CI-v4 EAp2: Minimum energy performance

  • Early design and energy review is the key

    The intent of this credit is to reduce energy consumption by choosing high-efficiency buildings, fixtures, and equipment for your tenant fit out. Teams that are familiar with LEED 2009 should be aware that the referenced energy code has been updated to ASHRAE 90.1-2010 from 90.1-2007.

    The prescriptive compliance path is likelier the easier option for smaller, straightforward projects that have budget restrictions and are just focused on lighting and equipment upgrades. Ensure that any base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). infrastructure that serves the project space – including envelope, HVAC, power, and lighting – meets the prescriptive requirements of ASHRAE 90.1–2010. Reviewing compliance early in the design is highly recommended so that teams can work with the landlord if upgrades are needed.

    The energy modeling option offers more flexibility than the prescriptive path. Plus, projects are eligible to earn more points under the related energy credit if this option is pursued. Projects interested in continuously improving their energy performance and reviewing the effects of design decisions might consider energy modeling a good return on investment. Energy modeling is an effective strategy for projects that are considering a number of different and/or innovative energy conservation measures.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • There are now two prerequisite options: Option 1, Tenant-Level Energy Simulation, and Option 2, Prescriptive Compliance.
    • Base building HVAC systems and service water heating systems now contribute to this prerequisite.
    • USGBC requires Appendix G requirements to be followed for all project components and systems, including the building envelope, for the baseline case. Existing conditions, however, are excluded when calculating the baseline case.
    • Tenant-level and whole-building energy modeling now correspond more closely.
    • Under the revised LEED methodology for simulation modeling of projects with shared HVAC systems, a percentage of the shared HVAC systems is now allocated to the LEED project.
    • For Option 2, Prescriptive Compliance, the LEED 2009 requirements for the prerequisite were adapted and are now Option 2 in LEED v4.
    • Version 2010 of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 is the referenced standard. This has been updated from version 2007.

    FAQs 

    Does the base building information need to be included in the minimum energy performance calculator, or is it sufficient to just include the tenant space?

    You will need to model some of the whole building characteristics, which will vary depending on the project. Portions of the base building that serve the project space will need to be included in the table. Exactly what you model will depend on many factors. In many projects, only a portion of the HVAC system serves the tenant space. In such cases, a percentage of the shared system can be allocated to the project space. The methodology to allocate the systems is explained in the LEED Reference Guide.

    Are there any exceptions to the daylight control requirement of ASHRAE 90.1–2010?

    The only exceptions are a) for retail spaces, b) if the adjacent building is twice the height as the distance to the window, and c) if the sidelighting effective aperture is 0.10.

  • A high bar, but still achievable

    This prerequisite is a big one, not only because it’s required for all projects, but also because it feeds directly into EAc2: Optimize Energy Performance, where about a fifth of the total available points in LEED are at stake.

    From the beginning, teams should recognize that the baseline requirements are fairly stringent. Some measures that may have previously contributed to design-case efficiency are now being required just to meet this prerequisite.

    Key updates with ASHRAE 90.1

    ASHRAE 90.1-2010 has introduced a number of new requirements compared to the 2007 standard, including increased efficiencies requirements for envelope, HVAC equipment and lighting; enhanced interior lighting control requirements (occupancy sensors, light level reduction and daylight controls); new exterior lighting and parking garage lighting control requirements; and new automatic shut-off requirements for 50% of receptacles in offices and computer classrooms.

    With these changes, however, comes a helpful update to the prerequisite documentation that will make the review process go more smoothly for both project teams and GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). reviewers. An updated Energy Performance Calculator is required documentation for your LEED submittal.

    It performs a series of self-checks in the background to flag potential issues, allows the energy modeler to do a step-by-step quality assurance review, and maybe most importantly helps the reviewer to better understand the model, all of which should significantly reduce the quantity of back-and-forth comments and responses required between the modeler and GBCI reviewer. Read more about the calculator, including an overview of how to use it, here on LEEDuser.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • ASHRAE 90.1-2007 has been updated to ASHRAE 90.1-2010.
    • Process energy no longer has to make up 25% of the overall building energy for your baseline and proposed simulation models.
    • USGBC now requires you to achieve prerequisite compliance without accounting for the cost of generating renewable energy onsite.
    • For data centers, USGBC requires that building power and cooling infrastructure provides 2% of the required 5% energy cost reductions.
    • For Option 2, LEED now includes a prerequisite that the standard for compliance uses the 50% savings version of the AEDG instead of the 30% savings version of the AEDG. This represents an expected savings of 50% over ASHRAE 90.1–2004.
    • To achieve the prerequisites for Options 2 and 3, your project must follow ASHRAE 90.1–2010 mandatory and prescriptive requirements.

    FAQs

    Our proposed design has insulation R-values that are below those prescribed by ASHRAE 90.1-2010. Can we still meet the prerequisite?

    Yes, the R-value of the building envelope is not mandatory. You can install lower R-values. You are only required to meet the mandatory provisions and earn the minimum percent savings.

    Do the required savings for this prerequisite (and credit) need to come only from building energy, or also process loads?

    The energy savings are based on the whole building energy use—building and process. LEED does not stipulate exactly where they come from, but there is a greater burden of proof on the project team to demonstrate savings in process energy. As a default, process energy should be modeled the same in both baseline and design case.

    Our project doesn't have enough energy savings to earn the prerequisite. Can we get there by incorporating onsite renewables?

    No. The energy cost offset from onsite renewable energy sources can no longer be used to earn the prerequisite. Additionally, it is usually more cost-effective to invest in energy savings in the building.

     

  • EA Prerequisite 2: Minimum energy performance

    Intent

    To reduce the environmental and economic harms of excessive energy use by achieving a minimum level of energy efficiency for the building and its systems.

    Requirements

    Option 1. Tenant-level energy simulation

    Demonstrate a 3% improvement in the proposed performance rating compared with the baseline performance rating for portions of the building within the tenant’s scope of work. Calculate the baseline according to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2010, Appendix G, with errata (or a USGBC-approved equivalent standard for projects outside the U.S.), using a simulation model for all tenant project energy use.

    Projects must meet the minimum percentage savings before application of renewable energy systems.

    The proposed design must meet the following criteria:

    Exception: the baseline project envelope must be modeled according to Table G3.1(5) (baseline), Sections a–e, and not Section f.

    Document the energy modeling input assumptions for unregulated loads. Unregulated loads should be modeled accurately to reflect the actual expected energy consumption of the tenant project.

    If unregulated loads are not identical for both the baseline and the proposed performance ratings, and the simulation program cannot accurately model the savings, follow the exceptional calculation method (ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2010, G2.5). Alternatively, use the COMNET modeling guidelines and procedures to document measures that reduce unregulated loads.

    OR

    Option 2. Prescriptive compliance

    Comply with the mandatory and prescriptive provisions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2010, with errata (or a USGBC-approved equivalent standard for projects outside the U.S.).

    • Reduce connected lighting power density by 5% below ASHRAE 90.1-2010 using the space-by-space method or by applying the whole-building lighting power allowance to the entire tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space..
    • Install ENERGY STAR appliances, office equipment, electronics, and commercial food service equipment (HVAC, lighting, and building envelope products are excluded) for 50% (by rated-power) of the total ENERGY STAR eligible products in the project. Projects outside the U.S. may use a performance equivalent to ENERGY STAR.

    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    Canada ACP - NECB

    Projects in Canada may instead demonstrate a percentage improvement in the proposed building performance rating compared with the baseline according to the National Energy Code for Buildings (NECB) 2011. The same percentage cost improvement in energy performance is required to meet the Prerequisite, and the same points for cost percentage improvement in energy performance are applicable for the Credit.

    The following conditions (where applicable) must be met. Note that unless otherwise noted, CanQUEST (the Canadian energy modelling software based on eQUEST that performs NECB 2011 compliance runs) does not implement many of these conditions correctly and would require corresponding modifications to the Reference case.

    1. Comply with mandatory requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2010
    2. ASHRAE 90.1-2010 mandatory requirements must be met, in addition to the performance path limitations referenced in the NECB 2011 Sections 3.4.1.2, 5.4.1.2 and 6.4.1.2. In cases where ASHRAE and the NECBC reference requirements concerning the same item, the more stringent requirement shall be adhered to.

      The following exceptions apply:

    • ASHRAE 90.1-2010 mandatory items 6.4.3.9, 9.4.1.2b, 9.4.1.4, 9.4.1.5, 9.4.3

  • Apply fenestration area convention similar to ASHRAE 90.1-2010
  • Maintain the same FWR (as defined by NECB, including doors) for the Reference as exists in the Proposed Design, up to the prescribed maximum. If the Proposed Design’s FWR exceeds the prescribed FWR, scale down the fenestrations in the Reference case accordingly.

  • Apply skylight area convention similar to ASHRAE 90.1-2010
  • Maintain the same SRR for the Reference as exists in the Proposed Design, up to the prescribed 5% maximum. If the Proposed Design’s SRR exceeds 5%, scale down the skylights in the Reference case accordingly.

  • Model proposed and reference outside air similar to ASHRAE 90.1-2010
  • Proposed and reference (baseline) outside air rates shall be modeled as per ASHRAE 90.1 – 2010 (G3.1.2.6).

  • Apply ASHRAE kitchen exhaust demand ventilation requirements
  • Provide for the same demand ventilation requirements as described in ASHRAE Appendix G3.1.1.d.

  • Apply ASHRAE’s chiller heat recovery requirements
  • Provide for the same chiller heat recovery requirements as applies to ASHRAE.

  • Apply supply air temperature reset controlled based on warmest zone
  • Reset the minimum supply air temperature to satisfy the cooling requirements of the warmest zone, as stipulated in NECB Section 5.2.8.8. Note that this control setting is already corrected in CanQUEST for the Reference case.

  • Account for uninsulated structural penetrations if they exceed 2% of net wall area
  • The 2% allowance may be applied, but based on the net opaque wall area, not the entire building envelope area.

  • Follow ASHRAE/LEED rules for renovations to existing buildings
  • Model existing components consistent with ASHRAE and LEED provisions.

  • Account for all anticipated energy use in building
  • Fully account for all energy end-uses in the energy performance modelling.

  • DES Systems are to be modeled according to Option 1, Path 1 or Option 1, Path 2 as indicated in the LEED v4 Reference Guide
  • The following exceptions apply:

    • Option 1, Path 1 - Do not apply ASHRAE 90.1-2010 requirements for purchased heating and cooling. Under this ACP, purchased heating and cooling (as applicable) are modeled as cost-neutral in the baseline and proposed case. Local rates for purchased heating (fossil fuel based) and cooling are used to establish the purchased heating and cooling costs. The energy model's scope accounts for only downstream equipmentThe heating and cooling systems, equipment, and controls located in the project building or on the project site and associated with transporting the thermal energy of the district energy system (DES) into heated and cooled spaces. Downstream equipment includes the thermal connection or interface with the DES, secondary distribution systems in the building, and terminal units. Drift water droplets carried from a cooling tower or evaporative condenser by a stream of air passing through the system. Drift eliminators capture these droplets and return them to the reservoir at the bottom of the cooling tower or evaporative condenser for recirculation., plus purchased heating and cooling. NECB clause 8.4.3.6 does not apply for LEED projects.
    • Model baseline systems in accordance with NECB requirements, with DX coils replaced with chilled water coils if purchased cooling is present and fossil-fired furnaces replaced with hot water coils if purchased heating is present.
    • Option 1, Path 2: Do not apply ASHRAE 90.1-2010 requirements for baseline systems. Model baseline systems in accordance with NECB requirements for onsite generated equipment (i.e. assume building is not connected to a DES and the proposed building is modeled with a virtual plant according to LEED v4 Reference Guide requirements).

31 Comments

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Gustav Alfaro Mechanical Engineer
Jun 21 2017
Guest
301 Thumbs Up

Overhangs and light transmittance vrs daylighting

Hi everyone,

This office tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. is located in a building with large overhangs and the visible transmittance through the windows is poor, we ran daylight simulations and it seems that the lighting levels over the work space will be lower than the Owner requirements, so always will need to have the lighting fixtures on. The question is, are we able to avoid the installation of daylighting sensorsA lighting feature that takes advantage of sunlight to cut the amount of electric lighting used in a building by varying output of the lighting system in response to variations in available daylight. They are sometimes referred to as "natural lighting control sensors " or "photocells."   by demonstrating that there is no possibility for them to dim or turn on/off the lighting fixtures?

Thanks in advance for the response.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 22 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70003 Thumbs Up

That does not appear to be one of the acceptable exceptions.

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Gabriela Mena Master in Science IACSA
Jun 19 2017
Guest
3 Thumbs Up

Automatic Receptacle Control

Project Location: Mexico

Hi,

We have a CI project in Mexico City, for the receptacle control we are specifying 50%of private and open offices with a timer. However we want to know if it is accepted if we also incorporate occupancy sensors that only work in non-normal business hours to give the occupants the chance to use their computers in case they need to stay longer.
This strategy is saving energy because only the receptacles needed will be used.
Can we do that?

Thanks in advance

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 20 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70003 Thumbs Up

I think what you propose would comply.

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Todd Tewksbury Mechanical Engineer Bala Consulting Engineers, Inc
Jun 16 2017
Guest
14 Thumbs Up

Definition of "modification"

Project Location: United States

This question is regarding the Energy and Atmosphere prerequisite Minimum Energy Performance and associated credit Optimize Energy Performance under the LEED v4 Interior Design and Construction rating system, specifically as it applies to Commercial Interiors projects.

Option 2: Prescriptive Compliance offers tenant improvement projects a certification path based on compliance with all mandatory and prescriptive requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2010, along with connected lighting load reductions and the use of ENERGYSTAR equipment. In the case that an element of the design does not strictly meet the mandatory and prescriptive requirements of 90.1-2010, the project must utilize Option 1: Tenant Level Energy Simulation to demonstrate overall compliance by achieving at least 3% improvement in energy performance compared to the ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Appendix G baseline.

The LEED v4 Reference Guide for Interior Design and Construction indicates that “Areas and systems that are not part of the tenant scope of work are exempt (from meeting the above requirements). However, modifications to base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). systems that serve the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. must comply with the ASHRAE 90.1-2010 prescriptive requirements if they are completed by or on behalf of the tenant.”

Can anyone clarify what constitutes a “modification” to areas and systems outside the tenant scope of work.
What precisely constitutes a modification to base building systems that serve the tenant space?
When modifications are made by or on behalf of the tenant, is only the modified component(s) subject to the requirements of 90.1-2010, or the whole system?

For example, in a building with an existing envelope system with a window to wall ratio in excess of 40%, or component U-values or solar heat gain coefficients not in compliance with Table 5.5, would the addition or relocation of a door or window, or installation of interior shading devices constitute a modification to the envelope system that requires the project to utilize Option 1 and energy modeling to show overall compliance?

As a second example, if a tenant is installing new variable air volume boxes, chilled beams, fan coil units, heat pumps, or other terminal air devices served with primary or outdoor air from by a base building air handling unit, does rebalancing or adjusting the operating parameters of this air handling unit constitute a modification which requires the existing unit to meet the prescriptive requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2010, or the use of Option 1 and energy modeling to demonstrate overall compliance?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jun 20 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70003 Thumbs Up

A modification would be a physical change to a system or its components that is regulated by 90.1. The precise modifcation may vary depending on the system. for example, suppose the gpm flow rate of the system was not adequate and a new pump was installed.

In alignment with the way the standard is applied in general only the component changed is subject to 90.1 compliance.

Replacement or relocation of one door or window could require compliance for that one door or window but that would not apply to all doors and windows. Shading devices would not trigger Option 1.

Rebalancing or adjusting airflows would not be a modification that requires prescriptive compliance or the use of Option 1.

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager Atkins North America
Mar 09 2017
LEEDuser Member
895 Thumbs Up

ENERGY STAR - only newly purchased eligible products?

Project Location: United States

Not seeing this qualified in the Reference Guide, but hoping someone can verify this is still the same as in 2009 CI....the pre-req compliance (and elective credit points under Optimize Energy) is based only upon equipment/appliances purchased as part of the project, correct? Existing in place, or existing items relocated from another location are excluded from this evaluation, correct?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 15 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70003 Thumbs Up

I think this is still the case. If you look at changes 2009 to v4 in the Reference Guide it says:

Option 2. Prescriptive Compliance.

The requirements of the 2009 prerequisite were adapted to become Option 2 in LEED v4.

That tells me that this aspect of the compliance did not change or it would be listed.

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Joanna Switzer Sustainability Project Manager, Atkins North America Mar 27 2017 LEEDuser Member 895 Thumbs Up

Belated thanks Marcus!

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emily reese Sustainability Consultant, Jacobs Apr 13 2017 LEEDuser Member 1722 Thumbs Up

I posted this same question, though under the credit rather than the prereq.
I got a response from LEEDCoach on this topic, and thought I'd share here for clarity:
The forms for these Prerequisite and Credit in LEED Online ask for equipment that was part of the scope of work and ask for a narrative to "Describe the ENERGY STAR eligible equipment installed in the project that was not included in the project scope of work, and confirm that this equipment was procured prior to the project."

Hope that helps. I'm posting this in the credit forum under my question, too.

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Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores
Jan 30 2017
LEEDuser Member
1623 Thumbs Up

Existing building - applicable requirements

I'm working in a project of an existing building refurbishment that will pursue LEED certification CI. However, since part of the HVAC equipments will be maintained (namely AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork.'s for ventilation and fan-coils for temperature control), I'm not sure if some of the requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2010 are applicable, namely the ones associated with control capacity (section 6.4.3 - zone thermostatic controls, dead band, off-hour controls, automatic shutdown,etc.).

Can you please help?

Regards,

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 15 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70003 Thumbs Up

I think you still only have to meet the mandatory provisions for the systems within the project's scope of work.

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Richard Mathews Mechanical Engineer
Oct 11 2016
Guest
106 Thumbs Up

Existing HVAC system efficiency

Project Location: United States

Let's say I'm doing a tenant job in an existing office building, and the tenant is served by an existing rooftop AC unit. I know that I've got to model the actual performance of that rooftop unit (along with the lights and other properties of the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. as it'll be built out), and get the required amount of energy savings (3% minimum, more to get points).

But I'm confused by the language in the "Bird's Eye View" above, where it says, "Ensure that any base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). infrastructure that serves the project space – including envelope, HVAC, power, and lighting – meets the prescriptive requirements of ASHRAE 90.1–2010". If the existing rooftop AC unit has EER=10.5, and the min efficiency required by ASHRAE 90.1-2010 for a new unit of that size would be EER=11.0, does that mean that the client would have to replace that piece of equipment, or abandon LEED certification? My thinking is that, as long as the tenant-level energy simulation shows the required savings after accounting for the less than terrific performance of the existing equipment, the existing equipment can stay.

In fact, the language above also indicates that building envelope would have to meet Prescriptive requirements. So if the wall insulation doesn't meet those requirements, even though I'm getting the required energy savings - would the owner need to open it up and add insulation?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Jan 18 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70003 Thumbs Up

I can't speak to what is written above. It is my understanding that you do not have to replace the roof top unit nor add insulation.

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Jorge López de Obeso Architect / Environmental adviser EA Energia y Arquitectura
Sep 07 2016
LEEDuser Member
1109 Thumbs Up

Lighting steps vs on/off

Hello everyone,

I am currently working on a LEED for CI v4 project. It consists on a small office space (1100 sf ) that is located within a high efficiency building, pursuing the LEED for CS v3 certification.

The base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). has already provided the lighting fixtures for the project. These are T5 fluorescent with a standard consumption of 14 W each, not dimmable.

The office is well illuminated with natural lighting, therefore its requirement for electrical lighting is almost none, so my question here is, is it necessary for my client to buy either dimmable ballasts or LED fixtures that allow the required 0, 30-70%, 100% steps? or can we document compliance by stating that the project barely uses electricity to fullfill the necessity for lighting?

It does not make much sense to my client to replace all the existing luminaries just to change the fact that they do not have the middle step between 30 and 70%, especially since the project is already achieving a 40% lighting use reduction and because of their little necessity for electrical aided lighting.

Can someone help me, please?

Thanks!

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 15 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70003 Thumbs Up

I think you are only required to meet the requirements if the system is within the project's scope of work. Since the lighting is already installed it is not within the project's scope of work and should not have to comply.

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Jorge López de Obeso Architect / Environmental adviser, EA Energia y Arquitectura Jun 19 2017 LEEDuser Member 1109 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Marcus.

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Kristopher Baker Syska Hennessy
Aug 23 2016
LEEDuser Member
23 Thumbs Up

Does base building performance now impact CI performance?

It appears that there is a fairly major shift in the relationship between the tenant spaces within the project scope and the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings).. In the past, all energy modeling for EA Credit 1.3 explicitly kept performance parameters of the base building and spaces outside the scope of the project identical to be sure they were energy neutral as it related to the CI submission. Now, the new energy modeling guidelines that are part of both the prerequisite and Credit 2 appear to penalize the CI submission for a poor base building and benefit the CI submission for a high performing base building.

For the record, i am interested in other's opinion's, as well as more conclusive responses from Tristan or others.

Can you please confirm the following:
1. In general are my conclusions above correct?
2. We should expect a differential between all chillers, boilers, base building AHUs, etc. since the baseline will be based on ASHRAE (not existing) and the Proposed will be based on reality.
3. We should expect a differential between building envelopes since baseline performance stems from ASHRAE and Proposed will be based on reality.
4. Lighting that is not in the scope of the project, should be modeled identically (energy neutral). This is different than the treatment of HVAC and Building Envelope.
5. There appears to be no change in the determination of the "Segment" with v4. The segment should be the smallest portion of the building served by the air-side HVAC system that serves our project. All water-side systems can be prorated.

Cheers, KB

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 15 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70003 Thumbs Up

Overall you are correct. This is outlined in the changes from 2009 to v4 in the Reference Guide. Your conclusions sound right to me but I have not researched each one.

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Matthew Setzekorn Principal, Emerald Built Environments May 25 2017 Guest

I downloaded the summary changes and there was no reference to the exception pertaining to the existing building envelope. The language online states "Exception: the baseline project envelope must be modeled according to Table G3.1(5) (baseline), Sections a–e, and not Section f." Section f being the part that allows the existing envelope to be used as is. I find the choice of the word "exception" to be confusing, if it in fact means the existing conditions can not be used.

We are looking for a more clear explanation of the intent if the "exception".

Any feedback would be appreciated.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group May 26 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70003 Thumbs Up

I think the "exception" is LEED as the adopting authority is creating an exception to the application of Appendix G. It is excluding the use of the existing envelop in the baseline. I would guess that the rationale for this is that your project should not be rewarded with additional savings for choosing to be located in a building with insulation levels below that required by 90.1.

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Gabriela Crespo CxA, LEED AP BD+C, O+M Revitaliza Consultores
Jul 18 2016
Guest
392 Thumbs Up

Daylight controls

Project Location: Mexico

Dear all,

We are working on a project to be certified CI v4. The use is a software development office, the building is 100% glazing in a very hot climate. The owner will be installing blinds due to the glare factor and visual comfort for employees. The blinds are to be down during occupancy hours, especially in the south facade. Is there any way that we could be exempt from the daylight control requirements? It seems that the investment in the daylight control would not be fruitful in this situation.

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jorge torres coto Building Systems Commissioning Engineer, Empirical Engineering, LLC Jul 18 2016 LEEDuser Member 654 Thumbs Up

Gabriela

I am assuming the blinds are not "black out" type. They are probably for glare control, as such, they are probably translucent. Again, these are assumptions. Though ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Mandatory Requirements are for Daylighting Controls according to the "PRIMARY SIDE LIT AREA" definitions and Figure 3.3.
The only exceptions are: if the adjacent building is twice as high as the distance to the windows (i.e. a tall building next to your project, on that facade only); if your effective aperture is less than 0.10; Retail spaces
Check the assumptions I made, but even black out drapes are not included in the exemptions, unfortunately your project may have inherited a bad envelope design from the Base BuildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings)..

Thanks

Jorge

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Gabriela Crespo CxA, LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Revitaliza Consultores Jul 18 2016 Guest 392 Thumbs Up

Thank you Jorge! The blinds are not black out, they only let 1% of light through, as farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). as we know from the owner. I've looked at the reference you mention, and it seems there is no way around the requirement for this case.
Thanks for your help!

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS. INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ
Feb 17 2016
LEEDuser Member
1284 Thumbs Up

Tenant Space Energy Modeling

Project Location: Argentina

To comply with EA_p2 we are goint to develo the energy simulation of the Tenant SpaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. Scope of Work.
My questions are:
1. Do we have to include the whole building characteristics in the Mínimum Energy Performance Calculator that replaces the TAble 1.4, or is it enough to include the Tenant Space Scope of work?.
2. If it is so, for the Baseline model, would it be right to assign the HVAC System correspondint to that space, which would be a exception and not the Primary HVAC system of the building?,
thank you!

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Gabriela Crespo CxA, LEED AP BD+C, O+M Revitaliza Consultores
Oct 30 2015
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Space control requirement sales area

There is a mandatory requirement to instal a space control that will have at least one control step (between 30 and 70%) for each space. Given that this is a retail project, that is not exposed to any natural light, we feel that it is an unnecessary requirement.
The project is already separating the perimeter circuits for accent lighting, as well as general lighting, so that if any maintenance, cleaning or re-arranging activities were to happen, not all lights would be on.
Is there anyway that there could be an exception for this requirement due to the use of the space?
Thank you!

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jorge torres coto Building Systems Commissioning Engineer, Empirical Engineering, LLC Jul 18 2016 LEEDuser Member 654 Thumbs Up

Top lit daylight zones on your project are only required if you have skylights. If your project does not have skylights the you do not require the TOPLIGHTING controls.

If your project has skylights you have triggered "TOPLIGHTING REQUIREMENTS", this is mandatory.

For retail projects you do not have mandatory requirements for SIDE LIGHTING

Thanks

Jorge

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Annie Argento Principal Argento/Graham
Mar 10 2015
LEEDuser Member
21 Thumbs Up

Modeling Office Space in an Existing High Rise Building

Project Location: United States

We're using eQuest to model a tenant improvement office space, which is about half of one story in a 28 story high rise office building in LA. We're
using ASHRAE 90.1-2010 modeling protocol (LEED v4 commercial interiors
project, ID+C).
Our basic strategy is:
1. Model the entire high rise building using floor multipliers and include
base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). plant equipment (building chilled water service and per-floor
air handlers).
2. Apportion the project space energy use from the total by area, per the
LEED reference guide. For this we will exclude the top and bottom story
energy use, presumably by putting a meter on each floor and subtracting
them from total before the apportioning calculations.

My question is: Can we take credit (model proposed different than baseline)
for efficiency measures of the base building (efficient chilled water
service, efficient air handlers, high performance envelope, etc)?

Also, please let me know if our strategy is way off base. It seems more
complicated than it needs to be, so I'm looking for a sanity check before we
dig in to a high rise to get our little T.I. certified.

Is there a guidance document or precedent for this strategy anywhere? I've
conducted a somewhat thorough search, but maybe I missed something.

Any insight or guidance would be appreciated.

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Kristopher Baker Syska Hennessy Aug 23 2016 LEEDuser Member 23 Thumbs Up

Hello Annie, Did you ever get any clarification on this? I noticed there are no responses here...

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Mar 15 2017 LEEDuser Expert 70003 Thumbs Up

The modeling procedure is spelled out in the Reference Guide.

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Erik Camacho Mechanical EIT, LEED AP BD+C TLC Engineering for Architecture
May 20 2014
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Automatic Receptacle Control

EAp2 has an mandatory ASHRAE requirement (90.1-2010, Section 8.4.2 Automatic Receptacle Control) requiring at least half of all private offices, open offices, and computer classrooms to be controlled by an automatic control device. This can be accomplished one of three ways:

1. Time of day schedule that turns receptacles on/off at specified times.
2. Occupant sensors that turn receptacles off after 30 mins of inactivity.
3. Signal from another control/alarm system that indicates when an area is unoccupied.

Unfortunately, this control requirement was overlooked during the design process. Is there a way to satisfy this requirement after the fact? (We suggested motion-sensor power strips that automatically turn off after 30 mins of inactivity. However, USGBC said that the control system needs to be part of the bldg.)

Any suggestions??

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Jun 23 2017
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