CI-2009 WEpc10: Sustainable wastewater management

  • This may replace WEc2

    The Sustainable Wastewater Management credit will continue to be tested in the pilot credit library as a replacement for LEED 2009’s WEc2 Innovative Wastewater Technolo-gies.  The credit has been revised to encourage more project teams to pursue the credit by finding ways to eliminate, reuse, or recover resources from wastewater.  The elimina-tion of water use for sewage conveyance is now focused on alternative technologies.  Project teams are encouraged to consider the overall impact of the system such as ener-gy use and air quality which may negatively offset the environmental benefits.  

    For Option 2, the amount of wastewater reused has been reduced but also must meet the NSF 350 or local standard, which provides a better framework for identifying potential strategies.  The NSF 350 standard, Onsite Residential and Commercial Reuse Treat-ment Systems, “establishes minimum materials, design and construction, and perfor-mance requirements for onsite residential and commercial reuse treatment systems” in-cluding wastewater treatment systems.  For more information visit the NSF website:  http://www.nsf.org/business/wastewater_certification/standards.asp?program=WastewaterCer

    Wastewater contains various organic matter, nutrients, and minerals that can be a source of energy or other reusable resource.  For Option 3, project teams are encouraged to think about how the resources, nitrogen or organic carbon can be extracted from wastewater and reused.  
    Credit Submittals

    General

    1. Register for Pilot Credit(s) here
    2. Register a username at LEEDuser.com, and participate in online forum
    3. Submit feedback survey; supply PDF of your survey/confirmation of completion with credit documentation

    Credit-Specific

    Option 1:

    Provide a narrative which includes the type of alternative technology and details about how it will be installed and operated for the project building.  Systems that negatively offset the environmental benefits, such as those that have high energy use or high pollution rates will not be accepted.

    Provide any applicable specifications, drawings, and calculations to show that the system significantly minimizes or eliminates the annual wastewater produced from sewage conveyance.

    Process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. reduction (i.e., from food service) may qualify for this credit, how-ever, and additional explanation of the method must be provided.

    Option 2:

    Provide a narrative about the wastewater treatment/reuse system including:

    • whether it meets the NSF 350 or a local standard (whichever is more stringent),
    • wastewater source and reuse location (e.g, building graywaterGraywater is untreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater typically includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washer and laundry tubs, though definitions may vary. Some states and local authorities also allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area. reused as toilet flushing water)
    • approximately what portion of the water type is being reused
    • Highlight the NSF 350 or local standard section to show the minimum requirements for the system installed.

    Provide any applicable specifications or drawings to demonstrate the system design and location. 

    Option 3:

    Provide a narrative explaining the resource recovery strategy used including:

    • Type of resource(s) recovered
    • Descriptions and specification on system used
    • Estimated annual quantity recovered
    • Estimated impact on total building resource production (i.e. approximately what percent of the identified resource is recovered).

     

    Additional Questions to Document

    • Did the revisions to this credit make it more achievable for your project?  For other projects?
    • Are there strategies that have been used on this or other projects that would be applicable to this credit?  Explain.
  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors

    WE Pilot Credit 10: Sustainable wastewater management

    Intent

    To increase the efficiency of wastewater reuse by encouraging water reuse, reduction or recovery.

    Requirements

    Option 1. Source reduction

    Reduce wastewater from toilets and urinals by at least 50% from the baseline calculated in WE Prerequisite Fixture & Fitting Water Use Reduction for toilets and urinals only.


    Percent reduction Points
    50% 1
    95% 1 (2nd point not available)



    OR
    Option 2. Reuse

    Reuse building wastewater on site. Use water from approved non-potable sources including:

    • recycled wastewater (on-site or municipally supplied),
    • swimming pool backwash operations,
    • air conditioner condensate,
    • rainwater,
    • cooling tower blow-down water,
    • foundation drain water,
    • steam system condensate,
    • fluid cooler discharge water,
    • food steamer discharge water,
    • combination oven discharge water,
    • industrial process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making.,
    • fire pump test water
    • municipally supplied treated seawater
    • ice machine condensate

    Reused water must meet the applicable local code, for its intended use (e.g., on-site irrigation, toilet flushing, cooling tower).


    Strategy Points
    Implement wastewater reuse 1
    Reuse at least 90% of wastewater on site 1 (2nd point not available)



    OR
    Option 3. Resource recovery

    Implement resource recovery and reuse of one or both of the following for up to 1 point::


    Resource recovery type Points
    nutrients (nitrogen and/or phosphorous) 1
    organic carbon loading from building occupants 1 (2nd point not available)



    Credit specific

    Option 1:

    • Provide a narrative which includes the type of alternative technology and details about how it will be installed and operated for the project building. Systems that negatively offset the environmental benefits, such as those that have high energy use or high pollution rates will not be accepted.
    • Provide any applicable specifications, drawings, and calculations to show that the system significantly minimizes or eliminates the annual wastewater produced

      from sewage conveyance.
    • Process water reduction (i.e., from food service) may qualify for this credit, however, and additional explanation of the method must be provided.

    Option 2:

    Provide a narrative about the wastewater treatment/reuse system including:

    • whether it meets the local standard wastewater
    • source and reuse location (e.g, building graywaterGraywater is untreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater typically includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washer and laundry tubs, though definitions may vary. Some states and local authorities also allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area. reused as toilet flushing water)
    • approximately what portion of the water type is being reused
    • Provide any applicable specifications or drawings to demonstrate the system design and location.

    Option 3:

    Provide a narrative explaining the resource recovery strategy used including:

    • Type of resource(s) recovered
    • Descriptions and specification on system used
    • Estimated annual quantity recovered
    • Estimated impact on total building resource production (i.e. approximately what percent of the identified resource is recovered).
    Additional questions
    • Did the revisions to this credit make it more achievable for your project? For other projects?
    • Are there strategies that have been used on this or other projects that would be applicable to this credit? Explain.
    Changes:
    • 1/15/2013: removed NSF 350 standard from requirements

56 Comments

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Oct 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
1870 Thumbs Up

Use of greywater

Project Location: Japan

Hi all,

We pursued Pilot Credit WEpc10 through Option 2, and planned to use recycled grey water for flush fixtures.This recycled grey water accounts for 100% reduction in flush water user from the base-line.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M Revitaliza Consultores
Oct 22 2014
Guest
261 Thumbs Up

Sharing credit results

Hallo,
My team and I have reduced water use in a project through high-efficient flush fixtures by 55%, which will give us an exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point.
In addition, 100% of the wastewater is treated on-site to tertiary standards and reused for irrigation.

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Mónika Egyed
Jun 26 2014
Guest
9 Thumbs Up

feedback comment

In our project, the pilot credit was achievable by 50% reduction from WC and urinal water use.

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Jens Apel
Jun 12 2014
Guest
974 Thumbs Up

90% refer to what?

I am wondering what the 90% in option 2 refer to. If I collect and use rainwater, I may use 90% of the annual rainwater on the site. But if I have any other of the listed sources (condensate from AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. cooling coils will be available almost everywhere), can I get the 90% point without using any other source than rainwater?
For the example rainwater, how would that be calculated? Site area x annual precipitation x run-off coefficient?
I think this is not really clear.

Additionally, how would "whether it meets the local standard wastewater" be documented?

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Jan 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
2361 Thumbs Up

captured rainwater

We have tried to comply by using 100% captured rainwater for flush fixtures. That reduces potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. use but does not affect a reduction in blackwaterBlackwater is wastewater containing urine or fecal matter that should be discharged to the sanitary drainage system of the building or premises in accordance with the International Plumbing Code or does not stimulate the re-use/upgrading of blackwater.

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Navisa Jain Project Manager dbHMS Consultants
Dec 19 2013
Guest
55 Thumbs Up

Pilot credit as well as exemplary performance

Hi,
We have reduced water use in a project through dual flush fixtures, low flow urinals, low flow lavatories by more than 35%. Further, 100% of the water used for flushing, washing are reclaimed and treated and reused in a close loop system using the Submerged Air Fixed Film Reactor process.

I'm wondering if we can apply for both the Exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. as well as Pilot credit or only one.

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ADRIENN GELESZ LEED AP, ABUD Engineering Ltd. Mar 27 2014 Guest 1290 Thumbs Up

Dear Navisa, I assume that the examplary performance can be applied. Please let me know your experiences if already submitted.

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Tanja Arnesson Skanska Sweden AB
Nov 21 2013
LEEDuser Member
757 Thumbs Up

Getting a Pilot credit by doing nothing!?

Hi,

We in Sweden have standard WC's that have a dual flush for 2 and 4 liters which gives us a effective flush on 0,7 GPF, by that we get a reduction on 56 % by doing "nothing". And then we struggles with the faucets for the public lavatory where we belive that the baseline is really low, especially in LEED v4 where sensor-controlled faucets doesn't help us anymore.
Maybe the credit shouldn't be about just wastewater?

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Jiri Dobias
Nov 01 2013
LEEDuser Member
1272 Thumbs Up

Pilot credit 10 vs. WEc2:Innovative Wastewater Technologies

I'm glad to know that the USGBC is trying to promote use of non-potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. sources since my clients are usually more willing to invest money in stormwater detention features. However, we should be careful about making very strict requirements. If the client and the whole team sees that achieving second point for this credit would be very expensive (e.g. Reuse at least 90% of wastewater on site could be) they will maybe decide to omit the water reuse at all because only one point does not create strong incentive enough to balance the added hard costs.

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Joanna Switzer
Jul 15 2013
Guest
454 Thumbs Up

Military installation with male dominated population

I am part of a team working on a multiple building complex LEED project at an Army Infantry installation. It consists of several Company Operations Facilities along with several Tactical Equipment Maintenance Facilities (COF & TEMF). The owner/organization project management team has documented that a significantly male-dominated building occupancy is expected for the entire operational life of these specialized Infantry facilities.

Subsequently, the combined use of waterless urinals and 1.28gpf toilets throughout the complex has yielded a calculated wastewater use reduction of greater than 50%.

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heesun ryu
Jun 26 2013
Guest
38 Thumbs Up

Can we acquire all credit points in WEc2, ID, WEpc10?

We have a factory LEED project. We will utilize factory process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. for all toilet usage(water closets, urinals). Factory process water is drained away in the generation process of primary reverse osmotic system. Can we acquire all credit points in WEc2, ID (Exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements.-WEc2) and WEpc10 (pilot credit)?

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Joanna Switzer Jul 01 2013 Guest 454 Thumbs Up

Hello Heesun,

Waste water generated by the LEED building's factory equipment (process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making.) would qualify as non-potable and would contibute to WEp1, WEc2, and WEc3 along with pilot credit WEpc10. Assuming the calculated outcome meets the targeted thresholds for all these credits...YES, you are eligible for achievement of them all.

However, I am not understanding one detail - Can you clarify the sequence you are describing with the statement "Factory process water is drained away in the generation process of primary reverse osmotic system."?

Calculations would need to be performed to estimate the annual volume of process water available and the overall regulated fixture demand for the building occupants to determine whether 50%-100% of flush fixture demand would be met by this water source...although its hard to imagine there would not be more than enough process waste water available!
Note- the LEED credit forms do not readily incorporate the non-potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. contibutions to credit performance. You will need to create a supporting document to show these calculations - refer to guidance outlined here: http://www.usgbc.org/Docs/Archive/General/Docs6493.pdf

Best of luck to you!

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Cristina Bayes Dec 17 2013 Guest 36 Thumbs Up

Our project is an administrative building. The projecte has already achieved WEc1, WEc2, WEc3 and their ID for exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements..

The building reuses non-potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. from rainwater. This rainwater is used in toilets and urinals.

We are going to pursue pilot credit 10, using option 2, as I have understood by reading the comments above that in our case we can also acquire the pilot credit 10.

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Joanna Switzer
Jun 24 2013
Guest
454 Thumbs Up

WEpc10 through use of cistern

Hello,

Latest one of my projects pursuing this pilot credit is a daycare facility. Adult toilets are low flow, but child sized toilets are standard 1.6gpf. There are no urinals included in the project. Over 100% of the calculated annual demand for these flush fixtures is being met by a poured in place cistern which collects rainwater from a multi-gabled steep sloped roof via gutters/roof drains and also condensate from the outside air ventilation system during the more humid months of the year. ( hot/humid Florida spring thru early autumn) This is also one of the primary stormwater run-off mitigation strategies for the small site on which this project is located.

The project will be eligible for all WEc3 points, WEc2 points, and Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. of WEc2 along with this pilot credit making Water Efficiency a strong success story for the sustainability features of the project!

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John Nichols Senior Sustainability Coordinator Moseley Architects
Jun 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
147 Thumbs Up

NSF Applicability to Rainwater Reuse?

We are confused on how to pursue this credit for buildings with rainwater reuse systems. Rainwater is specifically mentioned as one of the eligible non-potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. sources listed under OPTION 2 Reuse. However, from what we have read into NSF 350, it seems like this standard is geared more towards "wastewater" systems in the traditional sense of wastewater (i.e. anything going down the drain from toilets, urinals, kitchen equipment, and the like that would normally be collected in the sanitary sewer system).

Can someone clarify what requirements within the NSF 350 standard would be applicable to our rainwater system? The rainwater is being reused both for flushing and cooling tower make-up water. We are meeting all applicable local requirements for filtration, chlorination, color dying, pipe labeling, etc - but it is unclear what else we have to do to demonstrate compliance with the NSF 350 Standard.

Many Thanks

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Joanna Switzer Jun 11 2013 Guest 454 Thumbs Up

Hi John,

I just checked and it APPEARS that the NSF 350 requirements have been stricken from the current pilot credit language. It might be worth submitting your documentation noting this to see how GBCI review team responds....just a thought!
http://www.usgbc.org/node/2606866?return=/pilotcredits

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John Nichols Senior Sustainability Coordinator, Moseley Architects Jun 17 2013 LEEDuser Member 147 Thumbs Up

Thank you Joanna - it looks like you are exactly right. We should be submitting for this credit in early fall and will report back with how the documentation is reviewed. I appreciate your help!

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Alicia Silva CEO Revitaliza consultores
May 29 2013
LEEDuser Member
1582 Thumbs Up

Pilot credit 10

Hallo,
My team and I have reduced water use in a project through high-efficient flush fixtures by 40%.
In addition, 100% of the water used for sewage conveyance is treated on-site to tertiary standards and reused for irrigation.

GH

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Alicia Silva CEO Revitaliza consultores
Apr 30 2013
LEEDuser Member
1582 Thumbs Up

Pilot Credit 10

Hallo,
My team and I have reduced water use in a project through high-efficient flush fixtures by 39%.
In addition, 100% of the water used for sewage conveyance is treated on-site to tertiary standards and reused for toilet and urinal flushing.
The standards of this car manufacturing company states that every new building has to treat 100% of waste water. Therefore meeting requirements were easily achievable.
GH

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Lolita Wu
Apr 28 2013
Guest
178 Thumbs Up

Questions

Hi all,
We are working on a project that uses recycled wastewater and collected rainwater for toilet and urinals. As we can not meet the 50% water use reduction by just using water fixtures, we choose to follow option2.

The requirement is "whether it meets the NSF 350 or a local standard (whichever is more stringent)". As the project is outside US, the standard NSF 350 may not apply for this project, can we just use local standard for this requirement?

The instruction also says "Implement wastewater reuse - 1 point". Does this mean I can get one point as long as I have wastewater treatment system that meets all the requirement but no percentage of the reduction is required?

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Alicia Silva CEO Revitaliza consultores
Apr 26 2013
LEEDuser Member
1582 Thumbs Up

Pilot Credit 10

Hallo,
My team and I have reduced water use in a project through high-efficient flush fixtures by 67%.
In addition, 100% of the water used for sewage conveyance is treated on-site to tertiary standards and reused for irrigation. The project had to apply for a federal permit to be allowed to use this treated water for irrigation.

GH

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Jiri Dobias
Apr 23 2013
LEEDuser Member
1272 Thumbs Up

WEc2 vs. Pilot Credit 10

Hi all,
do I understand correctly that the pilot credit allocates WEc2 requirements to Option 1 and Option 2 and adds Option 3?
My project reduces use of potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. of 47 % just by installing efficient toilets and urinals. The total reduction of 55 % is achieved by harvesting rainwater and using it for flushing toilets - therefore I have chosen the Option 2. However, what if there is no local code addressing reused water? Credit's language states that "Reused water must meet the applicable local code, for its intended use (e.g., on-site irrigation, toilet flushing, cooling tower).".

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Apr 04 2013
LEEDuser Member
2361 Thumbs Up

waterless urinals

We have tried to comply with this credit using waterless urinals and dual flush toilets with a very low flush (3L/435L)

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Wei Jiang
Jun 22 2012
LEEDuser Member
502 Thumbs Up

Laundry drain water

Can laundry drain water be considered as non-potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. source for the credit compliance through Option 2?

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Redy Truccolo Engineer Ariatta Ingegneria dei Sistemi
Jun 04 2012
LEEDuser Member
273 Thumbs Up

Question

Hi Everybody,

I'm doing a CS 2009 Pre Certification and I've already achieved the 50% reduction for the WEc2 Innovative Wastewater technologies.
My question is, if I apply for this Pilot Credit (which has the same requirements) will I receive 2 points totally (one for the WEc2 and one for the Pilot)?
Thnak you in advance.

Redy

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Joanna Switzer Feb 06 2013 Guest 454 Thumbs Up

Hi Redy,

I have a project with the same design conditions you described. We have met the requirement through exclusive use of 0.8gpf toilets and 0.25gpf urinals, which use 50%+ less water than their EPAct 2005 code compliant counterparts (1.6gpf toilets and 1.0gpf urinals). I am nearly ready to complete my formal documentation.

By chance have you undergone your certification review of Pilot 10- if so, do you have any lessons learned you can share?

Thanks in advance!

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ADRIENN GELESZ LEED AP, ABUD Engineering Ltd. Mar 07 2013 Guest 1290 Thumbs Up

Hi Redy and Joanna,
We submitted this credit during the preliminary design application. The strategy that reduced potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. needed for the toilets and urinals consisted of high efficiency toilets (4 litres for full flush and 3 litres for low flush) and low water urinals (set to provide 1 litre per flush) with infrared control, which resulted in a 50% reduction that was accepted. However, we received a comment to upload evidence that a project team member has participated in the LEEDUser online pilot credit forum as required.
We are planning to submit the account details and the relevant comments made in this topic.
Can anyone confirm that this is the right documentation?
Many thanks,
Adreinn

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Joanna Switzer Mar 07 2013 Guest 454 Thumbs Up

Greetings Adrienn,

As the Pilot credit submittal requirements did not call for this supporting documentation I did not think to include it for the prelim submittal. Prelim review comments for my aforementioned project are anticipated from GBCI in early April so I can advise what I am asked to provide at that time. In advance of that, though, I think it could be as simple as printing this webpage to a PDF and circling your specific entry so its easy for the reviewer to see it quickly. Good luck!

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Joanna Switzer Apr 23 2013 Guest 454 Thumbs Up

Greetings all,

I just wanted to provide a quick update.

My project was just awarded both WEc2 and IDc1 for WEpc10 using the approach and documentation I referenced above. In addition, this in conjunction with high-efficiency flow fixtures also allowed the same project to achieve all available WEc3 points and an ID credit for Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. of WEc3 (calculated 45%+ overall regulated fixture water use reduction).

In summary, the use of very low-flow plumbing fixtures is a strategy to cost-effectively achieve (8) points under LEED 2009.

I hope this feedback is helpful- Best of luck to you all in your efforts!

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Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer Skanska Sweden
May 31 2012
LEEDuser Member
2455 Thumbs Up

Standard flush fixtures automatically gives credit in my county

I just wanted to hear thoughts about the fact that our standard flush fixtures reduce water usage by 56 %, without us doing anything. Our toilets are as set at 4-6 liters for a big flush and 2-3 liters at a small flush. This results in savings of 56 % for the 2/4 liter alternative (0.7 GPF), and 34 % saving for the 3/6 liter (1.06 GPF) alternative. The latter of course not enough, but the first one fine.
A discussion is however going on in my country whether the 2/4 liter fixtures work as they should and if pipes will be clogged or not. I have heard many opinions there.

Also the third option above, what exactly is required and which projects is it applicable to. Could a zero-lot-line city project pursue this option? If the municipal water treatment company treats the sludge through anaerobic digestion to retrieve biogas etc, would that comply? After this the remainings are treated and stored for 6 months and later used in agriculture, is this sufficient? This is also standard procedure in my city.

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Joanna Switzer Feb 06 2013 Guest 454 Thumbs Up

Hi Maria,

I am curious if you proceeded with documenting this credit and whether its undergone formal LEED certification review yet. Any update?

As for the 2/4 liter toilets, the closest I am aware of in the US is the 0.8gpf Stealth pressure assisted toilet available from Niagara Conservation. It poses the same concerns for maintenance and not all clients or plumbing engineers are comfortable with specifying it. I recommended the owner purchase one and install in one of their existing facilities (they have numerous multi-family buildings) to get a comfort level first and that made a big difference in the decision-making process. In this instance, the owner experienced no problems with the "test" fixture over the course of a year that design for the new LEED building was proceeding. As a result, this allowed the use of it to move forward with formal building owner approval.

From a functional perspective, it helped that the new LEED building was only 4 stories high (with only 75 unit toilets in all), as there's less potential for clogging over long length of pipe (stacking up through the building). It may have still been a concern in a high-rise building with 100's of toilets.

The support and open-mindedness of this project's owner was also a huge contributing factor to this process!

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Alicia Silva CEO Revitaliza consultores
Feb 02 2012
LEEDuser Member
1582 Thumbs Up

My team and I have reduced

My team and I have reduced water use in a project through dual flush fixtures, low flow urinals, low flow lavatories and low flow shower heads by more than 25%. Further we utilize rainwater catchment.
In addition, 100% of the water used for flushing, washing and showering and from rainwater are reclaimed and treated and reused in a close loop system using the Microclaire wastewater treatment system which meets the NSF 350 Standard.

So, the strategies used in the project were:
- Using low flow and dual flow fixtures
- Rainwater catchment
- Reclaim all the water and treat it for reuse and creating a close loop system.

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Molly A. Jones President Jones Design Studio, PLLC
Dec 15 2011
LEEDuser Member
261 Thumbs Up

Double the Pleasure???

So...if we participate in this pilot credit (option 1) AND we already comply with LEED-NC 2009 WEc2, is it safe to assume that we will be awarded 2 points under the LEED-NC 2009 WEc2 AND 1 ID point for this pilot credit??? If so, it seems like a no-brainer to me.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Molly, there is no exclusion against going for a regular credit and a similar pilot credit.

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ADRIENN GELESZ LEED AP, ABUD Engineering Ltd. Nov 21 2012 Guest 1290 Thumbs Up

Yes, but the compliance strategies have been separated. If you have only 45% reduction in flushing water, and had 5% of rainwater reuse, you can only comply for option 2. In this case you also have to prove that the quality of the water is good enough.

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Jiri Dobias Apr 23 2013 LEEDuser Member 1272 Thumbs Up

Option 2 says that ''reused water must meet the applicable local code, for its intended use (e.g., on-site irrigation, toilet flushing, cooling tower).''
If there is no local code addressing flushing toilets with rainwater in my country (Czech Republic) is it sufficient just to add a narrative explaining situation?

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SAMER ALHMDAN Feb 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 40 Thumbs Up

So if we get 2 points from WEc2 and extra point for exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements..
we can still attempt the WEpc10 and get total 4 Points ?

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Navisa Jain Project Manager, dbHMS Consultants Feb 20 2014 Guest 55 Thumbs Up

As per Version 4, our LEED CI project based in India is getting 12 points from water use reduction by using low-flow fixtures and using treated water for flush demands. This gives us an additional 1 point for Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements., 1 innovation point for Pilot credit and 1 more point for Regional Priority! 15 points in total.

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Prudence Ferreira Principal Integral Impact
Jul 21 2011
Guest
929 Thumbs Up

Treating and Reusing Process Waste Water

In an existing winery facility we are capturing 100% of our process wastewater (which is significant) and treating it onsite in aerated retention ponds, then using it for vineyard irrigation. The ponds and vineyards are not within our LEED boundary, but are under the winery's ownership. I am not sure if this meets the NSF standard, but would it be reasonable to count this under Option 3 - using the nitrogen and organic carbon as fertilizer?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 30 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Prudence, I can't speak to the technical credit requirements, but I don't see any issue relative to the LEED boundary. Projects can use land outside their boundary for specific credit compliance.

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Karen Poff Product Development Coordinator, Austin Energy Aug 02 2011 LEEDuser Expert 306 Thumbs Up

Hi Prudence,
Thank you for your comment. It doesn’t sound like the scenario you described would meet the requirements outlined under Option 3 but I can’t be sure without more information. Option 3 is intended to specifically recover and use the carbon/nitrogen. Under the aerated retention ponds scenario you described, are you recovering the nutrients and using them as fertilizer? Or does the pond remove/reduce the nutrients and then the effluent is used to irrigate? Option 2 seems like a better fit but we are still reviewing whether treatment and use of the wastewater outside of the LEED boundary is an issue. Is the location of the treatment ponds and vineyard adjacent to the LEED boundary? Are there local requirements in your area for using treated process wastewater for irrigation purposes?

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Prudence Ferreira Principal, Integral Impact Aug 03 2011 Guest 929 Thumbs Up

Karen,

The water is treated to reduce the biological oxygen demand, etc. So it would probably count as reducing the nitrogen and carbon content, then once it has been treated the effluent is used for irrigation. There are local requirements to treat winery waste water, but no requirements that the effluent is used for irrigation. The treatment ponds and vineyards are directly adjacent to the project boundary or up to 1/4 mile away - all on land owned by the project owners.

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Karen Poff Product Development Coordinator, Austin Energy Aug 12 2011 LEEDuser Expert 306 Thumbs Up

Hi Prudence,
Based on your response, it doesn't appear that your project would meet the intent of Option 3. Option 2 would be a better fit provided your treated effluent meets the NSF 350 standard or local code (whichever is more stringent) for irrigation. We are continuing to review whether treatment and use of the wastewater outside of the LEED boundary is an issue and I will post a clarification as soon as a decision is made. Thanks, Karen

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Scott Durbin
May 04 2011
Guest
76 Thumbs Up

Combined Sewer Areas

In areas with combined sewers, could option 1 be achieved by reducing runoff volume to the sewer?

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Karen Poff Product Development Coordinator, Austin Energy May 05 2011 LEEDuser Expert 306 Thumbs Up

Hi Scott,
Thanks for your comment. We had a similar discussion when we were considering how to address wastewater from sinks, showers, etc. We agreed that the reduction of wastewater for those applications is credited under the water fixtures credit. Similarly, reducing a project’s runoff volume is credited under the sustainable sites stormwater design credit and would not be eligible for credit under Option 1 of the Sustainable Wastewater Management Credit. Option 1 is designed to specifically reduce wastewater volumes from toilets and urinals.

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Karen Poff Product Development Coordinator Austin Energy
Dec 20 2010
LEEDuser Expert
306 Thumbs Up

LEED Pilot Credits

Hi LEEDusers -

Thanks for logging in. Relying on your experience and input, we are hoping to test the Sustainable Wastewater Management pilot credit and identify ways of improving it. Please provide comments and feedback to let us know any concerns or issues you have regarding the credit. I will be reviewing the site weekly to address any questions you might have. Thanks again for your help!

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Lisa Sawin Jan 22 2011 LEEDuser Member 550 Thumbs Up

If this pilot credit is implemented, would there be an opportunity for exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements.? If so what would the threshold be? Has any thought been given to providing additional points (beyond ID and regional) for teams that fully address the issue by reusing or eliminating 100% of the projects wastewater?

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Lisa Sawin Jan 22 2011 LEEDuser Member 550 Thumbs Up

To clarify my comment above: I know the current exemplary perfromance for WEc2 is 100%. Will this be the case for pilot credit 10? If it is has there been thought given to having this exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. be worth more than one point?

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Chrissy Macken Assistant Project Manager, LEED v4 , U.S. Green Building Council Jan 24 2011 LEEDuser Member 1135 Thumbs Up

Hi Lisa -

Pilot Credits are not eligible for achievement of Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. points. This credit is in the draft for the next version of the rating system (released in 2012) and so we will go through the exercise of determining which credits are eligible for exemplary performance at a later time, but prior to the release of the next rating system.

For now, achievement of this credit through the Pilot Library is worth 1 innovation point. If you are able to go beyond the requirements, though, we'd like you to tell us about it and share your strategies so we can help other projects do the same.

Thanks for commenting!

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Brendan Owens, LEED Fellow Vice President, LEED Technical Development USGBC
Sep 09 2010
LEEDuser Expert
837 Thumbs Up

leed pilot credits - we need your help!

Hi LEEDusers -

The idea behind pilot credits is to get feedback from project team members on the concepts we're testing so that USGBC can learn from your experience and make these credits better (so that you can make your buildings better, so that we can learn from that, so that we can make LEED better, so that you can make your buildings better...).

We can't do it without you so get on with it already.

Spread the word to friends and colleagues and if we run in to each other at Greenbuild, I'll buy you a beer!

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M San Miguel Paulson Chief LEED Specialist, Wulff Architects, Inc. Sep 24 2010 Guest 136 Thumbs Up

I've worked on many projects which get between 30%-40% reduction through the use of dual-flushA type of water-saving toilet that gives a choice of flushes depending on the type of waste — solid or liquid. toilets and waterless urinals. This will make WE2 much more achievable.

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Batya Metalitz Technical Director, LEED, USGBC Sep 24 2010 LEEDuser Expert 2488 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your comment. In the past, WEc2 has had fairly low credit achievement. When projects did achieve the credit, it was for the types of strategies you described, essentially using very low flow/flush fixtures and fittings. For the new credit, we wanted to make a clear distinction between the fixture and fitting efficiency credit, and the innovative wastewater credit.

With this new approach, we hope to incentivize innovative water use/water saving strategies, while keeping the fixture and fitting water use reductions contained within the fixture and fitting credit. As the credit is now written, the specific strategy used is not prescribed, so there is some flexibility in how projects earn the credit.

Projects will still be able to receive credit for going beyond the thresholds in the fixture and fitting credit through exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. in the ID section.

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deborah lucking associate, fentress architects Oct 21 2010 LEEDuser Member 1362 Thumbs Up

Feedback we got from projects that have installed innovative wastewater treatments - typically living machines - is that there are still too many bugs in the system (no pun intended) - primarily cost and maintenance, to the extent that we are reluctant to consider them for our larger projects.
As for the waterless urinals - we have encountered a lot of pushback from intended users, and less than glowing reports from current ones. State agencies in California are replacing waterless urinals in their buildings with low-flush ones.

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Bryan Pratt VW&B Sep 05 2013 Guest 30 Thumbs Up

We are pursuing Pilot Credit 10: WE - Sustainable Wastewater Management by using cooling coil condensate as makeup water for cooling towers. It would appear Option 2 is the most appropriate. The only issue is that I am unable to find anything in the local codes that state quality requirements for cooling tower makeup water. Would a comment in the narrative stating this be sufficient?

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Joanna Switzer Sep 05 2013 Guest 454 Thumbs Up

Hi Bryan,

Yes- I anticipate that acknowledging this requirement and confirming compliance within an overview narrative would suffice. LEED generally seeks to reinforce that local codes are the baseline, with LEED criteria enhancing them but not taking precedent or relieving projects from compliance with their jurisdiction's applicable codes. As a general precaution, I'd recommend submitting this pilot credit as part of a split certification review design submittal so that you'll have time (ideally during early construction) to respond to any potential reviewer clarification questions about this.

Good luck

PS - Next time I suggest starting a new thread so your issue is at the "top of the list" so to speak.

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Timo Rintala Green Building Partners Ltd Mar 18 2014 LEEDuser Member 218 Thumbs Up

We pursued Pilot Credit WEpc10 through Option 1 - wastewater was reduced by 50.62% from the baseline. Wastewater from toilets and urinals was reduced in our project by using dual flush toilets (4/2.5 liters/flush).

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Nov 23 2014
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