CI-2009 SSc3.1: Credit Alternative Transportation—Public Transportation Access

  • CI_SS3-1_Type3_PubTransport diagram
  • Site selection makes all the difference

    Site selection is the key factor in determining how easily a project can qualify for this credit. If your project is located in a densely populated area that is well-served by public transportation, it should be very easy to meet the requirements.

    An all-around good idea

    Facilitating access to public transportation not only brings environmental benefits in the form of reduced greenhouse gas emissions and fewer cars on the road, but it can also reduce commuting costs for building occupants and help attract new hires and retain employees.

    Options for larger projects

    Larger-scale projects may want to consider working with local transit authorities to bring public transportation access near the project site if none already exists. You may not need to ask for an entirely new bus route—some other options include diverting an existing bus route or adding a stop on a route that runs nearby.

    Go by streetcarLocating in neighborhoods with public transit, like Portland, Oregon’s Pearl District, reduces transportation energy use while giving occupants more options. Photo – Reconnecting America If public transportation cannot be brought closer to your project site, you still have the alternative of providing shuttles to existing public transit—either regularly scheduled or on demand. Note that shuttles buses should provide direct access to transit facilities within two miles of the project site, approximately a 5–10 minute drive, and must be available to all project occupants.

    FAQs for SSc4.1

    What are the requirements for shuttle buses?

    Per the LEED Reference Guide, they must connect to public transit and operate during the most frequent commuting hours.

    Per a LEED addendum published 4/1/12, they must also "provide direct access to transit facilities within 2 miles of the project site, approximately a 5-10 minute drive, and must be available to all project occupants."

    A bus has multiple stops within my 1/4-mile radius. Can I count each of those?

    No, as this doesn't increase service to the LEED project. (Depending on project specifics, you could try to make a case, however.)

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Selecting a site with easy access to public transportation is the easiest way to earn this credit, so ideally this credit will be considered during site selection. Projects located in dense urban areas generally can qualify, whereas projects located in rural or suburban areas, where public transportation infrastructure is not as developed, may need to facilitate access to existing mass transit nearby, which may in some cases be difficult or expensive.


  • If there are no bus stops or train stations in the project’s immediate vicinity, consider talking to local transit authorities to see if a bus line can be rerouted closer to the project site, or if a bus stop can be added near the building to serve the occupants.


  • There is generally no extra cost for projects with access to existing transportation access or those that request an added bus stop.


  • Establishing a regular shuttle for building occupants to a transportation hub can add additional costs. However, making commuting easier for your employees, or making your building more accessible to customers can pay off in productivity or sales.


  • A transit-oriented project may need less parking area, contributing to SSc3.1—Alternative Transportation: Parking Capacity. You can also reduce your costs for parking construction, maintenance, and stormwater infrastructure and fees.

Schematic Design

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  • Typically, the tenant or LEED consultant is responsible for documenting access to public transportation and should identify local stations and bus routes closest to the project, reaching out to local transit authorities if necessary.


  • To document the credit create a vicinity site map, to scale, illustrating the building in relation to the bus lines or rail stations that will be used for compliance. A delineated walking route from the project to the transit stop is also recommended.


  • One commuter train station within a half-mile walking distance is sufficient to meet the credit requirement. This can be a local metro, subway, light rail or long-distance commuter line. Alternatively, two bus lines within ¼ mile walking distance can satisfy the credit requirement. These can be private, public, or campus bus lines.


  • Walking distance must be measured from the main building entrance to the bus stop or rail station. This path must follow sidewalks and other walkable areas. Crossing highways, lawns or other private areas is not considered an acceptable part of pedestrian access.


  • Some projects have two or three “main” entrances from which to measure the distance to bus stops or rail stations. If any one of these entrances is within the required distance, this can qualify your project for the credit. Confirm in the credit narrative which entries are “main” entries.


  • Public, private, or campus bus lines in proximity to the project site can be used for credit compliance as long as building occupants have consistent access at peak times. If there is an existing shuttle that runs nearby to the project site with restricted access, consider talking to bus operators to see if you can get permission for your project occupants to use the shuttle. (See the Documentation Toolkit for an example using a shuttle from the project site.)


  • If a rail station or bus stop that you plan to use for compliance has not yet been built, you will need to provide proof that it will be funded, sited and planned at the time of project completion. (It does not have to be built, however.)


  • A bus line that goes in separate directions (for example, one into town, one out of town), counts as a single bus line, not two, and does not meet the credit requirement for two bus lines. Compliant bus lines must serve two distinct routes. The simplest way to determine this is to verify that the buses display two different route numbers. Two routes that converge near the project and then diverge blocks away count as separate.


  • Consider one of the two options for pursuing an Exemplary Performance point for this credit:

    • Developing a comprehensive transportation management plan. The plan must quantify the reduction of personal automobile use by building occupants due to a variety of alternative transportation options and strategies. This same Exemplary Performance point covers all of the Alternative Transportation credits.
    • Demonstrate access to double the number of train lines or bus lines. The frequency of service at these particular stations must total a minimum of 200 rides daily. (See the Documentation Toolkit for an example.)

  • Documentation of this credit can occur anytime between schematic design and 100% construction documents. Unless your team is pursuing an alternative compliance path, you can document the credit as soon as the locations of your main entries are set.

Construction Documents

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  • Fill in the LEED Online credit form. Document the credit with a site plan highlighting the pedestrian route from the building entrance to the identified bus or train stop or stops. Provide a distance scale to confirm that the building entrance is within the required distance of transit—¼ mile for bus, ½ mile for train.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Consider providing building occupants with information about public transportation options in the vicinity and instituting programs that promote their use, such as subsidized passes or other financial incentives. This could be part of a wider transportation management plan, which is one available strategy for gaining an Exemplary Performance point under IDc1. To meet this ID point, project teams would have to institute a Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan that promotes the use of alternate transportation and limits the use of personal vehicles.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    SS Credit 3.1: Alternative transportation - public transportation access

    6 Points

    Intent

    To reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use.

    Requirements

    Option 1: Rail station, bus rapid transit station & ferry terminal proximity

    Locate the project in a building within 1/2-mile (800 meter) walking distance (measured from a main building entrance) of an existing (or planned and funded) commuter rail, light rail, subway station, bus rapid transit1 station or commuter ferry terminal.

    OR

    Option 2: Bus stop proximity

    Locate the project within 1/4-mile (400 meter) walking distance (measured from a main building entrance) of 1 or more stops for 2 or more public, campus, or private bus lines usable by tenant occupants.

    OR

    Option 3. Rideshare proximity

    Projects outside the U.S. may locate the project within 1/4-mile (400 meter) walking distance (measured from a main building entrance) of 1 or more stops for 2 or more existing rideshare options2 that that meet the definition of public transportation3 and are authorized by the local transit authority if one exists.

    1 Bus rapid transit is an enhanced bus system that operates on exclusive bus lanes or other transit rights-of-way; it is designed to combine the flexibility of uses with the efficiency of rail.

    2 Rideshare is a transit service that involves sharing a single vehicle with multiple people, excluding large-scale vehicles such as buses and trains. The rideshare transit facility must include a signed stop and a clearly defined waiting area. Additionally, the rideshare must include an enclosed passenger seating area, fixed route service, fixed fare structure, continuous daily operation, and the ability to pick up and drop off multiple riders. Rideshare options must hold 4 or more passengers, except for human-powered conveyances which must hold 2 or more passengers.

    3Public transportation consists of bus, rail, or other transit services for the general public that operate on a regular, continual basis.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Perform a transportation survey of potential tenant occupants to identify transportation needs. Locate the building near mass transit.

Web Tools

Walkscore.com

A great site for finding walkable communities and neighborhoods.


Hopstop.com

Subway and bus directions for NY.


Public transportation resources

Find public transportation around your site.


Project for public spaces

List of online resources on encouraging public transportation and space usage.


Institute for Transportation and Development Policy

This is a list of resources on increase of access to public transportation and walkability of cities.


Radius Around a Point

Helps to determine the radius around a project site to determine how many bus stops and other amenities are nearby.

Technical Guides

USGBC guide for campus building

Important to refer to in case of multi-building development.


Guide to transportation management plan

This encyclopedia is a comprehensive source of information about innovative management solutions to transportation problems.

Organizations

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

Government organization dedicated to saving lives, preventing injuries, and reducing vehicle-related crashes.


Walkable Communities Transportation Alternatives

Organization advocating for pedestrians.

Publications

Comprehensive Transporation Management Plan for Seattle Children’s Hospital

A sample plan highlighting enhanced transportation options, including a shuttle to transit system, an innovative bicycle program, and increased financial rewards for employees who commute without driving alone.


Juniper Networks Headquarters Campus Transportation Demand Management Plan

A good example of a transportation plan that has variety of infrastructure and incentive based measures that encourage all forms of alternative mode use: transit/shuttles, carpool/vanpool, bicycling, walking, and telecommuting.

Other

Commuter Program at Juniper Networks

Video of a good transportation plan that highlights company’s mass transit subsidies and telecommuting programs as well as its financial incentives, which helped the company achieve over 24% trip reduction in 2007.

Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan

A comprehensive transportation management plan is one way to earn an Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point under SSc4. 

Alternative Compliance Path

This sample narrative (which was approved for a project whose name has been removed) illustrates documentation of an alternative compliance path, in which shuttle service is provided to connect the project building with a light rail station and a public bus line.

Subway Ridership

Exemplary Performance

Exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. was earned for this project by demonstrating proximity to at least two commuter rail lines with over 200 transit rides per day, total. (In this case, 14 subway lines with 2,227 stops per day were documented.)

Vicinity Map

Option 2: Bus Stop Proximity

Use a vicinity map like this to demonstrate your project's proximity to public transit. Include the number and location of stations or lines and the walking distances from main building entrances.

LEED Online Forms: CI-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CI-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

39 Comments

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Wayne DeFeo Principal DeFeo Associates
Jan 09 2014
LEEDuser Member
2 Thumbs Up

Exemplary Performance

On the form it notes that for exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. we have to show that we are within 1/2 mile of at least 2 existing commuter rail, etc….and/or within 1/4 mile of at least 2 stops for 4 or more…bus…I have checked this and demonstrated more than 1000 stops….but it does not show that I have documented exemplary performance on the form…is that normal?

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Daniel Garavito
Jul 25 2013
Guest
41 Thumbs Up

SS credit 3.1 Schedules and Rides per day

My project is 0.5 miles from Grand central station NYC, in order to achieve exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. i have to state rides per day, this means for example each time subway stops in that station counts as a ride? Also, Do i have to state each line separate or state a total number of rides for each line as one?

Thank you

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Aug 14 2013 LEEDuser Expert 16345 Thumbs Up

Yes, in principle each time a train – subway or commuter rail - stops at the station counts as one "ride." Projects often count the number of stops per day each line makes at the station and then add all the stops from each line into one total. For exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. you need to exceed 200 rides per day – I’m sure you do.

It's a bit mind boggling to imagine counting all the times a train stops at Grand Central. Hopefully a few of the statistics on the wikipedia entry for Grand Central Terminal will be enough to convince the reviewer!

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Elizabeth Ingram LEED Green Assoc.
Jul 03 2013
Guest
25 Thumbs Up

EP Confusion re: SS C3.1,.3.2, and 3.3

Hi Tristan! I am studying for the LEED 2009 ID+C and am confused regarding the graphics for the above credits and the way the EP is mentioned. They seem to differ. For instance: SSc3.2 states that there is a single EP point for all of SSc3, yet the EP bubble on the above graphic states 6+ credits are available. Please clarify. Thank you!

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Kristina Bach CORE Steward, Cooper Carry Jul 03 2013 LEEDuser Member 642 Thumbs Up

The Alternative Transportation Suite (all of the SSc3s) work a little differently than your standard EP options so that's part of the confusion.

There is only exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point available for alternative transportation strategies within a LEED-CI. This means that you can either get one point for doubling your ridership (directly related to SSc3.1) or for developing a comprehensive transportation management plan (which is supposed to include things from, as well as above+beyond, SSc3.1, SSc3.2, and SSc3.3). As the Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan is supposed to include items from all three of the SSc3 credits, you're allowed to submit it under any of them and so they all list it as an option within the Reference Guide.

So the possible points for each credit are:
SSc3.1 - 6 points
SSc3.2 - 2 points
SSc3.3 - 2 points
IDc1 - EP of SSc3.# - 1 point max for either the Double Ridership or the Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan. You could theoretically mark any of the points listed above as "X+1" but again, you could only get a maximum of 1 ID point for that strategy as you're limited to 1 EP within the whole SSc3-suite.

Does that make sense? When studying, I'd recommend just remembering that you can only get one EP point for transit-related strategies and understanding the basics of the two options (ridership vs comprehensive).

I actually hate that little diagram above as I think it's doubly-confusing for people not familiar with LEED-CI. You can actually tell that it's a poorly-edited version of the LEED-NC page (refers to "SSc4" which doesn't exist in LEED-CI).

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Elizabeth Ingram LEED Green Assoc. Jul 04 2013 Guest 25 Thumbs Up

Thank you so much for the clarification! :-D

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STEPHEN F OURS Associate Vice President HGA - Architects and Engineers
Jun 27 2013
LEEDuser Member
14 Thumbs Up

Bus "route" versus bus "line"

My project is served by three different bus "routes" (AT2, AT4 and AT5) that make stops that are located well within the 1/4 mile walking distance.
All of the Routes however are operated by the same city transit agency. My question is do the separate "routes" meet the intent of the LEED requirement for bus "lines"? Hopefully, this is just semantics.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 27 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Stephen, yes, different routes run by the same company are fine. Just semantics.

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Nandana Kumar LEAD Consultancy & Engineering Services
Jun 27 2013
Guest
133 Thumbs Up

Shuttle Service Alternate Compliance Path

Hi,

We are applying for LEED CI rating for one of our project. This project owner will be providing shuttle buses as a Door-to-Door service for more than 90% of the project employees. Can this be considered as an alternate compliance path to meet this credit requirement?

Thanks
Regards
Nandana

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 27 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Nandana, please see the first FAQ above under LEEDuser's guidance. Shuttle buses are allowed but there are specific requirements to meet.

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Nandana Kumar LEAD Consultancy & Engineering Services Jun 28 2013 Guest 133 Thumbs Up

Tristan, I am unable to locate the FAQ as indicated by yourself. request you to help out on this. Probably i am not a member in LEED User hence unable to view the FAQ section.
Thanks..

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Nandana, joining LEEDuser through a free trial (see the offers above) will provide you access to the FAQs and much other valuable guidance, as well as tools. I strongly recommend it!

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Rebecca Hart WSP
Jun 20 2013
LEEDuser Member
57 Thumbs Up

Provision of bus schedules as evidence

We are pursuing the exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. element of this credit, as the site is extremely well served by bus routes (just counting the main bus lines, we have over 706 compliant bus rides/day). Does anyone know if instead of providing bus schedules as attachments, I can provide the link to the website with all of the timetables on it? There are no readily available pdfs to supply and the information is easily accessible to commuters via the web. Any thoughts or experiences to share? Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 27 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Rebecca, if the LEED Online documentation for this credit asks for an upload, I would probably print the page with the schedules as a PDF, upload that, and include a link to the live page in your narrative.

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Lauren Fakhoury Research Assistant Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC
Jun 13 2013
LEEDuser Member
964 Thumbs Up

School Busses

I'm working on a middle school project that is being certified under LEED-CI. Does anyone know if we are allowed to use a school bus as one of the transportation options, even though the project isn't being certified under LEED for Schools? Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 27 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Lauren, I don't think so, because the buses aren't accessible by all occupants, and travel highly specific routes. I can see a case for this but I don't think it quite fits the CI credit.

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Sheela I
Aug 18 2011
Guest
886 Thumbs Up

Exemplary Performance

I am currently working on a project which has 1 train station stop @ 0.2 miles (walkable distance) and 4 bus stops with in 0.2 mile (walkable distance) to the project site. Will this project qualify for examplary credit?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Aug 19 2011 LEEDuser Expert 16345 Thumbs Up

Possibly - it depends on the number of bus lines and frequency of bus and rail stops, which add up to the total # of "rides." For an ID point, you need to quadruple the number of rides serving stops in the 1/4 mi radius - see Interpretation # 5020 for the details.

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Andrew Laing, LEED AP BD+C Vice President Cassidy Turley
Nov 02 2010
Guest
129 Thumbs Up

Bus Stop Distance

How strict is the 1/4 mile walking distance? If the stops are .28 miles walking distance but under 1/4 mile as the crow flies will they not qualify? Also, why is it ok to walk 1/2 mile for the train but only 1/4 mile for the bus? Shouldn't these be the same distances?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 03 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

I think the idea is that train networks have greater, faster reach than bus networks and so are higher value and more worth walking for. Also, bus stops are more common.

Usually LEED doesn't allow any kind of rounding, so the stops in this case wouldn't qualify. And it is a walking distance requirement, since accessibility is the key. Since you're close I could see documenting the credit anyway and arguing for it, but it's anyone's case if you would succeed.

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Eric Bosley
Oct 26 2010
Guest
307 Thumbs Up

Dial a Ride Shuttle

I am currently working on a LEED CI project where we want to pursue SS Credit 3.1. Our building owner is looking to pay for public transportation to and from the local light rail. The building is located in a very suburban area and no one will use the transportation so what i wanted to find out is if a dial a ride shuttle service acceptable to the GBCI, does this meet the requirements or does a bus line have to service a certain number of times per day or week? Please let me know if anyone has experience with this, thanks.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 29 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Not sure if this bears directly on the question, but I'm wondering how far away the rail station is, in miles? Also, how quickly does the dial-a-ride arrive and how many people can they handle? If a bunch of people from the building get off work at the same time and want to get to the station, can the shuttle handle it?

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Eric Bosley Oct 29 2010 Guest 307 Thumbs Up

This particular service would be available within 15-20 minutes, and a shuttle would be able to accommodate 10-15 people based on the demand, as multiple buses are available to provide the service as necessary. The service would be similar to any other public transportation shuttle service and would more than serve the needs of the building. The only difference is it would be on call because we don't anticipate much public transportation being used at this location. The service would be able to handle all public transportation demand for the building. I just wanted to clarify that the USBGC would find it acceptable for this public transportation to be on-call rather than running a constant route. If you think about it the we are probably reducing carbon emissions by having the shuttle on-call. Please let me know if you have any experience with this or if you think I can assume that the USGBC would find this acceptable, thanks for your help.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 29 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

How far away is the rail station? (Again, I'm not sure I can give you a firm yes/no on this approach, but trying to get a sense of things.)

Could it be scheduled for regular users so that a call at 4:40 isn't necessary every day?

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Eric Bosley Oct 29 2010 Guest 307 Thumbs Up

The rail station is approximately 1 mile away from the building, the service could run a normal route, so if there were 5 or 10 people or even 1 who wanted it to pick them up from the light rail at 8 am and take them to work and then pick them up from work 4:40 then it could be scheduled as such. It would be catered based on demand if there is no demand then it would not be operating. It is basically being funded by the building owner to meet the LEED requirement. But he isn't going to pay to have it drive its route if no one is using it. I hope that makes sense.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 29 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Thanks for the background.

So for starters, it's pretty clear that the project does not meet the credit requirements.

Given that the owner is willing to commit to something that is somewhat equivalent to the credit requirements, you could make an argument for earning the credit. I think, however, that it's anyone's guess whether it wouuld be approved. It's not the kind of thing that has been reviewed consistently, from what I gather.

Not sure if this was any help, but great question.

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Eric Bosley Oct 29 2010 Guest 307 Thumbs Up

If the owner were to hire a bus service for the tenants use how would it need to operate in order to meet the LEED requirements?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 29 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

A bus service falls under Option 2, and the requirement is for two bus stops within 1/4 mile walking distance. My understanding is that a single physical bus stop can be counted twice if it has two bus lines. Two bus lines represents a substantial area of the region that can be reached.

I suppose that if you can argue that this private service (which would have to be open to all building users, like a public service would be) is functionally equivalent, then it should qualify.

I would probably recommend a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide if you are counting on earning this credit and want to be more sure of it.

I might actually argue for it under Option 1, saying that 1 mile of riding on a shuttle is better or at least equivalent to 1/2 walking. Again, a CIR is probably a good idea.

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Eric Bosley Oct 29 2010 Guest 307 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your input Tristan, that helps. This shuttle service would be the second bus line, one is already in place.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 29 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Oh, you didn't mention that. That's huge—should improve your odds.

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Jason Zullo ArchEcology, LLC. Apr 25 2013 Guest 15 Thumbs Up

Eric - We have the exact same situation at our project. I would greatly appreciate it if you could update LEED user with the outcome of your approach towards achieving this credit.

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Kathy Buck Senior Project Manager Neumann/Smith Architecture
Aug 23 2010
LEEDuser Member
1409 Thumbs Up

definition of "bus line" vs. "bus stop"

I'm not sure that the graphic above for this credit for option #2 is correct. The credit reads for option 2: "Locate the project within 1/4 mile walking distance...of 1 or more stops for 2 or more public campus or private bus LINES usable by tenant occupants".

We have (5) bus stops around our project site and each stop is for a different route, BUT, each stop is serviced by the same bus company. Does this qualify for this credit?

What is meant by "bus line"? Does it mean that there must be or or more stops for 2 or more different bus companies? If you Google "bus lines", Greyhound pops up, which leads me to think that in order to achieve this credit there must be more than one bus "company" that has 1 or more stops avaialable within 1/4 mile of the project site.

Can you offer some clarification?

Thanks!!!

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Aug 23 2010 LEEDuser Expert 16345 Thumbs Up

Two bus lines would mean two different routes. They can be from the same bus company - many areas are only served by one public transit agency.

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei Aug 25 2010 LEEDuser Member 4429 Thumbs Up

Hi David,.

How about i have 2 bus station/stop, separated by main road and facing each other, having the same buses lines (one going to the south and the other toward the north bound), and each is serving 48 times of transit for whole day, can i count the frequency as 96 transit per day?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Aug 25 2010 LEEDuser Expert 16345 Thumbs Up

If you have a single bus line that runs in opposite directions, such as North and South, you would count that as one bus line. With two bus stops, one for each direction, you can count the number of times a bus stops at each of the two stops as "rides", so yes, in your example that would be 96 transit rides.

and you can count the # of times a bus stops

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei Aug 25 2010 LEEDuser Member 4429 Thumbs Up

Thanks Dave!

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Robert Usdin
May 24 2010
Guest
94 Thumbs Up

Ferries and Subway Stops for Exemplary Performance

If my CI project is with 1/2 mile to a ferry that then connects to 4 different subway stops that have several hundred stops in total, would that qualify for exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements.? This is in addition to 22 different bus lines that are within 1/4 mile and 1 subway line that has 16 stops.

Also, to clarify, if a subway has 20 stops and the schedule shows 30 scheduled trains, am I correct in multiplying the two?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 24 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

The Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. language in the LEED ID+C Reference Guide seems pretty clear that the project needs to be within 1/2-mile of the rail stops, or 1/4-mile of the bus stops, to qualify for EP.

If an occupant from your project needs to ride a ferry that would be a longer ride than those distances, then I don't see how you could earn the point here. Is there something you could clarify?

You might have better luck instituting a comprehensive transportation management plan to earn the EP point.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Jun 23 2010 LEEDuser Expert 16345 Thumbs Up

Robert, if your project is within 1/4 mile of 22 bus lines and 1 subway you may meet the Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. requirements without the ferry service.

The reference guide helps clarify how to calculate the level of service - you want to determine how many "rides" are available within the 1/4 mile radius: a bus that stops every 30 minutes, day and night, would be 48 rides in a 24 hour period. 1 bus that stops every 15 minutes, 96 rides. 2 bus lines, one stopping every 15 minutes, and another every 30 minutes would be 120 rides.

In your example, if by "stops" you mean the number of times a subway stops at that station within a 24 hour period, then that sounds like the same thing as "rides." You'd want to add the number of stops/ rides per day for the subway and bus rather than multiply them. Hope that helps.

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Apr 24 2014
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