CI-2009 MRc7: Certified Wood

  • CI MRc7 Type3 Wood Diagram
  • Is it worth it?

    This credit can be easy and with little or no cost premium if your project only has a small amount of wood. A multifamily high-rise, for example, may have little wood on the project except for doors and cabinetry. In this case, it would be easy to reach the 50% Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) threshold.

    Projects with more wood might encounter a larger upfront cost, but have the potential to demonstrate their environmental values of sustainable forestry management. Projects can also go above the 50% threshold and earn an ID point for 95% FSC certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System.. For example, a commercial interior fit-out for an investment bank involved large amounts of wood veneers and millwork. The project purchased 97% FSC-certified wood, earning an additional exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point under IDc1.

    No minimum amount of wood

    This credit awards points for dedicating 50% or more of your total new wood budget to wood-based products or materials that are FSC certified. 

    You can use as much or as little total wood as you want—as long as 50% of it is FSC-certified. If you make it 95%, you earn an extra point for exemplary performance. 

    More wood = more challenging

    If wood is a big part of your project, with a lot of wood flooring, framing, or veneers, you’re unlikely to earn this credit unless you can find a source of FSC-certified wood for those items that’s within your budget. Projects without wood as a big-ticket item should focus instead on other wood materials, including blocking, millwork, and wood finish materials, as well as casework, and wood composites.

    All projects should get their subcontractor, vendor, or lumberyard on board to price available—and preferably regional, for MRc5—FSC-certified products early in the process. You can usually find an FSC-certified version of what you need, but it sometimes takes longer to arrive.

    Not all FSC-certified products are equal

    Architectural Millwork produces finished and unfinished FSC-certified stock and custom molding and paneling (including radius paneling and millwork) for commercial and residential projects.

    Pay attention to the different types of FSC certification. You can find these on product cut sheets: 

    • FSC 100%  (previously "FSC Pure"): Valued at 100% of product cost. 
    • FSC Mix Credit: Valued at 100% of product cost.
    • FSC Mix (XX)%: A percentage of FSC content is indicated and you can claim that percentage of the wood product’s cost. For example, FSC Mixed 50%, means that you can claim 50% of the wood product’s cost.
    • FSC Recycled and FSC Recycled Credit: These do not count towards this credit and can be left out of the baseline wood budget. FSC Recycled wood can count towards MRc4: Recycled Content. 

    Chain-of-custodyChain-of-custody (COC) is he path taken by raw materials, processed materials, and products from the forest to the consumer, including all successive stages of processing, transformation, manufacturing and distribution. A chain-of-custody certificate number on invoices for nonlabeled products indicates that the certifier’s guidelines for product accounting have been followed. A chain-of-custody certification is not required by distributors of a product that is individually labeled with the Forest Stewardship Council logo and manufacturer’s chain-of-custody number. Chain of Custody (CoC) certification requirements are determined by Forest Stewardship Council Chain of Custody Standard 40-004 v2-1. certification

    Wood is FSC-certified if it comes from the right forests. To ensure that the same FSC-certified wood that leaves the forest arrives at your building without being mixed up with conventional wood, FSC oversees another certification process—chain-of-custody certification, or CoC.

    The FSC-certified Collins Almanor Forest in Northern California has been logged five times in the last 50 years.

    CoC certification tracks FSC-certified wood as it moves through harvesting, production, manufacturing, and distributing chains. In order for your LEED project to make a claim about FSC wood you use, you need to make sure that the product is handled by operations carrying CoC certifications at every step. Those needing CoC certifications (see Checklists for more detail) should provide their certification number on their invoices. Certified operators can also be found on the FSC website.

    Why FSC?

    The Forest Stewardship Council is a nonprofit organization that was created to set an international standard for responsible forest management, and to track and certify wood products from well-managed forests. FSC certification ensures that your wood products have come from third-party-certified forests that comply with the FSC principles and criteria. 

    The "wood wars"

    FSC is only one of dozens of forest certification programs in the world. Others include the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) label. FSC currently remains the only program recognized for this credit. Following lengthy development of a more inclusive policy at USGBC, USGBC membership voted to reject the new policy. BuildingGreen.com, a sister publication to LEEDuser, chronicled the extensive debate over FSC and other certification schemes in a series of articles, including articles looking at the impact of certification on jobs, on climate change, and the future of forest certification in LEED.

    Although FSC provides the certification standard, other groups provide the audits that determine whether certification can actually be awarded to a forest. The two groups most commonly seen here are SmartWood and SCS Global Services.

    Rapidly renewable materials

    Woody rapidly renewable materials like bamboo and cork have not generally been covered by this credit, because they are not conventional lumber products, because they are already covered under MRc6: Rapidly Renewable Materials (except for LEED-CS), and because FSC certification had not been available for these products until recently. However, with the advent of FSC-certified bamboo products, teams may include bamboo and cork in MRc7, at their discretion. It would only be advantageous to do so if you are using FSC-certified products; otherwise, it would make credit compliance harder.

    FAQs for MRc7

    We are pursuing IEQc4.5 from LEED-CI as an ID credit. Are we then required to include the cost of furniture in MRc3–7?

    No, per LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #3901.

    What building components are typically purchased with FSC content to earn this credit?

    Big-ticket items commonly used for this credit include flooring and subflooring, framing, doors and door cores, wood finishes, and casework.

    We’re having trouble getting FSC wood within our budget. Can we use products with another forestry certification?

    No. Only forestry products certified by the FSC can contribute to earning MRc7. Wood products that are not FSC-certified, including those certified to SFI or PEFC, can still contribute to MRc5, though.

    Do I need to provide invoices for all of the new wood products purchased for the project, or just FSC wood products?

    GBCI had required invoices for all wood products, but has switched to requiring only invoices for FSC certified products, per the April 2008 FSC memo, which states that all invoices must be collected, but they do not need to be submitted. The reviewer does not need to see those to determine compliance.

    Certified wood invoices must contain the FSC Chain of Custody (CoC) tracking number, and indicate whether the product is “FSC 100%,” “FSC Mix Credit” or “FSC Mix [NN]%.”

    I have supporting manufacturer documentation for the FSC wood used on our project. Is this enough to document this credit, or do I need invoices as well?

    Per the previous question, you do not need to submit invoices for all wood products, but you must collect invoices in order to determine the cost of wood products on the project.

    Can products labeled “FSC Recycled” or “FSC Recycled Credit” contribute towards MRc7? What about "FSC Mix" percentages that refer to recycled content?

    Because this credit focuses on "new" wood, products that are 100% recycled content may not be counted as certified wood under MRc7, and should be excluded from the total cost of new wood materials. However, those purchases could qualify for credit under MRc4: Recycled Content.

    Some FSC Mix products combine recycled and "new" content, in which case project teams must decide how to classify the product. This is addressed in LEED Interpretation #10372, which states, "Products identified as FSC Mix Credit or FSC Mix [NN] % also have pre- or post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product. recycled content, the latter of which is commonly reported separately by the product manufacturer. In these instances the project team must choose whether to classify the product (or some fraction of the assembly) as FSC certified or as recycled content; the material cannot contribute to both claims simultaneously."

    In other words, if a product is FSC Mix and also has recycled content, project teams have to choose which "environmental attribute" they will use to classify the product, and it (and its dollar value) will either go into an FSC "bucket" or into a recycled-content "bucket." 

    Does FSC-certified wood automatically contribute to IEQc4.4 as a low-emitting material?

    No, but it is common to find FSC composite woodComposite wood consists of wood or plant particles or fibers bonded by a synthetic resin or binder. Examples include particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), wheatboard, and strawboard. products that meet IEQc4.4 requirements.

    We are using a lot of reclaimed wood. Should we include this in our MRc7 calculations? What about wood that is already installed on the project, in a renovation? What about wood products with recycled content?

    MRc7 only applies to "new" wood. Reclaimed, reused, or recycled wood should not be included in MRc7 calculations.

    Does FSC-certified bamboo products count towards this credit?

    Yes. Bamboo is considered a forest product by FSC even though it’s technically a grass, and it’s often as a forest product in materials like plywood, veneer, and flooring. It can contribute to both the Certified Wood and also the Rapidly Renewable Materials credits. See LEED Interpretation #2535, issued 4/22/2009, for more information.

    A product has FSC-certified veneer, but a non-certified core. Can we prorate the MRc7 contribution of this product based on the cost of the veneer?

    No. If the product is built off-site then the entire assembly (the product which is shipped to site) must have an FSC label from the manufacturer of the assembly. Individual components, unless they are shipped to site and thereby complete the chain, may not contribute towards this credit. All entities that possess FSC materials until the product reaches the project site must have a chain-of-custody certification.

    Should wood used on site features such as benches or a gazebo be included here?

    Yes. If it is new wood and it is in your LEED project boundary, you should count it.

    Is there a minimum quantity of wood that must be used on the project to qualify for this credit?

    No, as long as some wood is used, no minimum threshold has been established. If you are not using any new wood on the project, you are not eligible for this credit.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Schematic Design

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  • Consider using FSC-certified wood on the project. Start by looking at the project’s applications for wood-based products. Wood blocking, framing, doors, millwork and wood finishes play a large role in obtaining this credit.   


  • Before identifying wood species and grades, check to see what FSC wood is readily available from local suppliers and try to design using those materials. 


  • FSC wood is becoming easier to find.  An increasing number of vendors and suppliers offer FSC wood as the consumer demand has increased.


  • There may be a price premium for FSC wood, depending on location, type of wood, and availability, but nationally the cost is becoming more competitive with conventional wood. This natural beaver pond in Lakeview, Oregon shows the potential for habitat protection in a working forest.For example, a project in New York City found a premium of 25% on high-end custom doors. A commercial interior fit-out project in New York found a 50% price premium on decorative hardwood veneers, while a core and shell project in New York found only a 5% price premium on wood blocking and plywood.  A school renovation project in Boulder, Colorado saw a 13% increase for FSC-certified wood flooring and 20% cost increase on ½” CDX FSC-certified new plywood.

     

Design Development

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  • All new wood products, including furniture, must be listed in line-item fashion in the documentation, whether FSC-certified or not. 


  • It is optional to add temporary wood structures such as sidewalk partitions, bracing, or concrete forms to the baseline wood budget. If added, however, the temporary wood structures can only count toward one project’s certification (that is, if reused on another LEED project, they cannot count toward MRc7 there). Also, if temporary wood structures are calculated towards the credit compliance, all temporary wood structures need to be counted in the baseline (essentially, you can’t just calculate FSC certified wood structures and not non-FSC certified wood structures). Unless the temporary structures are FSC-certified wood, it is not generally to your advantage to bring the baseline budget higher by adding them.


  • The baseline wood budget should be consistent across all wood products mentioned in MRc3–7. The LEED Online credit form helps ensure consistency.


  • To determine how much FSC wood you will need to incorporate into your project, look at the baseline wood budget. Determine how much you want to spend on certified wood. 50% of the wood budget cost will give the project one point and 95% will give the project one ID point for exemplary performance. Go through the project’s preliminary budget, identify what wood items could be purchased FSC-certified, and check to see whether these items add up to the amount needed to get the desired LEED points.


  • Include a cushion for this credit in case of changes in design and purchasing. For example, if you are counting on one point for using 50% certified wood, plan on using 60% of your wood budget for certified wood in order to avoid coming up short.


  • Using the estimated budget to integrate certified wood into the design and specs early in the process can help prevent costly change orders during construction.


  • Use your estimated budget as a guide throughout the project. Many projects fail to earn this credit because they wait until all the materials have been purchased before calculating whether they have purchased enough FSC-certified wood to gain the LEED credit. 


  • Focus on “big ticket” wood items first. Materials like flooring, custom millwork, and framing, if they meet the certified wood requirement, may represent enough value to earn the credit. This approach allows you to Iimit the number of certified wood items you need to track and document, reducing contractor headaches and keeping overall costs low. If big-ticket items are not enough, target medium-priced items next, until you reach your goal.


  • For some CI projects, like high-end offices, furniture costs can be equal to or greater than costs for building materials. Make sure to choose furniture that helps the project gain multiple MR points (for example, furniture that is locally harvested and made of certified wood). 


  • A single product or material can contribute to multiple credits. For example, cabinetry made both locally and with certified wood contributes to MRc5 as well as MRc7. Focusing on products and materials with multiple environmental attributes can also limit the overall number of items that must be tracked. 


  • There is no minimum amount of wood you need to earn this credit. If the project does not use a lot of wood, and your baseline wood budget is low, purchase 95% FSC wood to gain two points (for credit and exemplary performance) at very low cost.


  • Pay attention to the different types of FSC certification, which you can find on product cut sheets. You will need a letter, cut sheet, or statement from the vendor indicating the type of FSC certification.

    • FSC Pure: valued at 100% of product cost. 
    • FSC Mixed Credit: valued at 100% of product cost.
    • FSC Mixed (XX)%: A percentage of FSC content is indicated, and you can claim that percentage of the product’s cost. 
    • FSC Recycled and FSC Recycled Credit: do not count toward this credit at all and can be left out of the baseline wood budget. FSC Recycled can count towards MRc4 Recycled Content.

  • FSC Recycled and FSC Recycled Credit: do not count toward this credit at all and can be left out of the baseline wood budget. FSC Recycled can count towards MRc4 Recycled Content.


  • Assemblies


  • When a product is made of multiple materials that may or may not all be FSC certified, use the following special considerations.


  • The cost value for the LEED calculation is determined by weight or volume as a percentage of the total. See the example below, and a spreadsheet you can use in the Documentation Toolkit.


  • Request that manufacturers provide assembly information broken down by weight, volume, or cost. 


  • It is unwise to assume that 100% of an assembly is FSC-certified, just because the product literature says that it is. Double-check with the manufacturer on what percentage of the assembly (by weight or volume choosing one consistently) is FSC wood and allocate that percentage of the total assembly cost toward the credit calculations.

Construction Documents

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  • Revisit the baseline wood budget as the design evolves to make sure your numbers remain accurate and that you remain on track to achieve your goal for the credit.


  • Research specific products and incorporate FSC wood requirements into individual construction specifications. Require that vendors provide FSC Chain of Custody (CoC) tracking numbers on invoices, breakdown of wood costs and cut sheets.  See USGBC’s policy memo on CoC tracking for detail. (See Resources.)


  • Project contractors, subcontractors, and furniture installers are not required to be CoC certified, as long as they do not modify products beyond what is required for installation, according to the LEED Reference Guide.  However, vendors, suppliers, manufacturers are required to hold and provide CoC tracking numbers as the product moves throughout the supply chain.


  • You will need a letter, cut sheet, or statement from the vendor indicating what kind of FSC certification the wood has: FSC Pure or FSC mixed. FSC Recycled wood counts toward MRc4: Recycled Content, not this credit.


  • For guidance and sample specification language for incorporating LEED specifications into construction documents, see MasterSpec, or the Whole Building Design Guide. (See Resources.)


  • Incorporating the LEED requirements directly into the drawings as well as into the specs is a good way to remind the contractor and subcontractors of the requirements. 


  • Whenever possible, designate in the construction specifications that contractors use specific product manufacturers that you have verified as suppliers of FSC-certified wood items. This will help save research time for the contractors.


  • Include submittal requirements within each targeted construction spec section and add general requirements to the Division 1 bid package. Include a copy of any submittal documents that the contractor may need to fill out.


  • Carefully review manufacturer data. Don’t pay attention to vague claims such as “Our product will give you a certified wood LEED point” (when it will only contribute to the credit). No matter what the manufacturer claims, you’ll still need to collect actual costs and FSC Chain-of-Custody numbers. 


  • Some projects require materials submittals from contractors as a stipulation of payment to ensure that contractors provide all the needed documentation.


  • There may be a longer lead time for ordering FSC wood. Make sure to order FSC wood early. Check with manufacturers early to learn about possible delays.

Construction

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  • Preparation Before Construction Begins


  • The general contractor (GC) is oriented to this credit and the need to track FSC-certified wood, along with being oriented to all of their responsibilities, including construction IAQ management, low-emitting materials, environmental materials tracking, and construction waste management. 


  • LEED documentation and materials tracking are usually the GC’s responsibility even though specific materials selection may have been already determined by the architect or designer.


  • The GC should hold an orientation meeting with the subcontractors to review the LEED responsibilities related specifically to their trades. This exercise helps to build trust and is crucial for obtaining buy-in from all participants in the process.


  • Give the GC and subcontractors the following tools to help them track materials data for all MR and IEQ credits. (See the Documentation Toolkit for access.)

    • Materials Calculator:  This is a master tracking spreadsheet that the GC can use internally to compile product information received from the subcontractors. The spreadsheet tracks LEED values across multiple LEED MR and IEQ credits.
    • Environmental Materials Reporting Form: This is a material tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values for products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing. 
    • Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form: This is a VOC tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing.
    • Low-Emitting Material Limits: These tables, found with each credit here on LEEDuser, summarize the maximum VOC limits for different types of adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, composite wood, and flooring products. When subcontractors search for low-emitting products, they should consult these charts.

  • Enabling coordination and communication among the GC, subcontractors and design team early in the process can minimize scheduling delays and pushback from subcontractors.


  • Do additional research on the availability of any FSC-certified wood that you did not already research during the design phase before construction begins to ensure that the project earns this credit. If product decisions are made after construction begins, there may be less time to carefully review data sheets and much greater risk of using a noncompliant product.


  • During Construction


  • The contractor starts gathering and environmental data and cut sheets from subcontractors for approval. 


  • The GC functions as the overall quality assurance provider for this credit. Responsibilities include conducting weekly reviews of subcontractor product submittals and tracking forms including checking that CoC numbers have been provided for FSC wood.


  • Review subcontractor product suggestions ahead of time to avoid the purchase of inappropriate materials and eliminate the need for costly change orders.  


  • Streamline documentation and research by taking data gathered from subcontractors via the Environmental Materials Reporting Form and transfer it into a master spreadsheet for all the items being tracked across MR and IEQ credits. (See Documentation Toolkit.) For example, you may need to ask the millwork contractor for certified wood information for this credit, and information on urea-formaldehyde-free products for IEQc4.4. If one spreadsheet collects all the data, it can streamline your documentation, associated research, and help with quality control. 


  • A master spreadsheet facilitates information collection for subcontractors, giving them a road map of exactly what types of information to collect for each product.  


  • Assign a responsible party to input the subcontractors’ tracking forms into the Materials Calculator (see Documentation Toolkit). A LEED consultant or an administrative assistant in the GC’s office may be the best choice for this role.


  • Breaking out specific materials costs (excluding labor) for construction materials that contribute to LEED credits is a requirement for LEED MR credits. Some subcontractors prefer not to do this because there are always hidden markups in the materials that subcontractors purchase at wholesale. However, you can simply include the product markup when breaking out a product’s material cost from installation and labor costs.


  • Transfer all the data collected in the Materials Calculator spreadsheet (see Documentation Toolkit) to the LEED Online form and upload the product cut sheets. 


  • Only a random 20% sampling of product cut sheets need to be uploaded to LEED Online to document this credit.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Keep a list of FSC-certified wood products used on the project so that O&M staff can use these products for future renovations.


  • Develop FSC-certified wood procurement recommendations and incorporate them into a purchasing policy. If pursuing EBOM certification, this will contribute to MRp1: Sustainable Purchasing Policy.  

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    MR Credit 7: Certified wood

    1 Point

    Intent

    To encourage environmentally responsible forest management.

    Requirements

    When using new wood-based products and materials, use a minimum of 50% that are certified in accordance with the Forest Stewardship Council’s principles and criteria. Division 12 (Furniture) material value is included in the determination of the certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. content.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Establish a project goal for FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts.-certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. products and identify suppliers that can achieve this goal. During construction, ensure that the FSC-certified wood products are installed and quantify the total percentage of FSCcertified wood products installed.

Organizations

Revised Requirements for Documenting the Use of FSC Certified Wood in LEED

This is a memo from the USGBC clarifying how to address the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. calculation and detailing what documentation needs to be provided.


Forest Stewardship Council, United States

For information and practical tools such as databases of certified product suppliers, referral services, specification language, and the “Designing and Building with FSC” guide and forms.


Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG) — Federal Green Construction Guide for Specifiers

Support on incorporating LEED requirements into specifications. 


FSC Facts and Figures

This slide deck shows the global FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certified forest area by region. In North America, FSC forests account for 40.74% of certified forests.

Assembly Calculator

If your project has furniture or assemblies such as built-in bookshelves that mix certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. with steel or other materials that are not certified wood, you'll need to calculate the portion of the certified-wood portion of the assembly. This calculator can help.

Chain-of-Custody Certificate

Manufacturers should provide their FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Chain of Custody (CoC) certification number on invoices. They may also provide their CoC certificate, like the sample shown here.

Product Cut Sheets

Look to product cut sheets like the sample shown here for information on how a wood product can contribute to credit for certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System.. Note the annotated LEEDuser tips on the attached PDF document.

Materials Calculator

Teams can use this tool to track all materials across various MR and IEQ credits. It helps teams develop a roadmap of what information needs to be tracked for different products. It can also be used early on to create the baseline budget and ensure the products that are being used will apply to the various credit thresholds.

Environmental Materials Reporting Form

This is a materials tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values of products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing.

Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form

This is a VOC tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing. Use it specifically for earning low-emitting materials credits, but in conjunction with documentation for MR credits.

Letter to Contractor for MR and IEQ Credits

Use a letter like this sample to orient the contractor to their responsibilities for all MR and IEQ credits. This letter is an introduction that can be customized for the credits your project is pursuing.

LEED Online Forms: CI-2009 MR

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CI-2009 MR credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

98 Comments

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Viktor Reutherborg Trainee NCC Construction Sverige
Aug 12 2014
LEEDuser Member
11 Thumbs Up

FSC MIX

I'm working on my first LEED project and have a problem with the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certification regarding our doors. The project is located in Sweden and FSC in Sweden hasn't been able to help me (LEED is not very common in Sweden).

My problem is that my supplier want to label them "FSC Mix" and not FSC Mix[%] or FSC Mix Credit. When I ask FSC they say that the most common way to label FSC products are FSC Mix (without percentage or credit claim). How does this work with LEED? I need a percentage to show how much is FSC. Our supplier says she can write a certificate and certify how much is FSC wood but it will still only be labeled FSC MIX. Have anyone been in the same situation?

Thanks in advance!

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Judy Landwehr Product Compliance & Training Manager, Masonite Architectural Aug 12 2014 Guest 761 Thumbs Up

A claim on a product/invoice stating only FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Mix is non-compliant to the FSC standard. There are two types of FSC Mix claims. They are FSC Mix Credit or FSC Mix % as you have noted. The invoice and shipping documents must clearly identify which products are FSC with the respective claim including the % if it is a percentage based claim.

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Viktor Reutherborg Trainee, NCC Construction Sverige Aug 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 11 Thumbs Up

I think I've misunderstood something but I don't know what. I spoke with FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. and they said that FSC Mix is a correct labeling. If I got an invoice with a COC number and the label FSC Mix (without a percentage or credit claim) that would be a correct invoice/labeling. This meant that at least 70% was FSC wood and the rest controlled wood and that was enough to make it count as a FSC Certified product. I then suspected this was something only in FSC Sweden but they said it's the same globally. Apparently, there is something I've misunderstood but I don't know what.

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William Weaver Sustainability Practice Lead JLL
May 21 2014
LEEDuser Member
1362 Thumbs Up

ecoscorecard vs. invoice

In the past, whenever I have pursued MRc7, I have always provided invoices as supporting documentation. However, on a current project, the furniture vendor / manufacturer is refusing to provide an invoice, but has provided a fully executed ecoscorecard. The scorecard provides the material cost, percentage of wood-based product, FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. designations, percentages for FSC mixed where applicable, etc. For all intensive purposes, the ecoscorecard appears to provide all required documentation in support of the credit.

Ecoscorecard is widely accepted as supporting documentation for all other MR credits, as well as IEQ credits. However, will it be accepted for MRc7? MRc7 is unique among the other credits, as it is the only credit that requires an actual invoice be provided. Has anyone successfully attained MRc7 using ecoscorecard as supporting documentation in lieu of an invoice.?

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William Weaver Sustainability Practice Lead, JLL Aug 08 2014 LEEDuser Member 1362 Thumbs Up

I submitted this inquiry to GBCI and received a response indicating that the ecoscorecard CAN be used in substitution of a vendor invoice provided that the ecoscorecard contains all required FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. documentation - COC numbers, material cost, percentage of wood-based product, FSC designations, percentages of FSC mixed where applicable, etc.

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Mauricio Ramirez
Mar 13 2014
Guest
605 Thumbs Up

Can FSC Product Certification replace invoices?

Hello. I'm pursuing this credit on a project in Mexico City. I have mainly two products from new wood: Mohawk engineering floor, from which I have the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Certification for the species of wood my floor is made off. The othe rproduct is flooring wood from which I have my vendor invoice and his COC certification but for fiscal reasons, the COC does-not appear on the invoice but it is the same name from which I have the COC certification. We want to get the credit since we have made the right purchasing, but have this paperwork issue. How do you assess the chances to get this credit?

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Susan Di Giulio Project Manager Zinner Consultants
Jan 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
1184 Thumbs Up

MRI room speciality construction

Hi,
We are working on a medical research facility that has copper-lined MRI rooms. These room assemblies are factory built and are in the 13000 section of the specs, so the material should be exempt from MRc4 & 5, but there is some plywood included in the factory assembled product. Does this wood cost, FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. or not (probably not, since we didn't even know wood was in there) get counted for MRc7 purposes?

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Lara Schneider
Sep 10 2013
Guest
98 Thumbs Up

Products with Recycled Content

Ok, from what I am gathering, wood products with both recycled content and FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. mixed cannot count for both MR4 and MR7, correct? So if I choose to count these products under MR4, how do I address these products in MR7?

Which way do I approach it?

A) Don't count them in MR7 at all - input 0% for new wood, therefore not counting the products in the MR7 calcs at all.
OR
B) Acknowledge that they have some new wood (whatever percentage that may be) and input 0% under under new wood that is FSC certified, essentially lowering my percentage for MR7.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Lara, this credit only covers "new" wood Recycled wood can be ignored here.

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Steve Zuwala
Jul 24 2013
LEEDuser Member
6 Thumbs Up

FSC COC for subcontractors

I have a subcontractor that purchased COC certified materials from COC certified suppliers. The subcontractor modified materials and installed, are they also required to carry a COC certification?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jul 24 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15702 Thumbs Up

If they did more than trim items to fit, then yes they must also continue the COC chain and provide the proper documentation. For example, if they bought FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. plywood and made cabinets, they must have the COC.

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Kevin Dunham Architect GSA
May 29 2013
LEEDuser Member
126 Thumbs Up

New vs. Recycled Wood

Is paint-grade molding (made from short pieces finger-jointed together to form a usable length) considered new wood or recycled wood (presumably 100% pre-consumer)?

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Doug Pierce, AIA Architect / Sustainability Strategist , Perkins+Will May 29 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2250 Thumbs Up

Hi Kevin - Good Question.

One clue to consider, is the manufacturer claiming it to be pre-consumer? (Consider that manufacturers don't always know how to authentically define pre-consumer and I've seen pre-consumer claims made that didn't really qualify).

This one is clearly all about the definition of 'pre-consumer recycled content' and it may require some investigating on your part to find out the early life of those short-pieces. It is very likely they are 'new wood' unless they are starting off at the factory as post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product....particularly if the short pieces are recovered as off-fall from other moulding production (or similar operations) at the moulding factory in question OR if the shorts are readily marketable / valuable and clearly not headed for the landfill or as fuel for a biomass burner.

The FTC has this to say about pre-consumer recycled content and this document is referenced in LEED 2009 MR 4:
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PART 260—GUIDES FOR THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS

§ 260.13 Recycled content claims
"If the source of recycled content includes pre-consumer material, the advertiser should have substantiation that the pre-consumer material would otherwise have entered the waste stream."

(Excerpt from the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations - May 29th, 2013 located here): http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?c=ecfr&SID=1878c6359e4c8ee6abba22eb...

------------------------------------------------------------------------

I did some digging on this years ago to try and figure out what constituted 'substantiation' of a pre-consumer claim and at that time found a reputable / credible source (which I cannot recall at the moment, however I believe it was an FTC document) that required a commercial transaction to occur between (2) entities in which one transferred ownership of a waste product to another entity for their use as feedstock.

Doug

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Lara Schneider
Apr 23 2013
Guest
98 Thumbs Up

Reconstituted Veneer

Does anyone know if reconstituted veneer has to be counted under MR7? I am dealing with a furniture manufacturer that uses (as an option) reconstituted veneer that is not FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certified, but I am not sure if I would even need to count it for MR7. Thoughts?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Lara, this sounds like recycled content and not applicable under MRc7. 

Wood can be FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certified for recycled or reclaimed content, but that is not what this credit is about.

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Eric Thompson Architect NBBJ
Jan 31 2013
LEEDuser Member
395 Thumbs Up

FSC Invoices, Chain of Custody, and Certified Wood Cost

I'm working on a project in Norway and I'm somewhat confused about the documentation for Certified WoodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System..

The Reference Guide states: Collect all *vendor* invoices for permanently installed wood products, FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certified or not, purchased by the project contractor and subcontractors. Vendors are defined as those companies that sell products to the project contractor or subcontractors”.

So I read this as saying I *only* need invoices from vendors – correct? Not earlier in the supply chain? The diagram in the Reference Guide (Figure 1, page 270) seems to imply that organizations earlier in the supply chain need to provide documentation too (forest needs certificate, transportation company may need CoC ). Or is this covered by the invoice? The form on LEED Online only asks for 100% of “invoices”. I’ve asked around, and people I know have gotten project certified both ways.

Also, I have a casework sub providing casework, and their organization has FSC certification, and I have a document stating that. According to this FAQ helpfully posted previously https://us.fsc.org/frequently-asked-questions.296.htm “All other organizations will need to be FSC CoC certified in order for the certified wood products they fabricate and install to count toward MRc7. This includes organizations like cabinetmakers and architectural millworkers that manufacture products off-site and then install them on-site (even if considered a subcontractor).” So they comply with this.

But, I’m unclear who is the vendor in this case – the casework shop, or the people who sold the wood to them? If the casework shop is the vendor (selling to the contractor), then they need to provide an invoice for that sale (to the contractor)?

The second question is more to gain any insight (I think I know the answer). Why does this credit require not only itemizing the *non* FSC new wood, but also requires you to provide invoices for this non-FSC wood? Other credits, for example MRc4 - Recycled, allow you to just report only the qualifying recycled material, and not even itemize the non-recycled material. Why is this credit different? Why can’t you just report the total cost of all new wood and just provide the documentation for the certified wood? I am having a difficult time getting this documentation, and I don't understand the point of it.

Thanks

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Doug Pierce, AIA Architect / Sustainability Strategist , Perkins+Will Mar 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2250 Thumbs Up

Eric - You should need properly documented invoices from the final vendor only. What's shown in the reference guide illustration is that FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. is a 'Chain of Custody' meaning that there is a hand-off of confirming documentaion that occurs as the wood works it's way from the forest to the building through one entity after another.

The casework shop is the vendor that needs to provide an MRc7 compliant invoice for the FSC Certified assemblies they have created (by modifying FSC certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System., plywood, particleboard, etc). If an entity opens up bundles of FSC wood, plywood, etc and / or modifies FSC product and resells it, then that entity must be FSC certified so they continue the chain- of-custody process / documentation.

The MRc7 credit requires that you provide information for the Non-FSC wood because MRc7 compliance is measured against the total permanent wood used on the project, not the total of all materials used on the project (which the other MR credits such a s MRc4 recycled content are measured against)

Best,
Doug

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Ryan McEvoy Owner Gaia Development
Jan 25 2013
LEEDuser Member
193 Thumbs Up

FSC lagging?

The majority of the wood on a project I am working on is the lagging. Does anyone know if there is any exemption for lagging for the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. wood credit? There's some discussion as to whether it is "permanently installed" ... Has anyone encountered this on a project?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 25 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Ryan, can you give more detail on what application the lagging is being used in? That term can mean a couple different things, to my knowledge.

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Chris Voros Project Manager, LEED AP BD+C, James G. Davis Construction Corporation Jun 05 2013 Guest 6 Thumbs Up

I am not sure about Ryan, but I have same question specifically regarding lagging (or timber sheeting) used in support of excavation systems. It remains in the ground but is only used temporarily from a construction standpoint, and technically it is not part of the "building components" referenced in the credit description. The requirement for FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. lagging seems to vary widely among project types and LEED consultants that I have encountered.

Does lagging in this sense need to be accounted for in the FSC-wood calculations for MR credit 7?

I have not found a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for this anywhere- if there is one, please point me in the right direction.

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Doug Pierce, AIA Architect / Sustainability Strategist , Perkins+Will Jun 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2250 Thumbs Up

Hi Chris - That one definitely falls in a grey area. I am not aware of an interpretation that clarifies this issue, however there may be one out there. I would expect this question from an NC project, not a CI project. So I would answer from that perspective as this is about the base building construction - right?

The LEED NC V2009 MR 7 credit says to "Use...wood-based materials and products....for wood building components. These components include
at a minimum, structural framing and general dimensional framing, flooring, sub-flooring, wood doors and finishes. Include only materials permanently installed in the project. Wood products purchased for temporary use on the project (e.g., formwork, bracing, scaffolding, sidewalk protection, and guard rails) may be included in the calculation at the project team’s discretion."

The language outlines "components" to "include at a minimum", thus the list of included elements is clearly not all encompassing and it outlines structural and dimensional wood -- the lagging tends to fall towards those categories. Also, the overarching language in the V2009 BC+C Reference Guide Calculation section is to include "all new wood products." Thus including new wood is the default, with exceptions (such as temporary wood). This language leans towards including the lagging since it is presumably new wood and it never leaves the project site once it arrives,

Also, in this case, I would split hairs over the credit language "in the project" and "on the project". The lagging is permanently installed "in" the LEED project (in this case, presumably, the lagging is permanently and literally installed within the LEED boundary) and, as noted above, it is not temporarily "on the project" like formwork, barricades and the other examples cited in the credit langauge. These items are frequently reused from project to project, the lagging is used only on this project, permanently. This language also leans towards including the lagging in the calculation.

Sorry for the long post, but this one definitely needs some parsing.
Best,
Doug

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Christina Welzel Consultant Alpha Energy & Environment
Nov 27 2012
Guest
26 Thumbs Up

To include or not to include windows

Hello LEEDuser team, do I need to include windows with wooden frames into the calculation? The windows have been fitted during construction stage and were not part of the tenant fit-out. Thank you.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Nov 27 2012 LEEDuser Expert 15702 Thumbs Up

You only report on the items you control. If the windows were in the core and shell package, they aren't items you control.

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Christina Welzel Consultant, Alpha Energy & Environment Nov 28 2012 Guest 26 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Susan, for confirming that.

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Ward Miller Chief Environmental Officer Alpenglow Advisory
Sep 26 2012
LEEDuser Member
546 Thumbs Up

Metal/Wood Furniture to contribute to FSC credit?

We've found the project owner's preferred furniture for this fit-out. Many of the pieces are made of mixed materials that have metal and other non-wood parts for legs, arm rests, etc. The surfaces of these chairs, desks, and tables are made of wood, but the manufacturer will not substitute the regular wood he uses with FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts., but the manf. will sell only the parts we want. We have found a separate manf that works exclusively with wood and has an FSC CoC number for producing wood furniture. Our idea is to have the wood manf. purchase the non-wood parts and assemble the furniture pieces with his FSC Mixed wood parts. As far as I am aware, the wood manf. under FSC rules does not have the right to sell these assembled pieces as FSC furniture because they are mixed metal and wood pieces; but this shouldn't mean he can not sell us the wood parts of the furniture, which would all be FSC Mixed along with the metal pieces separately. Has anyone tried something like this or does anyone know whether this would be a GBCI acceptable approach to contributing to earning the credit? The amount of time required to do this doesn't make the approach very sustainable, but at least the product would be!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 23 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Ward, as roundabout as this is, I think it is compliant with MRc7.

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Alexia Anastassiadis Jan 16 2013 Guest 360 Thumbs Up

Hello Ward, a question, does the manufacturer who only uses FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. wood have an FSC COC certification? I find myself in the same situation. The furniture manufacturer uses only FSC wood, but he is not certified himself and the furniture is an assembly of wood and metal.

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Nena Elise
Sep 12 2012
LEEDuser Member
3726 Thumbs Up

Furniture

Furniture is not a part of our scope of work. Do we have to include it?

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Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Sep 12 2012 LEEDuser Member 1101 Thumbs Up

Yes - furniture must be included in LEED-CI: "Regardless of who specifies or provides them, all furniture and furnishings in the project should be included in the calculations for LEED for Commercial Interiors." (see page 208 in the ID+C v2009 Reference Guide for the full quote/section).

If you don't include the furnishings, you will also run into conflicts with general rating system eligibility. As outlined in LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 10102: "For LEED for Commercial Interiors and LEED for Retail: Commercial Interiors projects, spaces are considered incomplete if they do not include the furnishings, fixtures, and equipment (FF&E) intended for regular operations of the space."

For any project registering after that LEED Interpretation posting (11/1/11), at least 60% of the floor area must be considered complete to even be eligible to submit under LEED-CI (i.e. with all necessary FF+E). If you registered before that LEED Interpretation posting (11/1/11), you were technically held to the LEED Rating System Selection Guidance which required at least 40% of your area to meet the requirements of the system to be eligible.

So submitting without any furnishings included is not allowed in LEED-CI; you'd need to have at least 60% or 40% of the space fully fit-out for use in order to comply with the basic rating system requirements and that LI (percentage depends upon your registration date).

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Nena Elise Sep 12 2012 LEEDuser Member 3726 Thumbs Up

Thank you. For this credit, do I have to count furniture assemblies that contain wood? For example, if I have a chair that has wood legs but a plastic seat, will I need to identify the cost of the wood in that furniture item, as an assembly (by calculating weight)? And include that cost in my figure for FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. wood?

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Nena Elise Sep 12 2012 LEEDuser Member 3726 Thumbs Up

And I thought that we could choose whether or not to include furniture in our calculations for credits such as Recycled Content and Regional Materials. Can't we choose?

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Valerie Molinski Director of Sustainability, Vocon Sep 12 2012 LEEDuser Member 1289 Thumbs Up

In NC, the furniture must be included across all MR credits if you want to include it in any of the MR credits . You can choose to include furniture or not in that case.

In CI, the furniture must be included as a rule across all MR credits. There is no choice.

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Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Sep 13 2012 LEEDuser Member 1101 Thumbs Up

Correct - in LEED-CI, furniture must be included in the MR credits. If the project is coming through LEED-CI, you will need to make sure that it is include in all of your attempted MR credits.

For furniture assemblies with wood - you would need to follow the assembly calculation method to calculate the amount of new wood in the overall assembly (by weight) to then determine how much of that product is comprised of new wood and is applicable to this credit (MRc7).

As an extra note - if you intend to submit with only a portion of the space fully fit-out (i.e. only a portion with all FF+E as required for operation), please make sure to very closely read LI 10102 as there is quite a bit of extra documentation and work required to confirm compliance for the remaining incomplete areas (i.e. the areas that don't yet have all FF+E as required for operation). It's a complex one to keep your eye on closely if you are thinking of going that route.

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Caro Wilbanks lauckgroup
Jul 31 2012
Guest
111 Thumbs Up

Messages to the reviewing commitee thru LEEDonline

If you have submitted a questions using the message system for your project on LEED online to the reviewing committee, how long should you expect it to take to get an answer. I submitted on on 7/19 and still have not gotten a response.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 31 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Caro, I believe they aim for 30 days, or something like that. The policy is on the GBCI website. Sometimes they get behind....

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Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Aug 31 2012 LEEDuser Member 1101 Thumbs Up

Don't, don't, don't send a message through LEED Online v3!!! We were told that the Messages Tab was designed for internal team communications only and so the system doesn't alert the review team that there is any messages waiting for them. So it's very hit-or-miss when you could expect an answer. Similiarly, the "Feedback" button within LOv3 is tied to the IT Team and is only designed to collect technical, system issues (glitching forms, etc).

The "right" way to send a question/request through to GBCI is via the GBCI Contact Us Form (http://www.gbci.org/org-nav/contact/Contact-Us/Project-Certification-Que...). Messages sent in there are sent directly to GBCI review staff to look into. My experience has been that responses are much faster when submitted that way. The important thing to note is that: the more detailed your question, the more detailed your response will be (i.e. including specific project number, credit/rating system, details/descriptions, etc.).

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 31 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

I agree 100% with Kristina.

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Caro Wilbanks lauckgroup
Jul 19 2012
Guest
111 Thumbs Up

Job Built vs. Shop Built cabinetry

We have a job where MR7 has been kicked back due to the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. documentation on the cabinetry. The millwork was assembled off-site and now USGBC is requesting that we use the total assembly in the calculations for the Certified WoodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. Point. I have this and I also have the millworkers COC. However, on the Materials and Resources spreadsheet I orginally listed the individual components of the millwork in order to correctly document the Recycled Content, Regional Materials, etc. Those points have been approved. If I add the total assembly of the millwork it is going to mess up the calculations. Basically it will have the millwork $ in there twice. What should I do? We are going to have to pay the resubmission fee and I can't afford to do it incorrectly.

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Doug Pierce, AIA Architect / Sustainability Strategist , Perkins+Will Jul 20 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2250 Thumbs Up

Hi Caro,
I'll respond, but there is no guarantee that my response will lead you to approval of the credit.

You have a complex issue so the best way to approach it is to break it down into bite size pieces.

First: It sounds like you are in an Appeal - that usually means that GBCI had commented on your original submittal and offered suggestions during the initial review period. What were those comments and did they touch on this issue?

Second: Did the GBCI Reviewer give any clarification as to 'why' they requested that you list the total assembly as a unit (FYI - listing the product as an assembly would be a common approach to submitting FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Certified millwork).

Best,
Doug

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Caro Wilbanks lauckgroup Jul 20 2012 Guest 111 Thumbs Up

This was their response (we are on our second appeal of this credit)-
3. It is not clear whether millwork has been manufactured on-site or off. Note that for millwork manufactured off-site, the value for the total assembly must be used in the calculations (not the individual components); and the Chain-of-CustodyChain-of-custody (COC) is he path taken by raw materials, processed materials, and products from the forest to the consumer, including all successive stages of processing, transformation, manufacturing and distribution. A chain-of-custody certificate number on invoices for nonlabeled products indicates that the certifier’s guidelines for product accounting have been followed. A chain-of-custody certification is not required by distributors of a product that is individually labeled with the Forest Stewardship Council logo and manufacturer’s chain-of-custody number. Chain of Custody (CoC) certification requirements are determined by Forest Stewardship Council Chain of Custody Standard 40-004 v2-1. for the Millworker must be used to verify compliance.

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Patrick Lynn Summit Design + Build, LLC
Jul 02 2012
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19 Thumbs Up

Invoices for Non-FSC new wood

I just received a comment back from my LEED submission regarding needing to provide invoices for new wood items, plywood and flakeboard. I have listed these as new wood items, the plywood at 100% and the flakeboard at 0.8%, both of which are not FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. and accordingly their FSC percentages are both 0% on my IDC material and resource Calculator. I have other new wood items that are FSC that will get me the required percentage even with the Flakeboard and Plywood bringing down the overall FSC percentage. I do not have invoices for the plywood used or the flakeboard, but I am not sure why they are looking for invoices and backup since they do not help.
I have also noted that the in the vendor invoice column on the IDC worksheet I have listed both items as "No" since I am not providing the invoice and there is no backup saying it is not FSC. The % vendor invoice at the bottom of the spreadsheet still totals to %100 since I have %100 of all the backup for the FSC related items. Please let me know if this is correct that they should be looking for the invoices or if you think I should make a formal inquiry.

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Doug Pierce, AIA Architect / Sustainability Strategist , Perkins+Will Jul 03 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2250 Thumbs Up

Hi Patrick - Since the credit compares the dollar value of all new wood with FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certified new wood, the invoices for non-FSC wood helps to validate the total new wood dollar amount.

Does your IDC worksheet accurately show the total new wood materials cost even though you have not included vendor information (invoices) for non-FSC certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System.? It sounds like there is a chance that may not be happening if the percent of Cutsheets is tallying at 100%?

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Lee Chin
May 04 2012
Guest
143 Thumbs Up

MRc7

Pyro-Guard Plywood (fired treated).
How should i document this for MRc7?
My co-worker says 100% for new wood & 0% for FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts., is this correct?

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company May 08 2012 Guest 7989 Thumbs Up

Lee,

If it is not FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. then your coworker is correct.

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Steven Jones Vice President Quinn Evans Architects
May 03 2012
LEEDuser Member
45 Thumbs Up

credit for MR4 or MR7

I have a product sheet that states the product is 92.46% pre-consumer recycled, 4.81% post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product. recycled but later states that "the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. product is categorized as 100% mixed credit"

How should i document this product? It can't be both recycled and new wood???

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Lee Chin
Apr 30 2012
Guest
143 Thumbs Up

MRc7 New wood %

I recA Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) is a certificate representing proof that a given unit of electricity was generated from a renewable energy source such as solar or wind. These certificates are able to be sold, traded, or bartered as environmental commodities, where an electricity consumer can buy the renewable energy attributes of electricty to support renewable energy, even if they are consuming generic grid-supplied electricity that may be supplied by nonrenewable sources.'d an invoice for a wood product stating that the product is FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Mixed Credit, LEED Online is asking for new wood % for this product.Supplier can not provide me with % info, what should i do. Is there a formula to get the "new" wood % of the product. thank you

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Samantha Harrell LEED Project Reviewer certificate holder May 01 2012 Guest 2633 Thumbs Up

Hi Lee,

FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Mixed Credit products are valued in the credit calculation at 100% of their cost and all of it is considered 'new wood' (assuming it is not an assembly). In the form, a mixed credit product is entered as 100% new wood and 100% FSC certified. However, if the product is labeled FSC Mixed (NN%), then include the product in the form as 100% new wood and NN% FSC certified.

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Valerie Molinski Director of Sustainability Vocon
Mar 27 2012
LEEDuser Member
1289 Thumbs Up

FSC wood, but not FSC shop. Buy FSC anyway?

We are pursuing MRc7 on a project that I am working on, but the millwork shop does not have a COC certification. We should be able to achieve the credit anyway with the other wood on the project, but the client has asked us to purchase FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. wood for the millwork anyway, knowing that it won't count towards the final FSC percentages for the credit. They just feel that this is the right thing to do.

What are your thoughts on doing this? Does it really behoove us to buy the FSC when it won't count for us anyway? That is the contractor's view and keeps fighting us on this particular item. He doesn't want to provide the COC for the materials if it doesn't matter anyway, I think.

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Maory Sciubba Managing Member, Knowledge Resource, LLC Mar 27 2012 LEEDuser Member 194 Thumbs Up

Hi Valerie,

If your woodworker is an architectural woodworker, then you can certainly use certain 'wood' items, like veneers and cleats (used to hang cabinets) and declare it as FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts.. He needs to provide you with the CoC for the veneer house and lumber yard where he purchased the veneer/lumber and also all the invoices. Remember you will need your woodworker to submit ALL of his virgin wood invoices to you (plywood, solid base etc) anyway. Just make sure two things (1) that the veneer is not FSC controlled and (2) that the invoices specifically say the job name to show that it was specific for this project. If they are not FSC certified stock material will not work. One of the reasons the GC is fighting you on this is because of costs. FSC does impact cost.

Hope this helps.

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Valerie Molinski Director of Sustainability, Vocon Mar 27 2012 LEEDuser Member 1289 Thumbs Up

Maory,
Below is some info I copied from a previous response here. The woodworking shop on a LEED job must have a shop certification to work with FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. and have it count. Just because we use FSC material, doesnt mean it automatically counts towards the credit. We are aware of the additional cost this poses the job, and the client agreed to it and the contractor added it to the scope. The cost should be a non-issue as it was covered early on. Here is the info on FSC wood and the shop who handles it for a project:

The USGBC has published addenda to NC V2.2 and the certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. credit based on the LEED 2009 BD+C Reference Guide. The fabricator would Need to be FSC Certified and be part of the COC chain. They have substantially handled and modified an FSC product without being the 'End-User' (to be technical, the fabricator/vendor is someone who breaks the bands on a bundle of FSC plywood, cut the plywood, fabricate cabinets from and then sell it. )The installer or end user, however, does not need to have an FSC COC as they are not modifying the raw materials in any way.

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Maory Sciubba Managing Member, Knowledge Resource, LLC Mar 27 2012 LEEDuser Member 194 Thumbs Up

I am aware of the above statement, my suggestion has come from several conversations with the council. For instance, blocking is sent to the field to be field cut by installer just for fitting purposes. This was the example given to me . I was giving you a suggestion that was given to me. Hopefully someone can give you a better suggestion.

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Valerie Molinski Director of Sustainability, Vocon Mar 27 2012 LEEDuser Member 1289 Thumbs Up

Ok, I guess I misunderstood your initial response. Sorry if so. We are using FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. for everything else, and the blocking would count, I am aware of that. I was specifically asking about the millwork and its fabrication. The substrate, for example, comes in FSC and non FSC versions. The contractor submitted the Non-FSC version of the substrate-- even though it wont count towards our final totals because a non FSC shop is modifying it, the client still wants to buy it as FSC. The contractor is being lax about the COC of the material and I was curious as to thoughts on this, if we should insist on it.

Thanks.

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Apr 10 2012 Guest 7989 Thumbs Up

Valerie,

Since green building is not all about LEED points I commend your owner for insisting on FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. wood even when it won't count towards ceritifcation! That said, since it's at the owners request, I would probably insist on the documentation even though it won't be used for LEED certification.

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Maory Sciubba Managing Member Knowledge Resource, LLC
Jan 26 2012
LEEDuser Member
194 Thumbs Up

FSC Controlled Wood

Good morning all, I am positive that I read somewhere that FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Controlled Wood does NOT contribute to the certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. point. Does anyone know about FSC controlled wood and the LEED certified wood credit? I have been searching the web for some backup but to no avail. NEED HELP QUICKLY. Thanks!

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Doug Pierce, AIA Architect / Sustainability Strategist , Perkins+Will Jan 26 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2250 Thumbs Up

FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Controlled Wood does not count on it's own.
| dp

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Maory Sciubba Managing Member, Knowledge Resource, LLC Jan 26 2012 LEEDuser Member 194 Thumbs Up

Do you happen to know where I can find this information? I need this info as backup for my client . Thank you so much for your quick response.

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Doug Pierce, AIA Architect / Sustainability Strategist , Perkins+Will Jan 26 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2250 Thumbs Up

Maory - Try this link out - it's not explicitly clear, but it does talk about controlled wood as being part of the FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Mixed Sources label and how that works towards the bottom:
http://www.fscus.org/green_building/leed_faq.php

| DP

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Maory Sciubba Managing Member, Knowledge Resource, LLC Jan 26 2012 LEEDuser Member 194 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the link, I read this one before. My problem is that the client has chosen a FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Controlled Wood veneer and it seems like the consultant wants to use this towards the certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. credit. I am listing it, since it is a wood product, but do not want to claim it as a FSC certified product, since as far as LEED is concerned, it is not a certified wood. Or maybe I should just let it be, list it and move on?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 21 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Maory, Controlled Wood only indicates that the wood complies with minimum standards of legality. It is not a full FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts.-certification of sustainable practices, and should not count for LEED.

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Maory Sciubba Managing Member, Knowledge Resource, LLC Feb 21 2012 LEEDuser Member 194 Thumbs Up

Thank you Tristan. I read this a while ago, when controlled wood designation rolled out, but I cannot find the article that I read!!! Now I am working on a project and I have submitted the paperwork on the veneer as 'non-FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts.' and the consultant is complaining. I informed them that this FSC designation does not comply with the LEED certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. point and they very rudely told me to just submit it and let them worry about it. Now I am in a predictament because I am a LEED consultant foremost and I refuse to lie, so I told them that I would submit the invoice and they can deal with the rest. They agreed to go my way if I provide literature that states this controlled wood issue.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 21 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Maory, you can read more about FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. controlled wood direct from the source here:

http://www.fsc.org/cw.html
http://www.fsc.org/1011.html

Note that FSC the organization does not say or imply that Controlled Wood is equivalent to certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System.. It is a designation for content going in Mixed products, in which only a % is FSC-certified. You can count that % only.

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Elizabeth Thompson LEED Specialist, USGBC Feb 26 2013 LEEDuser Member 695 Thumbs Up

Thank you for this question. Your memory is correct, Maory, as are these responses. FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Controlled Wood may not be counted toward MRc7. In order for a product to be FSC Mixed certified, it must have Chain of Custody certification through the entire supply chain.
In addition to those above, this website may also help to explain the role of Controlled Wood https://us.fsc.org/controlled-wood.203.htm.

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Patricia Lloyd LEED Project Coordinator, Leopardo Companies, Inc. Mar 27 2013 LEEDuser Member 153 Thumbs Up

So the million dollar question is how do you document the controlled wood? It is new wood, but it isn't FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certified to LEED requirements- does that mean it counts against you on the MRc7 credit? I have looked at the links and addenda and am not finding this answer.

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Lloyd Johnson General Manager Lloyd Johnson Relocation Services
Oct 24 2011
Guest
24 Thumbs Up

FSC Mixed split between MRc7 and MRc4

We are using products sold as FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Mixed for our cabinetry in our LEED-CI project. According to page 397 of the LEED 2009 Green Building Design & Construction Reference Guide:
...If MDFMedium-density fiberboard (MDF): Panel product used in cabinets and furniture; generally made from wood fiber glued together with binder; similar to particleboard, but with finer texture, offering more precise finishing. Most MDF is made with formaldehyde-emitting urea-formaldehyde binder. and particleboard products are made from recycled wood scraps but are stated as being FSC Mixed (not FSC Recycled) the products can count toward MRc7 or MRc4, but cannot count toward both ...
My question is whether we can allocate a percentage of this product to MRc7 and the remainder to MRc4.
Thanks in advance for your help.

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Oct 24 2011 Guest 7989 Thumbs Up

I would think that by using any portion of it for one you are claiming it as either recycled or not. Thus this strategy may not work. I don't have specific experience with this though.

Anyone else?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 26 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

If the product is recycled then it should fall under MRc4, and it does not make sense to claim any of it for MRc7. Unless I am misunderstanding FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts., how can it get a Mixed label if it is known to be recycled?

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Harvard University Green Building Services Apr 30 2012 LEEDuser Member 281 Thumbs Up

Dealing with the exact same problem... Vesta MDFMedium-density fiberboard (MDF): Panel product used in cabinets and furniture; generally made from wood fiber glued together with binder; similar to particleboard, but with finer texture, offering more precise finishing. Most MDF is made with formaldehyde-emitting urea-formaldehyde binder. and PB products claim both recycled content and FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Mixed Credit certification... Any resolution on this?

FSC data:
http://www.flakeboard.com/docs/Environmental/Flakeboard_FSC_Data.pdf

Recycled Content data:
http://www.flakeboard.com/docs/Environmental/Flakeboard_Recycle_Content_...

Not sure how to enter this...

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 30 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Sure enough, I think I misunderstood FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. Mixed in my earlier content.

Several sources on the Web indicate that FSC Mixed can refer to recycled content. So the Vesta data here is entirely consistent, and judging by the "new" FSC wood policy, should not count for MRc7.

That conflicts with things I have read before about FSC Mixed, so I'd love someone else's opinion here.

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Kevin Mortensen Chief Sustainability Officer - LEED Green Associate, Complete Millwork Services May 03 2012 Guest 988 Thumbs Up

This has been kicked back at us from GBCI auditors in the past. We have a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide that clarifies that you claim items such as MDFMedium-density fiberboard (MDF): Panel product used in cabinets and furniture; generally made from wood fiber glued together with binder; similar to particleboard, but with finer texture, offering more precise finishing. Most MDF is made with formaldehyde-emitting urea-formaldehyde binder. PB and the like as an either recycled content or FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. – not both. We now include this CIR with our submitals so that it's headed off before it gets kicked back to us.

The dual claim on these products is because of the manufacturing process of MDF and PB
MDF PB and other such items are generally made from chips and fibers that are left over when a mill is making dimensional lumber out of a log. These scraps can either be thrown out, or recycled and turned into PB MDF etc.
These fibers are from FSC certified logs that are being milled down.
Thus the MDF PB etc carry both a Pre consumer recycled content AND FSC Mixed Credit certification.
The LEED Coordinator has the choice of claiming this product as EITHER MR4 recycled content, OR MR7 / FSC. But not both. This is an either / or. If some is claimed under one credit - than it must all be claimed under such credit.

This is also where you’ll find a caviate in the difference between making claims on FSC products vs Recycled materials. As an FSC COC Certified Manufacturer of Millwork items, I make a claim on my FSC Products – IE Cabinets / Wall paneling etc (Products) that we manufacture.
My FSC claim to the LEED coordinator would NOT be in the form of a list of FSC materials that I purchased but rather I would exercise my COC Cert and make a claim to the LEED Coordinator in the form of an FSC product invoice. I am making a claim on my products that have multiple wood inputs. I have to make a claim on the entire product not on each wood input.
Wheras for Recycled Content – I would actually give you a list of the core materials and what I paid for them along with a cert stating recycled content (Companies such as Sierra Pine are certified at a minimum 90% Recycled content on these items)

I'm sorry that I'm long winded in my posts, however I want to make sure that the whole scenario is understood.

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Piyush Varma Green Building Analyst EDS Pvt Ltd
Jun 14 2011
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82 Thumbs Up

FSC CoC Certification Requirement (Vendors and Contractors)

We are procuring FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. wood from a vendor, who in turn is going to procure the FSC certified products from a European vendor. The European Vendor in question has a FSC CoC certification whereas the other ‘sourcing’ vendor does not. Further, the FSC certified product is to be provided to the Interiors Contractor. The Interior Contractor too does not have a FSC CoC certification. In addition, the FSC certified product (Wood, sawn or chipped lengthwise, sliced or peeled, of a thickness exceeding, 6mm) needs to be modified to fashion door frames, window frames and shutters.

Given the following scenario:
1. The primary vendor has FSC CoC certification
2. The Secondary Vendor and Interiors Contractor do not have FSC CoC certification.
3. Additionally, the Interior Contractor has to modify the form of the FSC wood to fashion door frames, window frames and shutters.
4. Finally, project timelines do no allow time/money for arranging FSC CoC certification for Secondary Vendor or Interior Contractor.
What needs to be done to ensure MRc7 compliance? Further, is a FSC CoC certified Transport Agency required for the transport of material? Finally, can anybody, for the above mentioned usage, suggest a FSC certified products vendor fulfilling all the above mentioned requirements for a project based in Manesar (in Haryana, India)?
Refer to the under mentioned excerpts:
Source: http://www.fscus.org/green_building/leed_faq.php
Q: WHAT ARE THE CURRENT REQUIREMENTS FOR DOCUMENTING THE USE OF FSC-CERTIFIED WOODWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. IN LEED?
As of July 19th, 2010, the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) published several addenda relating to the MRc7 credit for FSC certified wood which can be found here. The addenda clarify two important issues relating to who needs to be FSC certified and partial claims:
Organizations that install an FSC-certified product or products on the project building/site (typically project contractors or subcontractors such as flooring installers or framing contractors, but also furniture installers and the like) do not require FSC CoC certification as long as they do not modify the product’s packaging or form except as is required for installation. All other organizations will need to be FSC CoC certified in order for the certified wood products they fabricate and install to count toward MRc7. This includes organizations like cabinetmakers and architectural millworkers that manufacture products off-site and then install them on-site (even if considered a subcontractor).
Q: MUST THE INSTALLING FABRICATOR OR CONTRACTOR HAVE AN FSC CoC CERTIFICATE IN ORDER TO COMPLY WITH LEED's MRc7 CREDIT REQUIREMENTS?
Yes! Note this is a change of interpretation that is noted in the July 19th addenda issued by the USGBC.Previously the USGBC stated the installing fabricator or contractor did not have to hold a valid FSC CoC certificate to comply with LEED’s MRc7 credit although it was an added benefit. Now, the installing fabricator or contractor will need to be FSC CoC certified in order for their products to count towards the MRc7 credit if they modify the product’s packaging or form besides for what is required for installation.

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Dec 19 2014
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