CI-2009 SSc3.2: Alternative Transportation—Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms

  • CI_SSc3.2 Type3 BicycleStorage Diagram
  • You can lead a horse to water…

    …But you can’t make it drink. In other words, bike racks and showers will probably not be enough to encourage biking in an area that’s unfriendly to bicyclists. If you’re thinking of pursuing this credit, first consider the realities of the neighborhood around your project. Is it realistic that building occupants will ride bicycles and make use of the bike racks and storage or the shower facilities? It’s important to consider whether the intent of this credit will bear out in reality or if your resources might be better allocated elsewhere.

    There are some additional costs

    This credit entails the costs of purchasing and installing the bike racks, as well as showers and changing facilities if you decide to provide those onsite. For smaller projects, the additional plumbing associated with showers and the space allocations for changing rooms and bike storage might make this credit cost-prohibitive. For larger projects, however, the initial cost of making a building “bike friendly” is relatively low. Remember—showers and changing facilities do not have to be onsite. They can be located anywhere within 200 yards of a building entrance as long as they are available to occupants at no cost. (There may be a cost to the owner, however, in the form of gym memberships or access fees to provide access to showers in other facilities when none are being provided in the LEED project building.)

    Different building types = different requirements

    Different building types call for different calculations under this credit—make sure you’re using the proper variables for your building type. Residential project teams should also keep in mind that bike storage facilities must be covered—which is not part of the credit requirements for other building types—and that this will impact building design.

    Do visitors need shower access?

    Bike-rack capacity is calculated for peak-time building users, which include transients and visitors. The number of shower facilities needed is calculated based on full-time equivalentFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 40 hours per week in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per week divided by 40. Multiple shifts are included or excluded depending on the intent and requirements of the credit. (FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.) occupancy, which excludes visitors. Therefore, transient occupants and residents (because they have their own showers in their residential units) don't need access to showers.

    FAQs for SSc4.2

    Does LEED have any requirements on spacing or the type of bike racks used? What about security?

    LEED does not prescribe the type of bicycle rack that should be used or the spacing between them, or the location. However, if you want to provide the best options possible for your bicyclists, look at bike rack design and capacity figures with a skeptical eye. So-called "wheel bender" and "wave" racks, for example, do not provide much security, and can become overcrowded. Some form of locking defines "secure"—choose what is appropriate for the project and location.

    Are there specific requirements for the changing rooms, such as size?

    No. Use common design standards and principles. A shower and a changing room may be part of the same space.

    Based on my FTE calculations, I am only required to provide 1 shower to meet this requirement. Since both males and females will have access to this one shower, and it will be in a single room, does this satisfy the credit requirements? Can I use an existing shower in a handicapped-accessible bathroom?

    Yes and yes.

    Do bike racks have to be within the LEED project boundary?

    No, as long as they meet the credit requirement of being within 200 yards of a building entrance.

    My project type serves visitors who can reasonably be expected to not be using bikes, e.g. hotel, airport, assisted living facility. Can I exclude them from bike rack requirements?

    Possibly. LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #2422 made on 01/23/2009 states that "When submitting this credit, the narrative should include the number of people that are excluded from SSc4.2 occupancy counts and why this type of visitor cannot reasonably be expected to arrive at this destination on or with a bicycle. The submittal should also state how guests with bicycles will be accommodated."

    While USGBC has not provided guidelines for how to determine when this path can be reasonably pursued, projects can reference this LEED Interpretation and make an argument based on the project specifics. Check the LEED Interpretations database for some more specific examples.

    Is a general storage room that is accessible to residents acceptable for covered bike storage?

    LEEDuser's experts have seen this credit approved with similar strategies. Check that each unit has its own storage area that is large enough for a bike, and that there is enough other storage in the unit for other common items like boxes of clothing, etc. A common-area storage room that could get filled up with non-bike stuff could be a problem, however. Be sure that the intended solution will really work.

    Do I round up or down? What if the calculations show that I need 0.5 showers?

    In all cases, round up. Round up 0.5 showers to 1.

    Our building is mostly residential. Must we provide showers and changing rooms for the nonresidential portion?

    It depends on the specifics, including square footage. LEED Interpretation #10209, issued 7/1/2012, states that “If the total nonresidential square footage of a mixed-use building is less than 10% and no greater than 5,000 square feet, it is acceptable for the nonresidential use to be excluded from the shower requirements.” Bicycle storage requirements must still be met, however.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • In determining the feasibility of this credit with the project team consider the following questions:

    • Does the building have access to safe bicycle pathways or bikeable access to mass transit?
    • Will the project be able to provide showers to building occupants?

  • In determining whether to pursue this credit, project teams should carefully consider the building where the project is located, climate, terrain, project location, cultural norms, and other factors that may affect bike ridership, in order to assess whether this is an appropriate strategy for your project. 

Schematic Design

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  • Determine the project's FTE occupancy, peak and transient occupant counts, and calculate the required number of bicycle racks and shower facilities needed to fulfill the LEED requirements. (One FTE equals eight hours of occupancy. A transient occupant is a visitor, hotel guest, or customer who visits during peak periods.)

    To calculate FTE occupants, use a standard eight-hour occupancy period. An FTE, therefore, has a value of one (8 ÷ 8). Each part-time staff occupant has a value of the number of hours of occupancy divided by eight (e.g., 4 ÷ 8 = ½ FTE). It follows that the total number of staff FTEs equals the total number of staff hours divided by eight.

     


  • Once you have determined total FTE and peak users, calculate how much space for bike storage and how many showers will be required. 

     


  • Per numerous CIR rulings, showers can be located off-site within 200 yards of a building entrance as long as they are accessible to building occupants. For example, a building owner could provide occupants with free access to gym facilities nearby to comply with the credit requirements.


  • Occupants will appreciate if showers are conveniently located and accessible from the bike storage area. This will also increase use of the biking and showering facilities. 


  • Although nonresidential projects don’t require bike racks to be covered, consider providing sheltered bike storage anyway. Bicyclists will appreciate it and may use the bike racks more often. 


  • Bike rackA bike rack comes in many different shapes and forms and doesn’t have to be a traditional sidewalk rack. Bikes can be hung in closets from hooks or stored securely in a room in the basement. Racks can be designed to stack bikes or hang bikes from a wall.


  • Get creative when it comes to finding space in buildings where that’s an issue. Use wall-mounted bike racks, racks designed to stack bikes over one another, or even space for bike racks on the roof. 


  • Building occupants must have dedicated use of the bike racks—typically enforced through signage or location. While they may be a good idea, public bike racks on the sidewalk that are not specifically designated for the LEED project use do not count towards the credit.  


  • If your project is located in a larger building that already has some bike racks, determine who has the right to access them. If project occupants can access them and a certain number of racks can be attributed directly to your tenant space, count the spaces and confirm that they are sufficient for 5% of peak users. Make sure that there enough additional racks to meet the needs of building occupants attributed to the project and for non-project building occupants alike. 


  • When sizing and designing the showers and storage facilities consider the possibility of future expansion. 


  • Bike rack capacity is calculated for peak-time building users, while showers are calculated by FTE. Peak users include transients and visitors, while FTE calculations do not. Therefore, transient occupants and residents (because they have their own showers in their residential units) are not counted in the showering facility calculation. 


  • Make sure the calculations of FTE and peak users are consistent for the project across all credits. 


  • If certain populations cannot be reasonably expected to arrive at a site by bicycle or to use bikes at all (for example, travelers passing through an airport or occupants of an elder care facility), you will have the option to exclude these populations, but must be able to demonstrate why these occupants (full-time or transient) should not be counted in total FTE calculations or why biking is not a realistic transportation option. Be sure to provide this information in the credit narrative and submit with credit documentation. 


  • Make sure your project will provide sufficient space to hold the number of specified bike racks. Generally a 2’ x 6’ (12 ft2) space will adequately accommodate a standard bike. 


  • When making credit calculations, you must round the number of showers or bike racks up to the next whole number. For example, if your calculation yields 2.1 showers, you must provide three showers; if your calculation yields 4.4 bike spaces, you must provide a minimum of five. Make sure any spreadsheets or calculators developed by your team are not rounding numbers automatically, as this may distort the actual number of spaces or showers required. 


  • In the case of a retail project, calculate full-time, shift-equivalent numbers for both employees and customers. This can be determined by using actual or historical data, projections, or estimations based on square footages and building type. In all three cases, assume 50% male and 50% female occupants. See the USGBC website for more information on LEED for CI Retail projects. 

Design Development

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  • Perform the calculations based on FTE to determine the number of bike racks and showers required. 


  • Identify the best space, either inside or outside the building, in which to locate bike racks. For projects with zero lot line and no site area, the bike racks will have to be located outside on the sidewalk or inside the building. Most of the time, the site’s parking area or garage is a suitable location for bike racks. Bike racks outside the building must be within 200 yards of the building entrance, either on the project site or on a public sidewalk. 


  • Retailers in particular may want to locate the bike racks closest to the storefront or the building entrance closest to their store. 


  • If you are limited by budget, space or programming, your team may want to find other ways to meet the shower requirements. Consider providing employees with gym memberships that allow them to take a shower after biking or partnering with other facilities within the same building that can provide access to showers (this approach is confirmed by multiple NC CIR rulings and a CI ruling from 2/12/07 for CI SSc3.2).  If pursuing gym membership or another alternate option, consult with GBCI about your approach and plan to write an alternative compliance narrative describing your approach and how it meets the credit intent and requirements.  

Construction Documents

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  • Provide the appropriate number of secure bicycle storage facilities, showers and changing facilities. These should be clearly marked on project drawings (see the Documentation Toolkit for an example).


  • Complete LEED Online documentation, including:

    • A plan showing the location of showers and changing facilities, demonstrating the distance from the building entrance to each service.
    • The submittal template showing calculations of FTE and peak users, and the number of bicycle storage spaces and showers.

Construction

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  • Make sure that bike racks, showers, and changing facilities are built according to plans.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Providing access to common bike racks, building terraces to install bike racks, and other shared services should be discussed with the building owner. These provisions must be incorporated into the lease agreement to eliminate any future misunderstandings. 


  • Educate building occupants about bike routes in the area and provide incentives for bicycle commuting. Bike routes can also be posted on the company intranet. 


  • Consider providing bikes to building occupants or instituting a bike-share program. If well-developed, such programs could potentially become part of a comprehensive transportation management plan that could earn the project an innovation credit through IDc1.


  • To encourage bike ridership, consider implementing a bicycle maintenance program for employees who bike to work. This could take the form of vouchers for local bike shops or availability of basic tools and resources for bike upkeep onsite.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    SS Credit 3.2: Alternative transportation - bicycle storage and changing rooms

    2 Points

    Intent

    To reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use.

    Requirements

    Provide secure bicycle racks and/or storage within 200 yards (200 meters) of a main building entrance for 5% or more of tenant occupants (measured at peak periods).

    Provide shower and changing facilities in the building, or within 200 yards (200 meters) of a building entrance, for 0.5% of full-time equivalentFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 40 hours per week in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per week divided by 40. Multiple shifts are included or excluded depending on the intent and requirements of the credit. (FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.) occupants.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Select a building with transportation amenities such as bicycle racks and shower/changing facilities or add them as part of the tenant fit-out.

Software Tools

62MZ Calculator: Ventilation Rate Procedure

This is a Microsoft Excel calculator that accompanies the ASHRAE 62.1 reference standard. The calculator allows users to plug in variables for specific project types and run the Ventilation Rate Procedure.


CONTAM 3.0 Multizone Modeling Software

Public domain software from NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) that has natural ventilation sizing tools, and flow models to analytically predict room-by-room airflows.


Loop DA Multizone Modeling Software

Public domain software from NIST (National Institute of Standards and
Technology) that has natural ventilation sizing tools, and flow models
to analytically predict room-by-room airflows.


ASHRAE 62.1 iPhone App

ASHRAE released an app for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad that allows you to perform comprehensive minimum ventilation calculations for a wide variety of commercial buildings based upon Standard 62.1, using either I-P or SI units. This app is based upon the 62MZCalc.xls. Now, you can make calculations at a meeting and know if your project meets IEQp1 or IEQc2.

Technical Guides

LEED for Retail 2009: New Construction and Major Renovations, from USGBC website

Draft rating system with information on how to calculate FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. in retail situations.

Publications

Bicycle Coalition of Maine, Employer’s Guide to Encouraging Bicycle Commuting

This website from the Bicycle Coalition of Maine suggests ways to encourage and facilitate bike commuting.


Commuting Guide for Employers

This website outlines strategies employers can use to encourage employees to commute by bicycle.

Organizations

Federal Highway Administration, Office of Human and Natural Environment, Bicycle and Pedestrian Program

The Federal Highway Administration’s Office of Human and Natural Environment promotes access to and use and safety of bicycle and pedestrian transportation.


Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center

The Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center provides information and resources for issues related to bicycle commuting, including health and safety, engineering, advocacy, education and facilities.


U.S. EPA, Transportation and Air Quality

This website provides information on the types and effects of air pollution associated with automobile use and links to resources for organizations interested in promoting commuter choice programs.


U.S. EPA and U.S. Department of Transportation, Best Workplaces for Commuters

This program publicly recognizes employers who have exemplary commuter benefits programs. It provides tools, guidance, and promotions to help employers give commuter benefits, reap the financial gains, and achieve national recognition.


Resource center on bicycles and bike paths in New York City

The center's mission is to reclaim New York City's streets from the automobile, and to advocate for bicycling, walking and public transit as the best transportation alternatives.


Resource center for bicycle support in USA

Find bike paths and services available in your local area.

Web Tools

Adventure Cycling Route Network

Bike paths in USA.

Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan

A comprehensive transportation management plan is one way to earn an Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point under SSc4. 

Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms – Plans

This office project earned this credit with bicycle storage on the roof and showers in the bathrooms. Although a LEED-CI project, this project's samples are also applicable to other LEED systems.

FTE Calculations and Bike Racks

These examples of SSc4.2 documentation show FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. calculations and a credit-compliant site plan with bike racks.

LEED Online Forms: CI-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CI-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

80 Comments

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Jose Ng Aqua Terra Panamá
Nov 22 2013
Guest
36 Thumbs Up

Bicycle Racks

Hi LEED User team,

We´re working on a CI project that is build on a CS pre-certified building (the building is not finished yet). The building will have 58 racks (The minimum was 22 racks but the project team decide use 58). The racks are for public usePublic or public use applies to all buildings, structures, or uses that are not defined as private or private use. on the building (Not a public racks for every one that works in the area, only for the building workers and visitors).

The project will have in peak period 128 persons. So we need 7 racks to achieve the credit (5% FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.).

How can i document that in the form?. Using the 58 racks or 7 racks. I´m confused because the guide says when the capacity cannot be reserved for a specific tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. i must use the complete building population. And the project don't have a reserved space in the racks, so everybody (worker or visitor) can use the rack who wants to use.

Best,

José Ng

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

José, I think you summed it up well. Since rack space cannot be reserved for tenants of your specific space, the number of racks must be sufficient to show compliance with the credit for the building as a whole. You can document this in the LEED Online form, explaining the circumstances in your narrative.

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MM K
Aug 21 2013
Guest
888 Thumbs Up

Showers not dedicated to CI project only

The project consists of one floor of offices located within a building of 12 floors. There will be dedicated cycle storage for the CI project only but showers will not be dedicated to the CI project only anb will be available for the entire building.
Can the team still document compliance if the number of showers are enough for the CI project ?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Oct 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 16284 Thumbs Up

The number of showers would need to be .5% of the total building FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. if they are shared by all building occupants.

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Stacey Olson Associate, LEED AP, ID+C, CID, Gensler Dec 02 2013 LEEDuser Member 140 Thumbs Up

The reference manual clearly states "shower and changing rooms can be provided by health club memberships if htose facilities are provided free of charge and if sufficient shower and changing facilities are available to satisfy the credit requirements of .5% of the tenant FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.. A minimum of a 2-year contract is required between teh tenant and the health club".
............Doesn't that say that you can use .5% of the tenant FTE, and not the whole buliding?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Stacey, I think the health club situation you are referring to, and the situation shared by MM are different. The health club would be responsible for making sure that it has enough capacity for its memberships. The LEED project just has to get enough memberships for the tenant population.

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Cinthia Kawano Sustentech Desenvolvimento Sustentável
Aug 06 2013
Guest
12 Thumbs Up

LEED CI inside a LEED C&S certified building

We are dealing with a Commercial Interior Project, which is located inside a LEED C&S certified building.

Regarding the credit SSc3.2, the attendance of the LEED C&S building (SSc4.2) does not guarantee compliance in the LEED CI once the methodology used to determine each number of racks use a different percentage (3% of the occupants for up to 300,00sf and an additional 0,5% for the occupants over 300,000sf for LEED CS vs. 5% or more of tenant occupants for LEED CI) which using the same occupancy will retrieve obviously different quantities, not being able to use the provided rack from the C&S building?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Aug 14 2013 LEEDuser Expert 16284 Thumbs Up

Cinthia,
Not sure if I understand your question - is your CI project over 300,000 sf? Or is it a smaller project in a large CS building? A CI project in a CS certified building can use the same racks that were counted for the Core and Shell certification. Those racks are meant to serve the future tenants who occupy the building, which would include your CI project.

A CI project can be very large, especially if it occupies the whole building. Its possible that 5% of the CI occupants comes out as more people than the 3% plus 0.5% method calculated for the original Core and Shell building. In that case you might need to add some racks in addition to the ones already built.

Does that answer your question?

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Alejandro Rivera Rivera Sustainability Coordinator Studio Domus
Apr 24 2013
LEEDuser Member
317 Thumbs Up

Showering and Changing Facilities in Men´s Bathroom

Hi,

I am working on a small project that only requires one shower, but due to space constraints, the shower and changing room have been located inside the men's bathroom facilities. Do you think we would have problems with this?

The shower and changing room will be accessible to both men and women (company's policy), but this might be misinterpreted from just looking at the plan.

Thanks for your help.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 24 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Alejandro, this seems problematic. How will women have access?

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Alejandro Rivera Rivera Sustainability Coordinator, Studio Domus Apr 24 2013 LEEDuser Member 317 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your prompt response, Tristan.

The shower and changing room will be available to both men and women, and a door will separate the shower and changing room from the rest of the bathroom.

Do you think we could justify having a unisex changing room and shower within a men's bathroom?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 24 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

It's hard for me to see how you can expect women to be comfortable walking into and through a men's bathroom to access a changing room. There may be a policy that women can access the room, but does that policy hold any weight in practice?

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Alejandro Rivera Rivera Sustainability Coordinator, Studio Domus Apr 25 2013 LEEDuser Member 317 Thumbs Up

Well, when you put it like that... I know it is not the ideal situation. Thanks for your help. We'll try to fit in a shower in the women's bathroom.

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MARIA GARCIA
Apr 08 2013
Guest
274 Thumbs Up

Changing rooms

Hi all,
We have the showers of the project inside the ADA bathroom due to lack of space in the project.
Is it possible to consider the ADA bathroom/shower room as changing facility at the same time as long as there is a lock to avoid the cloths to get wet? Or do we need to have a separate room for the changing facilities?
Thanks!

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Apr 11 2013 LEEDuser Expert 16284 Thumbs Up

Yes, a bathroom with a shower can also be your changing room - you don't need a separate room. This works fine with smaller projects that only need one shower - when you have more showers and people it can be difficult for multiple bikers to share the shower.

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Adele Bluck
Dec 20 2012
LEEDuser Member
397 Thumbs Up

Communal cycle spaces

We are currently working on a LEED-CI project, in which there is no cycle storage planned / available within the project area, however, there is ample cycle racks near to the site. When I mean ample, I mean thousands of spaces as the project is located next to a train station in a very bike-friendly European city. Does anyone have any experience whether we could get credit for Bicycle Storage and Changing Facilities if nearby “communal” bicycle racks were utilised for the employees?

The project owner does not want to spend additional money on installing cycle racks within their own space, as there is more than enough available within 200 yards of the site, but we’re not sure whether/how we could demonstrate compliance with the credit, so any ideas/experience would be welcome.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Jan 02 2013 LEEDuser Expert 16284 Thumbs Up

It may be hard to prove there are enough bike racks at the train station to serve your building *and* the surrounding buildings and transit users. We had five LEED projects on a multi-block redevelopment project that shared bike racks and showers in a central garage. We only earned this credit for a few of the projects instead of all 5, since there were not enough showers for 0.5% of the total FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. for all the projects combined.

In your situation,you might be asked to calculate the FTE for all buildings within 200 yards of the shared racks, not just your own building. There may also be people biking from farther away and parking at the trai station to ride transit, so these users may need to be included, too.

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Kevin Wilcox
Jun 11 2012
LEEDuser Member
181 Thumbs Up

New LEED CI SScr3

I recently completed a LEED CI project and submitting for review and just started a new LEED CI project under LEED CI v2009 and found a significant change to the SS credit 3 category. Can anyone shed some light on this change?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Jun 19 2012 LEEDuser Expert 16284 Thumbs Up

Kevin - Can you say more about the change(s) you're noticing or asking about - is it in the reference guide or in LEED online, and is it specific to credit 3.1, 3.2 or 3.3? Not quite sure where to point the light....

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ruifei gao
May 28 2012
Guest
45 Thumbs Up

Bicycle storage for whole building occupants, but no reservation

We are doing a project where the base building has enough bicycle places for the whole building occupants to use, but no bicycle places can be specifically reserved for any tenant. Is there a applicable alternative compliance approach?

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Jun 06 2012 Guest 6800 Thumbs Up

I imagine you will need to prove that there are enough to accomodate the entire building. This way you would be able to argue that even though they aren't assigned, your tenants will always have ones to use. There's some information on this under the Checklists tab above.

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Gail von Staden Principal, von Staden Architects Mar 11 2013 Guest 169 Thumbs Up

Emily, my project faces the same dilemma as Ruifei above.

What do you recommend is the best way to illustrate that there are enough bike racks to accommodate the entire building?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 11 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Basically, you would run the credit calculations but for the whole building. Do your best to get occupancy numbers from building management, or estimate if needed.

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Kasia Trojanowska Landscape Architect, LEED AP
May 14 2012
Guest
23 Thumbs Up

SS c.3.2 Secure Bicycle Storage instead of bicycle racks

We identified secure bicycle storage with pass code locker for exclusive use of project's occupants within a garage structure attached to the office building. We do not intent to have a bicycle racks inside the storage area, but designated storage area is large enough to accommodate 10 – 15 bikes (500sf). The LEED CI form for credit SS c.3.2, ask for a number of secure bicycle racks even though the LEED CI Book, 2009 Edition allows both: bicycle racks and/or bicycle storage. Should we put just number 10 under the ”Number of Secure Bicycle Racks” because we believe the secure storage can accommodate that many bikes or any further calculation is necessary to prove enough SF of space per bike?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Jun 13 2012 LEEDuser Expert 16284 Thumbs Up

You might get questions from the reviewer about how the bikes are supported since they might not all have kick stands. For a storage room containing more than just one or two bikes, most projects have some kind of support racks for the bikes or even simple hooks on the wall. Your drawings should probably show either the bikes themselves, the racks, or the spaces allotted for each bike.

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Matthew Macko Principal Environmental Building Strategies
Feb 16 2012
LEEDuser Member
711 Thumbs Up

Shower Access

I have a dental office project located in a residential condo tower. There is a health/fitness club in this tower that has showers located in them. All residents of the tower, including the FTEs of the dental office, have access to the showers in the health/fitness club. Do we still have to meet the .05% showers per occupant for the entire building's occupants even if though they all have showers in their own condos?

Thanks,

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Feb 17 2012 Guest 6800 Thumbs Up

Matthew,

Since the dental office employees do not live in the tower you will have to supply proof that they have access to the health club showers. And, yes, you will need to document that there are 0.05% showers for your FTEs.

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Robyn Vettraino President, verde Jun 07 2012 LEEDuser Member 50 Thumbs Up

Does access mean that they can get membership or that they are able use the showers even if they aren't members?

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Taylor Ralph President REAL Building Consultants
Jan 18 2012
LEEDuser Member
525 Thumbs Up

Approaching SSc4.2 w/ Alt Compliance Using LEED Retail Guidance

Has anyone had any success approaching this credit using the Retail requirements--where it is only required to provide lockable changing rooms?

There may be a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide related to a similar attempt/approach for other credits/certifications, but it would be too broad to search...I think.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 18 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

What's the reasoning for not providing bike racks or showering facilities?

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Taylor Ralph President, REAL Building Consultants Jan 18 2012 LEEDuser Member 525 Thumbs Up

client/users not interested in showers, bike racks will be provided, but was thinking since retail allows you to only provide a lockable changing room that perhaps this credit could be approached with that intent.

any insight into why leed for retail doesn't require showers?

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Taylor Ralph President, REAL Building Consultants Jun 07 2012 LEEDuser Member 525 Thumbs Up

to clarify--we are providing bike racks, and lockable changing rooms, per LEED for Retail requirements, and attempting an 'Alternative Compliance Path.'

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Simon Ng
Jan 17 2012
Guest
91 Thumbs Up

Enough space for bike storage but no showers?

Dear All - Our CI library renovation has a proposed area dedicated for bicycle storage, however, we have no showering facilities in our proposal or have no shower/changing facilities within 200 yards of the building entrance. According to my calculations we are technically required to provide 0.04 showering facilities. Therefore, I assume this would be zero? The reason for this value is because the library has very low staff occupants. Can we still pursue this credit or will LEED round the number up 1 shower/changing facility thus meaning we will get 0 points?

Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 18 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Simon, our experience in this kind of situation has been that LEED does not allow you to round down—you must always round up. So you would need one shower. Which I think makes sense here—if you're not offering showing facilities, the credit simply doesn't fit.

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JENNIFER COMEAU
Dec 21 2011
Guest
163 Thumbs Up

Shower FTE Question

Our tenant has purchased a bike rack just for their suite, and appropriate signage has been installed. When working on the credit template, I am able to input the # of secure bike racks and the distance; all the other data is automatically input from other credits (FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. for the tenant from PI Form 3, and the percentage calculation). This is all good, because my peak user number is 30 for the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space., and percentage comes out to 16.67%.
My problem comes up with the Shower/ Changing facilities. The building has its own changing room with showers, (1) room for men and (1) for women, both with multiple shower stalls. This room is provided for the entire building. I was able to find out that the total FTE for the building is 440 during peak occupancy; after calculating this by the .05% i need a total of 2.2 facilities. On the leed template, do i input the number of shower STALLS or facilities (aka changing rooms)?
Also the FTE number is automatically input from the PI Form 3, for ONLY the tenant's FTE number, not the entire building. How do I document the entire FTE in this leed template? Should I provide a separate narrative giving the calculations for the building FTE, or does anyone know of a way to revise this in the actual leed templates?
Please help... my credits are due asap!!!
Jenn

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Dec 21 2011 LEEDuser Expert 16284 Thumbs Up

The number of shower stalls is the number that matters, not the number of changing rooms. Since you meet the required number of showers for both your space and also for the whole building, I wouldn't worry too much about changing the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. coming from PI Form 3, just add a short narrative explaining the FTE for the whole building and the total number of shower stalls.

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JENNIFER COMEAU Dec 21 2011 Guest 163 Thumbs Up

PERFECT.... thank you very much!

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Sheela I
Oct 17 2011
Guest
886 Thumbs Up

Health club membership

If the building has a health/fitness club and is not free to all tenants - does this credit apply?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Oct 18 2011 LEEDuser Expert 16284 Thumbs Up

Yes, we've seen this credit approved for projects approved where access to showers required a monthly fee. Access to sufficient bike racks, however, needs to be free.

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Sheela I Oct 18 2011 Guest 886 Thumbs Up

Thanks David. If the tenant is not willing to pay the monthly fee - I guess we cannot opt. for this credit - correct?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Oct 27 2011 LEEDuser Expert 16284 Thumbs Up

If I understand your question correctly, the tenant of an office building (an Accounting firm, for example) is not expected to buy health club memberships for any and all of their employees who might want to use the health club for showering. If an individual employee of the accounting firm wants to use a shower, and there is one available in the health club for a reasonable fee, even if the employee has to pay it, I think the requirements have been met. In one example we've seen, individual building users had the option of paying a $40 monthly fee for use of a shower and locker.

Since I've not seen any official interpretation of your situation, I'm only guessing that If the only way for an employee to have access to a shower is to buy a full health club membership, with unlimited access to all equipment and facilities, that might not meet the intent of the credit. If bike commuters have the choice of a discounted, limited membership that at least allows them to shower, that seems more in keeping with the credit intent. A CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide is probably necessary to find out for sure.

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Sheela I Oct 28 2011 Guest 886 Thumbs Up

Hi David, thank you very much for the response!!
Yes - The client that is pursuing for LEED is one of the Tenant's in the Building.

As of now our project meets one of the two credit requirements of the credit - i.e. Free bike racks are provided for the commuters.

For the second requirement - The client is not willing to buy the club membership for all of their employees inorder to access the showers at this time. Incase they do have employees that are willing to pay for the showers and use them, how do we document that requirement?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Oct 28 2011 LEEDuser Expert 16284 Thumbs Up

To document the shower access you'd want to show a floor plan that indicates the location and number of showers and include a narrative in the credit form describing membership options that employees would have. Perhaps the tenant can negotiate an agreement with the health club for limited shower-access-only membership for their bike commuters. You may want to provide a copy of any membership forms or other agreements.

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Sheela I Oct 28 2011 Guest 886 Thumbs Up

Thank You very much for the quick response! Appreciate it!

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Rebecca Ruggles designer Gensler
Aug 04 2011
LEEDuser Member
32 Thumbs Up

Distance to showers for a multi-tenant space

We're pursuing LEED CI for an executive lounge within an airport terminal. There is a bicycle parking area within 200 yards of the terminal entry, and we have showers within the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. that are within 200 yards of the lounge entry. The lounge itself is not, however, within 200 yards of the building entry. The credit language says, "Shower facilities may be either within the tenant's space or in a common facility within 200 yards of the main building entrance." Does this mean that we still qualify or is it saying that both options have to be within 200 yards of the building entry?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Aug 08 2011 LEEDuser Expert 16284 Thumbs Up

Sounds like you would meet the intent of the requirements if the showers are within the overall tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space.. That they are also within 200 yards of the lounge entry, the space pursuing LEED CI, only helps. The credit wording doesn't appear to require the showers to be within 200 yards of the building entry if they are within the tenant space, especially given the context of a large airport. Hope that helps!

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Paola Figueiredo, Newton Figueiredo SustentaX
Feb 22 2011
Guest
768 Thumbs Up

FTE to SS 3.2 LEED CI case

How can I proceed with the credit SS 3.2 for a LEED CI v2.0, when the Tenant FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. exceed the number of FTE default calculation (total sf/250sf) for the Certified Core and Shell v2.2 Building, which this CI occupies? The CS building FTE results in 1298 when the tenant are reating about 12 floors with a FTE of 1760.

Can I persue the SS 3.2 for this LEED CI case, considering the inability to install more racks at the building?

Thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 23 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Paola, you can pursue the credit, but you'll have to have bike racks sufficient for your FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. today, not the CS design. It sounds like you may not be able to earn the credit under these conditions, unfortunately.

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Alejandra Feliciano LEED AP BD+C Architects Smith Metzger
Jan 19 2011
Guest
489 Thumbs Up

200 Yard Distance

The shower and changing rooms for our project will be outside the project boundary in a neighboring building. Is the 200 yard distance measured from entrance door to entrance door of each building? Or from the project's entrance door to the remote shower/changing room itself?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 20 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

I think the credit language is clear that the 200 yard distance is to the facilities themselves. You'd have to kind of blur your eyes to read it as entrance to entrance.

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Alejandra Feliciano LEED AP BD+C, Architects Smith Metzger Jan 27 2011 Guest 489 Thumbs Up

Let me clarify my question, our situation is the following: our FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. requires only one shower. There is a shower accessible to our occupants in a nearby building, but the actual showers are on an upper level. The form requires a site plan to show the distance from our building entrance to the 'shower facility' so would we have to count the walking distance (including stairs) from our building entrance to the shower room?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Feb 01 2011 LEEDuser Expert 16284 Thumbs Up

Since your situation is not explicitly addressed in the credit it's hard to anticipate if a particular reviewer will interpret the wording any differently than Tristan did above. The design phase preliminary review will give you a chance to see how the existing shower is viewed in your case, and thus gives you time to see if you need to pursue any other credits.

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Suraj Shah Owner Green Footprints
Jan 05 2011
Guest
124 Thumbs Up

FTE for multiple shifts with different start time & end time

There are different departments with each having multiple shifts, each of the shifts having different start time & end time. (For example, department A has 3 shifts with 1st shift time of 6 am - 3 pm, 2nd shift time of 10am - 8 pm, 3rd shift time of 2 pm - 11pm. Similarly, department B has 2 shifts with 1st shift time of 8 am - 4pm, 2nd shift time of 1 pm - 9 pm & assuming an occupancy of 50 people in each shift & about 50 visitors overall). How to calculate FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. for this kind of occupancy? What number is to be considered for the showers, bicycle racks & water use calculations? In actual we have about 7 departments & each one has varying number of shifts, times & occupancy. I also tried putting the occupancy numbers in a 24 hour cycle to check the overlap of the occupant & it turned out that the maximum number of occupants (200) are in the premises only for about 1 hour. So if I calculate FTE based on this maximum number, it turns out to be very low (200 X 1/8 = 25). Also please note that none of the occupants share the desks.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 10 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

I think I would take the same approach you did and look at it on a 24-hour cycle, and look for overlaps and maximums. I think you have the right approach.

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Bryan Waters Architectural Intern WHR Architects
Nov 30 2010
Guest
378 Thumbs Up

FTE for multiple shift - SS3.2 and WE1 LEED CI Hospital project

We are pursuing LEED CI v2.0 for renovation for a 31 bed single hospital level in a multi story hospital building. This is a 24/7 facility with multiple shifts. GBCI in its preliminary review has asked us to resubmit FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. calcs for SS 3.2 to include transient (visitors) occupants in the FTE. They have also asked us to clarify FTE calc for WE 1 for each shift, patients and visitors. My question is regarding how to maintain consistency with the FTE in a multiple shift situation for both SS and WE credits. The LEED CI v2.0 reference guide calculation section in SS3.2 states that 'In buildings that house companies utilizing multiple shifts, select the shift with the greatest number of FTE building occupants’ and also that the FTE should be consistent through all credits. However the WE credit is based on annual usage – though not stated in the CI v2.0 reference guide the NC v2.2 reference guide, states that ‘in buildings with multiple shifts, use the number of FTE s from all shifts since this credit is based on annual water consumption’ .
In this case of multiple shifts, what is the correct way to calculate FTE? Can the SS3.2 credit use the FTE number that has the maximum occupied shift and use the total number of occupants (adding all shifts) for the WE Credit? I understand the FTE needs to be consistent for all credits – please let me know how this consistency has been addressed in the past with regards to calculating FTE for multiple shifts for both SS and WE credits. Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 07 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

The FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. information should not be contradictory between credits, but as you point out there are cases where different information is needed.

For SSc3, peak use is more relevant.

For WEc1, annual use is more relevant, so adjust your calculations accordingly.

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Susan M Kaplan Director of Specifications and Sustainability HLW
Oct 25 2010
LEEDuser Member
739 Thumbs Up

Multi-floor tenant - LEED CI project on single floor

We're working on a project in a building in which the client is already occupying several floors. They have bike storage on the ground floor dedicated solely to employees of the company (but not the rest of the building). We do not have shower facilities designed in the new space, however, the client has several showers on other floors available to all employees.

I've done the bike storage/ shower facilities for the client's total FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. (all employees within the building) and have found we do not have enough of either. Rather than adding additional bike storage and shower facilities, am I able to simply use the new space's FTE and assign the existing bike storage/ showers (on other floors) to this project, knowing that we cannot double-dip for future projects?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 29 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

You didn't ask this question, but have you considered whether you can pursue LEED-CI for just one floor, and not other floors used by the same client? If you haven't already, check the stipulation of MPR#2 in the MPR supplemental guidance doc.

To answer your question: yes, you can take this approach if the space meets the other requirements for access (distance, etc.)

However, I think the MPR issue is very relevant here, and with good reason.

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Susan M Kaplan Director of Specifications and Sustainability, HLW Nov 01 2010 LEEDuser Member 739 Thumbs Up

Yes, the project is LEED-CI. The client is expanding into an additional floor in the building. The client's other already-occupied floors are not being renovated.

You make a good point. It seems our only option to achieve this credit is to apply only the project's FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. to the existing bike storage and showers (not the client's total FTE within the building) or else we begin to toe the line in not complying with MPR#2.

We will also need to keep in mind for future projects in the building for the client, we cannot take these same measures, but will need to provide additional bike storage and showers project-by-project.

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Patrick Moore GBD Architects, Inc
Aug 27 2010
Guest
401 Thumbs Up

Peak users

Our bicycle storage is shared with other tenants in the building, so we need to determine FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. and peak transients for the entire building.

FTE and daily visitors can be estimated based on default occupancy counts found in the LEED reference guide, but how would I go about estimating peak visitors? The spaces outside of our project include office, restaurant, and retail. Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 29 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

I'm not aware of a set process for this. If it's an existing project you can do some kind of survey or measurement of the other tenants. If not, you could look at similar spaces elsewhere, or perhaps talk with the future tenants. You simply have to come up with a defensible proces that's not an extreme amount of effort.

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James Wilson
Jul 28 2010
Guest
348 Thumbs Up

Off site bicycle storage and shower facility

We are doing our own office as a CI upfit in a building. We will not have on-site bicycle storage and showers, but we have a YMCA 200 yards away, which should quality.
Do we need to provide a Y membership for all FTEs, or can we conduct a 100% survey (only 8 employees) and provide Y memberships for only those who will actually bicycle commute?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 28 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

I would think that a documented company policy that Y memberships will be provided for any bicycle commuters would be sufficient (noting that the Y meets the 200-yard requirement), although the GBCI reviewer has the final word of course.

Or, in an office of eight people, one membership meets the requirement—so maybe just spring for one membership?

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James Wilson Jul 28 2010 Guest 348 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the follow-up. Where does it specify that for an 8 person office one membership will meet the requirement? I have not found that language anywhere.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 28 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

I'm simply going by the percentage calc from the credit language—see above. Make sense?

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James Wilson Jul 28 2010 Guest 348 Thumbs Up

As per my understanding, the percentage calc pertains to the quantity of showers (# of users x 0.005) needed for the FTEs. The access to that # of showers should be for everyone.
So for the Y, we obviously have enough showers, but we would need for everyone to have access, or at least for those who will actually commute by bicycle.
Am I incorrect? - Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 28 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Doh.... I wasn't thinking about it in those terms. You're right.

The most bullet-proof way to meet the credit intent, then, is to get a membership for the whole staff. Maybe the Y has a group rate and this isn't so expensive, plus the staff might appreciate the perk. Access to the gym, etc.

If that is cost-prohibitive, then I would do as you suggest—survey the staff and see who is a bicycle commuter, or might be. I would be conservative, i.e. over-estimate the number. To best meet the intent of the credit, you should probably provide memberships for all of those people, plus documenting a policy whereby anyone else who wants access would get a membership. Again I would check on group rates here.

Given your size, I would also just do a show of hands or a survey and see if people would actually use it. Not all credits really make sense for all projects.

How does that sound?

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James Wilson Jul 28 2010 Guest 348 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan. Exactly what I wanted to confirm.

I think the best route is to do what you suggest with people who will commute + optional future opt-in for anyone else who wishes to participate.

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Misc User Feb 22 2013 Guest 25 Thumbs Up

Does the organization need to provide a 100% free gym memberships to bikers or can the memberships be 50% subsidized?

Also, if a gym already offers a subsidized shower-only commuter membership option, does the organization need to further subsidize that rate to make it free to employees?

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Adolfo Silva Principal Ecovert Corporation
Dec 17 2009
LEEDuser Member
1335 Thumbs Up

How many showers & racks are needed?

I'm working on a LEED CI project. Our client is a one of four tenants in the building. There are existing bike racks in the common space and a shower in the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space..
My question is, is the number of showers and racks based on the building occupant count OR the tenant occupant count?

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