CS-2009 IEQc8.2: Daylight and Views—Views

  • IEQc8.2 diagram
  • Achievable in many buildings

    Buildings that provide views to the outdoors have proven to enhance productivity, testing performance, and overall occupant comfort and well-being. This credit is easy to achieve if you also plan to design for open space planning, placing occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space. near exterior windows with large glazing areas and so that this is for more than just offices using furniture that does not block views from a seated position, such as low or transparent partitions between workstations.

     If there is a standard design for every floor or standard spaces that are repeated throughout the design, the calculation may be easier as calculaitons can be repeated. Designing for compliance with this credit will likely be complementary with IEQc8.1: Daylight and Views—Daylight. Expect some tradeoffs associated with increasing window area, such as heat loss and gain through windows, increased glare, and privacy issues with open space planning and low furniture partitions.

    Documentation can be time-consuming

    The documentation for this credit does not involve complicated formulas, but the larger the project the more time-consuming the documentation will be, especially if spaces are varied.

    Use a consistent, justifiable layout

    Core and Shell buildings must demonstrate that they meet the credit requirements using a justifiable tenant layout and occupancy, which is to be consistent across all credits.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Analyze building orientation and site selection for opportunities to provide access to views to the outside.


  • Too much glazing, particularly east- and west-facing glazing exposed to low-angle morning and afternoon sun, may cause glare and overheating. Use overhangs, energy-efficient glazing, and daylighting designs that control glare, such as interior shades or lightshelves.


  • High performance glazing and increased glazing area may add additional costs unless they can be offset by integrated design solutions like right sizing of mechanical equipment, or in some cases the elimination of perimeter heating.


  • When selecting windows for maximizing views, consider also using operable windows for natural ventilation. This can contribute to credits IEQp1: Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance and IEQc2: Increased Ventilation.


  • While LEED does not dictate the quality of the view outside the window, considering this can help a project achieve exemplary performance. Also, occupants will likely prefer view of interesting objects, views with movement (though not too busy), and views of nature. In other words, a view of a brick wall may meet the letter of the LEED requirement, but not the spirit.

Schematic Design

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  • Determine which spaces in a project are “regularly occupied” (per LEED definition) and need to be included in the views calculations.


  • Some spaces can be exempt from being considered “regularly occupied” due to the nature of their use. Previously published CIR’s offer some guidance. Provide a narrative explanation of why a given space should be exempt based on use of the space as views and daylight may negatively affect the use of the space, not the frequency or time that the space is actually used. For example, museum gallery spaces, high security and privacy areas, dark rooms for photo development, and others can all be exempt from the calculation.


  • The calculation of regularly occupied space can be fine-tuned as decisions for “fixed” (attached to a wall) counters with overhead cabinets and equipment are integrated into the design. The square footage where the cabinets and equipment are located is not considered occupiable space, and therefore is not included as part of the view or the daylight calculation. For example, if an office is 500 ft2 in total, but fixed counters and cabinets occupy 100 ft2, the regularly occupied space of the room is only 400 ft2.


  • Ensure that the spaces identified as “regularly occupied” are consistent across credits, especially for IEQc8.1: Daylighting and Views—Daylighting.


  • Enter the names of the regularly occupied spaces in the LEED credit form along with the total floor area for each regularly occupied space.


  • Hold an integrated design meeting with the architect, interior designers, mechanical engineer, lighting designer, contractor, cost estimator and the end user to explore and resolve possible benefits and tradeoffs that increased glazing and access to views strategies could have on daylight, glare, heat gain and loss, furniture design and layout, and other design decisions.


  • Place regularly occupied spaces such as offices, classrooms and conference rooms near exterior glazing and perimeter windows to increase opportunity for access to views and daylight.


  • When considering office space layout and workstations, consider partitions and moveable furniture that are equal to or less than 42 inches high on all sides or incorporate transparent surfaces in upper sections to allow access to views while seated.


  • Window-to-wall ratios may be fixed if your project is pursuing a prescriptive compliance path for EAp2: Minimum Energy Performance and EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance. These fixed ratios will impact access to views and glazing areas. Check the ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guide and the Advanced Buildings Core Performance Guide for required window-to-wall ratios. If a building envelope window-to-wall ratio is over 40% there will be a penalty in the energy model for EAc1. The same is true if skylight-to-roof ratio is more than 5%. These requirements are based on ASHRAE 90.1.

Design Development

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  • Explore a combination of strategies that increase views such as low-partition furniture, space-planning techniques, and interior glazing.


  • Identify available products and furniture that combine glazing and building elements for optimum access to views while maintaining privacy—for example, workstations with low partition heights and interior perimeter glazing.


  • By increasing glazing and designing for natural light, projects can reduce the number of ambient light fixtures or the frequency with which they are used, reducing the cost of electric lighting both upfront and for ongoing operations.


  • Ensure that glare controls are factored into the design of daylighting and views.

Construction Documents

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  • Plan View Direct Line of Sight to Perimeter Glazing Calculations:


  • Calculate the floor area with direct-line-of-sight to perimeter vision glazing for each regularly occupied space. Moveable partitions must be included in your calculations.


  • Direct-line-of-sight is determined by visibility between the vision glazing (between 2’6” and 7’6” inches above the floor) without obstructions such as full-height partitions or solid doorways. 


  • Direct-line-of-sight can pass through two interior glazing surfaces before reaching exterior glazing, but not through solid doors, walls, or partitions taller than 42”. 


  • Create a floor plan showing areas with access to views as distinct from areas with no access to views.


  • Include more than one sight line if necessary to meet the requirement for all spaces.


  • Total the square footage with access to views and enter it in the LEED credit form.


  • Section View Direct Line of Sight Height Confirmation:


  • Create a representative building section for each type of area included in the calculation.


  • For each section, draw a line originating from 42” above the floor (typical eye height) to the perimeter glazing demonstrating access to vision glazing and views to the outside.


  • Show typical furniture heights in the sections if applicable.


  • Total the areas of regularly occupied spaces that have both direct-line-of-sight to perimeter glazing and access to views while seated (at 42”). Divide this value by the total area of regularly occupied spaces to confirm if the design provides greater than 90% of occupied areas with access to views. This is done in the LEED credit form. Upload plans to LEED Online.


  • Private offices where more than 75% of the floor area has a direct-line-of-sight to views can include the entire square footage in the calculations.


  • For Core and Shell buildings, project teams must use a feasible tenant layout and plan to demonstrate that it meets the credit requirements. A consistent and appropriate occupancy must be used across credits.


  • Include columns as obstructions when calculating the access to views in open floor plans.


  • Include columns as obstructions when calculating the access to views in open floor plans.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Core and Shell Development

    IEQ Credit 8.2: Daylight and views - views

    1 Point

    Intent

    To provide building occupants a connection to the outdoors through the introduction of daylight and views into the regularly occupied areas of the building.

    Requirements

    Achieve a direct line of sight to the outdoor environment via vision glazing between 30 inches and 90 inches (between 0.8 meters and 2.3 meters) above the finish floor for building occupants in 90% of all regularly occupied areas. Determine the area with a direct line of sight by totaling the regularly occupied floor area that meets the following criteria:

    • In plan view, the area is within sight lines drawn from perimeter vision glazing.
    • In section view, a direct sight line can be drawn from the area to perimeter vision glazing.

    The line of sight may be drawn through interior glazing. For private offices, the entire floor area of the office may be counted if 75% or more of the area has a direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazingThe approach used to determine the calculated area of regularly occupied areas with direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing. The area determination includes full height partitions and other fixed construction prior to installation of furniture.. For multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations., the actual floor area with a direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing is counted.

    The core and shell design must incorporate a feasible tenant layout(s) per the default occupancy counts (or some other justifiable occupancy count) that can be used in the analysis of this credit.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Design the space to maximize daylighting and view opportunities. Strategies to consider include lower partitions, interior shading devices, interior glazing and automatic photo-cell based controls.

    This credit requires consideration of tenant design for views that can be implemented during future tenant build-out. Core and shell design documents should include drawings or specifications that detail the design assumptions and information on how the tenant can use this capability. If design and construction guidelines are created for tenants, this information should also be included in the guidelines.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

Publications

The Biophilia Hypothesis (Stephen R. Kellert, ed.)

This collection of papers on elements of biophilia includes consideration of daylighting's effects on people.


Windows and Offices: A Study of Office Worker Performance and the Indoor Environment

The Heschone Mahone Group Study "Windows and Offices: A Study of Office Worker Performance and the Indoor Environment" defines “View Factor” criteria related to Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. compliance.

Views Documentation

These samples of views documentation demonstrate how to sucessfully document access to views via plan drawing, section drawing, and spreadsheet. Depending on the rating system and version, not all of these may be required. Samples generously provided by LEEDuser guest expert Allison Beer McKenzie.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

54 Comments

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS. INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ
Aug 28 2014
LEEDuser Member
546 Thumbs Up

Anticipated Tenant Fit Out and IEQ compliance

Background:
In a C&S building we suggest a Tenant fit out to comply with credit IEQ_c8.2, where we show meeting rooms, corridors and an office space layout resulting in a grater quantity of people of that responding to the "default occupancy". The questions are:
1. Do we have to consider this layout for the PIForms?
2. Do we have to consider this quantity of people for every other credit and prerequisite?, including de FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.?
3. Do lighting savings have to account for the different spaces like corridors in the lighting power allowed calculations?

Thank you

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Aug 28 2014 LEEDuser Expert 8964 Thumbs Up

1.The proposed tenant layout would only be needed in the views credit. But it could also be uploaded in the PIF 4 as additional documentation.
2.FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. would be based on default values.
3. This one needs posted in the EA credits because I don't truly know the answer to this one.

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS., INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ Aug 28 2014 LEEDuser Member 546 Thumbs Up

Thank you Todd,
It´s great to read this, I was worried about other credits.
Regarding question #3, I have already done this and received a satisfactory answer too.

thank you again,

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Brian Harris Principal TcaArchitecture Planning
Jul 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
61 Thumbs Up

IEQc8.2 Exemplary Performance

For Measure 4 of this credit, how do I determine if the View Factor is 3 or greater?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jul 18 2014 LEEDuser Expert 8964 Thumbs Up

I would highly suggest reading Heschong and Mahones study: Windows and Offices;As study of the Office Worker Performance and the Indoor Environment. Read the section on view factors. This is also noted in the Reference Guide. If you still have questions after reading that post them here.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 18 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

There is a link to this study in the Resources tab above.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International
May 23 2014
LEEDuser Member
1653 Thumbs Up

Is a car workshop considered a "regularly occupied space"?

Description: We have a core and shell project where part of the leasable area will be a car dealership. This area that will belong to the car dealership will have two main areas: offices and a car workshop (the place where they check cars for maintenance).

It is really clear that the offices area inside the car dealership are considered regularly occupied.

However we would like to know if the car workshop is also a regularly occupied space. We really need to know this because our car workshop due to the fact that will have lots of cars inside it need a really big area and for safety reason it has almost no windows.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group May 27 2014 LEEDuser Expert 8964 Thumbs Up

The Regularly Occupied Space Matrix dated October 2013 indicates that workshops are considered regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building.. I have seen car workshops at dealers with windows. The bayA bay is a component of a standard, rectilinear building design. It is the open area defined by a building element such as columns or a window. Typically, there are multiple identical bays in succession. garage doors are typically almost all glass, then a wall or two, usually at the ends of the bays has a bunch of windows. Those spaces will have to be included.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International May 29 2014 LEEDuser Member 1653 Thumbs Up

Thank you Todd,

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Ronald Dean Sumac Inc.
Jan 07 2014
LEEDuser Member
1177 Thumbs Up

IEQc8.2 Exemplary Performance

Hi:

About the Measure 1: "90% or more of regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. have multiple lines of sight, to vision glazing, in different directions at least 90 degrees apart"...
this "at least 90 degrees" should be drawning in top or section?

because its easy in top for our project, but in section is impossible.

Thanks.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jan 07 2014 LEEDuser Expert 8964 Thumbs Up

The drawing should be done in plan. From the occupants location, draw a line to the center of each one of the views available to the occupant. The angle between the views must be at least 90 degrees. The occupant has to turn their head at least 90 degrees to see the other view.

When it comes to documenting exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. for this credit, and image is priceless. The credit can be deferred until construction so an image(s) can be taken to document the requirements. This method is very useful for the documenting the view factor. You could also use 3D modeling to do the same thing.

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Alan Viale SUMAC Jan 10 2014 LEEDuser Member 93 Thumbs Up

Hi
For projects outside USA
we want to know which is the measure called HEAD HEIGHT?
at which point starts and finishes at which point,
We have not found a definition or diagram in the Reference Guide

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Jan 12 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4976 Thumbs Up

Hello Alan,

Head height is the measurement from the floor to the top of the window. If you need a more specific answer, I would say it is from the "finished" floor (the floor elevation that include the carpeting, tile, etc.) to the top of the glazed part of the window.

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Frantisek Macholda Sustainability Consultant EkoWATT
Oct 09 2013
LEEDuser Member
155 Thumbs Up

Interrupted view

Hello,
we have project with facade consisting of horizontal lamellas and glazing between them - like steps. The glazing is almost from a floor to ceilings. In a section view, the sitting person can look outside horizontally in the required level 42'' above floor but the horizontal lamellas (about 10'' thick) are blocking some parts of view between 30 - 90'' height. Is it necessary to have free view in the whole 30 - 90'' height from the floor?
Thank you for any comment.
Frantisek

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Oct 09 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8964 Thumbs Up

I'm basing my comment on what I think you have based on your description. As long as there is not a horizontal lamella at exactly 42" you could earn the credit. The credit can be earned when using interior and exterior shading.

Do you have link to an image or could you email me a section?

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Frantisek Macholda Sustainability Consultant, EkoWATT Oct 09 2013 LEEDuser Member 155 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your comment. I am sending the scheme by e-mail (as soon as I find it :-))

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Stella Hodgkins Sustainability Specialist GE Johnson Construction
Sep 19 2013
LEEDuser Member
53 Thumbs Up

Lease Language

Does anyone have recent experience with this credit (GBCI review comments), as it relates to lease language? Lease language is not supposed to be required, but it seems like review comments have become more stringent in general.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Sep 19 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8964 Thumbs Up

Can you post what they are asking specifically asking for.

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Stella Hodgkins Sustainability Specialist, GE Johnson Construction Sep 27 2013 LEEDuser Member 53 Thumbs Up

I don't have specific comments on this credit. I'm trying to anticipate whether or not lease language will be required. It's not supposed to be if we document a viable layout.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Oct 09 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8964 Thumbs Up

For this credit a tenant lease is not required. The requirement is providing a propose tenant layout to document credit compliance. You can be asked for tenant guidelines which show tenants how to maintain views designed into the space. Typically, if tenant guidelines or proposed lease agreement is requested in another credit, it will be blanketed across the other credits.

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Aditya Chemburkar
Sep 19 2013
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

Compliance for the horizontal view at 42”

For a CS Project, the tentative floor layout for the office space has been designed. And following are my queries in respect to the direct line of sight which is a requirement for the IEQ 8.2 Daylight and Views-Views.

1. A private office of 13.54’ X 10.6’ has two windows proposed on the 13.56’ wall. One window is from 0.65’ (7.8”) to 2.62’ (31.44”) from the floor level whereas the other is 1.75’ (21”) to 3.72’ (44.64”) from floor level.

2. There are two Cafeterias with area of 660 Sq.Ft. and 980.8 Sq.Ft. while both the Cafeterias have windows from 3.93’ (47”) to 7.87’ (94”) above the floor finish level.

My query is, since most of the floor area is qualifying for the Plan Area of direct line of sight to Perimeter Vision GlazingThe approach used to determine the calculated area of regularly occupied areas with direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing. The area determination includes full height partitions and other fixed construction prior to installation of furniture. and also we have the windows (as mentioned above) in between 30” to 90” without any obstruction, will this office and Cafeterias qualify for the horizontal viewThe approach used to confirm that the direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing remains available from a seated position. It uses section drawings that include the installed furniture to make the determination. at 42”?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Sep 19 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8964 Thumbs Up

Only the one window in the office would provide views. Cannot say whether or not the space would be compliant because I don't have the width. The cafeteria has a view at 42" also.

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Kathy Buck Senior Project Manager Neumann/Smith Architecture
Aug 30 2013
LEEDuser Member
1500 Thumbs Up

Tenant Layout

How detailed does the tenant layout need to be? Is it (most simply) a layout of anticipated tenant areas, or (more difficult) the development of hypothetical tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. interior layouts (to include offices, conference rooms, etc?).

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Aug 30 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8964 Thumbs Up

Everyone that I have seen includes the open office space with some desks and works stations along with the enclosed offices and conference rooms, etc.
I would think that just highlighting an area on a floor plan and calling office may not be sufficient enough to show how views and even daylight could be potentially earned.

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Matthew Macko Principal Environmental Building Strategies
Jul 03 2013
LEEDuser Member
770 Thumbs Up

Lines of sight depth cutoff

Is there a requirement for the depth of lines of sight to exterior glazing to be compliant with this credit? For example, we are currently working on an outdoor mall with several tenant spaces that only have windows at the front of the store, and some spaces are about 20 feet wide by 100 feet deep. Assuming they have an unobstructed view of storefront windows, can the lines of sight extend all the way to the back of the tenant space?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Jul 08 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8964 Thumbs Up

There is no maximum depth limit. As long as the views do not go through more than two layer of glass, you can go 200 feet.

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Petr Vogel Specialist Consultant EkoWATT CZ
Apr 13 2013
LEEDuser Member
260 Thumbs Up

Tenant Lease Agreement-Glazed partitions as part of fit-out work

Dear all,
when assuming glazed partitions in tenant spaces in order to comply with the credit. Does this condition of installing glazed partitions have to be included in the Tenant Lease Agreement? Credit IEQc8.2 is not listed in Appendix 4 of the Reference Guide. Or is this credit rather assessing potential to comply with the credit criteria?
Thanks for any kind of help.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Apr 15 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8964 Thumbs Up

So the space is initially designed to have the potential to earn the credit. Since the owner is not providing the fit out, then to maintain the views, the guidelines would need to be in tenant lease agreement, or tenant guidelines.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International May 27 2013 LEEDuser Member 1653 Thumbs Up

It is my understanding that you only need to provide a lay out that allows future tenant to achieve this credit, but it is not required to have a leasing agreement.

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MM K
Mar 06 2013
Guest
1339 Thumbs Up

Views calculation

For a CS project, we will show a plan of a typical floor with the layout. However, in the Views calculation spreadsheet do we need to include all floors or is one floor sufficient ?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Mar 22 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8964 Thumbs Up

You need to include each floor on the spreadsheet so that values of the total square footage are consistent and the compliant percentage is accurately calculated . I would also include a narrative stating the floors are the same.

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Ronald Dean Sumac Inc.
Jan 31 2013
LEEDuser Member
1177 Thumbs Up

Definition of offices

Hi,
I want to know in the case that the building owner will rent all building offices, and design plans have a projected plant design free (without Closings) but the internal regulations of tenants has no restrictions to tenants if they incorporate Closings opaque internal (eg drywall walls) which vary the external view and the entry of natural light.
I wonder if for certification C & S only should be supported with the plans proposed project and is not responsible for such condition the future tenant inside his office.

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Jan 31 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4976 Thumbs Up

No, in fact the opposite is true. To get the C&S views credit, the owner must have tenant restrictions in place that preserve occupant views.

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Ronald Dean Sumac Inc. Jun 17 2013 LEEDuser Member 1177 Thumbs Up

Hi Jill
I want to know if this restrictions what you talking about, must be in the form for this credits or should be in the TENANT GUIDELINES for credit SSc9.
because I check the form for the final review and dont see any option to put or specified this conditions of design, I just see the option to put the plans and photographs in the form for the final review.

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Jun 17 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4976 Thumbs Up

It should be in the tenant guidelines as a requirement in order to get this credit. Whether you include it as such in the tenant guidelines for credit SSc9 or as a separate tenant guideline if you're not going for credit SSc9, is up to you.

Include the tenant guidelines in the file upload section (Upload IEQc8.1-2) even if you've already attached them to SSc9. It doesn't matter which option you choose when uploading a file like this as long as you alert the reviewer that these are included by checking the box next to "Special circumstances preclude..." A dialog box will open and you can enter text there.

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Amra Ivojevic BSc ATP sustain
Oct 02 2012
Guest
42 Thumbs Up

Views to the inner courtyard?

Hello,
I would like to know, if I can count the regularly occupied space looking to the inner courtyard?
I know it says "direct line of sight to the outdoor environment". But the courtyard is greened with a width of 30 meters.
Thank you!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 24 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Amra, if the inner courtyard is an outdoor space, then I would say you can count it, particularly given such a large width. If it is enclosed, then I would say not.

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Jiri Dobias
Sep 03 2012
LEEDuser Member
1193 Thumbs Up

TESCO store

Dear all.
Our building has a TESCO store on the ground floor. Do we have to include the store into regularly occupied area? LEED reference guide says that regularly occupied areas should be just office, conference rooms, classrooms., core learning spacesCore learning spaces are spaces for educational activities where the primary functions are teaching and learning and where good speech communication is critical to a student's academic achievement. These spaces include, but are not limited to, classrooms, enclosed or open plan), instructional pods or activity areas, group instruction rooms, conference rooms, libraries, offices, speech clinics, offices used for educational purposes and music rooms for instruction, practice and performance. and cafeterias. That means that retail does not count?
Thank you for any advice.

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Sep 04 2012 LEEDuser Expert 4976 Thumbs Up

No, retail counts. Those are just examples of spaces that do count. The list is not all-inclusive. You need to go by the definition of regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building.. I would say that you could exclude stock rooms and storage rooms from the regularly occupied spaces, but otherwise rest of the area counts.

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Daniela Aguilera Poch asociados
Jun 27 2011
Guest
185 Thumbs Up

Regularly Occupied Spaces

Hi, i'm working on a core and shell proyect particularly in 8.2 credit,and i have the next question about it, are cafeteria and file room a regularly occuped spaces??, and another question is , there is a difference between regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. and regularly occupied gross area? , i'm asking this because our proyect was reviewed already , and one of the technical advices given, was match the total regularly occupied gross area of PIf3 form with total regularly occupied spaces of IEQ 8.2 credit form. I'd not worked on this proyect before , and i'm trying to understand what the other people did.

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Susann Geithner Global Sustainability Manager, Predictive Service Jun 27 2011 LEEDuser Member 11518 Thumbs Up

#1 cafeteria is most definitely regularly occupied, the file room usually not. That's how we have submitted it in the past and it has been excepted.
#2 We had that a couple of times before. Actually the numbers from the PIF3 form are no longer linked with the IEQ 8.1 / 8.2 form in the newest version of those forms. Might be that this hasn't been updated for Core& Shell yet. I would just verbally explain that this numbers can not match. Because gross area means including walls. The definition for IEQ 8 applicable area excluded walls. So basically LEED online is wrong. You might also just changed the PIF3 form to the same number, which you are using in IEQ 8.2. At least that's what I was doing on in my last CS projects.
The area definition and cross relationship in LEED Online is an ongoing problem. The reviewers are devices to asked for clarification if the difference between gross area and occupied or "area per EA P2 in your simulation" is to large.
You might want to send the reviewer an email through LEED online to asked for some clear guidance on the issue.

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Daniela Aguilera Poch asociados Jun 27 2011 Guest 185 Thumbs Up

Thanks Susann, i sent a "feedback" to leed on line. At the same time, i had another question with the regularly occuped spaces for IEQ c 8.2 form , the building has in each floor a central core and workstations around it , there are 6 floor in total and two of them has cafeteria and file room (my previous question), my doubt now is the corridors areas must be excluded from calculations of regularly occuped spaces? , basically this area is where the workers walk to the exit. I'm checking the leed user's glossary and corridors and lobbies are nonregularly occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space., but if this area is not large and is the way to walk into the open office i don't know if it count as regularly occupied spaces.
Thanks again.

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Susann Geithner Global Sustainability Manager, Predictive Service Jun 27 2011 LEEDuser Member 11518 Thumbs Up

If it's a corridor separated by full height walls, you will have to exclude it for sure. If it's a walkway in the open space than you can basically go either way. The determination of an area for this walkways is very arbitrary and therefore leave lots of room for discussions. We have done it either way included and excluded, what ever was the most likely layout.

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Rubén Morón Rojas Codirector CIVITA
Jun 09 2011
LEEDuser Member
844 Thumbs Up

Layout for retail spaces

Hi,
I am working on a C&S building, it will be mainly occupied by offices and we have a proposed layout for those spaces. The ground floor is for retail,
do we need to prepare a layout for that space, even if we have no idea of what kind of business will it be? Does all the area count as regularly occupied?
There will also be a Gym on the first 3 floors, do we need to make a layout? Wich spaces count as regularly occupied?

Thanks

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Susann Geithner Global Sustainability Manager, Predictive Service Jun 27 2011 LEEDuser Member 11518 Thumbs Up

You will need to show a proposed / potential tenant design. This doesn't have to be, what's actually been done in the space. But you will need it to determine compliance and what's regularly occupied or not. That's also the case for the retail area and the gym. Basically the whole building needs to have a potential tenant design. Keep in mind that it has to be consistent throughout the credits.

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Lauren Ulmer
May 20 2011
Guest
275 Thumbs Up

What is a "view factor?"

In the Reference Guide, under Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. for this credit, item #4 mentions a "view factor." What is that? I can't find an explanation of it in the Reference Guide or on LEED User.com.

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Susann Geithner Global Sustainability Manager, Predictive Service Jun 27 2011 LEEDuser Member 11518 Thumbs Up

The view factor is determined per the Heschong Mahone Group Study page 47 (see paragraph below #4 in the reference guide). You will also find the reference in the excel spread sheet (under resources) for documenting this credit on LEED online.

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Suzanne Johnson Director of Sustainablity-Federal, PB Dec 27 2012 Guest 103 Thumbs Up

Susan, unfortunately, the link provided in the Reference Guide does not work and the reference has not been found on the Internet. Please provide the calculation or definition of view factor.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 27 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Suzanne, the link given in the Resources tab above works for me. Try again?

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Suzanne Johnson Director of Sustainablity-Federal, PB Dec 27 2012 Guest 103 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Tristin. The link above does work. It's the link in the Reference Guide that is faulty.
Cheers,
S

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BH .
Apr 29 2011
Guest
983 Thumbs Up

Exemplary Performance

Hi,

I would like to confirm if in point 3 of exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. mean that within a distance of 3 x 42`` (typically) there will be no obstacles like glass walls, furnitures ect. between the desk and exterior view?

How should I understand "view factor", there is nothing about it in LEED Guide except this exemplary performance saying "with a factor of 3 or grater". How can I calculate it?

Thanks

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Jill Dalglish, PE Senior Engineer, Dalglish Daylighting Jun 28 2011 LEEDuser Expert 4976 Thumbs Up

In point 3 of exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements., unobstructed view means that no furniture or opaque or translucent material will be between the viewer and three times the head height of the view window. LEED does not count anything above 7'-6" as view window, above that it is called a daylight window. For example, if the window head height is 7', there will be no obstructions back to 21' from this window. If a glass wall is in this location, it must be transparent.

Although it is not obvious, there is something about view factor in the LEED Guide. It is in the paragraph following the 4 options of exemplary performance starting with "Measures determined per the Heschong Mahone Group..." and ending with the link on where to download the report that describes view factor. Susann Geithner has also noted this is the post immediately previous.

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Ricardo Sobral Technical Services Director Lend Lease (AR) S.A.
Jul 21 2010
Guest
669 Thumbs Up

Views for tennacies in CS

I would like to know if spaces for leasing, which are not part of the core & shell of the building, are requiered to have access to views, specially tennancies for commercial retail at ground floor and restaurants.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 24 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Andres, I think this question is answered in the LEEDuser guidance above (under Bird's Eye View and Credit Language tabs). Tenant spaces are included in this credit, in short.

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