CI-2009 SSc1: Site Selection

  • CI_SSc1_Type3_SiteSelection Diagram
  • It’s worth pursuing this straightforward credit

    This credit is fairly straightforward: the existing building selected by your LEED-CI project will either have LEED certification or other green features in place, or it won’t. (If your project hasn’t yet selected a building, consider looking for a building that will perform well under this credit.) 

    It’s worth considering this credit, because in the best case (Option 1), you can earn five points just for locating in a building certified under another LEED rating system.

    If that’s not your situation, you can earn 1–5 points through Option 2 by targeting items on a menu of 12 “paths,” each of which approximates a key LEED credit not otherwise covered under LEED-CI (see the credit language and Checklists tabs for more detail). You can't combine options and earn more than five points.

    The number of points you’re likely to earn can be determined early on by reviewing existing building components and characteristics. It’s likely that you can pick up a point or two, even if your base building wasn’t designed as a “green building.”

    Select the right building—don’t count on changing it

    Keep in mind that this credit is about encouraging tenants to locate in environmentally friendly buildings. The credit is not focused on redesigning the base building to fit the needs of the credit—that would be more likely to fall under another rating system, such as LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance. 

    LEED plaqueLocating in a building certified under another LEED rating system is the most staightforward way to earn the five points for this credit. Photo – YRG SustainabilityHowever, tenants can and should encourage building management to make environmental improvements over time, particularly if a good opportunity presents itself. (For example, if the roof is scheduled to be replaced, the owner could consider installing a reflective roof complying with Option 2, Path 5: Heat Island Effect—Roof.)

    Your strategies or green building characteristics need to be in place before submittal of your LEED application.

    Check the requirements carefully

    For the most part, the credit requirements of this credit are consistent with corresponding LEED-NC credits. However, there are some variations, so be sure to understand the requirements of any paths you have chosen to pursue.

    A note on LEEDuser’s guidance

    The Checklists tab for this credit offers key considerations for each option and path of this credit. For more detail, however, you will be referred to the corresponding LEED-NC credit page within LEEDuser. When reading those LEED-NC pages, be aware of requirements and recommendations that may or may not be relevant to the LEED-CI project.

    FAQ's for LEED-CI SSc1

    Do SSc1 paths pertain to the whole building or just your own space? What if our own space meets one of the SSc1 paths but the whole building does not?

    This credit must be applied to the whole building. The CI space can contribute, but the CI space can’t earn the credit on its own.

    What if my base building is LEED registered and not yet certified—can I still earn five points under SSc1?

    No. But, if the schedule allows, you could stall your submittal until the building is certified. Or, if you are in a LEED registered building, the building will likely meet some of the individual paths under Option 2 that can be documented and submitted without having to wait for the whole building’s certification.

    Is exemplary performance available for this credit, in addition to the five points?

    No. A project can only earn up to 5 points. Exemplary performance can count for one of the 5 points for Path 4, 5, 10 and 11, or some other strategy, but that goes under Path 12, Other Quantifiable Environmental Performance.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

Expand All

  • Consider which option is more likely for your project:

    • Option 1: You can earn five points here simply for locating in a LEED-certified building.
    • Option 2: Locate in a building (or improve it) to earn up to five points using a menu of 12 options based on green strategies.

  • Consider meeting as a project team during the pre-lease phase of your project to discuss the best site options for the tenant space, targeting green buildings if possible. Real estate brokers and leasing agents can help you identify buildings that are either LEED-certified, or that have implemented green strategies.


  • LEED plaqueThe level of LEED certification attained by the building is not a factor in this credit. Photo – YRG SustainabilityFor either option, this credit largely awards building selection. You can earn points here for tenant improvements (under Option 2), but it’s far easier and more cost-effective to start with a building that already achieves the credit, whether by being LEED-certified or having green features.


  • Careful building selection is crucial for following this option. Real estate brokers and leasing agents can help you identify buildings that are either LEED certified, or that have implemented green strategies with quantifiable results. The most straightforward wayto earn the maximum number of points, and to document this credit, is to locate your tenant space in a LEED-certified building. Consult the USGBC’s database of LEED-certified buildings while looking at your options. USGBC local chapters may also provide useful information. (See Resources.)


  • If your project is not locating in a LEED-certified building, guide your real estate broker to include the 12 environmental criteria of Option 2 in the search for your base building. (Refer to the questionnaire available from the Documentation Toolkit.)


  • If you are attempting any of the paths of Option 2, the environmental features need to be in place at the time of building selection, or at least by the time your CI project submits final LEED documentation.  


  • Rents in LEED-certified or “green” buildings may be higher than conventional rates. However, higher rents are likely to be offset by lower operating costs, as well as higher productivity and return on investment. 


  • Option 1


  • To document this credit complete the LEED credit template and upload the final certification scorecard for the base building. Your project building can be certified under any of the LEED rating systems, including LEED for New Construction, LEED for Core and Shell, LEED for Schools, and LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance.  


  • If your base building is in the process of pursuing LEED certification, note that this credit is awarded only if your base building has achieved certification at the time of your submission of the LEED-CI project. 


  • Option 2—General Considerations


  • Your safest best in pursuing Option 2 is to look for building environmental features to already be in place at the time of building selection. At the least, they must be in place by the time your LEED-CI project submits its application.  


  • Option 2, Path 1: Brownfield Redevelopment


  • Refer to LEED-NC SSc3 for detailed requirements and documentation tips.


  • Aim for a building constructed on a brownfield site that was subsequently remediated. Consult with building management to find out if any kind of remediation was ever carried out on the property. Be sure to inquire about asbestos remediation, which also qualifies even though it does not define a site as a “brownfield.”


  • You may have to check local, state, and federal government (particularly the EPA) offices for lists of buildings in your area on remediated sites.


  • Obtain documentation confirming that your project building was contaminated and that remediation was completed. Ask building management to provide an ASTM E1903-97, Phase II Environmental Site Assessment and proof of remediation. However, such documentation is not common and may be hard to find if remediation was well in the past. Alternatively, you can provide proof that the building was developed on a brownfield site, as determined by a local, state, or federal government agency via a letter or other formal confirmation. 


  • Option 2, Path 2: Stormwater Design—Quantity Control


  • Refer to LEED-NC SSc6.1 for more detailed requirements and documentation. 


  • Select a building that has implemented stormwater collection and reuse, infiltration, or other quantity-control measures, with rates that meet the LEED requirements. 


  • Request a copy of the stormwater management plan, if there is one, listing the best management practices implemented for onsite treatment or onsite storage of stormwater. 


  • Refer to the stormwater management plan or consult with your building’s civil engineer to learn the site’s imperviousness. If it is less than 50% impervious, the stormwater management plan must equalize the pre- and post-development peak discharge rates and quantities from the one-year, 24-hour, design storm. If your site has more than 50% impervious cover, the plan must reduce the volume of stormwater runoff by 25% from the 1½-year, 24-hour, design storm. 


  • If there is no formal stormwater management plan, work with a civil engineer to identify stormwater management features and confirm the pre- and post-development discharge rates.


  • If the plan does not meet the requirements, consider working with building management and the civil engineer to revise the plan and add features or performing work to improve infiltration, or install onsite storage and reuse mechanisms. These can be expensive to retroactively install, however.


  • Option 2, Path 3: Stormwater Design—Quality Control


  • Refer to LEED-NC SSc6.2 for detailed requirements and documentation.


  • Try to locate the project in a building that has a stormwater management system meeting LEED requirements. Constructed wetlands, filtering systems, bioswales, retention basins, or other systems that remove suspended solids from stormwater, will contribute to meeting credit requirements. If your project is in an urban environment, the building can install a detention tank that collects rainwater for reuse. Systems must remove at least 80% of the site’s average annual total suspended solids (TSS) and 40% of the site’s total phosphorus (TP).


  • In order to comply with this path, your building must implement specific best management practices (BMPs). These are found in Chapter 4, Part 2, Urban Runoff, of the EPA Guidance Specifying Management Measures for Sources of Nonpoint Pollution in Coastal Waters, January 1993 (EPA 840B92002). Alternatively, your building should follow the BMPs outlined by your local government if they represent the more stringent option.  


  • If information on the building is not readily available, check with code officials, permitting agencies, and your building’s engineer about the building’s stormwater treatment system and how well it performs. 


  • Option 2, Path 4: Heat Island Effect—Non-Roof


  • Refer to NC SSc7.1 for detailed requirements and documentation guidance. Note, however, that the requirement for this option through LEED-CI is to meet the credit requirements for 30% of the non-building-area instead of the 50% required for NC projects. 


  • Find out if your site meets any of the following three options:

    • Thirty percent of non-building surfaces are shaded by trees; have light-colored site surfaces with an SRI of 29 or greater; or have open-grid pavement. A combination of these three strategies is also acceptable. 
    • Fifty percent of parking spaces are covered or underground.
    • At least 50% of the parking lot area has open-grid paving (at least 50% pervious).

  • To document this credit provide site plans that indicate the areas of shading, highly reflective surfaces, open-grid or pervious-hardscape areas and parking under cover.  


  • Sketchup is a free modeling program from Google that can help you determine the shading area for trees. (See Resources.)


  • If the SRI of certain surface materials is not known, obtain a small sample and send it to a testing lab. This generally costs a few hundred dollars. 


  • If hardscape has gotten darker over time through weathering, the SRI value of the weathered hardscape must be used. However, some hardscapes can be cleaned to restore their SRI value, or close to it. 


  • You can earn an Exemplary Performance point here under Path 12 by meeting two of the three options described above. (Note that you can earn a maximum of five points under this credit, including Path 12, and that pursuing Exemplary Performance for bonus points under IDc1 is a separate process.)


  • Tenants benefit from locating in a building that has reduced its heat island effect—through lower operating costs related to cooling the tenant space. 


  • Option 2, Path 5: Heat Island Effect—Roof


  • Refer to LEED-NC SSc7.2 for detailed requirements and documentation guidance. 


  • There are three compliance paths available to meet the requirements of this path. Tenants can locate in a building with one of the following attributes. 

    • Option 1: 75% of the roof is covered with reflective materials with an SRI value of 29 or greater for pitched roofs or an SRI value of 78 or greater for low-sloped roofs.
    • Option 2: 50% of the roof is vegetated. 
    • Option 3: A combination of the first two options.

  • Ask the building owner for specifications on the kind of roofing materials installed and the SRI values of those materials. 


  • More and more municipalities require that “cool” or white roofs be installed on new buildings, so the stock of buildings that comply with this requirement should increase over time, making this path easier to follow. 


  • Tenants benefit from locating in a building that has reduced its heat island effect, through lower operating costs related to cooling the tenant space. 


  • Option 2, Path 6: Light Pollution Reduction


  • Refer to LEED-NC SSc8 for detailed requirements and documentation guidance. However, note that LEED-NC covers exterior and interior lighting, while for LEED-CI; you only need to follow the interior lighting requirements. 


  • Even if the LEED-CI project only involves a portion of a building, the requirements here must be met by the whole building. 


  • This is a particularly difficult path to comply with because tenants don’t have control over the entire building, or over other tenants’ design and lighting layouts. This compliance path implies requesting lighting power density from all other tenants and measuring light leakage from the windows. It can be time-consuming to document.


  • This path is most feasible if your LEED-CI project occupies the majority of the building, and is executing its own lighting design. 


  • Option 2, Path 7: Water Efficient Landscaping—Reduce by 50%


  • Refer to LEED-NC WEc1 for detailed requirements and documentation guidance. 


  • Determine if your building uses 50% less potable water for irrigation than standard water usage by employing a highly efficient landscaping irrigation system or using harvested rainwater or recycled water from the site. To determine this, run a preliminary calculation based on the methodology found in the LEED Reference Guide to determine this. 


  • Find out if your project building’s landscaping includes any permanent irrigation systems, which would be a red flag on your chances of following this path. The presence of native or adapted vegetation, rainwater or graywater collection and reuse would be positive indicators, on the other hand. 


  • If your building’s landscaping makes up 5% or less of the site area, you cannot follow this path. 


  • For zero-lot-line buildings, this path may be difficult to achieve. However, if your building has planters or garden spaces that cover 5% or more of the building site area (including building footprint, hardscape, and parking), your project may still be able to earn a point. Reducing the amount of water used to water a roof garden can also contribute to credit achievement.  


  • If your building uses no potable water for irrigation, it also complies with Option 2, Path 8: Water-Efficient Landscaping—No Potable Water Use or No Irrigation.  


  • Locating in a building that uses less municipal water may result in lower lease rates for the tenants. 


  • Option 2, Path 8: Water-Efficient Landscaping—No Potable Water Use or No Irrigation


  • Refer to LEED-NC WEc1 for detailed requirements and documentation guidance. 


  • You can meet the requirements of this path (along with Path 7) by simply having no irrigation. Alternatively, you can irrigate with non-potable water such as graywater, rainwater, or treated wastewater, but you must still reduce total water used for irrigation by 50%. 


  • Option 2, Path 9: Innovative Wastewater Technologies


  • Refer to LEED-NC WEc2 for detailed requirements and documentation guidance. Note, however, that while LEED-NC requires 50% of wastewater be treated onsite, this path for LEED-CI requires 100% of water be treated onsite.


  • There are two ways to comply with this path—choose one of the following: 

    • Find a building that treats 100% of its wastewater onsite to tertiary standards (meaning that water is treated enough to be discharged back into the environment).
    • Reduce the use of potable water for sewage conveyance (toilet and urinal flushing) by 50%.

  • This path applies to the whole building’s wastewater, not just your (tenant’s) waste water.


  • Options for decreasing potable water for sewage conveyance include: 

    • water efficient or waterless toilets and urinals;
    • rainwater harvesting systems; 
    • and graywater reuse systems.

  • Depending on the state and municipality, the use of graywater, as well as the use of waterless fixtures, may be more or less regulated. Check local codes for what is allowed in your area.  


  • If your project team is able to locate in a building that has highly efficient core plumbing fixtures, and the tenant is using these core fixtures in its scope of work, focusing on this credit is highly recommended, as the credit could be achieved with minimal or no adjustments. Compliance here may also contribute to SSc1, Option 2, Path 10: Water Use—30% Reduction, due to the synergy between the two paths, as well as to the prerequisite and credit WEp1 and WEc1: Water Use Reduction. 


  • Locating in a building that has highly efficient plumbing may lead to lower water utility costs for tenants. 


  • If water treatment systems are part of the tenant scope of work, they will need to be commissioned, which may entail additional cost. 


  • Option 2, Path 10: Water Use—30% Reduction


  • Refer to LEED-NC WEc3 for detailed requirements and documentation guidance. 


  • Aim to locate your tenant space in a building that has reduced its water use by 30% (for the entire building) and has instituted a plan to get future occupants to comply. 


  • This path covers the whole building’s water use, not just your tenant fit-out.


  • This path applies to projects that occupy less than 50% of the total building area. If you occupy most of the building and don’t qualify for this option, consider pursuing WEc1: Water Use Reduction instead. 


  • Calculations are based on the number of occupants that will use the plumbing fixtures and the fixture rates, not on the number of fixtures. 


  • Estimated occupant usage is determined by calculating the number of FTE occupants, as well as transient occupants, for the entire building, not just the tenant space. 


  • If projects can show that the reduction in water use in the building is 40% over the baseline, a point can be earned under SSc1, Path 12: Other Quantifiable Environmental Performance. 


  • Locating in a building that uses water efficiently may lead to lower water utility costs overall, which can translate into lower costs for tenants, too.


  • Option 2, Path 11: Onsite Renewable Energy


  • Refer to LEED-NC EAc2 for detailed requirements and documentation guidance. 


  • Select a building that has an onsite renewable energy system that can produce at least 2.5% of the building’s (not just the tenant space’s) total electricity or thermal energy needs. These include:

    • photovoltaic systems,
    • solar thermal,
    • geothermal,
    • wind,
    • biomass,
    • low-impact hydroelectric,
    • wave and tidal power,
    • and biofuel-based energy systems. 

  • Identify energy sources that make the most sense given your project’s geographical location and climate zone and, if possible, work with the building to install appropriate renewable energy sources onsite—usually photovoltaic panels on the roof. Although this is an upfront cost for the building, it offers potential cost savings over time as well as a visible environmental measure. 


  • If the onsite renewable energy system generates 10% of the annual building energy cost, one point can be earned under SSc1, Option 2, Path 12: Other Quantifiable Environmental Performance. 


  • Locating in a building that has an onsite energy generation capacity may lead to energy cost savings.


  • Option 2, Path 12: Other Quantifiable Environmental Performance


  • This path offers a catch-all way to earn points not otherwise covered by the LEED-CI rating system.


  • Consider implementing a strategy from another LEED rating system that is not included in the LEED-CI rating system, such as LEED-NC SSc5.2: Maximize Open Space. The LEED Reference Guide contains a list of credits from other LEED rating systems that are pre-approved for use under this path. In most cases, no special conditions apply, but with some of the energy credits from the LEED-EBOM system there are age and scope requirements that must be in place on the CI project to make it eligible.


  • Follow the exemplary performance criteria of Paths 1–11 offered under SSc1: Site Selection, Option 2 as follows:

    • Path 4: Heat Island Effect, Non-Roof – one point if two or more of the compliance options are met. 
    • Path 5: Heat Island Effect Roof – one point if 100% of the roof is vegetated
    • Path 10: Water Use Reduction 30% – one point if 40% reduction is achieved.
    • Path 11: On-Site Renewable Energy – one point for 10% renewable energy generated onsite.

    See the guidance above and the credit language for specific notes on pursuing these paths.

     


  • The LEED-EBOM rating system, which covers operations and maintenance, is a particularly good source for credits that can be applied to your project. LEED-NC may also offer some possibilities, but as it’s focused on design and construction, is less likely. LEED for Schools may offer some opportunities, particularly with its acoustics and mold prevention credits. Work with your base building owner and manager to learn if any of their operational practices would be covered by LEED-EBOM or other LEED rating systems. 


  • The environmental strategies in question must be in place and implemented at the time you submit your LEED application to GBCI.


  • You may submit an application for a Path 12 point for a feature that is not addressed in other rating systems. It might be helpful to clarify the approach through a CIR (Credit Interpretation Request) unless you know that precedent already exists. 


  • Often building management establishes programs and green building strategies to make the building more attractive to tenants. Common strategies pursued in Path 12 include better outside air, base-building controls, BMS systems or composting practices, or an exceptional transportation management plan. 

Schematic Design

Expand All

  • Option 1


  • If your project is in a LEED-certified building, request the LEED scorecard and a copy of the LEED certification. This should be sufficient to document this credit and earn five points under LEED-CI.


  • Option 2


  • Identify a representative from building management who can be contacted for details, documents, and specifications needed to document your chosen paths. 


  • Hold a meeting with the tenant, clients, architects, and base building management to discuss each Option 2 path and potential base-building changes needed to earn those options. 


  • Only five regular points can be awarded for this credit, even if your project is capable of meeting the requirements of more than five of the paths. 


  • If Option 2 paths are not applicable to your building, discuss the possibility of retrofitting and completing renovations to incorporate applicable changes, particularly if the owner already has renovations or maintenance scheduled. Target easy-to-implement points like flushometers, faucet aerators, reflective roof specifications, and irrigation updating strategies. 


  • It is helpful to discuss potential changes early in lease negotiation so that building management has time to decide on and implement needed changes by the time your CI project is complete. 


  • This credit is not about redesigning your base building to fit the needs of the tenants; however, encouraging building management to make improvements benefits both the building and the tenants. 

Construction Documents

Expand All

  • After your initial detective work to identify paths you can pursue, review those paths with operations staff and design team members, checking to see that you are still on course to achieve targeted SSc1, Option 2 paths. 


  • Complete all supporting documents for applicable paths and complete the LEED Online credit form. 

Operations & Maintenance

Expand All

  • If the building has reflective roof or non-roof surfaces contributing to Option 2, Paths 4 and 5, the reflectance of those materials should be maintained over time with proper cleaning. Although maintaining these materials may be out of your scope, consider recommending it to building operations staff.  


  • Make sure that waterless urinals, if installed, are maintained properly, according to manufacturer’s instructions.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    SS Credit 1: Site selection

    1–5 Points

    Intent

    To encourage tenants to select buildings that employ best practices systems and green strategies.

    Requirements

    Option 1

    Select a LEED certified building (5 points).

    OR

    Option 2

    Locate the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. in a building that has in place 1 or more of the following characteristics at time of submittal (1 – 5 points). Each of the following options may also be met by satisfying the requirements of the corresponding LEED 2009 for New Construction credit.

    Path 1. Brownfield Redevelopment (1 point)

    A building developed on a site documented as contaminated by an ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services E1903-97 Phase II Environmental Site Assessment or a local voluntary cleanup program. Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ASTM E1903-97 Phase II Environmental Site Assessment.

    OR

    A building on a site classified as a brownfield by a local, state, tribal or national government agency, whichever is most stringent.

    Effective remediation of site contamination must have been completed.

    Path 2. Stormwater design - quantity control (1 point)

    A building that prior to its development had less than or equal to 50% imperviousnessResistance to penetration by a liquid and is calculated as the percentage of area covered by a paving system that does not allow moisture to soak into the ground. and has implemented a stormwater management plan that is equal to or is less than the predevelopmentPredevelopment refers to before the LEED project was initiated, but not necessarily before any development or disturbance took place. Predevelopment conditions describe conditions on the date the developer acquired rights to a majority of the buildable land on the project site through purchase or option to purchase. 1-1/2 year 24-hour rate and quantity discharge.

    OR

    A building that prior to its development had more than 50% imperviousness and has implemented a stormwater management plan that reduced predevelopment 1-1/2 year 24-hour rate and quantity discharge by 25% of the annual on-site stormwater load. This mitigation can be achieved through a variety of measures such as perviousness of site, stormwater retention ponds, and harvesting of rainwater for reuse.

    Stormwater values are based on actual local rainfall unless the actual exceeds the 10-year annual average local rainfall, in which case the 10-year annual average should be used.

    Path 3. Stormwater design - quality control (1 point)

    A building that has in place site stormwater treatment systems designed to remove at least 80% of the average annual site area’s total suspended solids (TSSTotal suspended solids (TSS) are particles that are too small or light to be removed from stormwater via gravity settling. Suspended solid concentrations are typically removed via filtration.) and 40% of the average annual site area’s total phosphorus (TPTotal phosphorus (TP) consists of organically bound phosphates, polyphosphates, and orthophosphates in stormwater, the majority of which originates from fertilizer application. Chemical precipitation is the typical removal mechanism for phosphorus.).

    These values are based on the average annual loadings from all storms less than or equal to the 2-year, 24-hour storm. The building must implement and maintain best management practices (BMPs) outlined in Chapter 4, Part 2, Urban Runoff, of the EPA Guidance Specifying Management Measures for Sources of Nonpoint Pollution in Coastal Waters, January 1993 (EPA 840-B-92-002) or the local government’s BMP document, whichever is more stringent.

    Path 4. Heat island effect - nonroof (1 point)

    A building that provides shade (or will provide shade within 5 years of landscape installation), and/or uses light-colored or high-albedoAlbedo is synonymous with solar reflectance. materials with a solar reflectanceAlso known as albedo: the fraction of solar energy that is reflected by a surface on a scale of 0 to 1. Black paint has a solar reflectance of 0; white paint (titanium dioxide) has a solar reflectance of 1. The standard technique for its determination uses spectrophotometric measurements, with an integrating sphere to determine the reflectance at each wavelength. The average reflectance is then determined by an averaging process, using a standard solar spectrum, as documented by ASTM Standards E903 and E892 index (SRI)1 of at least 29, and/or has open-grid pavement areas that individually or in total equal at least 30% of the site’s nonroof impervious surfacesSurfaces that promote runoff of precipitation volumes instead of infiltration into the subsurface. The imperviousness or degree of runoff potential can be estimated for different surface materials., such as parking areas, walkways, plazas, and fire lanes.

    OR

    A building that has placed a minimum of 50% of parking spaces underground or covered by structured parking.

    OR

    A building that has an open-grid pavement system (less than 50% impervious) for 50% of the parking lot area.



    Path 5. Heat island effect - roof (1 point)

    A building whose roofing has a solar reflectance index (SRI) of the following minimum values for at least 75% of the roof surface:

    Roof Type Slope SRI
    Low-sloped roof ≤ 2:12 78
    Steep-sloped roof > 2:12 29





    OR

    A building that has installed a vegetated roof for at least 50% of the roof areaRoof area is the area of the uppermost surface of the building which covers enclosed Gross Floor Area, as measured when projected onto a flat, horizontal surface (i.e. as seen in Roof Plan view). ‘Roofs’, or portions of roofs, covering unenclosed areas (e.g. roofs over porches and open covered parking structures) are not included in the areas used to evaluate compliance with SSc7.2, though they may be applicable to SSc7.1..

    OR

    A building that has both high-SRI roofs and vegetated roofs that satisfy the following area requirement:

    Total Roof Area [ ( Area of SRI Roof x 1.33 ) + ( Area of Vegetated Roof x 2 ) ]



    Path 6. Light pollution reduction (1 point)

    A building whose nonemergency interior luminaires with a direct line of sight to any openings in the envelope (translucent or transparent) must have their input power reduced (by automatic device) by at least 50% between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. After-hours override may be provided by a manual or occupant-sensing device provided the override lasts no more than 30 minutes.

    OR

    A building whose openings in the envelope (translucent or transparent) with a direct line of sight to any nonemergency luminaires must have shieldingShielding is a nontechnical term that describes devices or techniques that are used as part of a luminaire or lamp to limit glare, light trespass, or sky glow. (with transmittance of less than 10%) that is controlled or closed by automatic device between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m.

    Path 7. Water-efficient landscaping - reduce by 50% (2 points)

    A building that employs high-efficiency irrigation technology OR uses harvested rainwater or recycled site water to reduce potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. consumption for irrigation by

    at least 50% over conventional means.

    Path 8. Water efficient landscaping - no potable water use or no irrigation (2 points in addition to Path 7)

    A building that uses only harvested rainwater or recycled site water to eliminate all potable water use for site irrigation (except for initial watering to establish plants), OR does not have permanent landscaping irrigation systems.

    Path 9. Innovative Wastewater Technologies (2 points)

    A building that reduces the use of municipally provided potable water for building sewage conveyance by at least 50%, OR treats 100% of wastewater on-site to tertiary standards.

    Path 10. Water use reduction - 30% reduction (1 point)

    A building that meets the 30% reduction in water use requirement for the entire building and has an ongoing plan to require future occupants to comply.

    Path 11. On-site Renewable Energy (1–2 points)

    A building that supplies at least 2.5% (1 point) or 5% (2 points) of the building’s total energy use (expressed as a fraction of annual energy cost) from on-site renewable energy systems.

    Path 12. Other Quantifiable Environmental Performance (1 point)

    A building that has in place at the time of selection other quantifiable environmental benefits.





    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    During the building selection process, give preference to those properties which exhibit green building strategies and technologies.

    For projects where asbestos is found, prepare executive summary-level content from the investigation’s report explaining the extent of the contamination and required action as well as documentation indicating an acceptable level of remediation was achieved based on an acceptable standard, such as RCRAThe Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) addresses active and future facilities and was enacted in 1976 to give EPA authority to control hazardous wastes from cradle to grave, including generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal. Some nonhazardous wastes are also covered under RCRA. or NESHAPs.

Publications

Chapter 4, Part 2, Urban Runoff, of the EPA Guidance Specifying Management Measures for Sources of Nonpoint Pollution in Coastal Waters, January 1993 (EPA 840B92002)

Specific best management practices (BMPs) are outlined in this chapter.


Green Office Guide: Integrating LEED Into Your Leasing Process

From the USGBC website: "The keys to successful green projects have always been preparation, committment and collaboration among all interested parties, and the Green Office Guide: Integrating LEED Into Your Leasing Process is specifically focused on helping tenants and landlords collaborate. This resource will help office tenants integrate green decision-making throughout the leasing process—encompassing team selection, site selection, negotiations, lease language, build-out and the tenant's ongoing operations within the leased space. The information and tools in this guide have been developed to assist tenants and their service providers (brokers, consultants, attorneys, design professionals) in reducing the environmental impact associated with real estate decisions and operations. The information contained within will also be useful for landlords and developers interested in preparing for negotiations with an understanding of the needs of tenants focused on obtaining LEED certification for their build-out."

Web Tools

List of LEED certified projects

The site can be searched for CS or other types of LEED projects in your area that may help you earn portions of this credit. 


Sketch-up

Use this software to model shaded areas from trees.

Technical Guides

U.S. EPA, Asbestos

This website provides information on the health effets of asbestos, where it is commonly found, and the laws and regulations governing testing of sites containing asbestos.

Building Assessment Checklist

Option 2

If pursuing Option 2, use this checklist as a quick way to assess how well the core-and-shell building complies with the Path 1–12 requirements.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

LEED Online Forms: CI-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CI-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

201 Comments

0
0
Katie Peterschmidt Associate Director, CORE Steward Cooper Carry
Sep 02 2014
LEEDuser Member
2 Thumbs Up

Regional Priority on this credit

Hello - I'm doing a tenant guideline for our C&S project and want to make sure I'm leading the tenants properly in what they can automatically achieve. Since the base building is a LEED Certified project, all tenants seeking certification should get an automatic 5 points under Option 1. Additionally, for Regional Priority under LEED-CI in this zip code, the choices include SSc1 Path 1 and SSc1 Path 2. I assume a tenant could automatically get two RP points by pointing out that the base building achieved SSc3 BrownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination (may include hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants). They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. (EPA) and SSc6.1 Stormwater Quantity in the C&S certification - right? Do I just give the tenants our final LEED scorecard or LEED templates for those credits so they can prove the base building achieved those credits with their CI Submission? Thanks!

Post a Reply
0
0
MM K
Aug 14 2014
Guest
1403 Thumbs Up

Path 12

What can be pursued under Path 12? Is there a definite list of measures or credits ?

1
3
0
Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Aug 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 986 Thumbs Up

For v2009 projects - check out ID+C v2009 Reference Guide (version 1) November 2009 Addenda. They added more detail regarding the eligibility requirements. They also included a list of all credits from the LEED-NC and LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. v2009 rating systems that can be applied/used along with any special conditions in order for them to comply.

I think that text was incorporated into version 2 of the ID+C v2009 Reference Guide as it does not appear on the ID+C Reference Guide (version 2) Addenda document. You can tell whether you have version 1 or version 2 of the Reference Guide by looking at the cover. Version 1 will say "2009 Edition" whereas version 2 will say: "2009 Edition (Updated June 2011)" in the lower left-hand corner.

2
3
0
MM K Aug 14 2014 Guest 1403 Thumbs Up

Thanks a lot Kristina, appreciate it! I only have the older version. Is there a link you could direct me to that lists eligibility requirements?
Thanks!

3
3
0
Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Aug 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 986 Thumbs Up

No problem! You should be able to download it here: http://www.usgbc.org/sites/default/files/DocumentAddendaRG%20ID+C%2010.0...

If that link doesn't work, you can always get the full addenda tables via the USGBC - > Resources -> Addenda page and then filtering by v2009 and ID+C: Commercial Interiors. You just want to always make sure you're looking at the right copy for the right version of your reference guide (the BD+C, ID+C, and O+M v2009 Reference Guides all have multiple versions).

Post a Reply
0
0
Keelan Kaiser Architect and Educator Serena Sturm Architects and Judson University
Jul 22 2014
LEEDuser Member
969 Thumbs Up

Extra PV, how to get credit?

We have a unique situation where we have an owner who wants to install a lot of pv on their project. SSc1 is already filled up with the max 5 points. Is there any way the additional PV can count as on-site renewable far exceeding this particular credit? Can we pursue an ID credit for this? Thanks.

1
4
0
Robin Dukelow, LEED AP BD+C Sustainability Consultant; Project Manager, Henderson Engineers, Inc.; Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC Jul 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 18 Thumbs Up

Keelan, you can take credit for the PV under EAc5; On Site Renewable Energy + ID credit for exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements..

2
4
0
Keelan Kaiser Architect and Educator, Serena Sturm Architects and Judson University Jul 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 969 Thumbs Up

Thanks, but I am talking about 2009 CI...Ideas?

3
4
0
Robin Dukelow, LEED AP BD+C Sustainability Consultant; Project Manager, Henderson Engineers, Inc.; Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC Jul 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 18 Thumbs Up

Keelan, Sorry - EAc5 is available for 2009 CI-Retail. If your project is not retail, you can still submit EAc5 as an ID credit, but that will only be worth 1-point, which is the same as taking Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. under SSc1, Path 11. Another idea is that you could also showcase the PV as part of a Green Building Education program, worth another ID credit.

4
4
0
Keelan Kaiser Architect and Educator, Serena Sturm Architects and Judson University Jul 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 969 Thumbs Up

Thank you, this is an office, and that is exactly what I was wondering..1 point potentially for 10% on-site renewable energy production, and another potential point if tied to an education program, both of which we can probably achieve.

Post a Reply
0
0
Reniel Barroso Green Technologies FZCO
Jul 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
4 Thumbs Up

LEED CI Boundary is within a Building's Core

This may be a simple question but we need a clear interpretation on this.

How can we apply Light Pollution Reduction Path in our case?
The whole LEED CI Project boundary is within the building's core and approximately 15m from the building perimeter.

Are we getting a point for not having any light spill from our boundary to the exterior of the building? or just simply, this path is not applicable for our project and thus no point at all?

Thank you in advance.

1
2
0
Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Jul 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 986 Thumbs Up

It looks like you're missing a key distinction about SSc1 in LEED-CI when considering this pathway. Note that SSc1 in LEED-CI is the whole-building credit. This means that in order to achieve ANY of the pathways in SSc1, ALL of the spaces within the base building will need to be included in the pathway calculations (both your tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. and all of the other tenants).

So for Option 2 - Path 6 specifically: it does not matter where your tenant space is in relation to the base building - you need to also be looking at all of spaces/tenants in order to achieve the pathway. As such, you could pursue the pathway in a tenant space on the base building interior. You just need to also consider all of the other spaces and their lighting to make sure that all of those are compliant as well. To be honest, my guess would be that this pathway is one of the most rarely attempted of all of the SSc1 options given that amount of work/effort to obtain the necessary information and documentation from all of the other tenants/base building...

2
2
0
Reniel Barroso Green Technologies FZCO Jul 15 2014 LEEDuser Member 4 Thumbs Up

Thanks Kristina. I'll take note of your comment.

Post a Reply
0
0
Robin Dukelow, LEED AP BD+C Sustainability Consultant; Project Manager Henderson Engineers, Inc.; Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC
May 13 2014
LEEDuser Member
18 Thumbs Up

Path 7

I have a situation where the project team members are seeing different versions of the same form. I have reviewed .PDF versions of the forms and verified that everything on the forms is identical, except that one of the forms requires and upload to provide "manufacturer's documentation or calculations to support controller efficiency value in table SSc1-10." . . . they are both version 4 of the form and this is a LEED 2009 CI-Retail project. Has anyone else experienced this situation?

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 13 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Robin, just to cover one more obvious question—the LEED Online forms are dynamic, in the sense that clicking a button earlier in the form influences what shows up later in the form. Have you checked this possibility?

I don't think I've heard of this situation before.

Post a Reply
0
0
MM K
May 06 2014
Guest
1403 Thumbs Up

Path 9

Hello,
If attempting Path 9, do the fixtures of the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. need to be included as well or do just the ones in the base build need to be included?

Many thanks!

1
1
0
Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist May 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 986 Thumbs Up

If attempting path 9, you need to include all fixtures within the base building (meaning all the common restroom fixtures, all the fixtures in your tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space., all the fixtures within the other tenant's spaces, etc.). Essentially any applicable fixture in the building needs to be included (same thing for all of the occupants - daily average staff of every tenant, daily average visitor/transient of every tenant, etc.).

Post a Reply
0
0
Graciela Kessler Lauckgroup
Apr 21 2014
LEEDuser Member
6 Thumbs Up

SSc1 Option 1 and Regional Priority Credit

I just received the Review Report for one of our project. We documented SSc1 option 1 LEED certified Building. This Credit is Regional Priority Available, when completing the documentation I marked the option to Attempt Regional credit. Even though SSc1 was Awarded the RP credit was not. It is not Pending, Denied or Awarded. Not comment just listed with 0 point. I am not sure why this happened. Have you had a similar situation? Do you have any advice on how should I proceed in this case?

Thank you so much for your help.
Graciela Kessler

1
1
0
Erika Duran Sustainability Consultant, Dagher Engineering Apr 21 2014 LEEDuser Member 984 Thumbs Up

Graciela,

If this is an older project, I am not sure what is the process but for NCv2009 whenever we obtain a credit that qualifies for RP the icon underneath that column on the scorecard lights up orange and the column under "Attempted" shows 2/1 instead of 1/1 that would normally appear. I would contact the team via the gbci contact page and inquire about this. It might have been a mistake on their part.

Post a Reply
0
0
Gail Williams Principal Consultant WSP
Apr 15 2014
Guest
10 Thumbs Up

Path 2: Storm Water Quantity Control - Discharge into Estuary

Hello,

We are working on a project in Ireland where the surface water runoff from the site flows directly into a tidal reach (estuary) without attenuation, as this has been confirmed to be the most sustainable approach with the local planning authority. Within BREEAMBuilding Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method, the first widely used green building rating system, developed in the U.K. in the early 1990s, currently used primarily in the U.K. and in Hong Kong. there is alternative compliance path allowing the peak rate of runoff and volume of run off credits to be achieved by default where sites discharge rainwater directly to a tidal estuary or the sea. Is anyone aware of anything similar with LEED?

Many thanks
Gail

1
3
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 15 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Gail, I've never heard of that with LEED. I think you would have to request guidance through contacting GBCI and likely getting a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide or Interpretation for an official ruling. The BREEAMBuilding Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method, the first widely used green building rating system, developed in the U.K. in the early 1990s, currently used primarily in the U.K. and in Hong Kong. rule is in your favor, but I think LEED would want to see specific definitions of why and when this is the most environmentally friendly option.

2
3
0
Erika Duran Sustainability Consultant, Dagher Engineering Apr 15 2014 LEEDuser Member 984 Thumbs Up

I have not read anything where I assume you will likely still have to perform calculations for the volume and rate of stormwater reduction. I would inquire on the GBCI contact page.

3
3
0
Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Apr 15 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2680 Thumbs Up

You are in what is commonly referred to as a "Direct Discharge" area. Basically, this is usually the most low-lying areas within a major river basin (or an ocean or sea). The thinking is you are not eroding the Atlantic Ocean, and any attempt to infiltrate anything is moot.

If you are discharging to a major reach, such as a river, the thinking is to have all your water gone, before the upstream basin makes its way down to the area of your site. We don't want you discharging from your site 24 hours after a storm when the entire basin runoff is getting there. This is a flood control measure.

I'd look into a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for this, but part of me feels that your site just is not applicable to this credit, because we would be simply giving you points just because you are in a direct discharge district.

Post a Reply
0
0
Vivien Fairlamb
Apr 03 2014
LEEDuser Member
1000 Thumbs Up

Path 12 - is Enhanced Refrigerant Management (LEED NC EAc4)

Has anyone successfully submitted the Enhanced Refrigerant Management credit ( LEED NC or CS) for a Base Build as an "Other Quantifiable Environmental Benefit" under LEED CI ? would likely meet the intent of the Path 12 requirements?

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 25 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Vivien, this seems to me like a good strategy.

Post a Reply
0
0
Laurie Thorwart Heller & Metzger PC
Jan 08 2014
Guest
34 Thumbs Up

2009 BD+C/ID+C Calculation problem for Heat Island Effect - Roof

Hey all,

Please bear with me, as this question is complicated and takes into account a couple different documents/rating systems. I'm sincerely hoping that I am just missing something obvious, and one of you can simply point that out, and I can stop obsessing about this. This pertains to Heat Island EffectHeat island effect refers to the absorption of heat by hardscapes, such as dark, nonreflective pavement and buildings, and its radiation to surrounding areas. Other sources may include vehicle exhaust, air-conditioners, and street equipment. Reduced airflow because of tall buildings and narrow streets exacerbate the effect. - Roof, Option 3 (BD+C SSc7.2, and ID+C SSc1 Path 5).

On page 119 of the 2009 BD+C Reference Guide, there is an equation listed to calculate the amount of compliant roof areaRoof area is the area of the uppermost surface of the building which covers enclosed Gross Floor Area, as measured when projected onto a flat, horizontal surface (i.e. as seen in Roof Plan view). ‘Roofs’, or portions of roofs, covering unenclosed areas (e.g. roofs over porches and open covered parking structures) are not included in the areas used to evaluate compliance with SSc7.2, though they may be applicable to SSc7.1. for a building with a combination high-albedoAlbedo is synonymous with solar reflectance./vegetated roof. It is listed as follows:

[(Area Roof Meeting Minimum SRI / .75) + (Area of Vegetated Roof / .5)] >= Total Roof Area

On page 6 of the ID+C Reference Guide, there is another equation listed for the same credit, in this case SSc1, Path 5, Option 3. That equation is listed as follows:

Total Roof Area <= [(Area of SRI Roof * 1.33) + (Area of Vegetated Roof * 2)]

This is where it gets confusing. I am currently studying for the ID+C specialty exam, and the answer to practice question #2 for Sustainable Sites on page 60 of the ID+C study guide is calculated incorrectly. The explanation for the question (on page 200 of the study guide) actually USES the first equation above to arrive at the "correct" answer, but it LISTS the second equation above as the equation to use. This is misleading, since 6000 * 1.33 equals 7,980, which means the compliant roof area drops below the required amount by 20 SF, changing the answer to the question (to D, not C, for those following along).

Please note that I am aware of LEED's number rounding principles, but that wouldn't apply in this case, since rounding that number up would actually give the design team an unfair advantage (that is, assuming there is more compliant square footage than actually exists).

I cannot find any LEED Interpretations, Addenda, or other Reference Guide changes to confirm that the equation listed for this credit in BD+C should be used to satisfy ID+C SSc1 Path 5 Option 3 instead of the equation actually listed in the ID+C reference guide for this credit.

Do I assume the ID+C reference guide is wrong, and use the BD+C equation? Am I missing something? I just find it really hard to believe that I'm the first person to notice this.

Thanks for reading,

Jake

1
3
0
Laurie Thorwart Heller & Metzger PC Apr 15 2014 Guest 34 Thumbs Up

I understand that this was a complicated (read: terribly framed) question, but in case anyone is keeping track, I did receive a response from the USGBC and there was an error in the study guide. For the test and for project use, should it come up, the second formula listed above should be the one used:

Total Roof AreaRoof area is the area of the uppermost surface of the building which covers enclosed Gross Floor Area, as measured when projected onto a flat, horizontal surface (i.e. as seen in Roof Plan view). ‘Roofs’, or portions of roofs, covering unenclosed areas (e.g. roofs over porches and open covered parking structures) are not included in the areas used to evaluate compliance with SSc7.2, though they may be applicable to SSc7.1. <= [(Area of SRI Roof * 1.33) + (Area of Vegetated Roof * 2)]

Just a general comment on USGBC study materials: I found a LOT of errors throughout the study material when I was looking information over for my exam. For what it's worth, I found that the redline guides on the USGBC website were probably my best resource, I just wish I had found them sooner (but don't anyone worry, I passed with flying colors).

Jake

2
3
0
Magda Kowalik-Gadek Interior Architect & Designer Apr 16 2014 Guest 6 Thumbs Up

Hi Jake,
I'm just studying to my AP CI+C exam and also noticed this error in study guide. Actually it is not even an error, but it is frustrating as this 'round-up' in formula (*1.33 vs /.75) is irritating. 75% should always be calculates as SRI area /.75. *1.33 is kind of 'inversion' but to be more exact it should be 1.33333(3), so why to express this formula like this..? The larger the roof areaRoof area is the area of the uppermost surface of the building which covers enclosed Gross Floor Area, as measured when projected onto a flat, horizontal surface (i.e. as seen in Roof Plan view). ‘Roofs’, or portions of roofs, covering unenclosed areas (e.g. roofs over porches and open covered parking structures) are not included in the areas used to evaluate compliance with SSc7.2, though they may be applicable to SSc7.1. SF the difference will be 'growing' and it will always be below required 75%...
I am studying also from CI+C Ref Guide and agree - it has plenty of errors. I just wonder what are these redline guides you're referring to on USGBC website? Thanks,
Magda

3
3
0
Laurie Thorwart Heller & Metzger PC Apr 29 2014 Guest 34 Thumbs Up

Hi Magda,

Sorry for the delay.

With regards to your question on the formula, all I can relay is what was told to me by customer service at GBCI, and what I saw on the test. I agree that the formula can be confusing, but it is what we're supposed to use nonetheless.

As far as the redline guides are concerned, go here: http://www.usgbc.org/resources/list?keys=redline

That is the Resources tab on the USGBC website, with "redline" in the search field. Scroll down to the applicable file and you should be all set. Redline guides are nice because they show what has been changed/added/omitted over time.

Jake

Post a Reply
0
0
Nicholas Vreeland
Oct 10 2013
Guest
27 Thumbs Up

LEED-CI 2009 SSc1 Option 2 Path 10

We are attempting SSc1 Option 2 Path 10 for a CI project within a CS registered building. My question is that the form provided for this credit automatically populated 30 sec. as a duration for public lavatory faucets. The CS form automatically populates a 15 sec. duration for public lavatory faucets. So, the CS form meets the 30% requirement, but the CI form does not. In addition, in the LEED-CI 2009 Reference Guide, Table 2, the duration for lavatory faucets is listed as 15 sec., not 30 seconds. I can not find any information in errata, interpretations or on this forum that address this discrepancy. Any information would be appreciated.

1
1
0
Nicholas Vreeland Oct 14 2013 Guest 27 Thumbs Up

I recieved the following response from the USGBC:

"The CI form was incorrectly updated to match the CS WEp1 addenda which changed the duration for public lavatory faucets from 15 seconds to 30. Please use the following workaround: after selecting "Public lavatory faucet" as the fixture family, select "Other" from the Fixture Type drop-down. This will allow the Duration to become editable and you may type-in "15." Please use the special circumstances section of your form to explain the issue and the workaround".

Post a Reply
0
0
MM K
Sep 23 2013
Guest
1403 Thumbs Up

Path 4

Can the project achieve Path4 if there are no parking spaces within the building. The project is a zero lot line as well.

Thanks!

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

A bit of a a gray area, but I would say not. The idea behind Path 4 isn't to reward not having parking, but to reward preventing the heat island effectHeat island effect refers to the absorption of heat by hardscapes, such as dark, nonreflective pavement and buildings, and its radiation to surrounding areas. Other sources may include vehicle exhaust, air-conditioners, and street equipment. Reduced airflow because of tall buildings and narrow streets exacerbate the effect.. Feels to me more like a cas of non-eligibility rather than automatic compliance. But if you ask GBCI, let us know what you learn.

I understand it's zero lot line, but is there any hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. at all within your LEED project boundary?

Post a Reply
0
0
Nick Chiarelli
Sep 17 2013
Guest
65 Thumbs Up

Base Building Ongoing LEED Certification

The base building is currently undergoing construction and their LEED certification will not be ready for a couple months. Our tenant fitout portion has already been submitted for Design Preliminary Review but now we would like to submit all of the design credits for Final Review. Since this point along with a few others are not yet complete, can I defer these points by simply not submitting them until the construction review stage? Thank You!

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, I would simply defer this credit.

Post a Reply
0
0
Susan Di Giulio Project Manager Zinner Consultants
Jun 27 2013
LEEDuser Member
1107 Thumbs Up

Tenant performance of base building improvements

We have a client who is leasing two entire, adjacent buildings for 12 years. They are taking on installing high SRI roof membranes and a photovoltaic canopy system in the parking lot. It seems logical that they should be able to use these for SSc1.2.5 & 1.2.11, but the wording of the credits only covers the owner having put these improvements in place previously.
Can we utilize these improvements for points? Would we need to defer SSc1 until construction submittal, so they are already in place?

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, I would defer until the improvements are in place. The credit is meant to reward site selection, not site improvements, so any improvements should be in place to be recognized.

Post a Reply
0
0
Rebecca Hart
Jun 25 2013
Guest
81 Thumbs Up

BREEAM certified building?

The building chosen for this LEED CI project already has a BREEAMBuilding Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method, the first widely used green building rating system, developed in the U.K. in the early 1990s, currently used primarily in the U.K. and in Hong Kong. rating - BREEAM is the UK's version of LEED. Has anyone got any experience of whether this could count towards either Option 1 - selecting a LEED certified building or Option 2 - Path 12 Other Quantifiable Environmental Performance. Any suggestions welcome!

1
4
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Jun 25 2013 LEEDuser Member 2264 Thumbs Up

I don't think that Option 1 will work but you should be able to make a strong case for Path 12. I don't have any experience with this but with a strong narrative (think BREEAMBuilding Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method, the first widely used green building rating system, developed in the U.K. in the early 1990s, currently used primarily in the U.K. and in Hong Kong. case study of building) I expect it would be accepted.

2
4
0
Vivien Fairlamb Jun 26 2013 LEEDuser Member 1000 Thumbs Up

I submitted (about 3 months ago) a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide on option 1 BREEAMBuilding Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method, the first widely used green building rating system, developed in the U.K. in the early 1990s, currently used primarily in the U.K. and in Hong Kong. in lieu of the LEED building and it was refused. I've not tried option 2 path 12 but could be worth submitting

3
4
0
Rebecca Hart Jun 26 2013 Guest 81 Thumbs Up

Looks like option 2 path 12 is the one to go for. Thanks for the advice!

4
4
0
MM K Aug 14 2014 Guest 1403 Thumbs Up

Has this worked out? It was rejected on our project.

Post a Reply
0
0
Nick Chiarelli
May 13 2013
Guest
65 Thumbs Up

Currently Ongoing LEED Certification

Hi,

The base building is currently pursuing LEED certification at the same time we are doing the tenant fit-out portion and pursuing LEED CI. Can we get these 5 points through Option 1 somehow?

Thanks,

Nick

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 13 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Nick, the most obvious way to do this is to time your final LEED application such that the building's application has been processed. This could be as simple as staggering your application by a few weeks behind theirs. If being submitted at the same time, you could include a narrative about how the reviewer should reference the pending certification when reviewing this credit.

 

Post a Reply
0
0
Brian Kelly Project Designer UED
May 08 2013
LEEDuser Member
19 Thumbs Up

SSc1 Path 7 Water Efficient Landscaping

We are doing a renovation on a hospital in Las Vegas NV. The hospital has two very small patches of landscape that use what we believe to be an efficient irrigation system. To fill out the form on LEEDonline.com, we need to fill in an 'irrigation baseline case' and an 'irrigation design case'. I've been told to fill out what exists at the hospital for the design case, and what "conventional practice" for the area is in the baseline case. How do I figure out what the exact numbers would be for 'conventional practice'?

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 13 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Brian, what you have been told is correct, and your question about what exact numbers should be is also a common issue. A good place to read more and get a better sense of this is on our NC WEc1 guidance and forum. In short, there is no one-size-fits-all method, so it's helpful if you read a bit more and get a sense of how to go about it.

Post a Reply
0
0
Ryan McEvoy Owner Gaia Development
May 03 2013
LEEDuser Member
191 Thumbs Up

LEED for Homes

We have a project that is moving into a building that has been certified under LEED for Homes Mid-Rise. Can the project still pursue option 1?

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 13 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Ryan, as the credit language says "LEED certified building" without specifying a rating system, I would think this would be fine.

Post a Reply
0
0
Sourabh Gupta
Apr 17 2013
Guest
14 Thumbs Up

SS Cr1: Path 9-Innovative WasteWater Technologies

In one of my project, they are attempting this point. While we have the water fixtures details & occupancy of the project space(tenant) only. Online template asks us to get the information of the water fixture details & their flow rate for the whole building which is not possible to get it. So how do we proceed ahead with this point?

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 13 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Sourabh, you will need the information for the whole building. While all the other credits in LEED-CI are just about the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space., the point of this credit is to reward and recognize whole-building performance. If you can't get that information, then you won't be able to attempt this path, unfortunately.

Post a Reply
0
0
Kerrie Racicot
Mar 20 2013
LEEDuser Member
43 Thumbs Up

Other tenant space is unoccupied...

Our project space occupies a majority of the building, however the only other tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. is unoccupied. Is Path 7 - Light Pollution Reduction possible? The landlord may be amenable to including LEED credit requirements in the lease for the unoccupied tenant space. Would this satisfy the credit requirements if a copy of the lease was provided? I'm assuming this approach wouldn't work for Path 10 - Water Use Reduction as there is no way to know the future occupancy profiles of the space.

Please advise.

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 21 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, I'd say you could meet this requirement with a lease. For water use reduction, I'd suggest looking at CS Appendix 4 in the BD&C LEED Reference Guide, if you have access to that.

Post a Reply
0
0
Mark Taake United Excel Design
Dec 06 2012
LEEDuser Member
68 Thumbs Up

SSc1 path 7,8

Is it possible to achieve only the points for path 8, without achieving path 7? Under path 8, the wording states that the 2 points are in addition to path 7. So is path 7 a pre-requisite for 8? Do you automatically get the two points for 7 if you qualify for 8? Thanks.

1
1
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Dec 06 2012 LEEDuser Member 2264 Thumbs Up

If you meet the requirements for path 8 then you also meet the requirements for Path 7 and get 4 points. At least that's my understanding of the way these paths are related.

Post a Reply
0
0
Elliot Young Designer Rinkachung Architecture
Nov 30 2012
Guest
42 Thumbs Up

SSC1 Path 5: Heat Island Effect: Roof

I am working on a project with an existing ballasted roof & am wondering if we could get this credit. It is a low slope roof so needs to have an SRI of 78 or higher.....but the roof is existing. what is an acceptable method for trying to prove compliance for this credit? Does a typical ballasted roof even qualify? Any guidance on where to start helps! Thanks!

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 30 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Elliot, there is detailed guidance on how to comply with Path 5 that is accessible under the Checklists tab above. I would start there and then post back here with more specific questions.

Post a Reply
0
0
Dana Hodges Project Manager DPR Construction
Aug 21 2012
Guest
33 Thumbs Up

Sustainable Site Regional Priority Credit

I am working on a project in a region where the regional priority credits include SSC1 paths, C, E, G, H, and L, but do NOT include path A - selecting a LEED certified building. At first glance, it looks like we our project only qualifies for 6 points maximum (paths E, G, and H > 3 SS credits and 3 regional priority credits for each of these = 6 credits total). However, I am wondering if there is a way to get the 5 credits for being in LEED building, and still get the three regional priority credits we qualify for also. Does anyone know if that is the case and how to go about documenting the credits if we can claim them?

1
1
0
Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Aug 22 2012 LEEDuser Member 986 Thumbs Up

Regional Priority:
First, I just want to confirm that you are in LEED-CI v2009 and not LEED-CI v2.0. The pathways in v2009 are numbered whereas in v2.0 they were lettered. Since your question references lettered pathways, it’s a little unclear whether you are in LEED-CI v2009. If you are in LEED-CI v2.0, there are no Regional Priority Credits (RPC) at all and so the question is somewhat mute as they wouldn’t apply to your project. I'm going to assume that was just a typo and that you are in LEED-CI v2009, so we’re discussing SSc1 Option 1 (Certified Building) versus SSc1 Option 2 – Path #s (Other Quantifiable Benefits).

SSc1 - LEED Building vs. Pathways:
Unfortunately, LEED Online v3 (LOv3) will only recognize a regional priority point as an option when the specific linked pathway/option is attempted. This means that if RPC is noted as available for SSc1 Option 2 – Path 4 and you instead select and submit under SSc1 Option 1, you will not receive any RPC points as the correct path/option was not selected and the RPC hasn’t been automatically linked by the LOv3 system. So, in your case, it sounds like if you really want to submit under the previously certified building/space option (SSc1 Option 1), that’s going to preclude you from being able to achieve any RPC point within SSc1 (as those are all associated with SSc1 Option 2 - Path #s).

The other important thing to note is that RPCs are awarded at the CREDIT level and therefore there is a maximum of one additional RPC point per CREDIT. The RPC needs to be attempted on the Credit Information Tab for SSc1 (the credit) within LOv3. As SSc1 is the credit and all of the paths are just compliance options to achieve that credit, you would only be able to achieve a maximum of one RPC point for SSc1 – even if you demonstrated compliance with all three of your noted pathways. You can obviously attempt any combination of pathways (as long as they total no more than 5 potential points) so it’s not as if you need to pick only one of the RPC-eligible pathways to pursue. You should just recognize that you could only get a maximum of one RPC point for SSc1 regardless of how many RPC-eligible pathways in SSc1 you complied with.

Your Specific Project:
So for your particular project – we’re really talking about 5 points versus 6 points total available for SSc1. At this point, it probably becomes an internal debate on how badly you might need that one additional point versus the extra work required to document base building compliance with the individual pathways within Option 2. In either case, you would definitely want to note the project as previously certified within PIf5 (Previously LEED Certified Details) and provide there the required official documentation from USGBC/GBCI to confirm the certification (note that screenshots of LEED Online and PDF Review Summaries don’t qualify; you’d need something like the official USGBC/GBCI-provided scorecard, congratulations letter, certificate, etc.).

By making sure you appropriately documented the previous certification in PIf5, that gives you a very good fall-back for the Final Review to ensure that you would be able to achieve at least 5 points for SSc1. It would enable you to attempt the pathways in the Preliminary Review via SSc1 Option 2 – Path #s if you wanted and try to get the six available points (5 full + 1 RPC). If you ran into any issues documenting compliance/achieving the individual pathways at the base building level, you could then always revise your compliance route before the Final Review to SSc1 Option 1 and be sure that you would get the five points available for being in a previously LEED certified building/space. At that point, you would then only miss out on the one additional RPC point available for your location.

But again – it’s based on how badly you need/want that one additional point. Documenting the individual pathways at the base building level is obviously going to be much more work than just submitting under SSc1 Option 1. If that one point is not going to be critical to a threshold, it might not be worth the time/effort required for the pathways...

It's incredibly frustrating to me that your region selected so many RPC options all within the same credit; that severely limited your overall RPC options... I'd love to know the project zipcode (if you're willing to share).

Hope that helps clear things up! More that willing to help answer any follow-up questions you might have.

Post a Reply
0
0
Alicia Freire Associate hurleypalmerflatt
Aug 13 2012
LEEDuser Member
647 Thumbs Up

Irrigation - Project Boundary

Hi,
I am working on a building located in a development in a business park with 4 buildings. The site has a large non-symmetrical vegetated area in the middle which is shared by the four buildings. Since this is a Commercial Interiors assessment and this is the only credit affected by this situation, undertaking a campus approach does not seem the best option. Would it be acceptable if I make the calculations for the whole area? Since results are a % they should not be affected by the extension of the area included.
Your feedback would be much appreciated.
Many thanks
Regards
Alicia

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 30 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Alicia, your logic makes sense to me. However, it's a fairly unique situation, not only because of the site configuration but also because this is coming up under LEED-CI, so I can't say with confidence that GBCI would approve this approach. I'd submit it and find out.

Post a Reply
0
0
Lavanya Veerappa Ms LEAD Consultancy & Engineering services
Aug 07 2012
Guest
341 Thumbs Up

Path 4-Heat Island effect non roof

Hi, one of my project building (P1) going for LEED CI is located in campus. This building is attached to another building (P2) and even shares a common wall of P1. However P2 is not considered as basebuilding as it is entirely served by a different HVAC system.

Therefore my question is if the notional boundary has P2 as well, then should i show 50% of parking under cover for only P1 . As the SS Cr1 paths is for entire base building and in my case the entire project is occupied by tenant and has no basebuilding as such. Any thoughts??

1
2
0
Yetsuh Frank Director, YR&G sustainability consulting, education and analysis Aug 07 2012 LEEDuser Member 698 Thumbs Up

Lavanya,

Is the project an interior fit-out of some % of the building, P1? Is the under cover parking shared by the buildings, P1 and P2? Is P2 getting certified as well?

2
2
0
Lavanya Veerappa Ms, LEAD Consultancy & Engineering services Aug 09 2012 Guest 341 Thumbs Up

Hi Yetsuh,

1. 100% of P1 is going for interior fit out.
2. yes, the under cover parking is shared by both P1 and P2
3. P2 is not getting certified.

Thanks

Post a Reply
0
0
SOHA YAMANI
Aug 05 2012
Guest
382 Thumbs Up

path 7 & 8 : Gray water

my project is registered for LEED CI 2009 , we are using gray water for irrigation , which means 100 % reduction of potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. , does this qualify the project for the other 2 points of path 8 ?? ,, and will i need to make calculations ??

1
3
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Aug 05 2012 LEEDuser Member 2264 Thumbs Up

Yes and yes. I asked a similar question recently (which I don't see now). You can only avoid the calculations if you don't use water. The LEED On-line form says you need to show a 50% reduction in water use for the second 2 points but this is not a CI requirement.

2
3
0
SOHA YAMANI Aug 06 2012 Guest 382 Thumbs Up

EXACTLY ,, so what is the CI requirements for achieving the 4 points ??

3
3
0
Susann Geithner Global Sustainability Manager, Predictive Service Aug 09 2012 LEEDuser Member 11767 Thumbs Up

Soha, you will still have to fill out the calculation to show that gray water available for irrigation is enough to meet the irrigation demand. Usually you will perform a calculation showing the supply of gray water, the tank and how much it is filled and the draw for irrigation. We usually show this for the entire year, per day.

Post a Reply
0
0
Lavanya Veerappa Ms LEAD Consultancy & Engineering services
Jul 25 2012
Guest
341 Thumbs Up

Parking availabilty

The requriement of the credit - "parking availability" is to meet but not exceed local norms. Hence If a project's parking capacity is lesser than local norms does the project meets the credit requirement? please note the project occupants are using public transporation to commute and thereby the intent of the credit is met.

1
1
0
Susann Geithner Global Sustainability Manager, Predictive Service Jul 25 2012 LEEDuser Member 11767 Thumbs Up

I think your question is regarding SS c3.3.
Please post your question there.Thanks

Post a Reply
0
0
Nena Elise
Jun 27 2012
LEEDuser Member
3507 Thumbs Up

Path 6

Does anyone have a sample of a sequence of operations narrative? I am not sure what they'd like to see.

Start a new LEED comment thread

Oct 24 2014
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2014 – BuildingGreen, Inc.