CI-v4 IPc1: Integrative process

  • It’s all about the process

    Any project can earn this credit, and it’s readily achievable for teams that take an integrated approach from the project onset. The credit requires early analysis of energy and water systems in order to identify synergies within the project design that can optimize energy and water performance. 

    To earn this credit, teams must create a “simple box” energy model and perform a preliminary water budget analysis. The LEED Reference Guide provides additional detail on the potential strategies that must be assessed in these analyses. Teams must then demonstrate how the preliminary analyses were used to optimize the design of the building’s energy- and water-related systems.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • This is a new credit, except for within LEED for Healthcare.

    FAQs

    This is the only credit in the IP credit category. Do all teams have to pursue it?

    This is an optional credit (not a prerequisite) and is therefore not required.

    Do we have to adopt all strategies that improve energy or water performance based on the analysis?

    You are not required to implement any strategies that you examine. However, it’s wise to take the opportunity to holistically examine your design decisions to ensure they are optimized to produce a high-performing building.

  • IP Credit 1: Integrative process

    Intent

    To support high-performance, cost-effective project outcomes through an early analysis of the interrelationships among systems.

    Requirements

    Site Selection and Energy-Related Systems (1 point)

    Starting in predesign and continuing throughout the design phases, identify and use opportunities to achieve synergies across disciplines and building systems. Use the analyses described below to inform the owner’s project requirements (OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project.), basis of designThe information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. (BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines.), design documents, and construction documents. Conduct analyses in site selection and energy-related systems (1 point).

    Site Selection

    Before site selection, analyze project goals to identify and select the building site that will provide the most opportunities and fewest barriers for the tenant improvement project. Assess at least two potential locations or base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). options, taking into consideration at least the following:

    • Building site attributes. Assess the base building’s location and site design characteristics.
    • Transportation. Assess the tenant occupants’ transportation needs for commuting to and from the site, including convenient access to alternative transportation that meets occupants’ needs.
    • Building features. Assess the base building’s envelope, mechanical and electrical systems that will affect tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. (e.g., controls, HVAC, plumbing fixtures, renewable energy supply), adaptability to future needs, and resilience in the event of disaster or infrastructure failure.
    • Occupants’ well-being. Assess the base building’s ability to provide daylight and views, indoor air quality, and other indoor environmental quality characteristics.
    Implementation:

    Document how the above analysis informed selection of a building site for the project’s tenant improvement and informed the OPROwner's project requirements: a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. and BODBasis of design: the information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. and site selection for the interior design project, including the following, as applicable:

    • suitability of the base building for meeting project goals relative to the building’s site attributes;
    • suitability of the base building site location for meeting daily occupants’ commuting needs;
    • suitability of the base building’s mechanical and electrical systems for meeting project goals;
    • capability of the tenant space for meeting the project’s goals related to indoor environmental quality and occupants’ well-being; and
    • other systems.

    Commit to the establishment and use of ongoing feedback mechanisms that provide information about tenant space performance and occupants’ satisfaction. Provide documentation of methods planned to gather feedback on occupants’ satisfaction.

    Energy-Related Systems
    Discovery:

    Perform a preliminary energy analysis before the completion of schematic design that explores how to reduce energy loads for the interior design project and accomplish related sustainability goals by questioning default assumptions and testing options. Assess at least two potential options associated with each of the following in terms of project and human performance:

    • Basic envelope attributes. Insulation values, window-to-wall ratios, glazing characteristics, shading, window operability.
    • Programmatic and operational parameters. Multifunctioning spaces, operating schedules, space allotment per person, teleworking, reducing building area, ongoing operations and maintenance issues.
    • Lighting levels. Interior surface reflectance values and lighting levels in occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space..
    • Thermal comfort ranges. Assess thermal comfort range options.
    • Plug and process load needs. Reducing plug and process loads through programmatic solutions such as equipment and purchasing policies or layout options.

    Document how the above analysis informed interior design decisions in the project’s OPR and BOC and the interior design of the project, including the following, as applicable:

    • building envelope and façade conditions;
    • elimination and/or significant downsizing of building systems (e.g., HVAC, lighting, controls, exterior materials, interior finishes, functional program elements);
    • methods planned to gather feedback on energy performance and occupants’ satisfaction during operations.; and
    • other systems.
    • Project teams may also choose Option 1 for an additional point..

      Option 1. Water-Related Systems (1 point)

      Perform a preliminary water budget analysis before the completion of schematic design that explores how to reduce potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. loads and accomplish related sustainability goals. Assess and estimate the project’s potential nonpotable waterNonpotable water: does not meet EPA's drinking water quality standards and is not approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction. Water that is unsafe or unpalatable to drink because it contains pollutants, contaminants, minerals, or infective agents. supply sources and water demand volumes, including the following:

      • Fixture and fitting water demand. Assess flow and flush fixture demand volumes, calculated in accordance with WE Prerequisite Indoor Water Use Reduction.
      • Process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. demand. Assess kitchen, laundry, cooling tower, and other equipment demand volumes, as applicable.
      • Supply sources. Assess all potential nonpotable water supply source volumes, such as on-site rainwater and graywaterUntreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washers and laundry tubs. It must not include waste water from kitchen sinks or dishwashers (Uniform Plumbing Code, Appendix G, Gray Water Systems for Single-Family Dwellings); waste water discharged from lavatories, bathtubs, showers, clothes washers and laundry sinks (International Plumbing Code, Appendix C, Gray Water Recycling Systems). Some states and local authorities allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Other differences can likely be found in state and local codes. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area., municipally supplied nonpotable water, and HVAC equipment condensate.

      Document how the above analysis informed interior design decisions in the OPR and BOD. Demonstrate how at least one on-site nonpotable water supply source was analyzed to reduce the burden on municipal supply and/or wastewater treatment systems by contributing to the water demand components listed above. Demonstrate how the analysis informed the interior design and systems affected by the project, as applicable, for the following:

      • plumbing systems;
      • sewage conveyance and/or on-site treatment systems;
      • process water systems;
      • methods planned to gather feedback on the performance and efficiency of water-related systems during operations; and
      • other systems.

Publications

The Integrative Design Guide to Green Building: Redefining the Practice of Sustainability

The following review of this book appeared on BuildingGreen in an article written by Nadav Malin:

Seeking to "redesign the design process," as they put it, the authors of this remarkable book share their unquenchable spirit of inquiry. At the core of the book is an expanded and updated presentation of their method of integrative design--"integrative" because the integration is ongoing, never completed as would be implied by the more common term "integrated designAn integrated design process (also called "integrative" design by some proponents) relies on a multidisciplinary and collaborative team approach in which members make decisions together based on a shared vision and holistic understanding of the project. Rather than a conventional linear design process in which a design is passed from one professional to another, an integrated process has all key team members talking together through out the design and construction process as they share ideas and use feedback across disciplines to iteratively move toward a high-performing design.."

In that sense, this book is like a reference guide to the "Whole Systems Integrated Process Guide (WSIP) 2007 for Sustainable Buildings & Communities," an ANSI/MTS standard. But wrapped around that step-by-step, nuts-and-bolts guidance are the big ideas that inform this integrative process. Understanding that buildings, their components, and their context are nested whole systems, the way to solve interconnected problems without creating new ones is to "solve for pattern." This is done by discovering the story of each place, and designing not merely to restore ecological functions but to facilitate the ongoing evolution of a place to higher and better functioning.

Ultimately, the focus of resources, energy, and attention that comes about when designing and building or renovating a facility becomes an opportunity to transform both the place and the participants, helping both initiate a continuing evolution. If this all sounds like pie-in-the-sky idealism, read a few of the many real-world stories to see the potential.


The Integrated Design Process; History and Analysis

This paper provides a partial history and some analysis of the characteristics of IDP.


The Social Network of Integrative Design

This paper seeks to analyze current integrative design process, offer a sharp, new understanding of team integration, and provide clear steps to optimize facilitation of project teams. It also uses social network science to define optimal team structure, why it is critical to the success of IPD, and how to create it.

Technical Guides

Improving Green Building Construction in North America: Guide to Integrated Design and Delivery

This guide, which draws on the 2013 report by the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC), Improving Conditions for Green Building Construction in North America: Enhancing Capabilities of the Green Workforce, outlines five main steps for success in implementing an integrated designAn integrated design process (also called "integrative" design by some proponents) relies on a multidisciplinary and collaborative team approach in which members make decisions together based on a shared vision and holistic understanding of the project. Rather than a conventional linear design process in which a design is passed from one professional to another, an integrated process has all key team members talking together through out the design and construction process as they share ideas and use feedback across disciplines to iteratively move toward a high-performing design. and delivery process. Based on current industry approaches, it highlights best practices and tools for 10 workforce sectors, and is supported by seven case studies and more than 50 reference documents. It is intended to introduce building practitioners to tested methods for incorporating deeper levels of integrated design and delivery into their construction projects. 

Prepared by Nadav Malin, Peter Yost, and Candace Pearson of BuildingGreen, Inc.

Understanding Integrative Design in LEED v4

This guide from John Boecker of 7group, who was closely involved in developing the Integrative Process credit in LEED v4, is a useful guide to introduce project teams to key Integrative Process resources and the requirements to earn the credit.

15 Comments

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Gabriela Mena Master in Science IACSA
Apr 19 2017
Guest

LEED CI v4 in a CS V2009

Project Location: Mexico

Hi,

We are designing a Commercial Interior v4 Space in a building that is already certified under CS v2009 with a Platinum level. We would like to know if there are any automatically earned points by doing this as it was in the v3 certification process.

Thanks in advance

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emily reese Sustainability Consultant Jacobs
Mar 21 2017
LEEDuser Member
1609 Thumbs Up

Not eligible if no non-potable water?

Project Location: United States

It appears that a project may not be eligible for the 1 point associated with the Water Related System if their building(s) do not offer non-potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. sources. Is this correct? Regardless of our end site selection, we would be one tenant in a large, multi-tenant building, and cannot integrate non-potable water use into the existing systems.
Thoughts?

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Kerry Honsinger Reynolds Ash and Associates
Nov 14 2016
Guest
86 Thumbs Up

I believe their is a typo in the reference guide

I believe there is a typo in the ID+C reference guide...My understanding of this credit is that it in no way requires specific site, energy or water improvements, it is just that the possibilities of selection and efficiencies must be analyzed, correct?

In the reference guide it reads, “Demonstrate how at least one on-site non-potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. supply source was *used* to reduce the burden…..”

In the credit library it states “Demonstrate how at least one on-site non-potable water supply source was *analyzed* to reduce the burden…”

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 15 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, there are often typos in the printed/PDF reference guide that are corrected via addenda and in the online version. I didn't check but that's probably the case here.

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Dana Piper Architect Allbee Romein
Apr 10 2015
Guest
10 Thumbs Up

partial credit?

Project Location: United States

If the tenant is remodeling existing space or the move location is predetermined, is it possible to get 1 of 2 points if we start in pre-design and look at energy and plumbing systems?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 15 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Dana, the credit is divided up into two options so you could get partial credit in that sense, but it would have to line up with how the options are defined in LEED.

That said, I don't understand how this credit is presented in LEED-CI. There is really no change in the credit requirements from LEED-NC, even though the scope of work is totally different. I've asked USGBC about this, but have not yet heard a response (after quite a while). I'll bug them again.

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Jonathan Weiss Feb 22 2017 LEEDuser Member 2621 Thumbs Up

Just a note that I got a message back from "LEEDCoach" that indicated that a project (such as mine) in an existing space to be reused cannot get either point under this credit under CI:

"...Projects that are renovating an existing space are not eligible for achieving this credit unless additional spaces were also considered and analyzed.

The Site Selection portion of this credit indicates that the analysis "to identify and select the building site" must be completed "before site selection".

Additionally, the Water-Related Systems portion of the credit may only be achieved if the Site Selection and Energy-Related Systems portion of the credit is earned. Water-Related Systems is marked as Option 1, only because "project teams may also choose Option 1 for an additional point"."

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Feb 24 2017 LEEDuser Member 9056 Thumbs Up

Hi all,
So I'm confused. LEEDuser's preamble above indicates any project can get this credit, and you're not required to implement anything just analyze. My current CI project is a second phase TI in a build to suit core and shell building. So though the building and site were extensively analyzed for the CS project, they are basically predetermined for my specific current TI.

My project and its client meet the intent of integrated process more than any of the 80 LEED certifications I've helped to secure in the past. They are committed to LEED Gold as a standard for all their projects and put incredible amounts of project team time, effort and money into integrating sustainability into their projects.

But I'm starting to get the impression that because this project didn't select their site as part of the schematic design process, we may not achieve this credit? I'm ignoring the issue of demonstrating non-potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. source use (though that is also an issue for most projects that I'm confused by) because this project can actually do so by virtue of the CS building attributes.

My decade of experience with LEED projects is that LEED certification is contemplated after a site is selected. We have never been involved with a project that sought their site based in any part on sustainable issues.

So can this credit really be earned by the vast majority of projects if site selection itself is part of the criteria? Does this disconnect with the reality of development not disincentivize the whole integrated process that has been a focal point of desire for the LEED rating systems since their inception?

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David Posada Integrated Design & LEED Specialist, SERA Architects Feb 24 2017 Guest 21472 Thumbs Up

Yes, Michelle - that sounds crazy - and I agree this has the potential to exclude a large portion of CI projects that are devoting significant time and effort to practicing integrated designAn integrated design process (also called "integrative" design by some proponents) relies on a multidisciplinary and collaborative team approach in which members make decisions together based on a shared vision and holistic understanding of the project. Rather than a conventional linear design process in which a design is passed from one professional to another, an integrated process has all key team members talking together through out the design and construction process as they share ideas and use feedback across disciplines to iteratively move toward a high-performing design. in every other respect.
The site selection parts of the Integrated Process Worksheet that are being required for CI are more appropriate for a client that is planning an office move and has the opportunity to evaluate different sites for their sustainability criteria. The very nature of many Commercial Interiors projects is helping companies to adjust their footprint as they inevitably expand and contract or shift over time. That's the basis of a multi-tenant office building.
Saying a project like Jonathan's is not eligible to pursue this credit would send the message that Integrative Design is only possible (or worth awarding) if you have control over the project scope that is beyond a range of many CI projects. There are 18 points in the LL section that can be awarded or *not* awarded if a project doesn't have control of the site selection, so I think we are covering that base.
Part of an exemplary Integrative Design process is one that defines the goals, scope, and boundary conditions that are appropriate for the project. This is still a relatively new credit, and prompts discussions from the project team that are not often asked. Out of all the credits, most don't involve as many different disciplines or address as many areas of performance as this credit does. Excluding CI projects in an existing space from pursuing this credit doesn't makes it more rigorous, or raise the bar for performance. I think we may inadvertently discourage such projects from pursuing a more integrative process if we say this credit is not relevant to them. We don't require LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. projects to consider and analyze the pros and cons of new construction, so let's not ask for an analysis that isn't called for in many circumstances.
I think it's worth requesting a closer look at this by reviewers, technical customer service or the TAGLEED Technical Advisory Group (TAG): Subcommittees that consist of industry experts who assist in developing credit interpretations and technical improvements to the LEED system..

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Jonathan Weiss Feb 27 2017 LEEDuser Member 2621 Thumbs Up

For the record - I could not agree more with both Michelle and David - I was just reporting back what I had been told. It is extremely frustrating to me as well. Hopefully we can get someone within USGBC to revisit this issue.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 27 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Speaking for LEEDuser, we would love to see more clear and inclusive guidance from USGBC and GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). on this. Our guidance above is not yet "tuned" to CI projects. As we get the landscape, along with you guys, we are updating it.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 06 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

I heard from GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). that they are reviewing this issue. I hope they'll update us here, or if I hear directly I will post an update.

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Jonathan Weiss Mar 07 2017 LEEDuser Member 2621 Thumbs Up

They told me the same thing. I pointed them to this stream as well so they could see the articulate thoughts that Michelle and David posted.

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Maria Glädt White Arkitekter AB
Nov 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
210 Thumbs Up

Automatically earn credit?

Will you earn this credit automatically if your in a LEED v4 project which has been awarded with this credit?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 15 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Maria, the credit requirements don't allow for that, no. If you believe you deserve it and want to show how the CI project benefited from that same work don't on the NC project, you could submit documentation to that effect, but there is no guarantee it will work.

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Apr 24 2017
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