CS-2009 PIf5: Building System Control

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  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Core and Shell Development

    PI f5: Project Information Form 5

    Intent

    Requirements

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    Any calculators related to this form can be found on the resources tab.

10 Comments

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Kath Williams LEED Fellow 2011, Principal Kath Williams + Associates
May 13 2013
LEEDuser Member
2334 Thumbs Up

Appropriate use of Core and Shell?

Can LEED-C&S be used for a distribution center that is design and constructed by the global construction group of a major product manufacturer with the operations and maintenance being controlled by the local arm of the same corporation? The local arm will have no control over design and construction and will only "take over" (same role as a tenant) when construction is completed. The two groups are independent of each other but owner is the same. Would it be based on how we fill out Appendix 3?

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John Beeson Green Mystic in Residence, Catalyst Partners Mar 12 2014 Guest 1613 Thumbs Up

Hi Kath.. You have probably moved on by now, but if not: my recommendation would be to submit a letter from the owners or main points of contact explaining the situation and confirming the local owner has the ultimate end of project control. To me, it should clearly outline the relationship and provide a signatory affidavit of sorts.

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Jay Murray LEED Administrator Commercial Construction Consulting
May 01 2013
LEEDuser Member
259 Thumbs Up

Amendnment to existing Lease Agreement

The Lease agreement has already been completed on a Core and Shell project before language was inserted spelling out lighting level mandates and water flow rate mandates, etc.. We would like to add a document either as an 'add' to the existing lease agreement or as a seperate document altogether explaining the specific thresholds that the tenant needs to design to...both agreements would be signed by the landlord and by the prospective tenant. My question is which one would you prefer? if the document was separate from the official Lease Agreement, would that be acceptable as a 'Tenant-Landlord Agreement'? Once again, this would be signed by both parties. Thanks.

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner ArchEcology, LLC
Dec 27 2012
LEEDuser Member
8973 Thumbs Up

Distinctions in Design Control

What is the distinction between Owner/Developer, Tenant and Lease Amendment?

The reference manual says "the party that has design control and oversight of the construction activities for a given system". But then refers to "sole control" by owner, "independent control" by tenant, and alternatively "tenant may have control over a system but the developer may enforce system requirements through a lease agreement, thereby influencing design and construction". So what kind of control are we talking about - sole, independent, or control with influence by other?

Since the latter is my case, future tenant will be guided by lease agreement set by owner for most of the items, do I check Owner/Developer because of the influence on future design, Tenant because the tenant will have control over the system in their TI and Lease Agreement because there is one?

If that is the case, there will be pages of rows with 3 radio buttons checked. That doesn't seem to yield many distinctions in the information given the seeming complexity of the form.

I understand what they are after, but does anyone know how to fill out the form correctly?

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Dec 27 2012 LEEDuser Member 8973 Thumbs Up

And a few more questions about the plumbing section. There are three lav faucets - public lav with aerator, public metering lav with aerator and metering faucets. If I am specifying public metering lav with aerator, do I only address that row? And then what, mark the other two rows as Not in Project Scope? And there's also a janitor's sink. As farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). as I'm aware, janitor's sinks aren't part of any plumbing LEED requirements at this point. So why include it here?

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emily reese Sustainability Consultant / Facility Planner, Jacobs Engineering Nov 14 2013 LEEDuser Member 1511 Thumbs Up

Hi there,

Did you ever get feedback on the specifics of this form? This is my first time filling it out for a CS project, and I'm having a hard time deciding which boxes are most appropriate to check. It's also hard to find definite guidance to use when explaining it to the client, too.
We have the Owner/developer controlling everything currently in the project scope. The future tenants have guidelines given to them in a lease agreement. Their work would not start until the CS project is complete. Most of our questions are between the Tenant and Lease Agreement columns.

It does not appear that any questions on this thread have ever been addressed...

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Nov 14 2013 LEEDuser Member 8973 Thumbs Up

Hi Emily,
I talked to a reviewer and got some guidance, so this is what I did on my recently certified warehouse with one small spec office build out in the corner but otherwise cold dark shell.

So radio button wise, the project doesn't have any lobbies or corridors at all so all that stuff was Not in Scope. Under the Build Out section, I checked both the Owner/Developer and Tenant boxes for everything and checked lease agreement also where applicable. Same thing under HVAC and Electrical except most everything was Not in Scope. With respect to the redundant metered faucet issue, I picked one to reflect our case and made the other one Not in Scope.

After all of which, consisting of checking a whole lot of boxes, I explained the heck out of it in the Special Circumstances. It seems to have worked. Weird form huh? Good luck.

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emily reese Sustainability Consultant / Facility Planner, Jacobs Engineering Nov 14 2013 LEEDuser Member 1511 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the quick response!
Yes, it does seem like an odd form, especially without a good description of what LEED considers each column to mean. I think we will go on instinct and do what you did: Explain everything in a little narrative, just in case. I don't think there's anything unusual about our project, but we'll probably do it anyway, just in case, to explain our logic.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International
Dec 13 2012
Guest
3014 Thumbs Up

What is a main corridor

I just noticed that on PIf5 on Table PIf5-1 the second part refers to a main corridor and the third part refers to a secondary lobby/corridors. What does this mean?

Our project is an speculative office building, with a main lobby.

Is main corridor the one that takes you from the lobby towards the elevators? and, Are secondary corridors all the ones that takes you from the elevator lobby (levels 2, 3, 4, 5, etc) to the leasable space?

Thanks!!

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Ronald Dean Sumac Inc. Apr 19 2013 LEEDuser Member 1937 Thumbs Up

I would like to have the same clarifications for these terms:
Main Lobby, Main corridors and Secondary corridors. Is there any stardard for this?

Thanks in advance.

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