CS-2009 IDpc60: Integrative process

  • Achieving integrative results

    The Integrative Process credits seek to answer the question, “How can we achieve an integrative result that augments performance, maintains cost, and in a simplified way that is replicable and measurable?”  Throughout the process of answering these questions, the Integrative Process credits underwent significant improvements between the 2nd and 3rd Public Comment periods. Integrative thinking as it pertains to buildings is about completing the design process differently; however, to the extent possible, outcome has been made the primary goal of the credits.  The value in the credits requirements is in demonstrating an improved project than a team would have had without it, in terms of performance, satisfaction, and long-term cost.

    Credit Submittals

    General

    1. Register for Pilot Credit(s) here
    2. Register a username at LEEDuser.com, and participate in online forum
    3. Submit feedback survey; supply PDF of your survey/confirmation of completion with credit documentation

    Credit Specific

    New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools, Retail – NC, Healthcare

    Energy Systems Implementation: Document how the analysis informed design and building form decisions in the project’s OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. and BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines.. Also, demonstrate how the analy-sis informed the design of the project, including, but not limited to, the following, as applicable:

    • Building and site program
    • Building form and geometry
    • Building envelope and façade treatments on different orientations
    • Elimination and/or significant down-sizing of building systems such as those re-lated to HVAC, lighting, controls, exterior materials, interior finishes,  and func-tional  program elements.
    • Other systems

    Water Systems Implementation: Document how the above analysis informed building and site design decisions in the project’s OPROwner's project requirements: a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. and BODBasis of design: the information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines.. Demonstrate how the at least one on-site non-potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. supply source was utilized in cascading ways to reduce the burden on municipal supply and/or wastewater treatment systems by contributing supply volumes to at least two different water demand components listed above. Also, demonstrate how the analysis informed the design of the project, including, but not limited to, the following, as applicable:

    • Plumbing systems
    • Sewage conveyance and/or on-site treatment systems
    • Stormwater quantity and quality management systems
    • Stormwater quality management systems
    • Landscaping, irrigation, and site elements
    • Roofing systems and/or building form and geometry
    • Other systems

    Cost Analysis Implementation: Document how the above analysis was utilized to reconcile the integrative design case construction and operations budgets (on a whole-building basis, instead of comparing solely individual line item costs) with the baseline whole building construction and operations budgets. Describe how first cost savings associated with any applicable systems offset first cost increases associated with other related systems; include a description of any potential operating costs savings and/or productivity increases identified by the analyses.

    Commercial Interiors, Retail – CI

    Site Selection Implementation: Document how the above analysis informed selection of a building site for the project’s tenant improvement and informed the project’s Owner’s Project Requirements and Basis of DesignThe information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines.. Demonstrate how the analysis informed the site selection for the interior design project, relative to, but not limited to, the following:

    • Suitability of the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). for meeting project goals relative to the building’s site attributes
    • Suitability of the base building site location for meeting daily occupant commuting needs
    • Suitability of the base building’s mechanical/electrical systems for meeting pro-ject goals
    • Capability of the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. for meeting the project’s goals related to Indoor Environmental Quality and occupant well-being
    • Other systems

    Provide documentation of methods planned to gather feedback on tenant occupant satisfaction.

    Energy Systems Implementation: Document how the above analysis informed interior design decisions in the project’s Owner’s Project Requirements and Basis of Design.  Demonstrate how the analysis informed the interior design of the project, as applicable:

    • Building envelope and façade conditions
    • Elimination and/or significant down-sizing of building systems such as those related to HVAC, lighting, controls, exterior materials, interior finishes,  and functional  program elements.
    • Methods planned to gather feedback on energy performance, occupant performance, and efficiency of energy-related systems during operations.
    • Other systems

    Water Systems Implementation: Document how the above analysis informed interior design decisions in the project’s Owner’s Project Requirements and Basis of Design. Demonstrate how at least one on-site non-potable water supply source was utilized in cascading ways to reduce the burden on municipal supply and/or wastewater treatment systems by contributing supply volumes to the water demand components listed above. Demonstrate how the analysis informed the interior design and systems affected by the project, as applicable:

    • Plumbing systems
    • Sewage conveyance and/or on-site treatment systems
    • Process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. systems
    • Methods planned to gather feedback on water performance and efficiency of water-related systems during operations
    • Other systems

    Cost Analysis Implementation: Document how the above analysis was utilized to reconcile the integrative design case construction and operations budgets (on a whole-tenant-space basis, instead of comparing solely individual line item costs) with the base-line construction and operations budgets. Describe how first cost savings associated with any applicable systems offset first cost increases associated with other related systems; include a description of any potential operating costs savings and/or productivity increases identified by the analyses.

    Additional Questions

    • How were the requirements of this credit different from the process/planning you’ve completed on previous projects?
    • Which typical project team members were critical to this process?  Did the project team engage members they otherwise would not have?
    • How did work completed for the requirements change what the project team would have otherwise done?
    • What parts of the process of meeting the requirements (if any) are similar to what the project team would have otherwise done?
    • What resources, if any, did the project team use to understand an integrative process?
    • What was the most challenging aspect of meeting the credit requirements?
  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Core and Shell Development

    ID Pilot Credit 60: Integrative process

    Intent

    Pilot Credit Closed

    This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

    Implement an integrative process that supports high performance, cost-effective project outcomes through analyses of key systems interrelationships before decisions are made on building form and throughout the design process.

    Requirements

    Starting in pre-design, and continuing throughout the design phases, identify and execute synergistic opportunities for high performance outcomes across different disciplines and building systems. Use the analyses described below to inform the project’s Owner’s Project Requirements (OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project.), Basis of DesignThe information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. (BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines.), Design Documents, and Construction Documents. Consider opportunities resulting from analyses, at a minimum, in the following three areas:

    Energy-related systems

    Perform a preliminary “simple box” energy modeling analysis before the completion of Schematic Design that explores how to reduce energy loads in the building and

    accomplish other related sustainability goals by questioning default assumptions and testing options for applicable parameters. Assess at least two potential parametric options associated with, at a minimum, each of the following:

    • Programmatic and operational parameters: Assess how multi-functioning spaces, operating schedules, space allotment per person, teleworking, reducing building area, on-going operations and maintenance issues impact project and human performance.
    • Site conditions: Assess how shading, exterior lighting, hardscapeThe inanimate elements of the building landscaping. It includes pavement, roadways, stonewalls, wood and synthetic decking, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios., landscaping, and adjacent siteA site having at least 25% of its perimeter bordering sites that has been previously developed. Any fraction of the perimeter that borders waterfront will be excluded from the calculation. For the purposes of this definition, a street or roadway does not constitute previously developed land. conditions impact project and human performance
    • Massing and orientation: Assess how massing and orientation impact HVAC sizing, energy consumption, lighting, and renewable energy opportunities.
    • Basic Envelope Attributes: Assess how insulation values, window-to-wall ratios, glazing characteristics, shading, and window operability impact HVAC sizing, project performance, and human performance
    • Lighting levels: Assess how interior surface reflectance values and lighting levels in occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. impact HVAC sizing, project performance, and human performance.
    • Thermal comfort ranges: Assess how thermal comfort range options impact HVAC sizing, project performance, and human performance.
    • Plug and process load needs: Assess how reducing plug and process loads through programmatic solutions such as equipment and purchasing policies, layout options, etc., impact HVAC sizing, project performance, and human performance.
    AND

    Water-related systems

    Perform a preliminary water budget analysis before the completion of Schematic Design that explores how to reduce potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. loads in the building and accomplish other related sustainability goals by assessing and quantifying the project’s potential non-potable water supply sources and water demand volumes. Assess applicable estimates for, at a minimum, the following:

    • Indoor Water Demand: Assess flow and flush fixture performance case demand volumes, calculated in accordance with WEp Indoor Water Use Reduction.
    • Outdoor Water Demand: Assess landscape irrigation performance case demand volume calculated in accordance with WEc Outdoor Water Use Recusion.
    • Process WaterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. Demand: Assess kitchen, laundry, cooling tower, and other equipment demand volumes, as applicable.
    • Supply Sources: Assess all potential non-potable water supply source volumes, such as on-site rainwater and grey water, municipally supplied nonpotable waterNonpotable water: does not meet EPA's drinking water quality standards and is not approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction. Water that is unsafe or unpalatable to drink because it contains pollutants, contaminants, minerals, or infective agents., and HVAC equipment condensate.
    AND

    Cost analysis (related to all above systems)

    Discovery: Perform integrative cost-bundling analysis1 that estimates the cost of implementing integrative strategies. Compare bundled design case first costs (associated with primary integrative strategies) with the project’s baseline first cost and operating costs budgets for the same components. This cost-bundling analysis must include, at a minimum, the following:

    • Establish the project’s baseline construction budget using line item first cost estimates
    • Establish the project’s baseline operations budget using line item cost estimates
    • Create a cost-bundling spreadsheet identifying primary bundles of interrelated systems
    • Identify and quantify potential design case first cost impacts (both reductions and increases) associated with each affected component of each primary bundle
    • Identify potential design case operational costs associated with each primary bundle
    • Identify any potential design case cost savings/benefits related to productivity issues associated with each primary bundle, where possible

    General Pilot Documentation Requirements

    Register for the pilot credit

    Credits 1-14

    Credits 15-27

    Credits 28-42

    Credits 43-56

    Credits 57-67

    Credits 68-82

    Credits 83-103

    Credit specific

    Complete the LEED v4 Integrative Process Worksheet. Additional guidance can be found in the LEED v4 version of this credit under the guide tab.

    Additional Questions

    • How were the requirements of this credit different from the process/planning you’ve completed on previous projects?
    • Which typical project team members were critical to this process?  Did the project team engage members they otherwise would not have?
    • How did work completed for the requirements change what the project team would have otherwise done?
    • What parts of the process of meeting the requirements (if any) are similar to what the project team would have otherwise done?
    • What resources, if any, did the project team use to understand an integrative process?
    • What was the most challenging aspect of meeting the credit requirements?
    Changes
    • 5/15/2014:

      replaced submittal requirements with LEED v4 documentation requirements
    • 5/04/2016:

      pilot credit closed, v4 version available to v2009 projects through the innovation catalog

13 Comments

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Sarah Corbitt LS3P Associates LTD
May 23 2016
LEEDuser Member
9 Thumbs Up

Integrative Pilot Credit - Design or Construction Credit

Project Location: United States

Hi there - when submitting the documentation for this credit, is this considered a design or construction credit?

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Glen Phillips Director of Sustainable Education, GreenCE, Inc. May 23 2016 LEEDuser Expert 1455 Thumbs Up

This credit appears to require construction cost data, so I'd objectively say it should only be accepted during construction phase review.

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Susan Coy LEED Administrator GMB Architecture + Engineering
Jun 17 2015
LEEDuser Member
149 Thumbs Up

Integrative Process-Value Engineering

Project Location: United States

Do you use Value Engineering in documenting this process?

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Jun 17 2015 LEEDuser Expert 6721 Thumbs Up

You may have heard the saying that “value engineering” has nothing to do with either value or engineering. What we call “VE” usually involves late-in-the-game redesign, cutting costs to bring a project in on budget. Too often, VE is false economy. Cuts often occur based solely on the first costs of individual items with little consideration for how those cuts can increase costs elsewhere.

One common example: Reducing the thermal performance of the building envelope might save initially on enclosure costs, but increasing the thermal load could require redesigning the mechanical systems for greater capacity. Bigger equipment costs more. The up-front savings shrinks, and future operating costs balloon.

This Pilot Credit’s requirements describe cost analyses that “bundle” interrelated systems to account for these ripples. Done right, this process occurs throughout design, rather than just at the end, to eliminate the ill-considered, last-minute changes commonly called “Value Engineering.”

For more on the Integrative Process, see the ANSI Standard Guide: http://www.usgbc.org/resources/integrative-process-ip-ansi-consensus-nat....

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Glen Phillips Director of Sustainable Education, GreenCE, Inc. May 23 2016 LEEDuser Expert 1455 Thumbs Up

I'd say yes, include the VE adjustments.

While we can chuckle about the array of VE jokes, please note that smart VE (during the early phases) can stave off harsher cuts later.

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Habitech Distretto Tecnologico Trentino LEED Services in Europe - Founding Member of GBC Italia Habitech-Distretto Tecnologico Trentino
Apr 03 2015
Guest
1151 Thumbs Up

Integrative process

I find this credit really interesting and it is very important to have this as a prerequisite for LEEDv4

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Glen Phillips Director of Sustainable Education, GreenCE, Inc. May 23 2016 LEEDuser Expert 1455 Thumbs Up

Me too!

Lots to be learned if we have more well informed perspectives.

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Helene Gotthelf Projects Manager, Institute for the Built Environment Nov 18 2016 LEEDuser Member 67 Thumbs Up

I agree! Although it is now an optional credit, hopefully it will become a prerequisite in future versions. We have used this process on several of our projects and successfully earned the pilot credit and LEEDv4 credit.

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Crina Bosch Energy Modeler Karpinski Engineering
Feb 19 2015
LEEDuser Member
275 Thumbs Up

Cost Analysis?

Thinking about pursuing this credit as an innovation for a LEEDv2009 Schools project. I'm confused about the requirements, however.

The pilot credit has a requirement for cost analsyis, but documentation requirement is the LEED v4 Integrative Process Worksheet, which doesn't have a place for cost analysis. The credit library also states that there are changes to this credit, 5/15/2014 "replaced submittal requirements with LEED v4 documentation requirements."

The LEED v4 version of this credit has removed the cost analysis aspect of as well.

So the question is, cost analysis required or no? If required, how to document?

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Janna Alampi
Feb 25 2014
Guest
66 Thumbs Up

Integrative Process

Building design should always be an integrative process. The tools found in this Pilot Credit would benefit any project. Is there any talk of this becoming a standard credit, or possibly a prerequisite?

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Mar 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 1894 Thumbs Up

Hi Janna,
LEEDv4 has added Integrative Process as a credit (not prerequisite). Check it out: http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-v4/IPc1

Post a Reply
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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader Opsis Architecture
Aug 07 2012
LEEDuser Member
1894 Thumbs Up

Whole System Integration Process Guide not referenced

Does any body know why this pilot credit does not use the reference standard, titled “ANSI/MTS Whole System Integration Process Guide (WSIP)-2007 for Sustainable Buildings and Communities.” It was referenced in the pilot credits 5, 6, and 42 which are the ones that are now closed, but for some reason is not referenced in Pilot Credit 60.

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Batya Metalitz Technical Director, LEED, USGBC Aug 08 2012 LEEDuser Expert 3864 Thumbs Up

Hi Heather - the WSIP document is not the basis for this credit, but it can certainly be used by project teams as a helpful guide. This version of the pilot credit is based on the most recent v4 proposal. The goal is to conduct an analysis (discovery) early enough in the planning process that the cost and time implications are kept low, so no specific guideline is required in order to earn the credit.

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