CI-2009 MRc3.2: Materials Reuse—Furniture and Furnishings

  • CI_MRc3-2_Typex_FurnitureReuse Diagram
  • Easy credit, but might take some time

    The large and thriving market for reused furniture makes this credit an easy one to achieve—and you can often find items that are as good as new. It can be a bit more time-consuming to search for furnishings that are appropriate for your project, and to ensure that what you find is durable enough.

    If your project involves moving existing tenants from one location to a new commercial interior fit out, the easiest way to obtain this credit is to reuse your existing furniture. 

    Reused vs. recycled

    It’s common to have some confusion about the difference between “reused” and “recycled.” Often the terms are (incorrectly) used interchangeably—but there is a distinct difference, especially for the purposes of LEED.

    Recycled refers to anything that contains recycled materials as a result of the manufacturing process—a chair that contains recycled material, for example, could be made from post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product. recycled plastic bottles.

    Reused material is something that has been reused or repurposed from another location or a different role—like pews saved from an old church and used as seating in a meeting room, or wood salvaged from deconstruction and used to make tables, or reusing furniture from an original office in a new fit out.

    Pricing can be tricky

    Your project needs to have 30% of the total furniture cost come from reused furniture to get the credit.  When you’re trying to determine the cost value of reused, salvaged, or donated materials for documentation, you may run into some difficulties, especially in finding replacement costs for comparable new products. It’s helpful to work with a construction pricing expert or furniture representative who may already have cost estimates on hand.

    Used furnitureChurn in offices creates an abundance of high-quality salvaged furniture that you can take advantage of for this credit. Photo – YRG SustainabilityAnother choice you will need to make is whether to value reused items at their actual cost or at the replacement cost. In some cases, it may not make much of a difference—the reused materials may be of similar value to the price of a comparable new item. But in other cases—for example, if you’ve purchased antique woodwork—the cost of the salvaged item may actually be significantly higher than the replacement cost of a comparable new item.  A more common scenario is if the salvaged furniture was free because you are reusing existing furniture already in your possession, you need to price value it to something new that is comparable.  

    Piggyback credits, but follow the rules

    In most cases, materials that have multiple environmental attributes can be applied to as many of the MR credits as they relate to. This credit put some tricky limitations on that practice, however.

    For example, salvaged furniture may be found easily within 500 miles, meaning that it can contribute to both this credit and to MRc5: Regional Materials. But materials that apply to this credit cannot be applied toward:

    Construction waste management

    MRc3.2 can involve furnishings that are salvaged onsite and used again onsite for another purpose or in another location, meaning that some materials can count toward this credit and toward MRc2: Construction Waste Management.

    For example, if a project demolishes a building and saves all the wood doors, then turns the salvaged doors into tables for the new construction, the salvaged doors count both toward MRc3.2 and MRc2. That’s because the doors were reused as furniture and diverted from a landfill. (If they had just been reused as doors, they would count toward MRc1.2: Building Reuse—Maintain Interior Nonstructural Components.)

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Schematic Design

Expand All

  • Research the availability of salvaged materials for your project.  


  • While some salvaged materials—such as a reclaimed raised floor frame—may be hidden from the occupants’ view, other salvaged materials, such as reclaimed molding or wood flooring, can add historic character to a space. 

Design Development

Expand All

  • Begin creating a baseline furniture budget. Even if you don’t know the actual furniture costs, it will be helpful to establish estimates at this stage. You can use a spreadsheet to help create the baseline budget and keep track of the environmentally beneficial properties of each budget item. (See the Documentation Toolkit.)


  • Your baseline furniture budget assumptions should be consistent across MRc3–7. The LEED Online credit form helps ensure this, as you only enter the information once for multiple MR credits.


  • Include in your baseline furniture budget the material cost (excluding labor) of all furniture items in CSI, MasterFormat, Division 12: Furniture.  


  • You must use the actual value of all furniture purchased (both meeting sustainable criteria and not meeting them). The default 45% materials budget option that is available for other rating systems is not available for LEED-CI projects.


  • Look at your baseline furniture budget to determine how much reused furniture you need to incorporate into your project. Determine how much you want to spend on reused furniture, and what salvaged furniture is available. Go through the project’s preliminary budget and identify what needs you might be able to meet with donated, reused, or salvaged furniture. Does the cost value of these items add up to 30% of the furniture budget to earn one point?  


  • To determine the value of the furniture, use either the actual cost of the furniture or the replacement value. 


  • Determining the cost of a replacement item leaves some room for interpretation, but the replacement must be a comparable product. For example, you cannot value the replacement of standard, medium-grade task chairs at the cost of a top-of-the-line chair.


  • Reused materials may require refurbishing and, in turn, add to costs for the owner. Include refurbishing costs in the total cost or value of the material.


  • Include a cushion for this credit, in case of changes in design and purchasing. For example, if you are counting on earning a point for using 30% reused furniture, plan for 35% of your budget to be spent on reused furniture to avoid coming up short.


  • Using an estimated budget to integrate reused or salvaged materials into the design and specs early on can help prevent costly change orders during construction. 


  • In some projects, such as high-end offices, furniture costs can be equal to or greater than building materials. Make sure to choose furniture that helps the project gain multiple MR points (for example, furniture that is both regional and reused). Refurbished furniture offers a great opportunity to help meet the goals of this credit.


  • If your commercial interior project involves moving existing tenants from one location to a new commercial interior fit out, the easiest way to obtain this credit is to reuse your older furniture. 


  • Use your estimated budget as a guide throughout the project. Don’t wait until all the materials are purchased before calculating whether you had enough reused furniture to meet the requirements, only to find out that you have fallen short. 


  • Focus on “big ticket” items when seeking reused furniture of sufficient value to meet the credit requirements. Materials like workstations that meet the reuse requirement may represent enough value to earn the credit. This approach allows you to Iimit the overall number of items you need to track and document, which greatly reduces contractor headaches. If big-ticket items are not enough, target a medium-priced item next, and so on, until you reach your goal.


  • Don’t confuse “recycled content material” with “material reuse”; the two terms have very different meanings:

    • Recycled Content is material containing recycled content as a result of the industrial process of making the product—for example, a chair with plastics made of soda bottles recovered from the waste stream. 
    • Materials Reuse is the reuse or repurposing of material from a previous place or role—for example, buying antique pews salvaged from an old church.   

  • MRc3.2: Material Reuse: Furniture and Furnishings and MRc1.2: Building Reuse are often confused when salvaged materials are recovered from the demolition of a project site.


  • MRc3.2: Material Reuse—Furniture and Furnishings can involve material that is salvaged onsite and used again onsite for another purpose or in another location. The salvaged material can count towards both this credit (MRc3.2) and MRc2: Construction Waste Management. For example, if a project demolishes a building and saves all the wood doors, then turns the salvaged doors into tables for the new construction, the salvaged doors count both toward MRc3.2 and MRc2. That’s because the doors were reused as furniture and diverted from a landfill. 


  • MRc1.2: Building Reuse can involve preserving part of a building or material onsite and either reusing it for its original purpose, or leaving it in its original location. Saving doors from demolition and reinstalling them on the new project as doors counts toward MRc1.2: Building Reuse—Maintain Interior Nonstructural Components.


  • If using salvaged furniture, make sure the durability of the product has not been compromised, or you may need to replace the salvaged item with a new product all too soon. Also be aware that salvaged furniture and furnishings may not come with warranties.


  • Assemblies


  • When a product is made of multiple components that may or may not be all reused, use the following special considerations.


  • Determine the value of assemblies by separating each component by weight as a percentage of the total. For example, if a $100 piece of built-in casework contains 80% (by weight) salvaged wood and 20% (by weight) new marble, $80 worth (80%) of the casework would contribute to this credit, because that is the proportion that is reused. (See the Reuse Assembly Calculator in the Documentation Toolkit for help making these calculations.)  


  • Request that manufacturers provide assembly information broken down by weight.   


  • Older versions of LEED allowed assemblies to be broken down by weight, cost, or volume. The new LEED Reference Guides only allows weight.

Construction Documents

Expand All

  • Revisit your baseline materials budget as the design evolves to make sure that the numbers are accurate and you are on track to achieve your goal.


  • Research specific products. Incorporate reused product requirements into individual construction specifications.


  • For guidance and sample specification language for incorporating LEED specifications into construction documents, see MasterSpec, or the Whole Building Design Guide. (See Resources.)


  • Incorporating the LEED requirements directly into the drawings and specs is a good way to remind the contractor and subcontractors of the requirements. 


  • Analyze the initial cost budget to know what materials the project can target and incorporate LEED requirement language accordingly into construction specs for the specific materials. The contractor will appreciate not having to fill out forms for materials that are not reused, or that have so little cost value that it is a waste of time. 


  • Whenever possible, designate in the construction specifications that contractors use specific sources that you have verified as suppliers of reused items. This will help save research time for the contractors.


  • Include submittal requirements within each targeted construction spec section and add general requirements to the Division 1 bid package. Include a copy of any submittal documents that the contractor may need to fill out.

Construction

Expand All

  • Preparation Before Construction Begins


  • The general contractor (GC) should be oriented to all LEED construction-related issues, such as IAQ management, low-emitting materials, environmental materials tracking tools, and construction waste management. 


  • LEED documentation and materials tracking are usually the GC’s responsibility even though specific materials selection may have been already determined by the architect or designer.


  • The GC should hold an orientation meeting with the subcontractors to review the LEED responsibilities related specifically to their trades. This exercise helps to build trust and is crucial for obtaining buy-in from all participants in the process.


  • Give the GC and subcontractors the following tools to help them track materials data for all MR and IEQ credits. (See the Documentation Toolkit for access.)

    • Materials Calculator:  This is a master tracking spreadsheet that the GC can use internally to compile product information received from the subcontractors. The spreadsheet tracks LEED values across multiple LEED MR and IEQ credits.
    • Environmental Materials Reporting Form: This is a material tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values for products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing. 
    • Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form: This is a VOC tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing.
    • Low-Emitting Material Limits: These tables, found with each credit here on LEEDuser, summarize the maximum VOC limits for different types of adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, composite wood, and flooring products. When subcontractors search for low-emitting products, they should consult these charts.

  • Enabling coordination and communication among the GC, subcontractors and design team early in the process can minimize scheduling delays and pushback from subcontractors.


  • Do any necessary additional research on the availability of reused and salvaged furniture before construction begins to ensure that the project earns this credit. If product decisions are made after construction begins, there may be less time to carefully review data sheets and much greater risk of using a noncompliant product.


  • During Construction


  • The contractor starts gathering and environmental data and cut sheets from subcontractors for approval. 


  • The GC functions as the overall quality assurance provider for this credit. Responsibilities include conducting weekly reviews of subcontractor product submittals and tracking forms.


  • Review subcontractor product suggestions ahead of time to avoid the purchase of inappropriate materials and eliminate the need for costly change orders.  


  • Streamline documentation and research by taking data gathered from subs via the Environmental Material Reporting Form and transfer it to a master spreadsheet for all the items being tracked across MR and IEQ credits. For example, you may need to ask the furniture rep for regional information for MRc5, reuse information for MRc3.2, and information about Greenguard certification for IEQc4.4. If one spreadsheet collects all the data, it can streamline your documentation, associated research, and help with quality control.


  • A master spreadsheet facilitates information collection for subcontractors, giving them a road map of exactly what types of information to collect for each product.  


  • Assign a responsible party to input the subcontractors’ tracking forms into the Materials Calculator (see Documentation Toolkit). A LEED consultant or an administrative assistant in the GC’s office may be the best choice for this role.


  • Breaking out specific materials costs (excluding labor) for construction materials is a requirement for LEED MR credits. Some subcontractors prefer not to do this because there are always hidden markups in the materials that subcontractors purchase at wholesale. However, contractors can include this markup when breaking out a product’s material cost from installation and labor costs.


  • Transfer all the data collected in the Materials Calculator spreadsheet (see Documentation Toolkit) to the LEED Online form and upload the product cut sheets. 


  • Only a random 20% sampling of product cut sheets need to be uploaded to LEED Online to document this credit.


  • Even though LEED Online only asks for 20% of the cut sheets to be uploaded, all material cut sheets should be saved as backup data may be requested of the project during the USGBC’s credit reviews.

Operations & Maintenance

Expand All

  • Keep a list of reused and salvaged furniture used on the project so that O&M staff can use these products and supply sources for future renovations.


  • Develop salvaged furniture procurement recommendations into a purchasing policy.  

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    MR Credit 3.2: Materials reuse - furniture and furnishings

    1 Point

    Intent

    To reuse building materials and products to reduce demand for virgin materials and reduce waste, thereby lessening impacts associated with the extraction and processing of virgin resources.

    Requirements

    Use salvaged, refurbished or used furniture and furnishings for 30% of the total furniture and furnishings budget.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Identify opportunities to incorporate salvaged and reuse furniture into project design and research potential material suppliers. Consider salvaging and reusing systems furnitureSystems furniture includes panel-based workstations comprising modular interconnecting panels, hang-on components, and drawer and filing components or a free-standing grouping of furniture items designed to work in concert. and furnishings such as case pieces, seating, filing systems, decorative lighting and accessories.

Organizations

Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG) — Federal Green Construction Guide for Specifiers

Support on incorporating LEED requirements into specifications. 


Reuse Development Organization

ReDO is a national nonprofit in Baltimore that promotes reuse as an environmentally sound, socially beneficial, and economical means of managing surplus and discarded materials. See the list of ReDO subscribers for contacts around the United States.


Building Materials Reuse Association (formerly Used Building Materials Association)

The Building Materials Reuse Association is a nonprofit, membership-based organization that represents companies and organizations involved in the acquisition and/or redistribution of used building materials.

Web Tools

Builders’ Guide to Reuse and Recycling

The Builders’ Guide to Reuse and Recycling is a directory for construction and demolition materials in the Metropolitan Washington, D.C., region, produced by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments. The website includes a searchable database for sources of salvaged materials.


California Integrated Waste Management Board, California Materials Exchange

The California Materials Exchange is a program of the CIWMB. This site enables users to exchange nonhazardous materials online. 

 


Materials Exchanges on the Web

The Local Hazardous Waste Management Program is a regional program of local governments working together to protect public health and environmental quality by reducing the threat posed by the production, use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials. 


Used Building Materials Exchange

The Used Building Materials Exchange is a free marketplace for buying and selling recyclables and salvaged materials. 


NY Waste Match

Think online dating, but for waste materials.  This is a New York City source for individuals to post waste they have that others may want.


Deconstruction Institute

This is a resource database of contractors proficient with deconstruction and recipients seeking material.


Reclaimed Material Consultant/Broker

PlanetReuse is a nationwide reclaimed construction material broker and consultant company. At no cost to the design team, they match materials with designers, builders and owners to serve LEED efforts, save money, and sustain the planet. They make it easier to use a wide variety of reclaimed materials in new projects as well as help find new projects for building materials being deconstructed, guiding clients through every step of the process.

Publications

Green Building Resource Guide, Salvaged Building Materials Exchange

The Green Building Resource Guide is a database of more than 600 green building materials and products selected specifically for their usefulness to the design and building professions. 


The Greater Vancouver Regional District, Old to New: Design Guide, Salvaged Building Materials in New Construction

This useful and detailed guidebook reviews the use of salvaged materials in real-life case studies. 

Materials Reuse Assembly Calculator

If reused materials are part of an assembly but not the whole thing, use this calculator to determine the cost value of the assembly that can count toward MRc3.

Letter to Contractor for MR and IEQ Credits

Use a letter like this sample to orient the contractor to their responsibilities for all MR and IEQ credits. This letter is an introduction that can be customized for the credits your project is pursuing.

Materials Calculator

Teams can use this tool to track all materials across various MR and IEQ credits. It helps teams develop a roadmap of what information needs to be tracked for different products. It can also be used early on to create the baseline budget and ensure the products that are being used will apply to the various credit thresholds.

LEED Online Forms: CI-2009 MR

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CI-2009 MR credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

LEED-CI Silver Office – MRc3.2

Complete documentation for achievement of MRc3.2 on a LEED-CI 2009 project.

57 Comments

0
0
richard heflin
Jul 21 2014
LEEDuser Member
2 Thumbs Up

Donated Furniture

Myself and two other students are trying to document and submit MRc3.2 for a health clinic that has roughly 90% donated used furniture. This includes things such as chairs, desks, and cabinets that have come from a couple of local organizations and businesses. Would this furniture be included towards the 30% of the furniture cost, and if so how? Would we calculate what it would have cost to by the used furniture? I have asked multiple people on the matter and have gotten a different answer each time.

Also, would the furniture specific to the function of the building – such as dental chairs, x-ray machines, etc. – be included as well? Thanks.

1
1
0
Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei Jul 21 2014 LEEDuser Member 4634 Thumbs Up

(I'm no expert, but it sounds like...)

Yes, this credit would require you to include all of the donated 'Furniture' items, with cost information.

You can start by defining the list of what is considered 'Furniture' in this project by referencing the Master Spec Divisions List, and separating items that would fall under other divisions, such as 'Equipment' or 'Specialties'.

For cost, this can be estimated by determining the donated furniture's brand/model and vendor's original or resale price. Depending on the number of items and number of different brands/models, it might be easier to hire a furniture specialist to give you a complete price estimate for all of the donated items as suggested in the credit language above.

Post a Reply
0
0
Vada Kornegay
Jan 28 2014
LEEDuser Member
7 Thumbs Up

Furniture not included

I have a project where the furniture was not included in the base contract and the contractor therefore did not include it in the material costs for the project. If the furniture was under separate contract, does it have to be included in the LEED material costs? What credits are affected by this material cost for commercial interiors?

1
1
0
Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Jan 29 2014 LEEDuser Member 1067 Thumbs Up

Yes - for LEED-CI, furniture must be included regardless of who provides it (see page 208 of the ID+C Reference Guide). It doesn't matter that it was in a separate contract/provided by another party. You will need to include the cost of all Division 12 items in all of the materials-related credits (MRc3-MRc7).

Post a Reply
0
0
Jeremy Kuhre Sustainable Buildings & Operations Manager Sustainable Solutions Corporation
Jan 09 2014
LEEDuser Member
738 Thumbs Up

Interior Renovation

I'm seeking clarification on how this credit applies to an interior renovation where the existing tenant maintains 100% of its existing furniture. After reviewing the reference guide, it would seem that a point would be awarded and that this would not be violating the intent nor requirements. Anyone successfully submitted this approach in the past?

1
1
0
Susie Spivey-Tilson Project Management Sustainability Services, CBRE Jan 09 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

You can definitely apply the reused furniture toward this credit and if all of the furniture is reused then you would also be able to earn an exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point (60% or more). If you're reusing within the 500 miles radius the furniture would also apply to MRc5. Hope that's helpful.

Post a Reply
0
0
Michelle Reott LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal Earthly Ideas LLC
Dec 03 2013
LEEDuser Expert
6522 Thumbs Up

Use of this credit on a LEED-NC or -SCH project?

Our team's interior designer is wondering if this credit can be utilized on a LEED-NC or -Schools project as an innovation credit. Or will the reviewers consider that reuse falls under MRc3 in those rating systems and direct teams to include furniture in their MRc3-7 calcs in order to capture reuse of furniture and furnishings?

I checked the LEED-NC and -SCH forums for IDc1 and did not see anything there regarding this credit. Nor did I see anything in the LI's or GBCI Review Tips. Thanks!

1
2
0
Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Dec 03 2013 LEEDuser Member 1304 Thumbs Up

Michelle,

The furnishings can already be included in MRc3, so this strategy will not be considered for an ID strategy. Sorry!

2
2
0
Michelle Reott LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, O+M, Managing Principal, Earthly Ideas LLC Dec 03 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6522 Thumbs Up

Thanks Lauren. I thought as much but wanted to confirm my thoughts. I got to meet several of your colleagues including Dagmar, Chip, and Meghan at Greenbuild last month.

Post a Reply
0
0
Michelle Bracewell-Musson Owner, LEED AP Musson General Contracting & Green Expectations Sustainability Solutions
Feb 08 2013
LEEDuser Member
1112 Thumbs Up

Total for Division 12-Reused Furniture Amount PLUS Cost of New??

The higher the amount for reused furniture, the higher the number for Total Division 12, therefore more difficult to obtain the 30%.
Ex. New Furniture is 400,000 and Reused Furniture is 150,000
Scenario #1 $150,000/$400,000 = 37.5%
Scenario #2 $150,000/$550,000 = 27.2%
It seems as though the more your reused is worth, the lower your percentage goes if you include the New PLUS the Reused amount. Am I supposed to include the Reused amount as part of the total Furniture cost for the project? I cannot exclude it from the template.

Thanks!

1
4
0
Michelle Bracewell-Musson Owner, LEED AP, Musson General Contracting & Green Expectations Sustainability Solutions Feb 09 2013 LEEDuser Member 1112 Thumbs Up

To further this, I want to know why we have to include the Reused amount in the Total when in fact, we haven't had to pay 1 cent for it? :/

2
4
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 09 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Michelle, I hink you are simply running up against the cold reality of the mathematics, but this is how all LEED MR calculations are done.

The LEED-compliant portion goes in the numerator and the total—compliant plus non-compliant—is in the denominator. If you're finding the math is not resulting in hitting your target, well, that's a good reason to increase your efforts to comply with the credit through reuse, with reduction of new purchases being the flip side of the same coin.

What other way could compliance be demonstrated? If there is no price assigned to the reused furniture, then it either has no value in your calcs, or you need some other measure, like weight or volume, or pieces.

If the value of reuse is not in the demoninator, then you'll get absurd results, like 2,000% of your furniture budget being LEED compliant. How could LEED set a target for credit compliance with no upward limit?

3
4
0
Michelle Bracewell-Musson Owner, LEED AP, Musson General Contracting & Green Expectations Sustainability Solutions Feb 09 2013 LEEDuser Member 1112 Thumbs Up

ThanksTristan,

I guess I get that part of it. However, I think overall, more people would attempt this credit (16% actually earn it), and in the long run, the total amount of reused furniture would be higher, due to people not giving up as the bar is too high.
I would love to study the stats on this credit and have a trial period where the other option is offered. This is the basis for putting something on sale. Try, see if it works, then get hooked on doing it all the time. Seems to be priced out of the market. Hmmm, either way I earned the credit.
Good discussion with some friends over a couple of drinks!
Your thoughts?

4
4
0
Sonrisa Lucero Owner / Energy Engineer / Sustainability Consultant, Sustainnovations, LLC Mar 08 2013 LEEDuser Member 1538 Thumbs Up

Michelle,

While it is true you include the total cost of new and reused in your denominator, in your example, it looks like you were increasing the amount of NEW furniture, not REUSED. In both secenarios, you have the resused portion as $150,000, but your denominator increased in Scenario #2.

If the added difference ($150000) between the two scenarios was given to the REUSED furniture, your Scenario #2 would actually be: ($150,000 + $150,000)/$550,000 = $300,000/$550,000 = 55%

Post a Reply
0
0
Adam Targowski Owner ATsec
Oct 18 2012
Guest
1838 Thumbs Up

scope of materials

I would like to clarify what should be included in the calculations for this credit. Should we include things like carpet, window blinds, trash cans, desk accessories like stapler and many more, accessories for the bathroom or bicycle racks? These kinds of items are included in the Division 12 list and it seems to be very detailed.

1
1
0
Susie Spivey-Tilson Project Management Sustainability Services, CBRE Oct 25 2012 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

In a LEED CI project you include the furniture and furnishings only. The LEED ID+C reference guide (pg 241) states that you can exclude furnishings components, artwork, plants and musical instruments. I assume accessories can be excluded. The focus should be furniture, casework, window treatments, panels and dividers, furniture systems, floor mats and frames, chairs. Hope that helps. Carpet is Div 9, yes it is included.

Post a Reply
0
0
David Mahood Princ. Olive Hospitality
Sep 21 2012
Guest
16 Thumbs Up

LEED Retail CI M&R Calculator

Is it a requirement for the April 2012 template to use all materials ( we are not using Div. 12 materials) across the template for Recycled Content, Regional Materials, and Certified WoodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System.? Under L-3 we have listed all materials we are using and some do not contribute credits to 4, 5 or 7. We have a figure for total materials cost but does that mean that all materials listed including Div. 12 materials are to be listed under L-3? Some materials like iron fencing do not use wood but it is local and pre-consumer recycled so do we list that for MR 7 too?

1
1
0
Susie Spivey-Tilson Project Management Sustainability Services, CBRE Sep 24 2012 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

I'm not sure exactly which form you're using, but if it is the one I think (and if I understand your question correctly) there should be a table L-4 where your Division 12 materials will be listed. They do have to be included regardless of whether they contribute to earning a credit. The table will collect the data for all materials. Some materials may contribute to more than one credit while some may only contribute to one credit. All of that data can be captured in the template.

Post a Reply
0
0
Pamela Branch
Dec 01 2011
Guest
36 Thumbs Up

MR c3.2 Materials Reuse - Furniture & furniture

My client is a small non-profit, and on a shoe string budget. They are using used or donated furniture for 100% of their Furniture/Furnishings. I'm having trouble with the table indicating that it is incomplete, anyone have any experience with this? I'm at a loss completely here, I've tried manipulating the table without any luck. Thanks in advance.

1
2
0
Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Dec 01 2011 Guest 7897 Thumbs Up

Pamela,

I have not worked with this form before, but I assume you're working on the LEED-online v3 form for this credit? 

If so there are a few things you could try:

If there is any part of the form that does not apply to you make sure you're putting zeros or n/a in those parts. Sometimes a form will not show up as complete unless there is a zero in every unused space.

If that doesn't work:

What version of the form are you using? If it's before v3 then it's a beta version and they sometimes have bugs. You could try upgrading the form, but you will have to re enter any data that is non one-to-one, so make sure you save everything.

Good luck!

2
2
0
Pamela Branch Dec 02 2011 Guest 36 Thumbs Up

I thought I was in LEED V3 forms, but I'll double check - I appreciate the input!

Post a Reply
0
0
Rebecca Griffith
Nov 08 2011
LEEDuser Member
420 Thumbs Up

Furniture - Reuse as ID Credit

I am attempting to apply the principles of this credit as an ID credit for a Leed for Schools 2007 project. Most of the furniture in this renovated school is being reused, with the exception of new furniture for the library addition. Will this apply?

Since I have to include all of the furniture and furnishings materials cost to demonstrate compliance with the possible ID credit, do I have then I have to include furniture and furnishings into my calculations for MRc3-7 for LEED for Schools 2007? Or can these be separated because it's being applied to an ID credit?

1
2
0
Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Nov 10 2011 Guest 7897 Thumbs Up

Hi Rebecca,

Yes, you can use this credit as an ID credit. Though I'm not sure if you will be required to include furniture in your other MR credits. 

2
2
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 19 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Rebecca, I believe I have heard from other projects that they did have to include furniture in the other MR credits in this situation.

Post a Reply
0
0
Raymond Loo Senior Manager, Corporate Services MEA & Associates Limited (Hong Kong)
Jul 22 2011
Guest
676 Thumbs Up

All Furniture to be Given to Another Company for Same Use.

Instead of reusing all of its furniture (chairs, cabinets, cubicle walls, etc.) after the renovation, our client is giving all of it to another company that will use it as furniture.

Would this qualify for credit under MRc3.2? If so, what kind of documentation would be required? Would a letter to the recipient company with details and photographs of the furniture be sufficient?

Sorry if this has been addressed previously but I did try to search an answer for this question. (This is our first project.)

1
2
0
Raymond Loo Senior Manager, Corporate Services, MEA & Associates Limited (Hong Kong) Jul 28 2011 Guest 676 Thumbs Up

And as an alternative to 'gifting' the furniture to another corporation for their use as furniture, just in case there is some furniture that does not fit into the plans of the other corporation, what if our client puts this furniture into storage to be used in a future project? Does this portion also qualify for MRc3.2 credit calculation purposes? (I thought I read this somewhere before but I am unable to find that comment again.)

Thanks.

2
2
0
Susie Spivey-Tilson Project Management Sustainability Services, CBRE Nov 21 2011 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

Raymond,
If I understand you correctly you are asking if the furniture your project donates to another project can be included in your project's calculations for MRc3.2. In this case you cannot claim material reuse for furniture you donate but you can include it in your MRc2 Construction Waste Management calculations as diverted from the landfill.

To get credit for MRc3.2 you would have to be using any 're-use furniture' in your own project.

Post a Reply
0
0
Reynaldo Castro
Jun 16 2011
Guest
1232 Thumbs Up

50% Furniture Used at Another One of Our Offices

We are moving about half of the existing furniture from our office to another one of our office locations to be used. The furniture is being reused for the same purpose but at a different location and not by the same people. The rest of our existing furniture will remain on-site and will be used after the remodel. Would this count towards MRc3.2? Is there any way it could also count towards MRc2? I'm not sure which credit I can count the furniture towards, if any, or both.

1
3
0
Susie Spivey-Tilson Project Management Sustainability Services, CBRE Jun 17 2011 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

Reynaldo - From the sound of comment you're good to count the reused furniture for MRc3.2. However, you cannot count the furniture for MRc2 (either for or against you) since it is furniture being reused as furniture. Read the last paragraph above under Construction Waste Management.

2
3
0
Raymond Loo Senior Manager, Corporate Services, MEA & Associates Limited (Hong Kong) Jul 28 2011 Guest 676 Thumbs Up

Could I get a clarification on the comments to this question "50% Furniture Used at Another One of Our Offices".

Reynaldo, are you asking about the 50% of furniture that is moved to another site or about the 50% of furniture that will be reused at the same site after completion of the project?

Susie, is your response that they could count both 50% and 50% reuse towards the MRc3.2 credit calculation? And to confirm my understanding of not qualifying for MRc2, is that the furniture is not going to be reused for 'another' purpose.

Thanks.

3
3
0
Susie Spivey-Tilson Project Management Sustainability Services, CBRE Aug 09 2011 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

I understood that Reynaldo was pursuing LEED CI for his office renovation and would be reusing 1/2 of the furniture that is currently there in the renovation and the other 1/2 of the furniture would go to a new (but existing) office that is not seeking LEED certification. The furniture that is being reused in the office being remodeled (and seeking certification) would count for MRc3.2. The furniture that is leaving the office being remodeled to go to their other office would count for MRc2 as it is being diverted from the landfill ,but that half of the furniture would not count for MRc3.2 in the remodel project as it is not being re-used in the project seeking LEED CI.

Clear as mud, right?

Post a Reply
0
0
Elizabeth Eason principal architect Elizabeth Eason Architecture LLC
Jun 02 2011
LEEDuser Member
156 Thumbs Up

existing furniture moved to new office

MRc3.3 & MRc5

We received the comment below. I am still a little confused. Are we to include costs of existing furniture (some new, some used, when purchased 6+ years ago) moved by Owner to new space at replacement value in the Division 12 costs?

The project team has provided a CSI MasterFormat 1995 Division 12 Furniture and Furnishings Cost that is reported consistently between MRc3.3: Resource Reuse, 30% of Furniture and Furnishings, and MRc5: Regional Materials. However, the total replacement value of reused furniture and furnishings reported for MRc3.3 exceeds the reported CSI MasterFormat 1995 Division 12 Furniture and Furnishings Cost. Note that the Division 12 cost must include the cost of both the new and salvaged, refurbished, or reused furniture. Please provide documentation verifying the CSI MasterFormat 1995 Division 12 Furniture and Furnishings Cost for use in both MRc3 and MRc5.

1
1
0
Anthony Brower Sustainable Design Director, Gensler Jun 02 2011 LEEDuser Member 341 Thumbs Up

Yes. You need to provide a cost to refurbish existing furniture as well as a cost to provide that furniture as new in todays market prices. The larger of the two numbers should be attributed as the product cost for both the furniture reuse, as well as the other cost related MR credits. Though re-used furniture wont qualify for recycled content, it will contribute to regional distance. The template should extract the reused cost from the recycled content credit so it does not negatively affect your calculations.

Post a Reply
0
0
James Shook
Mar 09 2011
LEEDuser Member
219 Thumbs Up

Reused Metal Shelving

We have a library renovation project that is reusing the existing shelving in the space instead of purchasing new. Since it is being used for the same purpose this guide indicates that it should not be used for credit MR3.2 but instead for MR1.2. How can a furniture item be calculated into 1.2 since it does not really have surface area?

1
1
0
Susie Spivey-Tilson Project Management Sustainability Services, CBRE Mar 09 2011 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

i think the distinction is relative to reusing them for the same purpose in the same location. If that's the case, they would qualify as built-in case goods for interior non-structural components.

Post a Reply
0
0
Max Calabro
Mar 03 2011
Guest
312 Thumbs Up

Custom Built Salvaged Wood Furniture

I'm working on a restaurant, and we're having our dining tables custom built from salvaged wood. We've been planning on getting this credit, but upon reading closer I'm not sure that our tables will count. The materials are salvaged from another site, as required, however they aren't salvaged from existing furniture. I believe we fulfill the intent of this credit, but are we technically meeting the requirements? Thanks!

1
3
0
Susie Spivey-Tilson Project Management Sustainability Services, CBRE Mar 08 2011 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

The reference guide says, on page 234, that refurbished materials such as a door that has been converted into a table, can count toward this credit or MRc3.1 but not both. So, based on that I would use it in my project. If it makes or breaks your ability to earn the credit test in out in MRc4 for recycled content and see how it contributes there. Where do you get the greatest benefit? Just remember you can only use it in one or the other, not both.

2
3
0
Max Calabro Mar 08 2011 Guest 312 Thumbs Up

We're already got all reclaimed millwork for MRc3.1, so it'll definitely go toward the furniture goal. Could this fit into MRc4 as you mentioned? Reclaimed wood seems more like reused than recycled, although the parts are reshaped and finished to make the tables. Thanks again!

3
3
0
Susie Spivey-Tilson Project Management Sustainability Services, CBRE Mar 09 2011 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

I believe you could. Of course that doesn't mean your review team will agree with me in the end. If you're not really able to claim it under MRc3.2, then it stands to reason that you deserve to be able to count it for MRc4 - and that follows the rule of not counting it in both.

If the table tops only are reclaimed but you have a 'new' base, enter it as one product, calculate the weight of the components and claim 100% post consumer on the portion of the table tops.

Post a Reply
0
0
Bryan Waters Architectural Intern WHR Architects
Jan 31 2011
Guest
382 Thumbs Up

Do reused Hospital beds qualify for furniture reuse credit?

We would like to pursue this credit, as our hospital floor renovation project registered under LEED CI v 2.0 is reusing all patient beds. However, there is a concern that patient beds may not qualify as furniture and could be considered as Medical Equipment. The CSI Masterformat Division 12 lists Healthcare Furniture as one of the items but does not specifically mention patient beds. We believe that the approach meets the 'resource reuse' intent of the credit - please let me know if any of you have came across a similar situation or have attempted the credit similarly.

1
1
0
Dave Intner Firmitas Architecture & Planning Jan 31 2011 Guest 1414 Thumbs Up

We included re-used exam room tables in a medical office building T.I. and the documentation was accepted. These are somewhat similar to hospital beds.

Post a Reply
0
0
Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager Google
Aug 24 2010
LEEDuser Expert
15937 Thumbs Up

Reused furniture works against you for MRc4?

Hi there,

I was filling out the Credit Form and realized that all my reused furniture is hurting me for MRc4, Recycled Content. This doesn't seem right.

For instance, it is my understanding that all reused furniture cannot be included under MRc4 but it is still part of the denominator. This doesn't seem fair. Anyone else notice this?

Lauren

1
12
0
Angelica Ospina Alvarado Aug 25 2010 LEEDuser Member 479 Thumbs Up

I guess you're right. The definition of reused material or reused furniture is different from the definition of recycled content, therefore you cannot use your reused furniture for credit 4, but you have to include them in your materials cost.

2
12
0
Susie Spivey-Tilson Project Management Sustainability Services, CBRE Aug 26 2010 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

Since the furniture is actually reused it stands to reason that you wouldn't also be able to call it recycled. I think this is inherent to the definition of 'reused' and 'recycled content'.However, it can contribute to MRc5.

Since the cost of all furniture has to be used in the Div 12 number it stands to reason that the reused furniture replacement value would be included. The key is perhaps in identifying the replacement value.

3
12
0
Anthony Brower Sustainable Design Director, Gensler Aug 31 2010 LEEDuser Member 341 Thumbs Up

I have completed this credit previously under the CIv2.0 system. You are correct in that reused furniture cannot contribute to MRc4 but it should not hurt your application for that credit. Previously I documented the credit by excluding the re-used furniture cost from the MRc4 template as directed by my projects review team. Now with the project cost reading from multiple credit templates it is more difficult to manually remove this value from only the MRc4 form. I would suggest following the aternate form of compliance and submitting supplementary calculations to illustrate credit compliance.

4
12
0
Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Aug 31 2010 LEEDuser Expert 15937 Thumbs Up

Thanks Anthony. You have described my exact issue here. Is there a way we can alert the GBCI to the problem so that they can fix their Credit Form?

5
12
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 31 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Anyone tried sending them a feedback request through LEED Online? I have heard that they are responsive to this kind of request.

6
12
0
Anthony Brower Sustainable Design Director, Gensler Aug 31 2010 LEEDuser Member 341 Thumbs Up

Like Lauren, I am also in the middle of this scenario for a current v2009 project. I posted a feedback query yesterday and will report back on the reply here. My plan though is to submit my calculations separately as opposed to trying to "back door" the form. I do not think that this is an issue they addressed in the beta forms yet as it is not a scenario often implemented. I think there is a lot of work to be done on the cost credit forms MRc3,4,5,6, & 7. The interface is very clunk and laborious.

7
12
0
Susie Spivey-Tilson Project Management Sustainability Services, CBRE Sep 01 2010 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

After looking into this further I have also submitted a feedback request for this credit. This will be my first time documenting it under v3 so I looked back and found that, as Anthony stated above, this is an issue for everyone since the form updates have not addressed this. I will also post the response I get here. In the meantime, I will also submit separate calculations showing MRc3.2 costs subtracted from Div 12 costs.

8
12
0
Anthony Brower Sustainable Design Director, Gensler Sep 01 2010 LEEDuser Member 341 Thumbs Up

Well, here it is:
"Yes, the value of reused materials is subtracted from the total materials cost for MRc4. The beta version of this form has two major problems; one is that it does not subtract the reused materials value from the total material cost for MRc4, and the other is that the tables are not linked as there were intended to be. There are new forms available for upgrade that have fixed both these issues. You have two choices to document points for MRc4. Either fill in the table in the current form and then submit correct credit calculations in special circumstances, or upgrade all the MR forms and re-enter the material data.

If you choose to keep the forms you have, you would select special circumstances and state that there is an error in the form and the value of reused furniture is not subtracting from the total materials cost for MRc4. This is a known issue the reviewers are familiar with.

If you choose to upgrade your MR forms, both of the tables will link across MR3.2, 4.1, and 5. Although you would lose the data entered in the table currently you would only have to re-enter it once."

9
12
0
Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Sep 01 2010 LEEDuser Expert 15937 Thumbs Up

Wow, thanks a lot Anthony!

10
12
0
Lauren Sparandara Sustainability Manager, Google Sep 01 2010 LEEDuser Expert 15937 Thumbs Up

Anyone know how long it takes between when you submit your request for new Credit Forms and you see your new Credit Forms for your project on LEED Online?

I just followed their protocol but am wondering how long I should tell my project team from entering anything on LEED Online?

https://www.leedonline.com/irj/go/km/docs/documents/usgbc/leed/config/co...

11
12
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 01 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

I received an email notice that my LOv3 forms were updated within a couple days.

12
12
0
Dave Intner Firmitas Architecture & Planning Nov 14 2010 Guest 1414 Thumbs Up

It's worth noting that the original ID+C Reference Guide text did not indicate that the MRc3.2 costs were to be excluded from MRc4, but that the 4/14/2010 addenda made it clear that this is indeed the case (revisions to pages 241 and 249). This underscores the importance of reviewing the current Addenda for any project you are documenting. Current Addenda available at:

http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=6394

Post a Reply
0
0
Angelica Ospina Alvarado
Jul 29 2010
LEEDuser Member
479 Thumbs Up

Reused furniture

I'm documenting the credit MR c3.2 and i have the following question. How do I present the 20% of cutsheets when the furniture is reused?. We are bringing furniture from the old office to use it in the new office, due to the lack of information that we have about the contractors, I want to know if it is completely necesary to include this cutsheets. We don't have them because the furniture is too old.

1
2
0
David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Jul 30 2010 LEEDuser Expert 17947 Thumbs Up

I think it would be reasonable to write a narrative explaining your strategy and upload that in place of the cutsheets. To minimize the chance of being second-guessed by the reviewer, it might help to provide some additional documentation that helps verify your story, whether photographs, part of the contract, drawings, specifications, work order, memo, or anything that indicates this is what's being done.

You can always use the check box and narrative at the end of most letter templates that indicates an alternative compliance path when your project doesn't exactly fit what the letter template is requiring.

2
2
0
Susie Spivey-Tilson Project Management Sustainability Services, CBRE Aug 02 2010 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

If you hover your mouse of the 20% Cut *** column in that template it notes that the column isn't applicable to MRc3.2, only MRc4-7. If for 7, then an invoice must also be included.

Hope that helps.

Post a Reply

Start a new LEED comment thread

Nov 25 2014
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2014 – BuildingGreen, Inc.