guess is my project kind of doomed from the start? Or has anyone had success with arguing that bringing the building up to 62.1 is cost prohibitive, and had success?

Any thoughts or insights would be very much appreciated. I'm sure plenty of people have run up against this problem... Thanks!

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Ciaran McCabe METEC Consulting Engineers
Jan 08 2016
LEEDuser Member
729 Thumbs Up

Kitchen Supply AHU (For Make Up Air)

As part of a fit out I the only tenant AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. is for make up air in a Kitchen 2966.4 CFM

Can anyone explain the approach to enter this is in LEED form. All other AHU;s are landlord ones and not applicable to this fit out.

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Vassil Vassilev Manager Termoservice OOD
Nov 13 2015
LEEDuser Member
477 Thumbs Up

IEQp1 VRP Calculator

Project Location: Russian Federation

Greetings,
Regarding IEQp1 and VRP Compliance Calculator there is a question on how to enter an AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. having the following characteristics:

The AHU is a constant volume device; supplying to several rooms, but with one and the same temperature; It is 100% OA unit.

The question is:
Should such AHU be entered as "Single Zone Unit" or as "100% Outside Air".
Thanks.

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Roger Chang Principal, Energy and Engineering Leader, DLR Group | Westlake Reed Leskosky Jan 05 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4588 Thumbs Up

Vassil, this should be modeled as a 100% outside air system, which will simplify some of the calculations.

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Vassil Vassilev Manager, Termoservice OOD Jan 06 2016 LEEDuser Member 477 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the reply.
Regarding the simplicity of calculation, the Single Zone is even more simpler than 100% OA. Besides, the AHUs for these zones are the only HVAC equipment to cover the thermal loads there and that was the reason for the question.
Thanks

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CBRE Sustainable Advisory CBRE, Inc.
Sep 25 2015
LEEDuser Member
24 Thumbs Up

IEQp1 Reductions in supply air flows due to occupant adjustments

We have a Commercial Interior Project with underfloor air distribution (UFAD) system designed to include adjustable supply air diffusersIn an HVAC context, diffusers disperse heating, cooling, or ventilation air as it enters a room, ideally preventing uncomfortable direct currents and in many cases, reducing energy costs and improving indoor air quality (IAQ). In light fixtures, diffusers filter and disperse light. in the floor, which can be used to adjust the amount of supply air being supplied to the occupied space served by the diffuser.
We just received the preliminary design review. The reviewer noted that a reduction in supply air flow would be expected to result in a reduction of ventilation air flow to the space served by the adjusted diffuser.
The reviewer also appointed that it is not clear how the ventilation rate procedure calculations have accounted for potential reductions in supply air flow rates due to occupant adjustments of the floor air supply diffusers serving meeting rooms.
The reviewer is asking to describe how the ventilation rate procedure calculations have been adjusted to account for potential reductions in supply air flows due to occupant adjustments. Our HVAC designer thinks this is a subjective issue since he can not estimate or predict how the occupant will adjust each diffuser for personal comfort.
Any recommendation on how to approach this technical advice is more than welcome.

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Roger Chang Principal, Energy and Engineering Leader, DLR Group | Westlake Reed Leskosky Jan 05 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4588 Thumbs Up

I believe the reviewer is looking for clarification on whether a zone distribution effectiveness adjustment was included (Ez) per Chapter 6 of ASHRAE 62.1. This correction factor accounts for the location of both supply and return in heating and cooling modes. A true displacement ventilationA system in which air slightly cooler than the desired room temperature is introduced at floor level and is lifted up by warmer air to exhaust outlets at the ceiling, increasing air circulation and removal of pollutants. system allows an Ez value of 1.2 to be utilized, which allows an effective decrease in ventilation air delivered to the breathing zoneThe breathing zone is the region within an occupied space between 3 and 6 feet above the floor and more than 2 feet from walls or fixed air-conditioning equipment. (AHSRAE 62.1–2007) while achieving an equivalent ventilation effect.

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Arslan Faisal
Aug 18 2015
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12 Thumbs Up

IEQp1: Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance

We are working on a plaza which have office spaces. we submit this project. But in the review report they asking the following documents. As we fill the online VRP Compliance calculator not excel form calculator. Compliance done. in the review report they asking following documents as below:
Provide documentation that includes the following:

A. Calculations confirming that the minimum outside air flow setpoint for the system has been determined to be no less than the minimum required by the Ventilation Rate Procedure to maintain the area-based ventilation requirement.

B. Calculations confirming that the maximum outside air flow setpoint for the system has been determined in accordance with and is no less than the minimum required by the Ventilation Rate Procedure for the maximum zone occupancy expected during normal operations.

My question what kind of calculations they are asking for...can any body give me little hint or example...
If possible, kindly contact me on this e-mail, m.arslanfaisal@yahoo.com or leave your e-mail ID here. please give me advice.
Thanks

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Graham Langton Building Services Engineer PM-Group
Jul 03 2015
LEEDuser Member
335 Thumbs Up

Base building system

Hi,

To what extent does the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). system need to be entered into the VRP calculator?My CI project spaces is carried out space by space but that level of detail for other tenants isn't available. Can this be entered as 1 additional zone?

Also, once I've filled out the VRP calculator in excel. (v2009v4_Minimum IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Calculator v02). Using the V4 form, I can't see a place to upload this. This will contain all the information required for table A3 (mechanical ventilation 100% OA
but it seem the calculation must be carried out on the template. Is this correct?

Regards

Graham

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Anke Koch Architect LEED AP Ingenieurbüro Anke Koch
Mar 11 2015
LEEDuser Member
78 Thumbs Up

Warehouse

Project Location: Germany

Dear LEED community,
we are working on a project in Berlin, Germany. The existing building is a logistics center consisting of a logistics and warehousing facility made up of 3 units (48,355 sf high-storage racks and packaging stations + 5,853 sf refrigerated) and an additional building with social rooms and administration offices (5,842,5 sf). Our client uses the warehouse for storing medical products and compiling these products for clinical trials.

The office building is mostly naturally ventilated (except for the WCs, showers and server room, which are not regularly occupied), and naturally conditioned (no cooling). All regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. within the office building comply with ASHRAE 62,1, section 5.1.
The warehouse is naturally ventilated and mechanically conditioned. As typical for warehouses, it doesn’t have windows or openings except for the smoke outlets in the roof and therefore doesn’t meet the ventilation rates required by ASHRAE 62.1.

Our question: Are warehouses excempt from the ventilation requirements?

Any suggestions how we should deal with this? Should we provide detailed analysis documenting the constraints and explaining that due to the function, the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). systems cannot be upgraded?

Thanks a lot in advance

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Preethi Ranjith Sr. Project Co-ordinator @ En3 En3 Sustainability Solutions Pvt Ltd
Feb 11 2015
Guest
17 Thumbs Up

LIFT Lobbies to be included in VRP Calculations

Project Location: India

i want some clarity on whether it is necessary to include Lift lobbies in VRP calculation to demonstrate compliance under IEQp1 and IEQc2? These lift lobbies are not regularly occupied. Hence is it necessary to provide fresh air for these areas? They are not conditioned as well..

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S Nagarajan
Jan 23 2015
Guest
45 Thumbs Up

Ventilation design-worst case conditions

Project Location: India

How to provide a narrative to explain how the worst-case condition was determined considering the total design airflow rate at the condition analyzed

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Cyriac Joseph
Dec 24 2014
Guest
23 Thumbs Up

"Determination of Ds Value for worst case scenario"

How do we calculate the Ds value for the condition where "The cooling load is low due to minimal envelope and internal loads but the number of occupants are at peak?"
We have the following comment from USGBC and do not know how to go about it. Some PLEASE HELP

"In the cooling mode, the worst-case scenario occurs when the zone supply flow rates are low as the cooling load decreases with
less envelope and internal loads, but the zone occupant number could be at the peak. The Ds value of 100% is associated with the
peak cooling design conditions. The worst case conditions for ventilation do not occur at peak cooling design conditions, but rather
occur when the critical zones are fully occupied, but have minimal envelope loads and minimal other internal loads (such as lighting or
plug loads). Although the project is located in climate zoneOne of five climatically distinct areas, defined by long-term weather conditions which affect the heating and cooling loads in buildings. The zones were determined according to the 45-year average (1931-1975) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days (base 65 degrees Fahrenheit). An individual building was assigned to a climate zone according to the 45-year average annual degree-days for its National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Division. 1, the TMY climate data indicates that the zones are not expected under the
peak cooling mode year round. The Ds value must represent the ratio of the flow at the worst-case condition analyzed (typically the
minimum supply for each zone and the minimum supply airflow at the system level) for the flow at design conditions. Provide a
narrative explaining how the worst-case condition was determined considering the total design airflow rate at the condition analyzed
(Ds)."

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Edgar Arevalo
Dec 19 2014
Guest
62 Thumbs Up

IEQp1 using indoor packaged DX units

I'm in a bit of a funk. I have a office space that populates two floors of a building. Each space is using one existing packaged DX indoor system per floor and will distribute heating via individual VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas. boxes (some existing some new) in each room. Since this would be considered a mechanical ventilation multi-zone unit, according to IEQp1, how would I go about finding the Design Outdoor Air Intake Flow (or Outdoor Air intake provided for system) for each packaged unit if they are not an outside air conditioning system?

Any help would be appreciated.

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Edgar Arevalo Dec 24 2014 Guest 62 Thumbs Up

Sorry, just realized that each floor has a design OA airflow % from the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). HVAC system. Please disregard comment

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Aparna Maladkar Miss
Dec 18 2014
Guest
34 Thumbs Up

LEED 2009 CI Preliminary Combined Review

Project Location: United Kingdom

Hello,
I am new to LEED and need some assistance before issuing for preliminary combined review. I have completed all the required project and pre-requisites forms. However to what extent do the other forms need to be completed to show that the minimum 40 points are being attempted? For example, I have completed EAc1.1 which gets 5 points+innovation point. However, in spite of the form being complete, the overall scorecard does not show that this credit has been attempted. Not sure how to change that. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thank you

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MM K Dec 18 2014 Guest 2673 Thumbs Up

If the credit does not show on the scorecard, you can add the credit by clicking on Add/Remove credits below the scorecard tab

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Aparna Maladkar Miss Dec 18 2014 Guest 34 Thumbs Up

Thanks, it worked now!

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Aparna Maladkar Miss
Dec 18 2014
Guest
34 Thumbs Up

IEQp1 - LEED CI 2009

Project Location: United Kingdom

Hi,
I have completed an offline (active) IEQp1 form which shows that pre-requisites are being met. When I complete the same form online, the result is that the pre-requisites are not being met. Has anybody come across this issue before? I intend to raise a feedback query with GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). as well, but any help will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
Regards,
A.

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MM K Dec 18 2014 Guest 2673 Thumbs Up

Usually, the form will say N (not met) if fields are left blank or if the numbers do not meet the requirements. Check your form again to make sure all fields are complete and that the numbers entered comply with the requirements.
Usually, forms will have a button at the bottom of the last page saying CHECK COMPLIANCE. If you click on that it shows you what fields are missing.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory Colliers International
Dec 15 2014
Guest
4635 Thumbs Up

Supplementary mechanical ventilation in naturally ventilated

Project Location: Sweden

Our project is primarily naturally ventilated and meets the requirements of Section 5.1 in non-core areas. We have added mechanical ventilation to the core areas which meet the requirements of ASHRAE 62.1.

In addition, mechanical ventilation has been added to a number of non-core spaces, primarily open offices and meeting rooms; however the fresh air supplied is not sufficient to meet the fresh air supply requirements of ASHRAE 62.1 in all instances.

If I understand correctly these spaces must provide at least 10 cfm per person to meet the prerequisite, and that if this is not possible the supplementary air ventilation system should not be installed. Is this correct?

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Sathish Kumar Green projects Conserve Consultants Pvt. ltd.
Nov 11 2014
Guest
19 Thumbs Up

MIXED MODE Ventilation

Project Location: India

May i know, what are the documents are providing clarity on designing the mixed mode ventilation strategies?

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Kasandra Martin Designer
Oct 29 2014
Guest
739 Thumbs Up

IEQp1 Design Review told me I have multizone not single

I have roof top units. Each serves several rooms. One system serves a single room with single thermostat. However the rest of them serve several rooms and instead of one thermostat to the RTU I have 2-3 which go to zone dampers. Is this why they told me I have a multi zone system? How do I show the single RTU with 2 "zones" for the thermostats in the VRP compliance calculator.

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MM K
Jul 29 2014
Guest
2673 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE 62.1

Clause 5..9 in ASHRAE 62.1 requires MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 6 filters on all cooling coils or other surfaces. This will very much affect the energy efficiency of the systems. Are there any exceptions when this is not required?

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Jul 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
4501 Thumbs Up

Multiple zone vs Single zone

Hi all,
we have a doubt about the system type to use for our project.
The mechanical ventilation is the following:
- outdoor air passes through two heat recovery systems;
- from heat recovery 1 the preheated air is addressed through two fan coils/cassette. Each fan coil mixes outdoor air and return air and serves one single space. Should these fan coils be considered as Single zone units or the Heat recovery system should be considered as Multiple zone unit?
- from heat recovery 2 the preheated air is addressed through two fan coils/cassette. One fan coil mixes outdoor air and return air and serves only one space. The second fan coil mixes outdoor air and return air and serves two different spaces (corridor and toilets). Should the fan coil that serves corridor and restrooms considered as Multiple zone unit?

Thanks!

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Scott Adams Principal, Sustainable Integration LLC Jul 17 2014 Guest 324 Thumbs Up

Heat recovery units only transfer heat, they do not mix air streams. As the outdoor and recirculated air are mixed at the fan coil units then all but the last would be single zone. That is assuming that each space only contains a single ventilation zone. It is not that uncommon for a single space to have both multiple ventilation and thermal zones.

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Nandana Kumar Senior Manager LEAD Consultancy & Engineering Services
Apr 24 2014
Guest
449 Thumbs Up

Louvers for Fresh Air intake

Hi,

For one of the LEED CI project, the developer has provided louvers with motorized dampers in the AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. for fresh air intake. Can the louvers qualify for fresh air intake? if Yes, then how do we account this in the VRP calcualtion. Or is it necessary the fresh air inline fans to be provided in the AHUs.

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Scott Adams Principal, Sustainable Integration LLC Jul 17 2014 Guest 324 Thumbs Up

Absolutely, that is how outdoor air is supplied by most package units. The multi-zone calculation only needs the total supply air and the amount of that air that is distributed to each zone. The minimum required outdoor air flow determined by the calculation informs what position the dampers have to be set at. AHUs will always provide the same amount of total air. The dampers only adjust what percentage of the air is OA.

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MM K
Mar 14 2014
Guest
2673 Thumbs Up

AHUs not within tenant space

If the AHUs are not located within the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space., do we still have to include information about it?

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Geoffrey Brock Sustainability Director - Construction, Lendlease Apr 08 2014 LEEDuser Member 89 Thumbs Up

The answer is definitely YES, but I'm struggling to figure out how to do that. I just received a clarification request from my design submission regarding this. We have a central air handler serving the entire building, including 9 zones within my boundary. I had used the sum of the design CFM ranges of my various VAVs, but they want me to either do the calcs for all spaces in the building (aint happenin), or they allow the following: "it is acceptable to use a fraction of the total supply air from the central air handling units as long as the information regarding the amount of air allocated to the project versus the other spaces is provided." I can easily calculate this based on sf ratios, but how do I put that into the form? Do I just plug that CFM into the last line of the form (Project Design Outdoor Airflow) after multiplying it by my known OA%?

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Scott Adams Principal, Sustainable Integration LLC Jul 17 2014 Guest 324 Thumbs Up

It is based on supply air, not square footage. If you can work out how much total air is supplied just to your space then you can use that number for your system air (Vps). Then you can use the %OA to determine your design outdoor air. This is not really something you can show in your calculator so you will have to submit a mechanical plan and narrative explaining where the numbers are coming from.

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Nandana Kumar Senior Manager LEAD Consultancy & Engineering Services
Mar 03 2014
Guest
449 Thumbs Up

Single Zone served by 2 HVAC systems

Hi,

In our project, a particular zone (Board Room) is being served by 2 systems: central chiller plant through an AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. & by Cassette Units. This additional system was introduced due to additional cfm requirement in that particular area. Please do let me know how do we need to zone this system in the VRP calculator and document.

Thanks
Nandana

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Mar 04 2014 LEEDuser Expert 9693 Thumbs Up

Yes you need to zone the space in the VRP. Is the AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork.'s air ducted to the room directly or into the Cassette unit. If the former then just proceed as if the cassette is not there. It is just conditioning the air not changing the ventilation rates.

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Ronald Dean Sumac Inc.
Feb 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
1941 Thumbs Up

Mech. exhaust fan required for a naturally ventilated project?

I'm working in a small project with natural ventilation overall.
Considering these 3 facts:

1. LEED states to comply with sections 4-7 of ASHRAE 62.1-2007.
2. Natural ventilation is designed according to section 5.1 of ASHRAE 62.1-2007.
3. Section 6 says: ''This section is not required for natural ventilation
systems''

So, my question is: do spaces like toilets, kitchenettes, dressing rooms, etc. need to comply with table 6-4 (minimum exhaust rates) by installing a mechanical exhaust fan? even when they comply with the section 5.1 (4% of operable window)?

Thanks in advance!

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS., INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ Aug 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 1284 Thumbs Up

I have the same problem in a building where kitchenettes and toilets have natural ventilation trhough an operable window, and they also count with injection air since the owner wants the bathrooms to be cooled and heated.
Do this spaces need to count with a mechanical exhaust system according to Table 6-4?,
Thank you

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SW LEE Project Manager
Jan 03 2014
Guest
627 Thumbs Up

VRV System

Hi,

My project is using VRV system for cooling. Is this correct for me to fill up the "VRP Compliance Calculator" and not the "62MZCalc".?

Besides that, some of this VRV system serving 2 or more zones in the project. One particular VRV system (with design OA of 200CFM ) are serving a meeting room, a storage room and a small one person quite room.
Therefore, am i correct to input 200CFM in Vdzd for each of these room assuming that i should fill up the "VRP Compliance Calculator" template in IEQp1?

Thanks.

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Jan 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 9693 Thumbs Up

For VRV I use the VRP Calculator because it is an 100% OA system. Even if it is supplying multiple rooms. I usually only list the VRV zones - not room by room. But you could go room by room to be safe.

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Kasandra Martin Designer
Dec 17 2013
Guest
739 Thumbs Up

IEQp1 online form

I have input my info but it is not complying with IEQc2. Do the uploaded forms need to be pre-approved before it will comply? Also do I need to fill out the Appendix?

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Jan 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 9693 Thumbs Up

No IAQp1 does not need ot be pre-approved in order to comply with IEQc2. Not sure what you mean about the appendix

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Kasandra Martin Designer
Dec 11 2013
Guest
739 Thumbs Up

IEQp1 LEED Online form what to input?

For ASHRAE 62.1 do I upload forms for the Baseline of meeting ASHRAE 62.1 and not my forms for IEQc2 Increased Ventilation? Table IEQp1-3. Mechanical Ventilation AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. Summary - Energy Simulation Do I enter values for Baseline ASHRAE 62.1 and what I actually designed? I am confused where to enter the Baseline and the 30% increased ventilation.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Kasandra, you should enter the designed values.

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Matt Humphreys
Oct 21 2013
Guest
215 Thumbs Up

Renovated spaces or whole building for ASHRAE 62.1

Hello,
We have a project that consists of renovating 3 separate spaces in a large commercial building. The building was designed under ASHRAE 62.1-1999 (applicable standard at the time) and received a LEED silver rating.

When complying with IEQp1 we understand that the ventilation systems serving the spaces to be renovated must comply with ASHRAE 62.1-2007. Is it also required to provide new ventilation air calculations under 62.1-2007 for rest of building as well?

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Roger Chang Principal, Energy and Engineering Leader, DLR Group | Westlake Reed Leskosky Nov 14 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4588 Thumbs Up

Matt, ASHRAE 62.1-2007 compliance is only required for the spaces within the proposed LEED-CI scope. That said, any adjustments made, could impact other spaces in the building, especially if you have multi-zone VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas. systems.

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Poorva Keskar
Oct 03 2013
LEEDuser Member
254 Thumbs Up

Multi-zone system when single AHU supplying OA to FCUs?

We have 2 AHUs supplying OA to individual FCUs via a separate duct as per ASHRAE 62 intake requirement. The mixing occurs at the individual FCUs and then supplied to the zone. In such a scenario, should we consider it a Multiple-zone system or single-zone system?

Thanks!

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Roger Chang Principal, Energy and Engineering Leader, DLR Group | Westlake Reed Leskosky Nov 14 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4588 Thumbs Up

Poorva, if an individual FCU provides ducted supply to more than one zone (with significantly different thermal load characteristics), you'll still need to use the multi-zone calculation approach in ASHRAE 62 for each FCU. If the FCUs are zoned appropriately, you'll be able to use a single-zone approach, which simplifies the required calculations.

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Esteban Martinez LEED Consultant Green Loop
Jul 18 2013
LEEDuser Member
329 Thumbs Up

Multiple or Single Zone?

Hello everybody

We are working on a CI 2009 Office project with dedicated Fan Coil Units for each space. The FCU are located above the ceiling (inside the plenum). FCU take the necessary air from the Plenum which works as a "Mixing Chamber" combining return and outside air.

Since all the FCU per floor take the same ventilation air from the plenum: ¿could we treat it as a Multiple-Zone system by adding up FCU rated CFMs in order to calculate the minimum OA rate that should be provided to the plenum? or ¿shall we comply with 62.1-2007/5.2.2 (which basically would be covered taking the required OA rate (Voz) near each FCU using additional ductwork) and calculate Voz for each space independently (Single-Zone)?

Thanks

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Jul 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 9693 Thumbs Up

Esteban,

It sounds like you have a system that provides outside air into a ceiling plenum. That type of outside delivery system is no longer satisfactory in the codes I deal with. You have to either directly duct outside air to each FCU or duct to within 5 feet of the FCU's return air intake. The reason is that the FCUs closest to the outside air supply will take the most of the outside air and the FCUs furthest away will get the most diluted outside air.

However, since this is CI. You could probably be grandfathered in by going with option 2. You don't comply with the ASHRAE standards, but the outside air system can still provide at least 10 CFM/person of outside into the ceiling plenum.

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Diana Hill
May 26 2013
Guest
239 Thumbs Up

Design Outdoor Air Intake much larger than required

Hello, we are doing our office project on a tenth floor of an office building. We have two fan coil units which supply outdoor air to the office. The Design Outdoor Air Intake Flow for both is over 20,000 cfm. The Outdoor Air Intake Flow calculation for AHU1 and AHU2 are both around 3500 cfm. To meet IEQc2 are around 7000 for AHU1and 10000 for AHU2.

The comment we received for IEQp1 is as following:

It is unclear what system is supplying the outdoor air to the LEED-CI project. The PIf4: Schedule and Overview Documents narrative appears to indicate that the project spaces are served by fan coil units (which appear to be delivering the outdoor air, mixed with return air to the project spaces). However, the VRP calculations provided have been completed for larger air handling systems that also appear to serve spaces outside the LEED-CI project scope, based on the design outdoor airflow stated on the form. Additionally, if these larger systems are providing ventilation to the project space, it does not appear that the spaces outside the project boundary have been accounted for in the ventilation rate procedure calculations, as required. The VRP calculations must be performed at the ventilation system level.

The TECHNICAL ADVICE is to provide a narrative describing the HVAC systems that provide the outdoor air to the spaces within the LEED-CI project boundary and to the rest of the building.

We know that the Design Outdoor Air Intake Flow is too large. However, this is the real situation. The two fan coil units are only serving the whole project. If this would influence the pass of the whole project? Could anybody tell us how shall we response to the reviewer?

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Jim Park Project Manager, EAN Technology May 26 2013 Guest 778 Thumbs Up

I would provide all of the building duct plans or diagrams, and explain that AHU1 and AHU2 only serve your project area only.

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Diana Hill May 28 2013 Guest 239 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Jim. We will provide the mechanical plan, mechanical schedule and a HVAC narrative from the HVAC engineer for AHU1 and AHU2. Are these sufficient to support this credit?
I am also worried if the large Design Outdoor Air Intake Flow will be a problem? Because it is obvious not efficient.

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Diana Nezamutinova Consultant Self Employed
Apr 29 2013
Guest
594 Thumbs Up

Supplementary ventilation for after-hours

Our project has one primary ventilation system for the entire project space served by the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). AHUs. In addition, several rooms could be served by the newly installed split units for the "after-hours" use, whenever necessary. Do I need to enter info on the supplementary "after-hours" system too in addition to the primary one? Thanks in advance!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Sounds to me like you would need to, if they are part of the regular ventilation system used in the building.

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