CS-2009 SSc3: Brownfield Redevelopment

  • NC_CS_SSc3_Type3_Brownfield Diagram
  • Redevelop land or facilities

    The intent of this credit is to reduce the development pressure on undeveloped land by encouraging development of land that has access to existing infrastructure and services. 

    This credit is straightforward. You can earn it if your site has been designated a brownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or possible presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. by a state, local or federal agency and if the site is remediated to meet appropriate standards for development. 

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines “brownfields” as “abandoned, idled, or under-used industrial and commercial facilities where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination.” 

    Your documentation needs to include brownfield designation, records of testing conducted on the site, and records of the remediation performed.

    Asbestos can qualify, lead may not

    Asbestos and other non-soil contamination in an existing structure may also qualify for brownfield redevelopment, per LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 5/9/2011 ID#10001. An asbestos plan should be developed by a qualified environmental professional and documented according to EPA and state regulations.

    Having lead paint on walls in the building is not a sufficient threshold to earn this credit. The physical site must have been contaminated and need remediation in some way in order to earn the credit.

    A degraded brownfield site and erosion-prone streambed were restored into an ecologically productive wetland at the Real Goods Solar Living Center. Photo – Alex Wilson

    Benefits to the environment

    Brownfield projects remediate damaged land, creating clean, highly developable properties, often with good access to utility and public infrastructure. Focusing development on brownfields restores vacant lands, reconnecting communities ravaged by industrial waste and abandonment.

    In addition, techniques for remediating brownfields may restore water quality and wildlife habitat on marginal sites—many brownfields are located along urban waterways in need of ecological restorationEcological restoration is the process of assisting in the recovery and management of ecological integrity and includes biodiversity, ecological processes and structures, regional and historical context, and sustainable cultural practices.. Brownfield development can often take advantage of creative financing packages offered by state and local governments that aim to focus economic activity in depressed or abandoned areas. 

    Actual remediation not always necessary

    You can occasionally earn this credit even if no actual remediation is performed, because brownfields are often designated as such simply because of the perception that contamination is present due to a site’s history of use, abandoned or derelict condition, adjacent industrial sites. If investigation finds that contamination is not present despite the brownfield determination, you can still earn the credit.

    What’s the catch?

    If a site’s owner uncovers information that leads to the site being classified as a brownfield in need of remediation, then the owner will need to perform the remediation in order to qualify for the credit. This will require detailed site investigation to understand the nature of contamination and the steps needed for remediation. 

    • Remediation can be expensive, both in terms of cost and time. Begin the Environmental Assessment process early to avoid design and permitting problems in later phases.
    • Weigh the value of the remediated property against cleanup costs to determine whether the site is economically viable for redevelopment.
    • Work with your community as early as possible in the project to communicate the goals of site remediation and eventual use of the property. Good communication will help to prevent misunderstandings and the potential for legal issues. Professional facilitators can be helpful in developing your relationship with the community and building a strong local partnership.
    • Brownfield owners become part of the chain of title, and as such, are partly responsible for environmental liability for the property. However, there are established legal ways to reduce the risk that you will be sued for costs of environmental cleanup or personal injury. Consult an attorney experienced in brownfield real estate law before entering into your purchase.
    • Buyer and seller can work out financial responsibility for liabilities during the sale transaction. 
    • Environmental liability insurance can insure against unknown cleanup costs or cap the policyholder’s liability for cleanup cost overruns.
    • Federal and state governments have devised special programs to encourage brownfield reuse, including special protection from liability.

    Steps to evaluate your site for contamination

    • If you suspect that your project site is contaminated, but it has not been designated a brownfield by a local, state, or federal agency, you will need to conduct a preliminary assessment to establish the likelihood of contamination.Petco Park in San Diego is the centerpiece of a 26-block brownfield redevelopment project in which the City acquired properties through eminent domain. Photo – SCS Engineers
    • This study is a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment An evaluation of an area's aboveground and subsurface characteristics, including its structures, geology, and hydrology. Site assessments typically help determine whether contamination has occurred and the extent and concentration of any release of pollutants. Remediation decisions rely on information generated during site assessments.(ESA), ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services E1903-11. Phase I looks at prior land use records, including use of adjacent and nearby sites. It does not require special soil tests and must be performed by an environmental professional. 
    • A Phase I ESA is not necessary if the site has a clear indication of contamination from previous development, such as underground storage tanks for hazardous substances, or if the site was historically used for heavy industry. 
    • If the contamination is obvious, or the Phase I study indicates the likelihood of contamination, then further development will require a Phase II ESA (ASTM E1903-11). Phase II requires soil testing to measure the degree of contamination, determine whether remediation is required, and outline proposed steps for remediation.

    Questions to consider before approaching this credit

    • Has the site already been remediated to an appropriate standard for redevelopment?  This may be the case if a previous owner sought to develop the property and performed remediation as a condition of sale. 
    • Are there known or obvious contaminants (eliminates need for Phase I Environmental Site Assessment)?
    • Has a Phase II Environmental Site Assessment been conducted on the site?

    FAQs for SSc3

    Is earning one point for this credit an appropriate reward, given the work involved?

    Given the effort, expense, and risk involved in many brownfield projects, one LEED point is probably not a worthy reward. It would probably be more useful to think of this credit as a token, and to acknowledge that developers aren't likely to choose a brownfield site to earn this point. There is a silver lining, however, in that urban infill sites, which are often brownfields, are typically well-rewarded in LEED's density-related credits.

    Do we have to get testing done even if contamination is obviously present?

    Yes, an environmental professional will need to verify that contamination is located on the site using the specified standards for testing and verification. This helps identify the scope of contamination and thus the scope of remediation that will be required.

    If the remediation work is not part of the LEED project scope, can I still achieve this credit?

    No. If the remediation occurred prior to when the property was purchased, you are no longer developing a contaminated site. SSc3 addresses sites that are subject to corrective action; it doesn't address the past history of the site.

    Are there minimum contamination thresholds that need to be met in order for a site to be classified as a brownfield?

    Brownfield requirements are determined at the federal, state, or local level and vary from one jurisdiction to another. For LEED, there are no minimum thresholds (volume or area) required to meet this credit as long as the site—or a portion of it—is classified as a brownfield.

    Am I eligible to earn the credit if there is ongoing remediation on my project site and remediation is not yet complete?

    Yes, a project team may earn the credit even when remediation is not complete provided there is an approved ongoing remediation plan in place and the applicable regulatory authority has approved the site for its intended use.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Brownfield Sites


  • Determine whether your project site has been designated a brownfield by local, state, or federal standards, or has been documented as contaminated through an ASTM-E-1903-97, Phase II, Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) or local voluntary cleanup program. 


  • If you have reason to believe that your project site is contaminated, but it has not yet been designated Petco Park in San Diego is the centerpiece of a 26-block brownfield redevelopment project in which the City acquired properties through eminent domain. Photo – SCS Engineersas such by a local, state, or federal agency, hire a qualified environmental consultant, engineer, or hazardous materials remediation professional to conduct an ASTM-E-1903-97, Phase II, ESA to determine the degree of contamination and whether remediation is required. 


  • A Phase II ESA involves a detailed look at the site. The environmental professional takes samples and tests for contaminants on the grounds and within existing structures. High concentrations of heavy metals, toxic chemicals, or asbestos may require remediation. Petroleum byproducts, pesticides, solvents, and mold may also lead to remediation, depending on the specific chemicals and concentrations. 


  • Research liability issues, financial obligations and incentives, community interest, remediation options, and regulatory requirements. You’ll need to consult with local, state, and federal regulatory agencies to determine much of the information. 


  • It’s important to have the support of the community when remediating a brownfield. Consider holding an open meeting to educate members of the community about the actual and perceived risks of remediating a brownfield, especially in terms of impacts on groundwater and the potential risks associated with the disruption of contaminated soils. 


  • If remediation is required, seek out qualified environmental firms to provide bids to perform the work. 


  • Once hired, this firm will document the process and demonstrate the removal of identified contaminants to meet the appropriate thresholds and credit requirements. 


  • Determine the best strategy for your site, contamination type, and degree of concentrations in collaboration with your environmental professional. Set a timeline within which to determine any impact on your construction schedule. (See Schematic Design, below, for more detail on common remediation options.)


  • Invite several companies to bid on the creation and implementation of a master plan for site remediation. This strategy enables comparison of remediation techniques and costs. Try to contract with an environmental firm early in the project.


  • Cleaning up contaminated sites to appropriate standards for development can be costly due to the time required to determine the level of contamination, analyze various cleanup options, and carry out the remediation. 


  • Work with local, state, and federal regulatory agencies to research available funding for the remediation of your contaminated project site. 


  • International projects can still achieve this credit even if the local government agency has not designated it as a brownfield by pursuing the Option 1 compliance path by conducting your own ASTM E1903-97 Phase II Environmental Site Assessment.


  • Asbestos 


  • If your project building was built prior to the late 1970s, there may be some form of asbestos present in piping insulation, siding, or other materials. If you are undergoing major renovations, it’s likely that some asbestos will need to be removed from the building or remediated. However, not all types need to be remediated. To determine whether you will need to remediate asbestos on your project site, hire a qualified environmental professional to inventory asbestos and document it according to EPA Reg. 40-CFR-763 or similar state or local standard, whichever is most stringent.  


  • Make sure your environmental professional provides a summary of the asbestos inventory and a plan for its remediation. The plan must document the type, amount, and location of the contamination, and create a remediation plan following EPA Reg. 40-CFR-763 and the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) program. This will serve as your documentation for this credit.  

Schematic Design

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  • Brownfield


  • Hire a qualified environmental engineer or professional to manage the remediation effort according to the master remediation plan. 


  • Each contaminated site requires different remediation efforts. The remediation technique you use should be based on the type, extent, and concentration of contamination, as well as the risk level. Some examples of remediation techniques are: 

    • Pump-and-treat, a process in which contaminated groundwater is brought up from the subsurface for treatment.
    • In situ remediation, which involves placing injection wells in the natural path of groundwater for treatment of contaminants.
    • Phytoremediation, which involves planting the site with plants that uptake and store contamination within the plant tissue.      
    • Haul-away, where the contaminated soil is removed from the site and used as daily cover at the landfill.

  • Depending on the extent and type of remediation required, it is possible that some site features may be affected. For example, it may be less expensive to cap contaminated soils with concrete, leaving no room for landscaping or stormwater infiltration. This can have an effect on other site credits your project is attempting, such as SSc5.1: Protect or Restore Habitat and SSc6.1 and SSc6.2: Stormwater Management.


  • After remediation is completed, your environmental professional should write a letter stating that the site cleanup has been conducted to local, state, or federal standards. This letter should describe the actual remediation steps in detail.


  • Asbestos 


  • Remediate asbestos according to accepted standards, such as NESHAP or comparable state regulations. 

Design Development

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  • Brownfield


  • Prepare the documentation for submission to LEED Online. Documents should include:

    • The brownfield designation by a local, state, or federal agency or a summary of the Phase II ESA, signed by a qualified environmental consultant, that outlines the type and amount of contamination and the remediation required to reduce the contamination to acceptable levels. 
    • A summary of the remediation plan and its implementation, signed by a qualified environmental consultant, that includes final measurements of contamination levels as compared to the initial maximum contaminant thresholds. 

  • Asbestos 


  • Prepare documentation for submission to LEED Online. These documents should include:

    • A summary of the asbestos inventory, signed by an environmental consultant qualified in asbestos investigation.
    • A summary of the remediation plan and its implementation, including reference to compliance with NESHAP or similar standard, signed by a qualified asbestos removal contractor. 

Construction

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  • Prior to issuance of the Certificate of Occupancy, ensure that all remediation efforts have been completed, properly documented, and submitted to the proper authorities.    


  • Verify any ongoing requirements with your regulating agency, as some state and local agencies require a contaminated and remediated site to be retested or monitored on an ongoing basis.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • If required by the remediation plan, monitor the levels of identified chemicals onsite after the remediation is complete to ensure that contamination remains below the maximum thresholds. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Core and Shell Development

    SS Credit 3: Brownfield redevelopment

    1 Point

    Intent

    To rehabilitate damaged sites where development is complicated by environmental contamination and to reduce pressure on undeveloped land.

    Requirements

    OPTION 1

    Develop on a site documented as contaminated by means of an ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services E1903-97 Phase II Environmental Site Assessment or a local voluntary cleanup program. Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ASTM E1903-97 Phase II Environmental Site Assessment.

    OR

    OPTION 2

    Develop on a site defined as a brownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or possible presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. by a local, state, tribal or national government agency, whichever is most stringent.

    For projects where asbestos is found and remediated also earn this credit. Testing should be done in accordance with EPA Reg 40CFR part 763, when applicable.

    Streamlined path available

    Achievement of this credit can be documented via a LEED ND v2009 submittal. For more information check out this article.

    SITES-LEED Equivalency

    This LEED credit (or a component of this credit) has been established as equivalent to a SITES v2 credit or component. For more information on using the equivalency as a substitution in your LEED or SITES project, see this article and guidance document.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    During the site selection process, give preference to brownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or possible presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. sites. Identify tax incentives and property cost savings. Coordinate site development plans with remediation activity, as appropriate.

    For projects where asbestos is found, prepare executive summary—level content from the investigation’’s report explaining the extent of the contamination and required action as well as documentation indicating an acceptable level of remediation was achieved based on an acceptable standard, such as RCRAThe Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) addresses active and future facilities and was enacted in 1976 to give EPA authority to control hazardous wastes from cradle to grave, including generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal. Some nonhazardous wastes are also covered under RCRA., or NESHAPs.

Web Tools

U.S. EPA, Sustainable Redevelopment of Brownfields Program

This is a comprehensive website on brownfields that includes projects, initiatives, tools, tax incentives and other resources to address brownfield remediation and redevelopment. For information by phone, contact your regional EPA office.


EPA Reg. 40 CFR 763

This EPA website provides laws and federal regulations relevant to asbestos.


U.S. EPA, Asbestos

This website provides information on the health effects of asbestos, where it is commonly found, and the laws and regulations governing testing of sites containing asbestos.

Publications

NESHAP – demolition practices update

This link outlines the Asbestos Remediation guidelines.

Organizations

Council of Development Finance Agencies

This organization offers options for brownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or possible presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. refinancing.


Environmental Law Institute, Brownfields Center

The Environmental Law Institute’s Brownfields Center provides information on brownfields cleanup and redevelopment with a focus on the concerns and needs of community groups across the country.

Technical Guides

ASTM E1527-05

This document defines good commercial and customary practice in the United States of America for conducting an environmental site assessment of a parcel of commercial real estate with respect to the range of contaminants within the scope of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act.


ASTM E1903-11

This document is intended for use on a voluntary basis by parties who wish to evaluate known releases or likely release areas identified by the user or Phase II assessor.


U.S. EPA, Asbestos

This website provides information on the health effets of asbestos, where it is commonly found, and the laws and regulations governing testing of sites containing asbestos.

Other

LEED Interpretation Ruling for Asbestos

This is a LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. Ruling that spells out the requirements to use asbestos remediation as an alternative compliance path for this credit.

LEED Online Forms: CS-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CS-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions on these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

Asbestos Abatement

This is a sample narrative for a project in NYC that is showing that the local regulation for asbestos removal is an acceptable standard.

11 Comments

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Julia Otero Jacobs
Jan 23 2017
LEEDuser Member
3 Thumbs Up

Soil contaminated (by oil/diesel)

Project Location: Spain

We are working in a project where a tank containing 6,000 lt of fuel has been detected in the soil. This tank is confined within a concrete structure to prevents soil contamination and into this structure were with soil in it. Some tests are conducted and we find that the soil into the concrete structure was contaminated and the soil out of this structure were not. My question is if the remediation of the soil into the structure qualifies the site for the brownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or possible presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. redevelopment credit?.

Thanks in advance,

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Martin Meehan Principal Meehan Associates
Feb 08 2016
LEEDuser Member
445 Thumbs Up

Contaminated soil found during excavation.

Project Location: Ireland

The project involved the demolition of a existing building that had asbestos present on it. Asbestos were removed prior to demolition and the process was properly documented for LEED.

During excavation works, a small portion of soil contaminated (with oil/diesel) was extracted, it was rejected from the landfill and moved to a special facility.

A survey of this soil was not conducted. Does this mean the credit is lost or can it be achieved only by documenting this remediation?

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Larry Sims Principal, Studio4, LLC Feb 08 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3555 Thumbs Up

Martin, although the remediation had been completed, the credit is not necessarily lost if you have an environmental consultant confirm the fact that the on-site soils were contaminated and were properly remediated. That said, I can’t predict how an environmental consultant could confirm the on-site soils were contaminated if the consultant wasn’t on-site before the soils were removed.

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Nereyda Rodriguez Director of Sustainable Design Miller Dyer Spears
Aug 06 2013
LEEDuser Member
62 Thumbs Up

Asbestos abatement for existing building renovation

The Phase I Environmental Site Assessment indicated the property as having "no Recognized Environmental Conditions in connection with the property", BUT the building has asbestos containing materials and PCB containing materials that will need to be removed.
How do I fill out the SSc3 credit form for an existing building that contains asbestos/PCBs, since none of the 3 check boxes apply? Is this considered "Special circumstances preclude documentation of credit compliance with the submittal requirements
outlined in this form." AND/OR
"The project team is using an alternative compliance approach in lieu of standard submittal paths."?

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Larry Sims Principal, Studio4, LLC Aug 07 2013 LEEDuser Expert 3555 Thumbs Up

Nereyda

I’m having difficulty seeing 3 options available for SSc3 as related to CS, or NC and EB on any submittal template. You can go to the “Documentation Toolkit” section (located on the grey bar above) and view each version of the LEED Online Forms for CS-2009 SSc3 to see your available options.

I assume neither of the 2 options applies here, so you could select the “The project team is using an alternative compliance approach in lieu of standard submittal paths.” checkbox and submit an executive summary report as developed by an environmental professional. All contamination types must be documented with an appropriate remediation plan. GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). shouldn’t have an issue with this as long as the contamination is discovered and remediated, to whatever degree.

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charles bell principal theGreenTeam, Inc.
Oct 18 2012
Guest
1014 Thumbs Up

LUSTs discovered and remediated

Project is urban core multi-story mixed use CS. Leaking Underground Storage was discovered and remediated (including soil) and identification of water wells in the vicinity. Project did not perform Phase 1 or other Environmental Assessment. Project did provide reports by Licensed EE group and proper documents were submitted to Texas DEQ and other agencies as required. Question is - will this qualify for this credit?

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Larry Sims Principal, Studio4, LLC Oct 22 2012 LEEDuser Expert 3555 Thumbs Up

Charles,
Projects have been awarded this credit if conditions had been met by a state DEQ and other agencies, provided: 1. Documentation that the Texas DEQ had determined that this site was contaminated to a level that must be remediated prior to development. 2. Documentation that the site had been remediated to Texas DEQ requirements. If water wells are present, periodic monitoring may be required.

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Yong Lee Low ESD Consultancy ZEB-Technology Pte Ltd
Jul 26 2010
LEEDuser Member
2492 Thumbs Up

Project Site: Commercial Salt Pan

The project site was a commercial salt pan, with parts of the site also serving as fishery and shrimp pool. The site hence has a high salt content and water table. The process of remediation was through the removal of part of the contaminated soil and addition of new soil for stabilization for upto 3.5m with soil dredged from nearby rivers. Would this qualify for compliance with the credit.

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Larry Sims Principal, Studio4, LLC Jul 26 2010 LEEDuser Expert 3555 Thumbs Up

Shilpi,

SCENARIO ONE: Assumptions: 1) the site was determined to be contaminated as defined by SSc3 BrownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or possible presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. Redevelopment, via Option 1 or Option 2; 2) the contamination was remediated appropriately; 3) the site ownership, when the remediation was conducted, is the same as when the project was registered. If these three assumptions are correct, then the project should qualify for the credit. "Dredge and Fill" operations in instances such as this is permitted.

SCENARIO TWO: If the site was determined to be contaminated, your comment regarding the “removal of part of the contaminated soil” would be cause for concern and I don’t see how you are protecting the environment or human health by leaving some parts of the site contaminated. Given the fact that contaminated sites are determined by the presence of a contamination and not by the quantity of contamination, the project could not earn the credit. Although only part of a site needs to be contaminated to earn the credit, you must remediate all of the contamination.

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Kelly Pimmel
Jun 25 2010
Guest
219 Thumbs Up

Asbestos abatement for existing buildings prior to demolition

I'm working on two projects (LEED - CS v2 and LEED 2009 - NC) that both require the demolition of existing buildings on the project sites. The existing buildings have asbestos and other hazardous materials that have been identified and will be professionally abated prior to demolition. Do you think this qualifies the sites for the BrownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or possible presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. Redevelopment credit even though the projects are not major renovations?

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David Posada Integrated Design & LEED Specialist, SERA Architects Jun 28 2010 Guest 21447 Thumbs Up

Yes - We've seen a project acheive this credit under version 2.2 where an existing building being demolished for a new construction project contained asbestos.

The probable presence of asbestos in a number of the existing building materials was identified with a Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment and confirmed by an Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) survey. The abatement was carried out by a licensed contractor before demolition of the building.

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