CI-v4 EAc2: Optimize energy performance

  • Focus on integration

    With the more stringent requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2010 as the baseline, additional creativity and effort is required to achieve higher levels of energy efficiency under this credit.

    Teams will need to take a concerted approach from the early design phase forward to optimize the building massing and envelope, reduce heating and cooling loads, and maximize daylighting opportunities, in order to make the selection and integration of high-efficiency lighting and HVAC systems practical and effective. However, the effort is worth it as this credit can provide long-term operational cost savings, as well as a significant number of points toward your LEED certification goals.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • Refer to EAp2: Minimum Energy Performance, which contains changes from LEED 2009.
    • There are now only two options for compliance: whole-building energy simulation or the prescriptive path using applicable ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guides. The Advanced Buildings Core Performance Guide is still allowed for prerequisite compliance, but is no longer an allowable path to earning this credit.

    FAQs

    The energy cost offset from onsite renewable energy cannot be used to demonstrate compliance with the prerequisite. Can this cost offset still be credited to the proposed energy cost savings for this credit?

    Yes, you may still factor in the estimated energy production of onsite renewable energy systems as a credit against the energy costs of the proposed building.

  • EA Credit 2: Optimize energy performance

    Intent

    To achieve increasing levels of energy performance beyond the prerequisite standard to reduce environmental and economic harms associated with excessive energy use.

    Requirements

    Establish an energy performance target no later than the schematic design phase. The target must be established as kBtu per square foot-year (kW per square meter-year) of source energySource energy is the total amount of raw fuel required to operate a building; it incorporates all transmission, delivery, and production losses for a complete assessment of a building's energy use. use.

    Choose one of the options below.

    Option 1. Tenant-level energy simulation (1–25 points)

    Analyze efficiency measures during the design process and account for the results in design decision-making. Analysis can include energy simulation of efficiency opportunities, energy simulation analyses for similar projects, or published data from energy analyses performed for similar projects (such as AEDGs).

    Analyze efficiency measures focused on load reduction and HVAC-related strategies; passive measures are acceptable. Project the potential energy savings and cost implications for all affected systems.

    Follow the criteria in EA Prerequisite Minimum Energy Performance to demonstrate a percentage improvement in the proposed tenant project performance rating compared with the baseline.

    Table 1. Points for percentage improvement in energy performance

    Interior construction Points
    4% 4
    5% 6
    6% 8
    7% 10
    8% 11
    9% 12
    10% 13
    11% 14
    12% 15
    13% 16
    14% 17
    15% 18
    16% 19
    17% 20
    18% 21
    20% 22
    22% 23
    24% 24
    28% 25



    OR

    Option 2. Prescriptive compliance (1–16 points)

    Use any combination of the strategies in any or all of the categories below.

    Base Building Systems (2-6 points)

    For base building systems that serve the project, as well as any applicable improvements that are part of the project, document compliance with the following according to base building type and climate zoneOne of five climatically distinct areas, defined by long-term weather conditions which affect the heating and cooling loads in buildings. The zones were determined according to the 45-year average (1931-1975) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days (base 65 degrees Fahrenheit). An individual building was assigned to a climate zone according to the 45-year average annual degree-days for its National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Division.. For projects outside the U.S., consult ASHRAE/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2010, Appendixes B and D, to determine the appropriate climate zone. 

    • Building Envelope, Opaque (2 points)

      Comply with the recommendations in the appropriate ASHRAE 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for all roofs, walls, floors, slabs, doors, vestibules, and continuous air barriers.
    • Building Envelope, Glazing (2 points)

      Comply with the recommendations in the appropriate ASHRAE 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for all vertical fenestration.
    • HVAC Equipment Efficiency (2 points)

      For all base building HVAC systems that serve the project, comply with the recommendations in the appropriate ASHRAE 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide.
    HVAC Systems (2 points)
    • HVAC Zoning and Controls (2 points)

      For the tenant fit-out of spaces, provide a separate control zone for each solar exposure and interior space. Provide controls capable of sensing space conditions and modulating the HVAC system in response to space demand for all private offices and other enclosed spaces (e.g., conference rooms, classrooms).

    Interior Lighting Power (1–4 points)

    • Lighting Power Density A measure of the total building floor area or dwelling units on a parcel of land relative to the buildable land of that parcel. Units for measuring density may differ according to credit requirements. Does not include structured parking.(1–4 points)
    • Reduce connected lighting power density below that allowed by ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2010, either using the space-by-space method or applying the whole-building lighting power allowance to the entire tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space.. Points are awarded according to Table 2.

    Table 2. Points for percentage reduction in lighting power density

    Percentage below standard LPDLighting power density (LPD) is the amount of electric lighting, usually measured in watts per square foot, being used to illuminate a given space. Points
    10% 1
    15% 2
    20% 3
    25% 4



    Interior Lighting Controls (1–2 points)

    • Daylighting Controls (1 point)
    • Install daylight-responsive controls in all regularly occupied daylit spaces within 15 feet (4.5 meters) of windows and under skylights for at least 25% of the connected lighting load. Daylight controls must switch or dim electric lights in response to daylight illumination in the space.

    • Occupancy Sensor Lighting Controls (1 point)
    • Install occupancy sensors for at least 75% of the connected lighting load.

    Equipment and Appliances (1–2 points)

    • ENERGY STAR Equipment and Appliances (1–2 points)
    • Install ENERGY STAR appliances, office equipment, electronics, and commercial food service equipment (HVAC, lighting, and building envelope products are excluded from this credit) or performance equivalent for projects outside the U.S.. Calculate their percentage of the total (by rated-power) ENERGY STAR–eligible products in the project. Points are awarded according to Table 3.

      Table 3. Points for installing ENERGY STAR equipment and appliances

      Percentage of ENERY STAR products Points
      70% 1
      90% 2



20 Comments

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emily reese Sustainability Consultant Jacobs
Mar 29 2017
LEEDuser Member
1608 Thumbs Up

Energy STAR appliances - what counts

Project Location: United States

Under v3, only new appliances/equipment being purchased for the project counted and had to be tracked for credit compliance. Is that still the case here? I cannot find specific language to it in the guide, addenda, or on here. In our project, we are assuming that much of our existing computer equipment would be brought with us.
Please advise. Thanks.

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Ashwini Arun Sustainability Manager, YR&G Mar 29 2017 LEEDuser Expert 214 Thumbs Up

Emily,
My assumption is that only new appliances and equipment need to be tracked in LEEDv4, similar to v2009. The language in the reference guide does not specifically call it out, but the "Changes from LEED 2009" section in the reference guide does not mention any changes to the requirements for Energy Star appliances. So I think the credit would apply only to new appliances.

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emily reese Sustainability Consultant, Jacobs Apr 13 2017 LEEDuser Member 1608 Thumbs Up

I got a response from LEEDCoach on this topic, and thought I'd share here for clarity:
The forms for these Prerequisite and Credit in LEED Online ask for equipment that was part of the scope of work and ask for a narrative to "Describe the ENERGY STAR eligible equipment installed in the project that was not included in the project scope of work, and confirm that this equipment was procured prior to the project."

Hope that helps. I'm also posting this in the related prereq forum where someone else asked this same question.

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Kalyan Nishtala
Mar 16 2017
LEEDuser Member
268 Thumbs Up

Energy Effiicency Measures

Project Location: United States

Under option one for compliance (energy simulation), which measures can credit be taken for? Ex: Envelope, HVAC, Lighting, Process Loads, DHWDomestic hot water (DHW) is water used for food preparation, cleaning and sanitation and personal hygiene, but not heating., etc.

Also, how can one establish if LEED CI is right for a given project compared to LEED NC if the scope of the project may overlap.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 17 2017 LEEDuser Expert 69427 Thumbs Up

The specific modeling protocol is spelled out in the Reference Guide. You can get credit for or penalized for the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). systems under this protocol. You can claim savings for all energy end uses.

Follow this link for rating system selection guidance - http://www.usgbc.org/articles/rating-system-selection-guidance

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Brian Salazar President, LEED AP, WELL AP Entegra Development & Investment, LLC
Mar 09 2017
LEEDuser Member
1284 Thumbs Up

EAc3 Menu Missing?

Hi! Where's the dropdown for EAc3 Advanced Energy Metering? Thanks!

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Judhajit Chakraborty Building Performance Specialist WSP Built Ecology
Feb 28 2017
LEEDuser Member
92 Thumbs Up

CI v4 Enhanced Energy Performance Sample Form

This is more of a statement, but I wanted to bring to attention the fact that the LEED CI v4 sample form on the usgbc website (below) for Optimize energy performance contains duplicates of the forms and calculators for the Minimum energy performance credit.

http://www.usgbc.org/sampleforms

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Casey Krieg Project Designer Manns Woodward Studios
Nov 29 2016
Guest
3 Thumbs Up

Equipment and Applicances

Project Location: United States

This question is in regards to the Optimize Energy Performance section, under the Prescriptive compliance method and more specifically the Equipment and Appliances credits.

My team and I are seeking clarification on some of the wording in the book which states "Calculate their percentage of the total (by rated-power) ENERGY STAR-eligible products in the project."

The first thing in question is the ENERGY STAR-eligible, which in this case we are referencing microwaves. Being that microwaves either cannot or have not received an energy star rating, would they even be considered eligible. And with that if they are not considered eligible, can they be excluded from the calculation regarding percentage of energy star products?

The second thing of interest is the rated-power verbiage. And we are merely just looking for more information on what exactly that means or what it is referring to. Any and all information is helpful and i thank you for your time.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 30 2016 LEEDuser Expert 69427 Thumbs Up

Both of these subjects have been covered in the LEED v2009 forums for this credit. You might find some more detail there.

Yes only Energy Star eligible appliances are counted. Anything else is excluded.

Rated powerRated power is the nameplate power on a piece of equipment. It represents the capacity of the unit and is the maximum that it will draw. is usually expressed in watts.

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Vicki Rybl Energy Engineer RDK Engineers
Nov 14 2016
Guest
44 Thumbs Up

HVAC Zoning & Controls

Project Location: United States

The base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). for my project is an odd shape and there are a few zones which touch two building walls (for example, a conference room has one window which faces west and three windows which face southwest). How does USGBC define 'exposure'? It would be a bit excessive to design two zones in this conference room. Would it be appropriate to have one zone for this space?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Nov 16 2016 LEEDuser Expert 69427 Thumbs Up

Yes one would probably work and I would pick the predominate one.

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Kerry Honsinger Reynolds Ash and Associates
Nov 10 2016
Guest
86 Thumbs Up

Exemplary Performance and Regional Priority

My reference guide states that this credit is eligible for exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. on the Quick Reference table on page 17. It is also eligible for Regional Priority credit. On the LEED online site, it seems I have achieved an extra credit point automatically, which I understand to be the Regional Priority Credit. Exemplary Performance is attained by meeting 32% savings. Can I attain both the Regional Priority Credit and the Exemplary Performance credits and get essentially 2 extra bonus points?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 15 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, you can earn EP and RP for the same credit.

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Eric White Sustainability Consultant Mission Green Buildings
Nov 02 2016
LEEDuser Member
7 Thumbs Up

Prescriptive Path - Interior Lighting Controls

Project Location: Canada

We are looking to comply with this credit using the Prescriptive Compliance Path. My question is regarding the Daylighting Controls portion of the Interior Lighting Controls credit.

The Reference Guide says "Install daylight-responsive controls in all regularly occupied daylit spaces within 15 feet (4.5 meters) of windows and under skylights for at least 25% of the connected lighting load. Daylight controls must switch or dim electric lights in response to daylight illumination in the space. "

Is this "25% of the connected lighting load"
a) 25% of the project's TOTAL connected lighting load, OR
b) 25% of the connected lighting load in all regularly occupied daylit spaces

Thanks!
Eric

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Michael Wahjudi ESD Consultant Kaer Pte Ltd
Apr 15 2015
Guest
250 Thumbs Up

Prescriptive compliance

Project Location: Singapore

Can a project eligible for points under Base BuildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). Systems - Building Envelope, Opaque and Building Envelope, Glazing if they can meet most of recommendations from 50% AEDG? Our base building able to meet at least 80% and 60% of the requirement respectively.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 16 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, I don't think so. The way these prescriptive requirements are set up, it's not meant to be a menu of choices—I think LEED wants you to meet all the requirements.

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Amy Van Dam Sustainable Design Coordinator Boulder Associates Architects
Mar 24 2015
Guest
485 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE 50% AEDG

Project Location: United States

Can a project pursue the prescriptive compliance path if there is not a ASHRAE 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide that is specifically applicable to the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). (i.e. it is greater than 100,000 SF, is not retail, is not a hospital and is not a school).

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 16 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Amy, no—unfortunately those paths are limited to the specific building types that apply.

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Ameet AA Feb 06 2017 LEEDuser Member 1685 Thumbs Up

My project has the same issue, i.e., the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). is a large office building.
However, the base building has received LEED precertification Gold, and it has also been awarded Green Mark Platinum (the highest in the local green building rating standard), can the project be exempted form filling ASHRAE 50% AEDG? Thanks.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Feb 07 2017 LEEDuser Expert 69427 Thumbs Up

I don't think that gives you any exemption to the requirements. You may not be eligible for the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). points but could look at the remaining points not based on the AEDG.

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