CI-2009 WEp1: Water Use Reduction—20% Reduction

  • NC CS Schools CI WEp1 Action Steps Diagram
  • The bar has been raised

    You will not earn this prerequisite using standard fixtures that only comply with the federal EPAct 1992. This prerequisite, first introduced in LEED 2009, raises the bar significantly. All projects must now reduce water use by at least 20% as a prerequisite, whereas earlier versions of LEED awarded a point for a 20% reduction. The baseline against which water savings are measured has also become more demanding. The LEED 2009 baseline for commercial lavatory faucets is 0.5 gallons per minute (gpm), whereas the previous baseline was 2.5 gpm. Note that this prerequisite addresses interior water use only, but can be coupled with other water credits addressing outdoor water use.

    Plan on focusing on efficiency with ultra-low-flow or waterless fixtures, as well as overall conservation with strategies like rainwater capture and graywaterGraywater is untreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater typically includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washer and laundry tubs, though definitions may vary. Some states and local authorities also allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area. reuse (these strategies are documented as an alternative compliance path in LEED Online). Careful attention to fixture selection and flow rates can help projects achieve 20% or greater interior water savings  at minimal cost and without compromising comfort.

    Follow these key steps

    1. Determine Full Time Equivalent (FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.) occupancy and Fixture Usage Groups.
    2. Determine the Baseline Case Water Use Budget for Indoor Water Use.
    3. Choose fixtures and water reduction or reuse strategies. 
    4. Estimate the project’s water usage by creating a Design Case Water Use Budget. 
    5. Use the LEED Online credit form to compare the baseline and design case water budgets to determine the water reduction percentage for the project. 
    6. Complete the LEED Online credit form and upload water fixture cut sheets.

    Sample water use reduction chart for a commercial building.

    In the example illustrated in this bar chart, 21% savings is achieved by looking for savings in the fixtures that use the most volume of water: toilets, urinals, and showers. This example assumes 1.28 gpf toilets, 0.5 gpf urinals, and 2.0 gpm showers. Sinks are a less likely target because baseline use is already very low in many cases.

    Only some water uses are under the LEED scope

    Project teams often assume that if a water fixture or process on their project uses water, then it must fall under the scope of this credit. However, only specific "regulated" fixtures fall under the scope. The following uses, among others, are not within the credit scope. Following efficient practices is a great idea for these uses, but it's simply not covered under the scope here.

    • "Process" water
    • Pot- or bucket-filling sinks
    • Bidets
    • Laboratory sinks
    • Dishwashers and other appliances

    Key guidance from USGBC

    Since LEED 2009 was launched, USGBC has developed and updated a key guidance document for WEp1 calculations: Water Use Reduction Additional Guidance. It provides indispensable guidance for fixture groups, total daily uses calculation, dual flush toilet flow rates, public metering faucet flow rate conversion, non-potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. use alternative compliance path and gender ratio guidance.

    For example, this document provides key guidance on when a non-default male-female gender ratio is appropriate—essentially, modifications to the 50:50 ratio must be shown to apply for the life of the building, with specific exceptions allowed.

  • LEED-CI with no plumbing fixtures?

    LEED‐CI projects that do not have any plumbing fixtures or fittings in the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. are exempt from WEp1. Even if off-site showers are being used to earn SSc3.2, they must be included in calculations for both WEp1 and WEc1.

    When a project has replaced some of the core fixtures, they have essentially brought those fixtures into their LEED-CI project scope of work. If they wish to take credit for the new fixtures in the base building, all fixtures within the core restrooms must be included in the calculations for the prerequisite and credit. If they have registered before the July 17, 2010 Addenda applyig to WEc1, the team can exclude the core restrooms in their entirety (which would mean excluding the newly installed fixtures), since in the past projects could earn this credit based solely on their tenant fixtures.

  • FAQs for Water Use Reduction

    Will the reviewers accept a spreadsheet as a plumbing fixture schedule in lieu of the plans from the Construction Documents?

    A copy of the plumbing fixture schedule from the project's construction documents, outlining detailed information for each flush and flow fixture specified (including fixture manufacturer, model number and flow rate) helps the review team verify that those fixtures are part of the construction contract. In the absence of such documentation, a copy of project-specific specifications and details or a project-specific contractor’s submittal with manufacturer’s cut sheets highlighting flush and flow rates for each fixture specified can be provided.

    In LEED review comments I've been referred to the Water Use Reduction Additional Guidance document. I didn't know this was a required reference document.

    USGBC originally created this guidance document to address common questions project teams encountered when documenting WE credits. The calculations in these forms are fairly complex and are generally not addressed in the reference guide. The guidance document is intended to guide the user through the process of filling out the form, but is not intended to create any new requirements.

    Should I include bar sinks? What about mop sinks or janitor sinks? Swimming pools? Safety showers? Bidets? Tub spouts?

    If the bar sinks installed have a similar usage pattern and are similar fixture type as for those in kitchens then these should be included.

    Mop sinks, janitor sinks, swimming pools, bidets, and safety showers are considered process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. and are not included. Consider only the showerhead and not the tub spout.

    Additionally, commercial kitchen sinks and bar sinks including pot sinks, prep sinks, wash down, and cleaning sinks are considered process water and are not included.

    However, pre-rise spay valves must be considered. If your project is registered after the 11/1/2011 addenda release then the pre-rinse spray valve flow rate must be 1.6 gpm or less in order to comply with the prerequisite. If your project has a pre-rinse spray valve that has a higher flow rate than 1.6 gpm, then the project is not in compliance and the pre-rinse spray valve would need to be revised in order to be eligible for LEED certification.

    We provided showers to comply with the alternative transportation credit. Should they be considered in WEp1 calculations?

    Yes. Once you enter the project occupancy the WEp1 form calculates the default daily FTE shower uses.

    If those fixtures are outside the LEED Project Boundary, they should only be included if your project is LEED-CI, however.

    Can you explain the 12-second duration for metering faucets?

    This duration is intended to prevent LEED projects from claiming credit for reducing the duration below 12 seconds; durations less than 12 seconds are not permitted for LEED calculations as shorter intervals are insufficient for typical hand washing

    Can I use a nonpotable water source to contribute to WEp1 compliance?

    Yes. Although the focus is water efficiency of the installed fixtures, onsite sources of nonpotable water such as captured rainwater, graywaterGraywater is untreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater typically includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washer and laundry tubs, though definitions may vary. Some states and local authorities also allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area., air conditioner condensate, cooling tower bleed off water, etc., can be applied via an alternative compliance path. Refer to the Water Use Reduction Additional Guidance document for further information.

    Our project does not have any eligible water fixtures in the project boundary. Can we comply with WEp1?

    Yes, per LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #10214: "A project without eligible water fixtures in the LEED-NC project boundary is exempt from WEp1. Should such a project wish to pursue points under WE Credit 3, they may do so by evaluating WEc3 performance based upon all of the fixtures that are necessary to meet the needs of the project occupants, even if they are located outside the project boundary."

    We are having trouble finding EPAct-compliant fixtures. Is that a problem?

    Not for individual fixtures. You only have to meet the LEED requirements for your fixtures as a group.

    Where can I find a clear meaning of "public" and "private" as relevant to lavatory faucets?

    Private usePrivate use applies to plumbing fixtures in residences, apartments, and dormitories, to private (non-public) bathrooms in transient lodging facilities (hotels and motels), and to private bathrooms in hospitals and nursing facilities. applies to plumbing fixtures in residences, apartments, and dormitories, to private (non-public) bathrooms in transient lodgingLodging are facilities that provide overnight accommodations to customers or guests, including hotels, motels, inns and resorts. facilities (hotels and motels), and to private bathrooms in hospitals and nursing facilities. Any fixtures that are not in one of those more residential-focused situations are considered to be public fixtures.

    Our project is a factory with historically a 95% male workforce. The restroom design accounts for this. Can I argue that the male/female gender ratio is different than 50/50?

    LEEDuser has seen numerous comments on our forums suggesting that reviewers are providing little leeway for situations like this, even in a case just like you describe. Even a 10% bump toward women to account for possible future trends was not deemed sufficient. At this point (February 2013), LEEDuser is not aware of clear guidance on when a nonstandard gender ratio would be accepted, nor are there any applicable LEED Interpretations for LEED 2009 projects. If you have any relevant experience on this, please let us know!

    Are shower duration controls an acceptable water-saving strategy?

    LEED assumes a baseline of 300 seconds for a shower, and LEEDuser has heard of review comments rejecting controls that would shorten this duration for the design case. A CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide or LEED Interpretation would likely be needed to make a case.

    Can I include process water savings in order to earn an Exemplary Performance point?

    Yes—refer to LEED Interpretation #5819, issued 8/31/2004 and modified 4/1/13 to apply to NC-v2.2 and NC-v2009 projects. Quoting the relevant text from LI #5819: “A whole building approach to process water must be used (including washing machines, dish washers, drinking fountains, cooling towers, etc.) The project must demonstrate a process water savings that is equal to or greater than 10% of the regulated water usage as calculated in WEc3. The project should obtain information on the average amount of water use for each type of equipment to determine an appropriate baseline and demonstrate that the increased efficiency compared to the baseline exceeds the 10% WEc3 threshold. Required submittals for this innovation would include: 1) A narrative explaining what strategies were used and how the baseline was developed. 2) Calculations demonstrating performance compared to the baseline. 3) Cut sheets showing water usage of equipment used.”

    NC projects have also had success using Schools WEc4 as an ID credit. Also see LEED Interpretations #808 (issued 7/8/2004) and #5752 (issued 5/13/2005) for some history on this issue. You can also earn an EP point for 45% savings under the Water Use Reduction credit, but it appears, based on the most recent ruling, that the 45% savings should be based on regulated (non-process) fixtures alone.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Check local codes and incentives for water-saving opportunities and restrictions. Rebates are common, as are plumbing codes restricting some water-savings technologies such as waterless urinals, graywater reuse, on-site wastewater treatment and reuse, rainwater harvesting, composting toilets, and other strategies.


  • In Commercial Interiors projects, tenants should work with the base building to determine whether efficient water fixtures are already provided, or if water fixture upgrades can be added to the scope of work.


  • Graywater and rainwater collection systems may offer the potential for non-potable water to be used in interior applications, helping to achieve this prerequisite, and the additional water-reduction credit.


  • Perform a Water Balance Study for the entire project to make informed decisions about where to focus water savings efforts. Look for all water sources on the site, such as stormwater, graywater, and onsite water, and note opportunities for using that water for interior water use and or irrigation. 


  • Calculating outdoor water use is not required for this prerequisite . However, understanding how indoor water use compares to outdoor water use can help you gauge where to focus reduction efforts for the greatest benefit. Some water saving strategies address both indoor and outdoor water needs holistically. For example, graywater from interior sink fixtures can be collected for landscape irrigation.


  • Graywater used for landscaping cannot be calculated for this prerequisite, but can be counted in WEc1: Water Efficient Landscaping.


  • Are composting toilets an option? While not common, composting toilets can go a long way toward achieving this prerequisite. They affect programming and layout, so consider them early.


  • Consider setting water-reduction goals higher than the 20% reduction required by this prerequisite. Many projects are able to achieve 30%–40% savings with little or no impact on cost. First-time costs for water savings above 20% can be minimal since project teams will already be integrating water-saving techniques for this prerequisite.

Schematic Design

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  • Estimate the project’s baseline water needs and determine the baseline water use budget for indoor water use. This helps determine where the most effective water-saving technologies can be applied.


  • Establish goals for water use reduction and include these goals in the Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR) for EAp1: Fundamental Commissioning. Consider aiming higher than a 20% reduction. Many of the same strategies used for this prerequisite will also apply to WEc2: Innovative Wastewater Technologies and WEc3: Water Use Reduction.


  • Determine the numbers and types of occupants in the building. The water use calculation is based on occupant use and the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) occupants, including employees and visitors, not the number of water fixtures installed.



  • Determine user groups for the various fixtures as not all occupants may be using all the fixtures; for example, employee restrooms and customer toilets in a retail store will have different use patterns.


  • The baseline for commercial lavatory faucets has been changed in LEED 2009 to 0.5 gpm.  The previous baseline for commercial lavatory faucets was 2.5 gpm. Take note of this more stringent requirement compared with earlier versions of LEED.


  • This prerequisite only includes core water uses—bathroom lavatories, water closets, urinals, showers, kitchen faucets and pre-rinse sprays. Janitors’ sinks, pot fillers, and tub faucets can be left out as they are used to fill containers with a fixed water volume regardless of the flow rate. "Kitchen sinks" includes all sinks in public or private buildings that are used with patterns and purposes similar to a sink in a residential kitchen. Break room sinks would be included; commercial kitchen sinks are not included. Lavatory faucets refer to hand-washing sinks, regardless of location, but lab or healthcare sinks with regulated flow rates are excluded. Pot-filling sinks can be excluded.


  • Well water and pond water are not considered “reused” water for the purposes of this credit and must count as potable water—so you don’t get credit for substituting them for conventional water sources. Water types that do count as reused are: graywater (lavatory, sink and shower water), rainwater, treated wastewater, air-conditioner condensate, reverse-osmosis reject, and sump-pump water.


  • Commercial Interiors projects must include in the water-use calculations any water fixtures that are being used by occupants, even if the installation of the fixtures is not within the scope of the project. For example, an office project that is not updating the base buildingwill still need to include the core bathroom fixtures in the LEED water use calculation.

Design Development

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  • Select water-efficient fixtures and strategies. Gather information on applicable fixtures including manufacturer, model number, and flush or flow rates.


  • For residential projects, showers typically use more water than any other fixtures due to the duration of use. For commercial projects, toilets and urinals typically use more water. Water-saving strategies should target the most consumptive fixtures to achieve greatest water reductions.


  • Compare the baseline and design case water use budgets to determine the water reduction percentage goals for the project. The LEED Online credit form has a built-in calculator to facilitate this calculation. Repeat this process until final selection of water fixtures and strategies have been made and the project’s water reduction goals are satisfied. 


  • Size graywater and rainwater systems to match non-potable water demand, for needs such as toilet flushing, cooling tower makeup, and irrigation.


  • Untreated rainwater, graywater, and blackwater may corrode plumbing systems, or lead to biological growth. Teams should plan for water treatment, filtration, or using corrosion-resistant materials. The use of seawater for toilet flushing, although very uncommon, can cause similar problems.


  • Plumbing piping must be doubled for interior water fixtures when graywater or rainwater is reused in addition to potable water. This is likely to add upfront costs, while potentially reducing water and sewer charges.


  • Sensors on toilets and faucets are perceived as saving water. However, several studies have shown that while they may offer some hygiene or other operational benefits, they increase water use substantially, due to “phantom flushes” and faucets running longer than needed. If you do choose lavatory sensors, look for models with adjustable flow durations. Although the LEED calculation estimates a standard 30-second use, setting the flow duration to a shorter time interval can help save water. In other words, adjusting the LEED design case calculation to a more accurate (and shorter) flow duration can help you meet the 20% reduction.


  • Aerators are very cost-effective, costing only a few dollars per fixture. Installing an aerator allows you to chose the sink fixtures that are desired and not have to worry if they are low–flow—simply purchase compatible aerators in addition to the fixtures. You can also easily retrofit existing faucets with low-flow aerators.


  • Many commercial toilets can be retrofitted with dual-flush flushometers, costing less than installing new dual-flush toilets. Check with manufacturers for retrofitting compatibility.

Construction Documents

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  • Integrate efficient water fixture specifications into construction and design development documentation.


  • Specify signage for water strategies that may require special instructions for use. This may include occupant signage for operating dual-flush toilets, indicating non-potable water, and operational signage for distinguishing pipes carrying reused water.


  • If reusing graywater or rainwater, ensure that key system components such as treatment and cisterns are not removed during value engineering.


  • Fill out the LEED Online credit form and upload water fixture cut sheets to LEED Online.


  • You must use an Alternative Compliance Path to document savings from a non-potable source in LEED Online. Adjust the design case total water use volume to account for the annual amount of non‐potable water. Then use the adjusted design case total water use to recalculate the percent reduction of water use for all fixtures. Additional documentation or calculations may include but are not limited to plumbing drawings, calculations and system capacity to support quantities provided, and any analysis to confirm the availability of the non‐potable water source.

Construction

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  • The contractor ensures that the correct fixtures have been purchased and any applicable water reuse systems or specified metering systems have been installed. 


  • Make sure supply pipes carrying non-potable water are clearly labeled and color-coded to avoid inadvertent cross-connection with potable water lines.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Apply for water-reduction incentives and rebates through municipal water authorities.


  • Provide building managers with manuals for all irrigation systems and controls, fixtures and fittings, water-reuse technologies, on-site water treatment systems, and unconventional products.


  • Consider installing permanent water metering for ongoing monitoring of the project’s water use. A sub-metering system can help operations staff detect problems early and facilitate future LEED-EBOM certification.


  • Train cleaning and operations staff to maintain atypical fixtures such as waterless urinals, water sensors and other fixtures.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    WE Prerequisite 1: Water use reduction

    Required

    Intent

    To increase water efficiency within the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. to reduce the burden on municipal water

    Requirements

    Employ strategies that in aggregate use 20% less water than the water use baseline calculated for the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. (not including irrigation).

    Calculate the baseline according to the commercial and/or residential baselines outlined below. Calculations are based on estimated occupant usage and must include only the following fixtures and fixture fittings located within the tenant space: water closets, urinals, lavatory faucets, showers, kitchen sink faucets and prerinse spray valves.

    Commercial Fixtures, Fittings, and Appliances Current Baseline (Imperial Units) Current Baseline (Metric Units)
    Commercial toilets 1.6 gallons per flush (gpf)*

    Except blow-out fixtures: 3.5 (gpf)
    6 liters per flush (lpf)

    Except blow-out fixtures: 13.5 lpf
    Commercial urinals 1.0 (gpf) 4.0 lpf
    Commercial lavatory (restroom) faucets 2.2 gallons per minute (gpm) at 60 pounds per square inch (psi), private applications only (hotel or motel guest rooms, hospital patient rooms)

    0.5 (gpm) at 60 (psi)** all others except private applications

    0.25 gallons per cycle for metering faucets

    8.5 liters per minute (lpm) at 4 bar (58 psi), private applications only (hotel or motel guest rooms, hospital patient rooms)

    2.0 lpm at 4 bar (58 psi), all others except private applications

    1 liter per cycle for metering faucets

    Commercial prerinse spray valves

    (for food service applications)
    Flow rate ≤ 1.6 (gpm)

    (no pressure specified; no performance requirement)
    Flow rate ≤ 6 lpm (no pressure specified; no performance requirement)


    Residential Fixtures, Fittings, and Appliances Current Baseline (Imperial Units) Current Baseline (Metric Units)
    Residential toilets 1.6 (gpf)*** 6 liters per flush (lpf)
    Residential lavatory (bathroom) faucets 2.2 (gpm) at 60 psi 8.5 lpm at 4 bar (58 psi)
    Residential kitchen faucet
    Residential showerheads 2.5 (gpm) at 80 (psi) per shower stall**** 9.5 lpm  at 5.5 bar (80 psi) per shower stall

     
    *       EPAct 1992 standard for toilets applies to both commercial and residential models.

    **     In addition to EPAct requirements, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers standard for public lavatory faucets is 0.5 gpm at 60 psi (2.0 lpm at 4 bar (58 psi) (ASME A112.18.1-2005). This maximum has been incorporated into the national Uniform Plumbing Code and the International Plumbing Code.

    ***   EPAct 1992 standard for toilets applies to both commercial and residential models.

    ****                Residential shower compartment (stall) in dwelling units: The total allowable flow rate from all flowing showerheads at any given time, including rain systems, waterfalls, bodysprays, bodyspas and jets, must be limited to the allowable showerhead flow rate as specified above (2.5 gpm/9.5 lpm) per shower compartment, where the floor area of the shower compartment is less than 2,500 square inches (1.5 square meters). For each increment of 2,500 square inches (1.5 square meters)of floor area thereafter or part thereof, an additional showerhead with total allowable flow rate from all flowing devices equal to or less than the allowable flow rate as specified above must be allowed. Exception: Showers that emit recirculated nonpotable waterNonpotable water: does not meet EPA's drinking water quality standards and is not approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction. Water that is unsafe or unpalatable to drink because it contains pollutants, contaminants, minerals, or infective agents. originating from within the shower compartment while operating are allowed to exceed the maximum as long as the total potable water flow does not exceed the flow rate as specified above. 




    The following fixtures, fittings and appliances are outside the scope of the water use reduction calculation:

    • Commercial Steam Cookers
    • Commercial Dishwashers
    • Automatic Commercial Ice Makers
    • Commercial (family-sized) Clothes Washers
    • Residential Clothes Washers
    • Standard and Compact Residential Dishwashers

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    WaterSense-certified fixtures and fixture fittings should be used where available. Use high-efficiency fixtures (e.g., water closets and urinals) and dry fixtures, such as toilets attached to composting systems, to reduce potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. demand. Consider using alternative on-site sources of water (e.g., rainwater, stormwater, and air conditioner condensate) and graywaterGraywater is untreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater typically includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washer and laundry tubs, though definitions may vary. Some states and local authorities also allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area. for nonpotable applications such as custodial uses and toilet and urinal flushing. The quality of any alternative source of water used must be taken into consideration based on its application or use.

    FOOTNOTES

    1 Tables adapted from information developed and summarized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Water based on requirements of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992 and subsequent rulings by the Department of Energy, requirements of the EPAct of 2005, and the plumbing code requirements as stated in the 2006 editions of the Uniform Plumbing Code or International Plumbing Code pertaining to fixture performance.

    2 Projects where fixtures or fixture fittings are not within the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. are exempt from WE Prerequisite 1.

Technical Guides

Energy Policy Act of 1992 and amendments

Pages 62-69 of this legislation set federal standards for plumbing fixtures.


Energy Policy Act of 2005

The Energy Policy Act (EPA) addresses energy production in the United States. One example, the Act provides loan guarantees for entities that develop or use innovative technologies that avoid the by-production of greenhouse gases.

Web Tools

WATERGY version 3.0

WATERGY is a spreadsheet model that uses water/energy relationship assumptions to analyze the potential of water savings and associated energy savings.


EPA Water Information links

This website offers links to state and regional water information.


Water Studies

This site provides a number of studies related to water.

Organizations

Alliance For Water Efficiency

AWE advocates for water-efficient products and programs and provides information related to water conservation.


EPA Office of Water

The Office of Water coordinates EPA's efforts to protect drinking water, oceans, watersheds and other aquatic ecosystems.


American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association

This organization promotes rainwater catchment in the U.S.


Oasis Grey Water Policy Center

Oasis Design, a maker of graywaterGraywater is untreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater typically includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washer and laundry tubs, though definitions may vary. Some states and local authorities also allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area. systems, maintains this compilation of graywater laws and other resources on the regulation of graywater use.

LEED-CI Silver Office – WEp1

Complete documentation for achievement of WEp1 on a LEED-CI 2009 project.

WEp1 LEED Online Form

This sample form for WEp1 is from a real project whose name was changed on the form. (Note that WEp1 was achieved for this project even though this sample displays that the form was not completed.)

Product Cut Sheets

Carefully research products and examine cut sheets to find fixtures and fittings meeting the credit requirements, as shown in these examples.

LEED Online Forms: CI-2009 WE

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CI-2009 WE credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

203 Comments

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Jaclyn Noga Environmental Intern EHRA, LLC
Jul 22 2014
LEEDuser Member

Flow Fixture Data table

I am working on a project that has one sink in each of the two utility rooms in the building. In the Flow Fixture Data table, I am wondering which fixture family the utility faucet belongs to? The families are "Private Lavatory Faucet, Public Lavatory Faucet, kitchen sink? "Can I upload it under "kitchen sink " and make a note about it?

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Scott Adams Principal, Sustainable Integration LLC Jul 23 2014 Guest 2 Thumbs Up

A utility room faucet would be a kitchen sink though depending on the usage, for example the filling of mop buckets, it may not be under the scope of this credit at all.

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Chris Hammett Mechanical Designer Turpin & Rattan Engineering, Inc.
Jul 09 2014
Guest

TI in a LEED certified Core & Shell Building

Hello. I am currently working on a tenant improvement project located within a building that was previously LEED certified under the Core & Shell rating system. The tenant is pursuing LEED certification for this space under the CI rating system. The new design contains only (1) water fixture, a break room sink. I am under the impression that typically the restroom water fixtures that will be used by the tenants of the space need to be included in the water reduction calculations. However, since those fixtures are in restrooms serving all occupants of the building and were included and accounted for under the Core & Shell LEED project, is it appropriate to include them under this CI project? What I am getting at is that if we provide a break room sink fixture that is 45% below baseline, this will count towards a substantial number of points. This may appear to be gaming the system a bit, but I would argue that it is unfair to include water fixtures that the CI project owner has no control over and are already accounted for on another LEED certified project.

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Scott Adams Principal, Sustainable Integration LLC Jul 17 2014 Guest 2 Thumbs Up

I have fought this fight before, and lost. It does not matter that the fixtures were accounted for in a previous LEED certification or even that they are outside of your control. You will still need to include them.

Note that this requirement only applies to the credit. Fixtures outside of your project space do not need to be included for the prerequisite.

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Jatuwat Varodompun Dr Green Building Soultion
May 02 2014
LEEDuser Member
1070 Thumbs Up

Water use test report

In case the the manufacturer does not have the cutsheet showing the water data, can we do the on-site measurement and adjust the flowrate to be used in the calculation?

We plan to do the elaborated test report by measuring all fixtures used with contractor and CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements.. Is it necessary to get the letter from the manufacturer to confirm the onsite test report?

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Jatuwat Varodompun Dr Green Building Soultion
May 02 2014
LEEDuser Member
1070 Thumbs Up

Commercial kitchen handwashing

In a restaurant, we have a foot padel hand washing for food preparation of restaurant staffs. Does it require to include this equipment in the calculation by using baseline of 0.5 gpm?

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Scott Adams Principal, Sustainable Integration LLC Jul 17 2014 Guest 2 Thumbs Up

No, as an autocontrol fixture the base line would .25 gallons per cycle. The design case would be calculated the same as an infrared faucet, faucet flow rate for 12 seconds.

Alternatively, if the sink is located within the food prep area and could potentially be used for purposes other than hand washing you could make the argument for it being treated as a kitchen faucet rather than a lavatory with a baseline of 2.2 gpm. I have been able to make this argument before as faucets located in commercial cooking and food prep area undergo a much higher degree of health department regulation than restroom lavatories do.

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Patrick Salmon EIT, LEED AP BD+C Highland Associates
Apr 07 2014
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

Fixture Replacement

Our project will be pursuing the thirty percent (30%) savings threshold by including fixtures both within and outside the LEED project boundary. Based on the use of existing waterless urinals and metering faucets, we can achieve this goal even when considering existing 2.0 gpm kitchen hand-washing faucets. Per the CI reference guide, these faucets are well over the 0.5 public lavatory faucet baseline. Are we required to replace these in order to fully demonstrate EPAct compliance despite the thirty percent (30%) savings?

Thanks!
Patrick

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Apr 07 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

Hi Patrick,
Kitchen sink faucets have a baseline flow rate of 2.2 gpm; whereas commercial lavatory (restroom) faucets have a baseline flow rate of 0.5 gpm.

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Patrick Salmon EIT, LEED AP BD+C, Highland Associates Apr 07 2014 Guest 47 Thumbs Up

Hi Carlie,

That's what I originally thought. However, page 106 of the LEED CI reference guide states the following that I believe our project falls under:

"The 'Public lavatory faucets' and 'Private lavatory faucets' categories encompass all sinks used primarily for hand-washing regardless of location."

Therefore, I don't know whether we need to install improved aerators per LEED simply because the flow rates are greater than the baseline. We already meet the threshold, so it would be great if we could leave them untouched.

Thanks!
Patrick

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Apr 07 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

Hi Patrick,

This comment is specifically addressing lavatory faucets (public or private) used for hand washing. Kitchen sinks have a different baseline; based on a 2.0 gpm kitchen sink you are below the 2.2 gpm baseline. Note that each fixture does not need to individually meet the 20% minimum requirement.

Hope helpful!

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Apr 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 4788 Thumbs Up

Hi Patrick and Carlie,
It is likely that Carlie is right and you can characterize this sink as a kitchen fixture with a 2.2 gpm baseline. However, we have hand washing sinks in commercial kitchens in some of our projects which do in fact use the 0.5 gpm baseline to reflect the hand washing issue that Patrick notes. These are distinguished from process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. uses like pot filling or washing produce etc.

In either event, Patrick, you do not have to modify the flowrate of that fixture if you are achieving your goal with the other fixtures. Pick your baseline flowrate with the "kitchen" fixture with respect to how it is used in your facility and make sure you can back it up in narrative if necessary.

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Apr 07 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

ah-ha! Michelle is correct, if this is simply a sink located in a kitchen but primarily used just for hand washing, then it would fall under the 0.5 gpm baseline (if this is the case, then I misunderstood the scenario).

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Patrick Salmon EIT, LEED AP BD+C, Highland Associates Apr 07 2014 Guest 47 Thumbs Up

Thank you both! I appreciate the insight.

Patrick

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Glen LeComte
Mar 21 2014
Guest
13 Thumbs Up

Credit Template Troubles

I am filling out the pre-requisite template for our LEED 2009 CI project. There are only 2 Break Room Sinks for the project. I have filled in all of the pertinent data and the form calculator savings shows 31%. However, the compliance indicator on the form shows that we do not have 20% reduction. I'm stumped....any ideas?

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Robert Calloway President Global Facility Solutions, LLC
Jan 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
139 Thumbs Up

Measuring Flow Rate

Hello,

We are investigating a building that claims to have reduced flow fixtures installed but this does not seem to be the case. Upon our inspection, we have observed the water flow rate to be much higher than specified by the building engineerA qualified engineering professional with relevant and sufficient expertise who oversees and is responsible for the operation and maintenance of mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems in the project building. and cut-sheets provided. The way we tested this is by filling up a container of known volume and clocked the time elapsed. Is this a valid method of testing the flow rate?

Thanks!

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Jan 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6784 Thumbs Up

Robert
Are you questioning the flow rate of a certain fixture? Which one? A sink, a bathroom faucet?
Sometimes the pressure in a building is higher than the "rated" pressure which is the basis for labeling a fixture or aerator.
Try to read the gpm off the aerator and see if that matches what was specified and submitted on.

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Shirley Li
Dec 23 2013
Guest
23 Thumbs Up

Handicapped toilet and Pedal-type toilet flush valve

Hi all,
We are working on a renovation office project, with fixtures located outside of tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space.. There are 2 restrooms loacated at public core area, one for Female, another one for Male. In each of the two restrooms, one toilet flush fixture was installed for handicapped stuffs or visitors. Actually, there is no handicapped stuff currently working on the project floor and also has rare handicapped visitors per year. How many handicapped fixture group occupant number need be used in this project to meet the compliance of WE calculation? Will that be accepted if one female and one male are assigned to use these two toilets?
Anthother unique question is that except the handicapped fixtures and urinals installed in male restroom, other flush fixtures in both restrooms are all pedal-type toilet flush valves which connect squatting pan. The duration of the flush will depends on the user. there is only minimum Instantaneous flush rate 1.2L/s can be found in the product catalogue. Thus it is not easy to get a gpf number for this kind of fixture to fit the WE calculation table. Does anyone meet this problem before? Especially in Asian region, like Japan and China. Many Thanks!

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Gail Williams Principal Consultant WSP
Nov 21 2013
LEEDuser Member
9 Thumbs Up

WE Pr1 Fixture Groups

Hello,

I'm getting a little confused!!

I am working on an office building which has the following WCs with different flush volumes:
1) Existing WCs for both male and female (1 bathroom per floor of 6)
2) New female only WCs (1 extra bathroom per floor of 6)
3) Accessible WCs (1 extra bathroom per floor of 6)

From reading guidance here and in the Water Use Additional Guidance, do I need to assign a fixture group for each and calculate the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. for each based on the number of fittings?

I would then need to ensure the fixture group for the new female only WCs has 100:0 ratio of females to males as there will be no males using these bathrooms?

Do I need to do anything with the default 'Total Daily Uses' for the Accessible WCs as they do not have urinals?

Am I over complicating things or is it this complicated??

Thanks
Gail

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Jan 18 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

There are probably a few ways you could go about calculating, but I agree that the easiest path would be to assign a fixture group for each restroom and calculate the associated FTEs for each (estimated based on the number of fittings per restroom). In any case I would suggest providing a narrative supporting your project and rationale for FTE’s daily uses for each restroom.

Yes, the fixture group for the new female only WCs has 100:0 ratio of females to males as there will be no males using these bathrooms.

Regarding the accessible restroom without urinals, the calculations in the form automatically assume that 100% of male occupants will use restrooms; therefore, the default Total Daily Uses for water closets will need to be adjusted. Alternatively, you could set the female ratio to 100:0 here as well and get the same results.

Hope helpful!

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Henrique Mendes Mr. Green Domus
Nov 13 2013
LEEDuser Member
681 Thumbs Up

No water use

What happens if we are working on a project that has no water use. No fixture or fittings...
How to comply with the prerequisite?
Or does that mean that this project is not elegible for LEED?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Henrique, this is covered in one of the FAQs above.

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Selvarasu M Director, LEAD Consultancy Engineering Services Apr 21 2014 LEEDuser Member

Dear Tristan, although the additional guidance only refers to use of non portable water in retail & healthcare, can we use this method for office space as well. Please confirm.

Thank you

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Ashley Nedza Project Designer, LEED AP BD+C, Baskervill May 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 7 Thumbs Up

you are exempt from WEp1 if the tenant does not add plumbing into their space. If the tenant wants to go for WEc1, they need to include the core bathrooms. You can read more about this in the WEc1 birds-eye view.

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Matthew Catterall Cotera+Reed Architects
Oct 15 2013
LEEDuser Member
29 Thumbs Up

Existing Fixtures in the Tenant's Space

We have a project that is a renovation to part of a tenant's existing space. There are two existing single user toilet rooms (one for each sex) and one existing break room sink in the tenant's existing space, but they are not in the part that is being renovated. We don't know yet what the flush and flow rates are for the existing fixtures. Are we required to replace them if they don't meet the prerequisite? The tenant was not wanting to do any plumbing work on the project to save money.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Matthew, if they are in the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space., they are in the scope of this prerequisite.

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner ArchEcology, LLC
Oct 10 2013
LEEDuser Member
4788 Thumbs Up

Shower Use by Non-FTEs

Shower calcs only look at FTEs and not transients or visitors. I have an office building TI that is putting in a fitness center with a locker room scenario. The locker room will have no urinals and both regular and ADA showers which have different flow rates. Meaning I will need separate fixture groups that I can assign different users to. This LEED project has a small footprint and very small FTE count that is commensurate with the size of the space and the few new FTEs associated with it. However, the building is full of people that will be using the showers.

How would I reflect the actual use of the showers that is a building wide issue vs. the LEED area boundary of the small TI with its small FTE headcount? Do I plug in the whole building FTE count as transients than force a daily use of 0.1?

With respect to the lack of urinals, the locker room also sits across the hall from core bathrooms that have urinals. And of course there are other urinals in the building. How do I establish how many of these locker room users who are showering would actually also use the toilet? As opposed to the other restrooms in the building that do have them?

Any suggestions? Or experiences along these lines?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Sorry, I don't have any specific suggestions other than to do your best and make reasonable assumptions.

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Jaclyn Whitaker AIA LEED AP BD+C Director, Project Manager Delos Living
Jun 17 2013
Guest
53 Thumbs Up

WEp1 fixture group for bicyclists

Does anyone have experience with including a bicyclist fixture group for 5% of the project's FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. (and Peak Transients) for showers (1 shower per day per FTE for this bicyclist fixture group) rather than using the default for the project's entire FTE? It seems like a valid method. Thoughts?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jun 18 2013 LEEDuser Expert 13578 Thumbs Up

If the credit requires you to calculate across FTEs, what benefit are you gaining by creating a separate fixture group? I've not heard of this approach and would get clarification from the GBCI before proceeding with this approach. They will likely want you to ensure that your project meets the credit intent when calculated across FTEs.

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Alejandro Rivera Rivera Sustainability Coordinator Studio Domus
Apr 18 2013
LEEDuser Member
441 Thumbs Up

Total Daily Uses: Some unisex bathrooms witout urinals...

Hi,

The project I am working on has a bathroom set for women, a bathroom set for men (includes urinals), and two unisex bathrooms without urinals.

Initially, I had defined just one Fixture Usage Group for the entire office since in theory all occupants will have access to all bathroom facilities. However, I received a LEED Review stating that I need to adjust the Total Daily Uses because the current scenario assumes that 100% of male occupants will use restroom that contain urinals, and the unisex bathrooms do not.

What would you suggest doing?
1. Should I define an additional Fixture Usage Group for the unisex bathrooms? These are mostly for visitors, so I could justify that these bathrooms are for visitors and the rest for staff.
2. Should I assign a certain percentage of FTEs to the unisex bathrooms? If so, how can I decide on what percentage would be most appropriate?

Thanks!

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Apr 18 2013 LEEDuser Member 4788 Thumbs Up

Hi Alejandro,
We have had this happen several times. Yes, you need to define an additional fixture usage group for the unisex rooms because the male usage will be increased to 3x per day in those rooms. And yes you need to assign some bodies to that new usage group.

How you do so depends on your situation and the case you can make. It could be just visitors would work if the design and proximity of the rooms suggests that staff would not use them. I would be inclinded to assume that including a few FTEs would be a good idea. Is there a percentage that is specific to reception perhaps who like visitors just might use these?

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MM K
Apr 15 2013
Guest
1189 Thumbs Up

Toilets not within the tenant space

For WE Prerequisite 1 and WE credit 1, should toilets that are not within the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. be included in the calculations?
If not, how do we complete the online form as it marks incomplete when the first table is left empty?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

If they are not in the space they are not in the scope of the prerequisite. Reading LEEDuser's guidance above will provide some useful orientation to this issue.

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Kasandra Martin Designer
Feb 11 2013
Guest
350 Thumbs Up

Active Sample Form not calculating Annual Water Consumption

I am using the active sample form to calculate my usage. Seems basic, 13 FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. and 48 transients. I am making different usage groups. But when I enter the info and calculate the form is showing 0 in the Annual water consumption columns? Shouldn't it calculate it for me? It is from the usgbc site.

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Kasandra Martin Designer Feb 11 2013 Guest 350 Thumbs Up

I think I figured it out! lol I didn't enter the days of operation. That would be noted by the architect correct? this is a LEED CI so the PIF3 form would show that? It hasn't been registered yet, we are still trying to work out possible points.

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Feb 11 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

Hi Kasandra,
It's good to hear that you are using the sample forms to run some preliminary calculations prior to registering the project. Yes, once the project is registered in LEED Online the annual days of operation will be listed in PIf3 and will link to the WEp1 form.

Note that the fixture groups are meant to define occupant groups (i.e. office, warehouse, retail, etc.) within the building that use a specific subset of flow and flush fixtures. If your project occupants have similar usage patterns, one fixture usage group may be used to represent the entire tenant occupancy and the form will automatically calculate the daily usage rates for each fixture based on the percent male/female as entered in the Fixture Group form table when the group is assigned to each fixture.

Hope helpful!

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Kasandra Martin Designer Feb 11 2013 Guest 350 Thumbs Up

Thank you! It is an office with FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. and Transients so I was going to do a group for each. The forms are so helpful.

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Feb 11 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

Unless the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. and transients use different fixtures (with different flow/flush rates) then no need to list a group for each...you can list one fixture group in the form table and it will automatically calculate the daily usage rates for these occupant types.

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Kasandra Martin Designer Feb 11 2013 Guest 350 Thumbs Up

Well there are two sets of bathrooms. The FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. have showers in their bathroom. Otherwise all the fixture types will be the same. So mayby just make a group of the FTE and showers?

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Feb 11 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

You can identify one group if the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. and transients have access to the same fixture types between these two bathrooms...the form will automatically calculate the correct daily uses for the FTE and transient numbers you list for this group (e.g. it will calculate the daily uses for the FTE shower use, and excludes transient shower usage). :)

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Kasandra Martin Designer Feb 11 2013 Guest 350 Thumbs Up

The showers are in the bathroom in the back office area where the transients use the front bathrooms. It is a government office building with waiting area. So the visitors don't really have access to the shower I would say.

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Feb 11 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

Yep, the form takes this into account - that transients do not utilize the showers (per the LEED default daily usage rates outlined in the LEED Reference Guide).

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Kasandra Martin Designer Feb 11 2013 Guest 350 Thumbs Up

oh wow. So you just simplified this for me quite a bit. Thank you! this forum is so helpful. It is my first project to work on so I have alot to learn. Thank you for all your help.

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Feb 11 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

glad to help! you can take the time listing out each of these groups, but there's really no need in your project case, so I was hoping to save you some time.

If your front restroom had different flush/flow fixture rates from the back restroom, and the transients only had access to the front restroom, then this scenario would require you to list different fixture groups to accurately account for this... hope this helps clarify.

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Sharon Chen
Jan 30 2013
Guest
16 Thumbs Up

WEp1- Kitchen Sink for Cafeteria

I am working on a LEED CI project. It’s an office building with kitchen sinks in pantry areas throughout the building, which is available for all the occupants. There are also kitchen sinks in the cafeteria which is only available for the kitchen staff. I know I need to include the kitchen sinks in pantry areas and use the building’s FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. to calculate its usage. But do I need to include kitchen sinks in the cafeteria? Under WEp2 requirement, kitchen sink is only listed under Residential Fixture not under Commercial Fixtures. Kitchen sinks in the cafeteria is for commercial use (food service application). And the LEED CI guideline said kitchen sinks with low –flow rates are not appropriate because volume of water of predetermined does not save water and will likely cause frustration. Should I exclude kitchen sink in the cafeteria in WEp2 and WEc1 calculation?

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Jan 31 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

Hi Sharon,

Kitchen faucets to be used for break room sinks must be included, but commercial kitchen sinks and bar sinks including pot sinks, prep sinks, wash down, and cleaning sinks are considered process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. and are not included (November 1, 2011 Addenda).

However, pre-rise spay valves must be considered. If your project is registered after November 1, 2011 – the pre-rinse spray valve flow rate must be 1.6 gpm or less in order to comply with the prerequisite. If your project has a pre-rinse spray valve that has a higher flow rate than 1.6 gpm, then the project is not in compliance and the pre-rinse spray valve would need to be revised in order to be eligible for LEED certification.

Hope helpful!

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Jaclyn Whitaker AIA LEED AP BD+C Director, Project Manager, Delos Living Feb 13 2013 Guest 53 Thumbs Up

Hi Sharon and Carlie.

Do hand washing sinks within commercial kitchen (cafeterias) need to be included in the WE calculation?

Thanks,
Jaclyn

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Mar 12 2013 LEEDuser Member 4788 Thumbs Up

We'd like to know the answer to this one also. Per Addendum, all hand washing sinks regardless of location need to be included. However, there are some arguments in the NC pages for not including them based on usage differences.

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Mar 22 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

Hand washing sinks located in commercial kitchen areas that do not pass through a grease interceptor should be included in the water use calculations under the kitchen sink category (November 1, 2011 Addenda)

Public and private lavatory faucets encompass all sinks used primarily for hand-washing regardless of location (February 2, 2011 Addenda)

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Vivien Fairlamb
Jan 10 2013
LEEDuser Member
881 Thumbs Up

WEp1 and occupancy definition

I have a fit out project which is occupying a new core and shell building. The scope of the core and shell includes wash room fitout on each floor and shower facilities in the basement for use by the whole building.

The tenant will be occupying the whole building and will be adding a gym, catering/ restaurant and kitchettes as part of the Fit Out works - this therefore includes adding a few WCs, Urinals and Wash Hand Basins, extra showers and faucets in the kitchettes and pre rinse spray valves in the kitchen areas.

To document WEp1 - should i calculate how many people might use the Fit Out WCs and Urinals and showers - based on the likely occupancy of those areas ? Otherwise my occupancy figure will be the same for WEp1 and WEc1 as they are occupying the whole building.
For the gym occupancy i could base this off the company's existing use and pro rata based on floor area. would this work if i provide a narrative to explain how the figures have been derived?

many thanks

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Mar 22 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

Hi Vivien,

Note that if the LEED-CI project has replaced any existing fixtures within the base building restrooms then the project has expanded the LEED-CI scope of work in regards to the prerequisite and all fixtures within those restrooms (both new and existing) must be included in the calculations of the prerequisite as the restroom is now viewed to be included within the LEED-CI project scope of work.

Since the tenant is occupying the whole building, I assume that the project occupants have similar usage patterns and utilize the same fixtures; therefore, one fixture usage group may be used to represent the entire building occupancy. The form will automatically calculate the daily usage rates for each fixture based on the percent male/female as entered in the Fixture Group when the group is assigned to each fixture.

Your approach to calculating the gym fixture use seems reasonable and I would definitely include a narrative describing your rationale. In this case, you will need to create additional usage groups for the “gym occupants” and “restaurant occupants.”

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Diana Hill
Dec 28 2012
Guest
172 Thumbs Up

What is WEp1-1, plumbing fixture and fitting schedule?

In the summary of the online table it says,
Upload WEp1-1. "Provide the plumbing fixture and fitting schedule for the project highlighting flush and flowrates for all applicable plumbing fixtures and fittings within the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. that meet the needs of tenant occupancy."
Is there a format for this?

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Dec 28 2012 LEEDuser Member 4788 Thumbs Up

Hi Diana,
No, typically the plumbing fixture schedule is found on the plans. You can just upload that plansheet. We tend to use product cutsheets, since schedules can vary in terms of the information provided. Reviewers tend to prefer the fixture schedule for some reason. Either should work, but if you use cutsheets you might provide a quick explanation as to why.

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Diana Hill Dec 28 2012 Guest 172 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Michelle. I think maybe we will upload the product data cutsheets.

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Jan 03 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

Hi Diana,

The reviewer is requesting the plumbing fixture schedule for the project as part of the required documentation to verify that the fixtures listed in the form were specified for the project.

A copy of the plumbing fixture schedule from the project's construction documents, outlining detailed information for each flush and flow fixture specified (including fixture manufacturer, model number and flow rate) helps the review team verify that those fixtures are part of the construction contract. In the absence of such documentation, a copy of project-specific specifications and details or a project-specific contractor’s submittal with manufacturer’s cut sheets highlighting flush and flow rates for each fixture specified can be provided.

Hope helpful!

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Kasandra Martin Designer
Dec 11 2012
Guest
350 Thumbs Up

FTE

How do I know what my FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. is? I am guessing it is what I am told the occupancy will be. I am working on a LEED CI, existing building with new addition. It's a government office with a public restroom and an employee restroom. A women's and a men's of each.

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Dec 12 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

Hi Kasandra,

Guidance on how to calculate the project occupancy (FTEs, visitors, etc) is outlined in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Interior Design and Construction, 2009 Edition. In addition to Full-Time EquivalentFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 40 hours per week in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per week divided by 40. Multiple shifts are included or excluded depending on the intent and requirements of the credit. occupants, a value must be provided for transient occupants for both daily average and peak period transient occupants. For a typical office space, transients may include individuals, such as consultants or clients, who may visit the space over the course of the day (such as for meetings, etc.). Additionally, ensure that your occupancy numbers are reported consistently throughout all submittal documentation.

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Kasandra Martin Designer Dec 12 2012 Guest 350 Thumbs Up

Wouldn't this be filled out on PIf3 when the project is registered? Or does the reference guide have a set guideline for an office? Is the reference guide available online?

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Dec 12 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

Yes, occupancy is completed within the PIf3 Form; however the WEp1 form allows project teams to define "user groups" to reflect populations within the building that use a specific subset of flow and flush fixtures - within this form the occupancy can be entered incorrectly by the project team (and if it doesn't match the occupancy within PIf3 it will be questioned by the reviewer).

Reference Guides (hardcopy or electronic) are available for purchase via the USGBC website under 'Resources'.

Hope helpful!

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Kasandra Martin Designer Dec 12 2012 Guest 350 Thumbs Up

Thank you that is very helpful. this is my first project to work on so it is overwhelming. I have a guide for the leed GA test and then a new construction major renovation from v2.2. The project hasn't registered yet so I am thinking leed online will have resources?

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Kasandra Martin Designer Dec 12 2012 Guest 350 Thumbs Up

One more question. Is there a guide book that would be good to have on hand that covers multiple rating systems? Since I don't know for sure which this project is going for yet. Or is there one for each one?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 12 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Kasandra, there is a LEED Reference Guide for each rating system, which is a good idea to have. However, they are expensive so I wouldn't buy one unless you knew you were using that rating system.

Another idea is to subscribe to LEEDuser (this website) for $9.95/month, and get access to all of our credit-by-credit guidance for all the major rating systems.

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Kasandra Martin Designer Dec 12 2012 Guest 350 Thumbs Up

Thank you for the response. This site is very useful.

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Kasandra Martin Designer Dec 13 2012 Guest 350 Thumbs Up

what is the difference between the LEED for Commercial Interiors v2.0 Reference Guide and the LEED Reference Guide for Green Interior Design and Construction? I think the first is a study guide? One more question, my project for LEED CI would go for v2.0 or 2009, how do you pick one?

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Dec 13 2012 LEEDuser Member 4788 Thumbs Up

Hi Kasandra,
As Tristan noted, there are different rating systems for different project types. The rating systems also evolve over time. LEED-CI v2.0 is the old rating system. "Green Interior Design and Construction" is the 2009 version of the LEED-CI system. You do not have a choice in this case about which to register for. If you are newly registering a project, it will be a LEED 2009 project, i.e., the Green Interior Design reference guide.

The study guides are different.

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Kasandra Martin Designer Dec 13 2012 Guest 350 Thumbs Up

Thank you, I thought that was the case but needed to make sure. Thank you for all your help.

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sompoche sirichote
Sep 13 2012
LEEDuser Member
184 Thumbs Up

Toilet Scope

If our client who own the entire building would like to do the fitout for only 1 floor. The toilet is out of fitout scope.
The client would like to get LEED CI certified.
Is the project eligible to be exempt from WEp1?

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Carlie Bullock-Jones, LEED Fellow Principal, Ecoworks Studio Sep 13 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2401 Thumbs Up

Hi Sompoche,

LEED-CI projects without plumbing in their scope of work are exempt from WEp1.

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Jonathan Weiss
Aug 28 2012
LEEDuser Member
2151 Thumbs Up

Ritual handwash/foot wash sink

I am working on a project with a ritual hand wash / foot wash (ablution) fixture as part of the program. We have a fixture that has been selected by the owner, and I cannot find any alternates that are lower flow fixtures. Am I OK in assuming these are essentially "process" fixtures since there is no defined baseline? Or does anyone have any advice for this type of situation?

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