CS-2009 SSc4.3: Alternative Transportation—Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles

  • CS_SSc4-3_Type1_LowEmittingVehicles Diagram
  • Promote use of high efficiency vehicles

    This credit is focused on limiting environmental impacts from automobile use. It targets commuting specifically, but also addresses company vehicle fleets, maintenance vehicles, and buses.

    Projects that have substantial parking area may find the requirements of this credit to be low-hanging fruit, because they should easily be able to designate preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy., which is one option. There are other options for compliance, all of varying difficulty and requiring varying levels of commitment from the project owner.

    Pick a path and go with it

    It’s wise to choose your compliance path early in the process, especially since some of the options require infrastructure development, such as alternative fueling stations. 

    LE/FE vehicle signageMake sure that you base your choice on the greatest likelihood that building occupants will take advantage of the resources you provide. While this is not often done, surveying occupants or prospective occupants is a good way to determine which strategy is likely to have the highest impact.

    A range of options

    Option 1: Providing preferred parking for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles is by far the most cost-effective option for projects that have onsite parking managed by the building ownership. “Preferred” is defined as easy to access (such as close to building entrances), or available at a discounted price.

    Option 2: Providing onsite alternative fueling stations for 3% of total vehicle parking capacity is a bit more involved and potentially more expensive. The most readily accessible strategy here is providing plug outlets for electric cars.  

    Parking signageParking is not a prerequisite

    Projects that do not provide onsite parking can still earn this credit by pursuing Option 4 and implementing a low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicle-sharing program (many residential projects prefer this option). Projects may also earn the credit by pursuing Option 2, providing alternative fueling stations onsite.

    Signage matters

    Parking signage for this credit must typically include the terms "Low-Emitting" and/or 'Fuel-Efficient," with the only exceptions being "Zero Emissions Vehicles" or "ACEEE 40+." Signage using solely terms like "Alternative Fuel Vehicles," "Hybrid Vehicles," or "Electric Vehicles" is not sufficient, because some hybrid vehicles, etc., do not meet the LE/FE definition.

  • Don't double-count parking spaces

    If your project is pursuing both SSc4.3 and SSc4.4, be careful not to double-count preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces allotted for those credits. The total number of preferred parking spaces must be equal to those required for SSc4.3, plus those required for SSc4.4. The same parking space cannot count for both credits (although they do not have to be distinguished through signage).

  • FAQs for SSc4.3

    Do all hybrid vehicles automatically qualify for this credit?

    No. The qualifying list rates vehicles for fuel efficiency as well as emissions. Most—but not all—hybrids meet the criteria. There are also non-hybrid cars that qualify for the credit. Always check the most up-to-date list for qualifying vehicles. The list is long and inclusive.

    Can a project pursue this credit via a combination of Option 1 (preferred parking) and Option 2 (alternative fueling stations)?

    This would probably be approved by LEED, depending on specifics, but you would need to get an official ruling—either a  CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide or LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org..

    How should the signage read for preferred parking spaces?

    Neither USGBC or GBCI has provided a mandatory signage design, but there has been consistent guidance indicating that one or more of the following terms must be on the sign:

    • Low-Emitting
    • Fuel-Efficient
    • Zero Emissions
    • ACEEE 40+

    Some project teams have struggled with this because they think it does not clearly convey the concept to occupants, but nonetheless, this has been the pattern of review comments from GBCI. For projects that want to use additional terms, they may use one of more of the above terms, in combination with any of the following terms.

    • Alternative Fuel Vehicles
    • Hybrid Vehicles
    • Electric Vehicles

    These terms are not sufficient on their own, however, as not all hybrid vehicles are low-emitting, for example.

    For electric vehicle charging stations, how are the parameters established for fueling capacity?

    Typically credit is given for each available preferred parking spot with a separate charging plug. If a charging station provides a fast charge and the project wants to have that reflected in its credit calculations, then the project team should provide evidence from both the charging system manufacturer and the building or parking management showing that the logistics of allowing multiple vehicles to share a single charging station will be managed accordingly.

    I am working on a project with no parking spaces allocated. Can I earn this credit?

    Yes, some projects have earned this credit with a regional car-sharing program that locates a publicly accessible car share vehicle adjacent to the project site.

    Our project is outside the U.S., and the LEED-approved ACEEE Green Score and CARB ratings and classifications don't apply to many vehicles. Is there another approach that is accepted?

    Only in Brazil, where projects can benefit from the approval of a regional program in LEED Interpretation #10230. GBCI's policy is that until a Global alternative compliance path (ACP) or LEED Interpretation comes out, proposals for non-standard approaches must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis by individual review teams. This means that some LEED projects may be able to create a successful approach, and some might have difficulty—a situation that is consistent with what LEEDuser has heard about LEED review comments.

    Should I consider motorbikes and parking spaces for them under this credit? What about fleet vehicles?

    Fleet vehicle and storage spaces—for example, spaces for school buses, military vehicles, rental cars, or tractor trailers—are not counted in the number of total parking spaces, but commuter spaces are counted, including those dedicated to atypical vehicles such as motorcycles.

    According to GBCI, an "atypical" vehicle used for commuting, such as a motorcycle, should be counted the same as a "standard" passenger car parking space.  The amount of preferred parking provided should be distributed evenly among the various parking space types.

    For example, if 40% of the project’s parking is for motorcycles, 60% of the total parking is for standard passenger vehicles, and 10 preferred spaces are required to earn the credit, the preferred spaces should be distributed such that four preferred spaces (40%) are provided for motorcycles and six preferred spaces (60%) are provided for passenger vehicles.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • There are two options available for attaining this credit. Determine the most feasible compliance path for your project early in the process:

    • Option 1: Provide preferred parking for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles for 5% of total parking capacity or, a discounted parking rate (at least 20%) for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles.
    • Option 2: Install alternative-fuel stations for 3% of parking capacity.

  • Costs for each option are very different, and occur at different times. Don't forget to factor in infrastructure development, administration costs, procurement costs, and maintenance and upkeep costs. For example, installing fueling stations is much more expensive than providing preferred parking spaces with signage.


  • Simply providing preferred parking for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles is the easiest way to comply with this credit. It is also a low-cost option.   


  • Consider the feasibility of each option based on your site location. Is your project located in a dense urban environment where most people commute to work via mass transit, or are you in a suburban or rural area where most people drive to work, and may appreciate a vehicle-sharing program? Also consider things like whether there are alternative-fuel vehicles used by occupants or whether occupants tend to use low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles. Are HOV (high-occupancy vehicle) lanes available? These types of questions will help to determine an appropriate approach to this credit.  


  • Consider the preference of building occupants so as not to dedicate resources to programs or infrastructure that will remain idle and not serve their intended audience. Is the organizational culture such that employees would appreciate such amenities? Depending on the building type, building occupants can be surveyed to assess the demand for amenities relating to low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles. If you are planning on providing alternative-fuel refueling stations, assess what kind of fuel is preferred.


  • If the project team is committed to creating a comprehensive transportation management plan to qualify for an Exemplary Performance point through IDc1, dedicating the resources upfront to develop and implement a vehicle-sharing program makes sense, as it will be folded into the broader transportation plan.


  • A residential building in a dense urban area that does not have parking facilities may favor a vehicle-sharing program as a way of attracting new tenants and earning the credit at the same time. 


  • The same parking space cannot contribute to both SSc4.3 and SSc4.4 by being designated for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles (SSc4.3) and carpools or vanpools (SSc4.4).   

Schematic Design

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  • Refer to the California Air Resources Board Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEV) list and to the American Council for an Energy Efficiency Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide to determine which vehicles are classified as low-emitting and fuel-efficient. (See Resources.)


  • Hybrid and electric vehicles are not the only ones considered low-emitting and fuel-efficient. Many common gasoline vehicles with mileage efficiency of 21 mpg and above also meet that description depending on their make, model, fuel efficiency and emissions. 


  • “Preferred parking” refers to parking spaces near the building entrance or to discounted parking rates (minimum 20% discount), which must be offered to all eligible parking customers. Preferred parking is separate from, and should not be confused with disabled parking. Preferred spaces should be broken out evenly for the various types of parking spaces that are provided in the project—automobiles, trailers, compact cars, etc. Spaces for vehicles integal to the facilities process such as fleet or "inventory" vehicles can be excluded from calculations.


  • In a parking-garage, look to the location of disabled parking spaces for guidance on what is “preferred.” This may be on the lowest floor, or it may be closest to stairwells or elevators spread out over multiple floors.   


  • If it is not possible to reserve designated parking spaces close to the main entrance for LE and FE vehicles, comply by offering discounted rates for parking through coupons, vouchers, or other similar incentive programs. 


  • Some past projects have been able to designate preferred parking spaces in off-site parking areas attributed to the project that were not within the LEED scope or boundary, as long as they were within one-quarter mile of the project's main entrance or serviced by a shuttle. These preferred spaces had to be reserved for LEED project building occupants only. Project teams with similar circumstances need to consult with GBCI to see if taking a similar approach is allowed.


  • Since there are no “LEED police” to check compliance with parking rules after a project’s completion, it is the project owner’s responsibility to meet the intent of the credit throughout the operations phase using the honor system. Some owners choose to screen occupants’ cars and distribute stickers to those that are allowed to park in designated preferred-parking spaces.


  •  Option 1: Provide Preferred Parking


  • Calculate the total vehicle parking capacity of the site and allocate 5% of it for preferred parking spaces for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles.  


  • Calculations should be based on any parking spaces within the LEED project boundary. If some of the parking associated with the building is onsite and some is off-site, confirm the appropriate approach with GBCI. 


  • Alternatively, if the LEED boundary includes a multi-story garage that serves multiple buildings in addition to the LEED project, all the parking spaces within the LEED boundary must be included for calculations even if only a portion of the parking area is expected to be for the project building’s use. 


  • If designating parking spaces is not desirable, the credit can be achieved by providing a discounted parking rate of at least 20% for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles.  


  • Option 2: Refueling Stations


  • Incorporate alternative fueling stations into your plan early in the design stage. 


  • Calculate the total vehicle parking capacity of the site and install alternative fuel stations for at least 3% of that capacity. 


  • Fueling stations can be as simple as an electric-car charging outlet in a parking garage, but they must be designed to support street-legal, long-range vehicles (not electric golf carts, for example).


  • If installing a electric car-charger, install a 240V conductive power supply (or inductive charger). The emerging market for electric vehicles is expected to require J-1772-compliant outlets, which need a 240V power supply.


  • To assess the demand (potential or future) for alternative fueling stations, conduct surveys to determine the alternative fuel most likely to be used by future building occupants. Consider polling future building occupants via email or a paper survey.


  • Research local code requirements and standards that may apply to installing fueling stations on your project site, including building, fire and electrical codes. Also look into relevant equipment, upkeep, and maintenance of refueling stations.  


  • Project teams should carefully consider available technologies and different fuel sources before installing fueling stations. There are also legal, technical, and safety issues to take into account and deal with early in the process: 

    • Look at the kind of liability that is associated with installing these fueling stations on your project site. 
    • Look at fuel availability and compare the price and requirements of installing fueling stations for different kinds of fuels. Cost will vary depending on the type of fuel and the complexity of installation. 
    • Consider the fueling and charging characteristics of each type of fuel that you are considering. Natural gas fueling facilities, for example, consist of one or more gas compressors, a compressed gas storage tank, and gas dispensing equipment. If you are using another kind of alternative fuel, the equipment requirements may be different, affecting cost and feasibility. 
    • Consider health and safety aspects that may be linked to each alternative fuel option. For example, electric vehicles with batteries should generally be charged in a well-ventilated area.  
    • Consider how easy or difficult it will be for operations personnel to maintain the stations.

  • For liquid fuels like biodiesel and ethanol, provide storage and safe handling procedures for fueling stations. Research a variety of fuels that may be made available to the project occupants. 


  • Providing alternative fueling stations may have significant cost implications, though the popularity of alternative-fuel vehicles is slowly working to make them more cost-competitive. 


  • The project owner may choose to sell the alternative fuel to the public in addition to providing it to building occupants.


  • The costs of installing and maintaining alternative fueling stations should be weighed against the anticipated use of the facilities and the environmental benefits that can accrue from it. 

Design Development

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  • Design your building to include transportation amenities such as preferred parking for low-emitting vehicles or alternative fueling stations, depending on your chosen option. 

Construction Documents

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  • Indicate the locations of all preferred parking spaces on site plans, along with requirements for signage. 


  • If providing alternative-fueling stations, make sure the construction documents include all required specs.  

Construction

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  • Install markings on preferred parking spaces. These can include a sign, striping or both.  


  • Complete the LEED Online credit form, and provide the following supporting documentation, as applicable:

    • Drawings or a site plan that indicates the location and number of preferred parking spaces or alternative-fueling stations. 
    • If discounted parking is offered, provide information about the program and explain how the information is disseminated to building occupants. 
    • Sample signage for preferred parking.
    • Equipment cut sheets and product information for alternative-fueling stations. 
    • Vehicle product information for low-emitting and fuel-efficient cars provided to employees. Include make, model number, and fuel type. 
    • If a vehicle-sharing program is put in place, prepare information about the program, including statistics about users, contracts, and other relevant information.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Continued compliance with the spirit of this credit is largely based on the honor system and the integrity of building management and users. To ensure that preferred parking policies are respected, consider the following strategies:

    • Wherever preferred parking is provided, post signage that identifies preferred parking or alternative-fuel stations.
    • Signage can be as noticeable or discreet as desired, but must clearly demarcate preferred spaces as such. 
    • A sticker program can be implemented to identify cars that qualify to park in preferred parking spaces. 
    • Provide information about the parking program via appropriate channels for your project.
    • Post information about the parking program in entryways and in public areas. 

  • Make sure that operations and maintenance personnel (or a vendor, if involved) are set up to maintain the alternative fueling stations. Provide them with all required information about safety and maintenance procedures.


  • Building staff will also spend time administering the various parking programs: preferred parking, discounted parking, or vehicle-sharing. Procedures and policies for their use must be developed, along with enforcement mechanisms. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Core and Shell Development

    SS Credit 4.3: Alternative transportation - low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles

    3 Points

    Intent

    To reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use.

    Requirements

    Option 1: Preferred or discounted parking

    Provide preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system.1 for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy.2 for 5% of the total vehicle parking capacity of the site. Providing a discounted parking rate is an acceptable substitute for preferred parking for low-emitting/fuel-efficient vehicles. To establish a meaningful incentive in all potential markets, the parking rate must be discounted at least 20%. The discounted rate must be available to all customers (i.e., not limited to the number of customers equal to 5% of the vehicle parking capacity), publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area and available for a minimum of 2 years.

    For project types that demonstrate market barriers to the definition of preferred parking closest to the main entrance, alternatives may be considered on a case-by-case basis.

    OR

    Option 2: Alternative fuel

    Install alternative-fuel fueling stations for 3% of the total vehicle parking capacity of the site. Liquid or gaseous fueling facilities must be separately ventilated or located outdoors.

    1For the purposes of this credit “preferred parking” refers to the parking spots that are closest to the main entrance of the project (exclusive of spaces designated for handicapped persons) or parking passes provided at a discounted price. To establish a meaningful incentive in all potential markets, the parking rate must be discounted at least 20%. The discounted rate must be available to all eligible customers (i.e. not limited to the number of customers equal to 5% of the vehicle parking capacity), publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area, and available for a minimum of 2 years.

    2For the purposes of this credit, low-emitting vehiclesLow-emitting vehicles are classified as zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) by the California Air Resources Board. are defined as vehicles that are classified as Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEVZero-emission vehicles.) by the California Air Resources Board. Fuel-efficient vehicles are defined as vehicles that have achieved a minimum green score of 40 on the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Provide transportation amenities such as alternative-fuel refueling stations. Consider sharing the costs and benefits of refueling stations with neighbors.

    FOOTNOTES

    1 For the purposes of this credit “preferred parking” refers to the parking spots that are closest to the main entrance of the project (exclusive of spaces designated for handicapped persons) or parking passes provided at a discounted price. To establish a meaningful incentive in all potential markets, the parking rate must be discounted at least 20%. The discounted rate must be available to all eligible customers (i.e. not limited to the number of customers equal to 5% of the vehicle parking capacity), publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area, and available for a minimum of 2 years.

    2 For the purposes of this credit, low-emitting vehiclesLow-emitting vehicles are classified as zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) by the California Air Resources Board. are defined as vehicles that are classified as Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEVZero-emission vehicles.) by the California Air Resources Board. Fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. are defined as vehicles that have achieved a minimum green score of 40 on the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide.

Web Tools

American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy

ACEEE is an online, searchable green car guide based on an evaluation of fuel efficiency and tailpipe emissions. It also offers hardcopies of Green Guide to Cars and Trucks, an annual publication of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.

Publications

California Air Resources Board, Cleaner Car Guide

CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it. has developed a comprehensive, searchable buyer’s guide to finding the cleanest cars on the market. The guide also lists advantages clean vehicles offer.


Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology

The Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology offers a useful guide to fuel cells and hydrogen in vehicles. 


Rocky Mountain Institute Transportation Page

This website offers information on the environmental impact of transportation and extensive information about Hypercar vehicles.


Union of Concerned Scientists, Clean Vehicle Program

This site provides information about the latest developments in alternative vehicles, the environmental impact of conventional vehicles, and documents such as the guide Buying a Greener Vehicle: Electric, Hybrids, and Fuel Cells.


U.S. Department of Energy, Fuel Economy

This website offers comparisons of new and used cars and trucks based on gas mileage (mpg), greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution ratings, and safety information.


American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide

A comprehensive list of vehicles that score 40 and above in the rankings. These vehicles are considered LE/FE vehicles. 


List of alternative fuels

A summary of common available alternative fuels in production. 

Technical Guides

Clean Cities Vehicle Buyer’s Guide For Fleets

The Vehicle Buyer’s Guide for Fleets is designed to educate fleet managers and policymakers about alternative fuels and vehicles to help them determine whether the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992 affects them. Use the site to determine whether your fleet is covered under EPAct; obtain pricing and technical specifications for light and heavy-duty AFVs; find an alternative fueling station in your area; or research information about state AFV purchasing incentives and laws.

Organizations

Electric Auto Association

This nonprofit education organization promotes the advancement and widespread adoption of electric vehicles.


Electric Drive Transportation Association

Through policy, information, and market development initiatives, this industry association promotes the use of electric vehicles.


National Biodiesel Board

This trade association, representing the biodiesel industry, serves as the coordinating body for biodiesel research and development in the United States. The website provides information on the purchasing, handling, and use of biodiesel fuels.


Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition

The Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition consists of natural gas companies, vehicle and equipment manufacturers, service providers, environmental groups, and government organizations.


U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Alternative Fuels Data Center

This center provides information on alternative fuels and alternatively fueled vehicles, a locator for alternative fueling stations, and more. Their Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Advanced Technology Vehicle Listing for 2007 can be found online here.

 


City Car Share

Car Share program in the BayA bay is a component of a standard, rectilinear building design. It is the open area defined by a building element such as columns or a window. Typically, there are multiple identical bays in succession. Area – partnering with a program like Car Share may help meet the requirements of a vehicle sharing program. 


Zip Car

Car SharingA system under which multiple households share a pool of automobiles, either through cooperative ownership or through some other mechanism. Service – partnering with a company like Zipcar may help meet the requirements of a vehicle sharing program.

Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan

A comprehensive transportation management plan is one way to earn an Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. point under SSc4. 

Site Plan with Preferred Parking

Document preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. with a site plan like this example.

LEED Online Forms: CS-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CS-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions on these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

78 Comments

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Sofie Absér
Jun 23 2014
LEEDuser Member

Possible to rent parking and make them preferred parking?

Hi! I am working with a project where there are no parking spaces within the project, but parking owned by the municipality very close to the project. Would it be possible to earn this credit by renting x parking spaces from the municipality, and making them preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for low emitting and fuel efficient vehicles? Meaning; do the project owner need to be owner of the parking?

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Jun 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

You can still attempt this credit even if parking is not in your scope. If you are renting a certain number of spaces for your project from the municipality, you can reserve 5% of those spaces for LEFEVs (though they will likely require your signage to state that those spaces are reserved for your building only). Another option would be to ask the owner of the parking to provide reserved spaces for 5% of the total parking capacity.

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Heather Holdridge Sustainability Coordinator Lake/Flato Architects
Mar 07 2014
LEEDuser Member
1262 Thumbs Up

Street parking

I am working on an urban project where parking will be provided across the street from the LEED buiilding. There are a few parallel street parking spots within the LEED project boundary that are closer to our building, but they will all be for limited (2 hours or 30 minute loading) time parking. Will we need to designate these street parking spaces as our preferred LE/FE spots?

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 869 Thumbs Up

Hi, Heather! All you need to do is include a narrative that clearly explains the situation and your reasoning behind choosing the next closest spaces that do not have a time limit. I think this is a very straight forward issue that I don't see GBCI having an issue with at all. Hope that helps!

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Loreana Marciante
Jan 02 2014
LEEDuser Member
2 Thumbs Up

Preferred Parking on two different garage floors

On our project all the parking is underground. Rather than placing all preferred spots on one floor we would like to stack them over two floors close to the parking elevator. Does anyone have any experience with this approach.

Thanks!

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Jan 02 2014 Guest 2389 Thumbs Up

Ellen discussed this on the NC forum for this credit.

There is an interpretation - not that new but recently enforced - that has come to my attention on the Core & Shell page that I wanted to share over here on NC. According to interpretation #10202, it is no longer acceptable to split up preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces among levels of a parking garage - even if they are closest to the vertical circulation. Now, all preferred parking must be on the closest level to the building entrance unless it can show that the walking distance is greater than the driving distance to these spaces.

If you go to that page you can find the discussion http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/SSc4.3?all-comments=true

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Dan Lokken
Nov 07 2013
Guest
5 Thumbs Up

Preferred Parking Requirements

On our campus we are using both LE/FE vehicle preferment as well as carpool preferment. Is it necessary to label the parking as one or the other or can we attain our goal for the credit by calling these spaces preferred spaces for LE/FE or Car Pool drivers

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Nov 08 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

Interesting question. I would assume you could have a single sign that reserves spaces for both as long as you have enough of them for 5% of LEFEVs and 5% of carpooling vehicles. So 10% of total spaces....no double dipping.

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Eric Shamp Principal, Ecotype Consulting Nov 14 2013 LEEDuser Expert 829 Thumbs Up

Dan-
We had the same thought on a LEED for NC project. Our review team did not accept that approach, citing LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #2292. The interesting technicality is that the interpretation states clearly that it applies to LEED C&S projects. Our project is registered under NC, but it would seem that our review team thinks it still applies.

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Nov 15 2013 LEEDuser Member 869 Thumbs Up

Eric and Dan - The requirements for SSc4.3 and SSc4.4 for LEED CS projects are the same for NC projects; therefore, LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #2292 would be applicable. Ellen is correct, though. You could designate the spaces for both LE/FE and car/van pool vehicles if you designated 10% of the preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces.

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Laura Charlier LEED Services Director, Group14 Engineering Nov 19 2013 LEEDuser Member 319 Thumbs Up

We have unsuccessfully used this approach. Here is our review comment:

The LEED Submittal Template has been provided stating that 25 preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces have been designated for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy.. Site plans and details have also been provided.

However, Overall Site Sheet A011 indicates a total of 50 parking spaces designated for either low-emitting/fuel-efficient vehicles or High Occupancy Vehicles. Combining the designated spaces for both low-emitting/fuel-efficient vehicles with High Occupancy Vehicles without ensuring that the minimum required spaces will be reserved for low-emitting and fuel efficient vehicles does not meet the credit requirements.

We received the same comment for SSc4.4 and had to separate the signs.

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Nov 19 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

HI Laura - the way that I'm reading your review comment makes me think that the reviewers don't have a problem with you combining the LEFEV spaces with the carpool spaces, but that they don't think you have the minimum number of spaces to meet the requirement. Were you able to get the credit(s) approved just by separating them and not adding any more spaces?

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Laura Charlier LEED Services Director, Group14 Engineering Nov 19 2013 LEEDuser Member 319 Thumbs Up

Sorry. Should have provided the entire comment. We needed 25 FEV/LEV spaces and 25 carpool spaces based on our total parking. We provided 50 signs that said parking for FEV/LEV or Carpool and they responded to both SSc4.2 and SSc4.4 that we needed separate signs to guarantee that the minimum required spaces would be reserved for each use (or permits which wouldn't work).
Design Application
The LEED Submittal Template has been provided stating that 25 preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces have been designated for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy.. Site plans and details have also been provided.

However, Overall Site Sheet A011 indicates a total of 50 parking spaces designated for either low-emitting/fuel-efficient vehicles or High Occupancy Vehicles. Combining the designated spaces for both low-emitting/fuel-efficient vehicles with High Occupancy Vehicles without ensuring that the minimum required spaces will be reserved for low-emitting and fuel efficient vehicles does not meet the credit requirements.

TECHNICAL ADVICE:
Please provide a revised parking plan highlighting the spaces exclusively designated for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles or provide clarification as to how permits for both low emitting/fuel efficient vehicles and High Occupancy Vehicles will be issued.

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Nov 19 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

Wow, well then I stand corrected. It surprises me that this approach was rejected - their technical advice seems to ask for information on enforcement, which isn't required in any other scenario. I suppose this is to ensure that all the spaces are not taken up by carpooling vehicles, leaving no room for LEFEVs (or vice versa).

Has anyone else had experience with this approach? Did you get the same comment?

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Nov 19 2013 Guest 2389 Thumbs Up

This portion of the comment seems unecessary and confusing "[...]without ensuring that the minimum required spaces will be reserved for low-emitting and fuel efficient vehicles "

If you don't separate them you can't ensure that the spaces will be open for the right number of carpool/LEVs unless you have some parking attendant counting the number of cars and ensuring that not more than 50% of the spaces are taken up by Low Emitting/Fuel efficient vehicles ... right? Theoretically the parking spaces could all be taken up by LEVs and no one carpooling would have any incentive.So you might as well separate them.

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Mary Ostafi Sustainability Specialist HOK
Sep 17 2013
LEEDuser Member
190 Thumbs Up

Preferred Parking for employees or visitors?

Our building has 2 main entrances, one in back where the employees park and one paid lot in front where visitors and general parking is located. The majority of daily people in and out of the building park in back so our stratrgy was to place all the preferred spots there. My question is, are paid lots exempt, and if not, do we need to provide preffered spots in both lots, split 50/50? If you know of a specific CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide that addresses this please let me know.

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Sep 17 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

I don't know about a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide, but my approach in this kind of situation is to reserve spaces in each lot - the intent of the credit is to incentivize employees as well as visitors to drive fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy.. I try to get as close to 5% as I can in each so that bigger lots have more preferred spaces. If you have a good argument to put all the spaces in one lot you can try to submit a narrative explaining your approach but there are no guarantees that will work. I would also think that if one of your lots is paid, you could use the 20% discount approach instead if that makes more sense for your project.

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Kathy Kwong
Aug 16 2013
LEEDuser Member
16 Thumbs Up

Car-shared (zip car) parking spaces

Can car-shared (zip car) parking spaces be accepted as low-emitting /fuel efficient vehicle parking in a project as compliance to option 1? My project does provide parking in basement and is required to provide 9 low-emitting vehiclesLow-emitting vehicles are classified as zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) by the California Air Resources Board. parking. We have currently 11 car-shared parking spaces. What kind of documentation is needed besides floor plan with parking designation.

Thanks!

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Aug 19 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

I think this approach is better suited to Option 4. Take a look at the sample forms - you will get a better understanding of what kind of documentation is required.

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Kathy Kwong Aug 20 2013 LEEDuser Member 16 Thumbs Up

Thanks Ellen!

One more question. Do you know if I can count the parking spaces alloted
for electric vehicle charging stations as part of the LE/FE vehicle preferred (with Low Emitting on sign)? It means the parking spaces will be used for electric car charging as well as preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for LE/FE vehicles.

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emily reese Sustainability Consultant / Facility Planner, Jacobs Engineering Nov 06 2013 LEEDuser Member 437 Thumbs Up

I have a very similar situation to Kathy. Our project is required to provide electric charging stations (though not enough to completely cover our required number of spaces), and we're required to provide allocated parking spaces for Zip cars (though our CS project is not providing the service, itself, only the parking spaces).
We're trying to determine the best way to include these already allocated spaces with the documentation for this credit, and figure out how to sufficiently make up any differences in remaining parking spaces with LEV spots. I tried playing in the form, but Options 3 & 4 are not available for CS projects anyway. I have thoroughly searched all rating system posts for guidance on a combined approach, but there's nothing that has any real meat to it.
Any guidance here would certainly help, too.

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Bernd Schadl Prof.Jürgen Schwarz Consulting GmbH
Jul 24 2013
LEEDuser Member
16 Thumbs Up

Electric fueling stations outside project boundary

Our Core and Shell project is a multi-tenant business building with a parking garage (underground) and is part of a campus area with some more buildings and parking areas. All parking spaces are for use for all FTE’s of the campus area. The owner wants to install electic charging stations for the FTE’s as a part of the building activity. He prefers to situate the charging station not inside the Project boundry but on the campus area near excisting parking spaces (it would be about 300 meters from the entrance of the building). We only found the information that in credt SSc4.3 the preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces have to be closest to the building but no information about the distance of the fueling stations.

So would it be conform with the requirements of the credit SSc4.3 if the fueling stations are installed as part of the building activity on the campus area but not inside of the project boundry?

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Jul 24 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

I don't think that your EV charging stations necessarily have to be preferred to meet the intent of Option 2, but if you are doing a campus-wide approach, you will need to make sure that there are enough charging stations to serve 3% of the total parking capacity of the campus, not just the parking serving your LEED project. Or conversely, if you want to provide charging stations for only 3% of the project's parking capacity, those spaces will need to be reserved specifically for your building only. In that case, it would seem to make more sense to have them all in your parking garage.

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OSCAR DE LA RED LEED AP BD+C PROMEC
May 21 2013
Guest
167 Thumbs Up

SIGNALIZATION SIZE

Is there any requirement for the signalization size and position (on the wall, on the floor, etc..) for credit 4.3 preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. places?

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. May 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

No. The only requirement for the signage is the verbaige.

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GABRIEL MORALES Architect Grupo Syasa
Apr 09 2013
LEEDuser Member
580 Thumbs Up

identify preferential sites

Our project developed, we have an underground parking garage, where 100% of the places will be operated by robotic systems.
How do we identify preferential sites for LEED credits?
regards,

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Apr 09 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

Are you charging to park in this garage? If so, I would think that the 20% discounted rate for qualifying vehicles makes more sense for you.

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GABRIEL MORALES Architect, Grupo Syasa May 28 2013 LEEDuser Member 580 Thumbs Up

Ellen, is not charging, what can we do?
The rate is the same for everyone.
In what way can we establish preferential places?

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. May 28 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

You will have to find some way to incentivize using low emitting/fuel efficient vehicles if you want to achieve this credit. If there is a rate (it is unclear from your statement above), then you would need to discount it. If not, this may be one of those instances where this credit is just not applicable to your project.

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GABRIEL MORALES Architect, Grupo Syasa May 28 2013 LEEDuser Member 580 Thumbs Up

If we establish a discount to low-emission cars, you may earn credit to encourage use.

How do we locate these places in the drawings?

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. May 28 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

If you go with a discounted rate, you won't need to have a drawing to demonstrate compliance. You will need some sort of documentation to prove that you have this discount program in place - a signed statement by the owner and/or some sort of marketing material showing how you intend to inform building occupants of the program would be a good start.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International
Apr 05 2013
LEEDuser Member
1462 Thumbs Up

Tandem Spaces

Our project, due to physical limitations of the site being this quite small, is providing mostly all of the spaces in tandem across 8 underground levels.

According to calculations we need to provide 36 preferred spaces, we located all of this on basement 2 all of them in tandem (18 tandem = 36 spots).

There are a few single spaces on every floor, in fact only 4 of them in each floor are really close to the parking elevator. If we select these 4 as preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. that would make us to place preferred spaces from underground level 2 to underground level 7 (around 6 per level).

Acording to LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 10202 "the preferred parking spaces in a garage are those that are the shortest combined driving distance from the parking garage entrance and walking distance to the project building's main entrance".

We believe that if we provide preferred parking down to the 7th level we wouldn't be complying with LI 10202.

Will provide the 18 tandem spaces for a total of 36 spots on the underground level 2 comply with the credits requirements? Due to marketing barriers more than 80% of spaces need to be provided in tandem becasue of site dimensional limitations and according to the reference guide for projects applyign to LEED-CS that demonstrate market barriers alternative may be consider.

Comments will be really appreciated.

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Apr 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

It is hard to say for sure, but I'm guessing that you are going to have a hard time convincing a reviewer that the tandem spaces are "preferred". I have had success on past projects by spreading out the preferred spaces across all levels and selecting the spaces closest to the vertical circulation on each level. That being said, the interpretation that you referenced seems to indicate that this is no longer an acceptable approach and that preferred spaces should be located on the main vehicle entrance level. Has anyone had this interpretation referenced in a review comment?

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Julie Hendricks Director of EcoServices, Kirksey Apr 05 2013 LEEDuser Member 930 Thumbs Up

Yes, we've had this CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide referenced in our last two submittals on this credit. They now want all the spaces as close to the main entrance level as they can be.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International Apr 05 2013 LEEDuser Member 1462 Thumbs Up

This will be a little bit difficult for projects with compromised space and underground parking, this will be like you either comply with close disctance to entrance or single parking.

Should we call the USGBC to ask for advice? We'll email this same question to the feedback on leed online, When they reply we'll post the answer here.

Julie, would you please provide us with the CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. number so we can see it on the USGBC website?

Thank you very much for your adivces!!

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International Apr 24 2013 LEEDuser Member 1462 Thumbs Up

This is the response we get from GBCI customer service:

"Thank you for your patience as I researched your questions on LEED-CS v2009, SSc4.3. Based on the description provided in your inquiry, we feel that the suggested approach (providing 18 tandem preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces on level 2) appears acceptable. However, please note that Customer Service is not authorized to review or approve compliance approaches outside of the formal review process.

Please provide a narrative with your LEED application submittal explaining why the arrangement described in your inquiry is favored compared to distributing the spaces on multiple levels.

I hope that helps, but if you have any further questions or concerns, please feel free to use the contact form at http://www.gbci.org/contactus and select "Follow up to GBCI Response," inputting your case number from this email's subject line."

So I think we have a chance. We will probably submit it as two preferred parking spaces per company, and it will be preffered since it will be at second underground level and since enterprises are asigned their respective parking spaces as a first come first serve basis, someone whose company has been asigned at the underground level 8 will have the preference to have one or two parking spots replaced by one at the second level.

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American University Sustainability American University
Jan 28 2013
LEEDuser Member
849 Thumbs Up

Biodiesel?

The glossary definition of "alternative-fuel vehiclesAlternative-fuel vehicles use low-polluting, nongasoline fuels such as electricity, hydrogen, propane, compressed natural gas, liquid natural gas, methanol, and ethanol. In LEED, efficient gas-electric hybrid vehicles are included in this group. use low-polluting, non-gasoline fuels such as electricity, hydrogen, propane, compressed natural gas, liquid natural gas, methanol, and ethanol." Biodiesel is not on this list, but would it count as an alternative-fuel vehicle?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 28 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Emily, biodiesel does have a place in some of the SSc4.3 credit requirements, but since any diesel vehicle can run on biodiesel, I think the definition maybe purposeful in not mentioning biodiesel. What credit requirement are you considering this in reference to?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jan 28 2013 LEEDuser Expert 13695 Thumbs Up

I think you would have to define the level of bio diesel. There is a point where the amount of bio oil does require engine modification and this may be something that qualifies. I doubt the GBCI would accept unmodified cars running on B5 to B20 blends as low emitting or alternative. Otherwise, how would you guarantee that the vehicle is always using the environmentally preferred fuel?

In DC, there are buses and vans that do run on bio diesel and have the engine modifications. Last time I checked, you couldn't easily get biodiesel beyon B5 blends in the area and the closest to you was at the Pentagon.

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American University Sustainability, American University Jan 29 2013 LEEDuser Member 849 Thumbs Up

I didn't realize I was posting in the Core & Shell system (sorry), but I guess this is applicable regardless. I'm just wondering because I'm conducting a LEED Green Associate exam prep class and the question came up as we realized biodiesel wasn't listed in the definition.

Here at American University we just started using a B20 blend in our shuttle buses and other diesel powered equipment so the question is relevant to us. You're right that we did nothing to alter the vehicles, but did go to great lengths over the course of almost a decade to add a biodiesel tank on campus and source the fuel.

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Elizabeth Durney Sr. Green Building Consultant KEMA Sustainable Buildings and Operations
Mar 23 2012
Guest
51 Thumbs Up

What is the current definition of Alternative Fuel Vehicles?

Does it include flexfuel cars?

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Samantha Harrell LEED Project Reviewer certificate holder Mar 24 2012 Guest 2511 Thumbs Up

Hi Elizabeth, according to the LEED Online v3 Glossary under Help, Alternative Fuel Vehicles use low-polluting, non-gasoline fuels such as electricity, hydrogen, propane, compressed natural gas, liquid natural gas, methanol, and ethanol. In LEED, efficient gas-electric hybrid vehicles are included in this group.

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Gabriela Hernández Castillo Architect, LEED AP BD+C SYASA - México
Feb 20 2012
Guest
2399 Thumbs Up

Tandem parking

If we provide tandem parking within our building (tandem spaces will be used for valet parking), should we leave these out of the total spaces?

I mean, lets say I have 50 regular spaces and 50 tandem spaces. Should I provide 5% of the 50 regular spaces, or 5% or the 100 spaces?

Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 21 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

David, I would assume that the valet spaces should not be included in the credit calculations.

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant, Taitem Engineering Jan 14 2013 LEEDuser Member 904 Thumbs Up

Tristan or anyone else, can you confirm it is OK to exclude all valet parking spaces in credit calculations? We have a project which has both self and valet parking spaces and I am not positive on how to treat those spaces and which number of total site parking spaces to use.
Thanks!

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Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Jan 14 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2767 Thumbs Up

You cannot exclude valet spaces. The most straighforward approach here would be to provide preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. for 5% of all self-parking spaces and a 20% valet discount for all low emitting and fuel efficient vehicles.

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant, Taitem Engineering Jan 15 2013 LEEDuser Member 904 Thumbs Up

Great, thank you Ellen for this clarification. Much appreciated!

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Landry Watson DPR Construction
Jan 05 2012
LEEDuser Member
60 Thumbs Up

Partial spaces -- round up or round down

I have a calculation for preferred spaces that falls less than .5 of a space (7.35spaces = 5% of 147). In most land use or permit calculations there is specific language indicating that one can round down in these cases. Therefore, 7 spaces would be sufficient to achieve the amount. However, in LOL when I put 7 spaces into the template, the template indicates that I have not documented the amount of spaces required in order to comply. I don't find any language in the guidebook or credit language that indicates that the amount must be GREATER than 5% or... no less than 5% of total parking. Therefore, I'm thinking that rounding down on partial spaces would be allowed.

So how should we deal with partial parking spaces when calculating total required?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jan 06 2012 LEEDuser Expert 13695 Thumbs Up

LEED rounds up because the requirement is for a minimum of 5% and they encourage project teams to do more than that.

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Landry Watson DPR Construction Jan 06 2012 LEEDuser Member 60 Thumbs Up

Thanks. Would it not be wise to indicate so in the calculations of the guidelines? Unless I've erred, I don't see where the guidelines or calculations clearly indicate to round up. Thanks again.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 18 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Landry, it would make sense for USGBC to indicate this, but they haven't done so. It's a tip we pass around on forums like this one.

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Sarah Corbitt Assoc AIA, LEED AP BD+C LS3P
Dec 09 2011
Guest
237 Thumbs Up

Refueling Station As a Separate Project

Hi, there. The project I'm submitting does not have parking within the project boundary. It's a Core and Shell renovation on a tight urban lot. As part of a separate project, my firm is developing a natural gas refueling station on the lot beside this project (no building, just this station). The two lots are separated by a city street, and the project timelines are not concurrent. The refueling station will be complete within 6 months of the building opening. Is it possible to pursue an alternative compliance path for this credit? The city does not require parking here, because this is a dense, downtown zone.

Sarah Corbitt

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 19 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Sarah, are you asking whether the refueling station can help you earn SSc4.3 on the renovation project?

It sounds like they are fundamentally different projects—what do they have in common, other than your firm's involvement? As such, I don't see them being combined.

If there is a way you could combine them, I think you'd have to wait on the renovation LEED submission for the refueling station to be substantially complete.

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Julie Hendricks Director of EcoServices Kirksey
Sep 29 2011
LEEDuser Member
930 Thumbs Up

Combine Option 1 and Option 2?

Have any of you LEED experts out there ever done a combination of preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces and alternative-fuel fueling stations? I just looked through every CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide related to this credit (which was really fun, I assure you) and could find no precedent for this. Our tentative plan for this project is to provide 5% of spaces total, of which approximately 25% would be alternative fuel stations and 75% preferred parking.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 21 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Julie, your approach makes sense to me, although I have heard of trouble on other credits where combining options was not explicitly allowed. Have you gotten approval of this yet?

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Ryan Gaylord Director, CTG Energetics, Inc. Nov 21 2011 LEEDuser Expert 662 Thumbs Up

Hi Julie, I'm am also not aware of precedent for this particular approach. If you haven't already done so, you might file a LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. request to confirm whether or not this approach will be accepted. The approach you described above seems reasonable to me, but you might feel more confident having an official verdict from GBCI.

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Jiri Dobias
Jun 29 2011
LEEDuser Member
1136 Thumbs Up

Automatic Parking System

Is it possible to achieve this credit by choosing the first option (preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system.) and using an automatic parking system. This system is designed for 24 cars therefore I need to offer 2 preferred parkig spaces however the car owner cannot choose where his car will be.
Thank you for any suggestions.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Jun 29 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17194 Thumbs Up

The automatic parking systems we've used don't provide any "preferred" location - since the cars get moved around they don't give the driver of those two preferred spaces a shorter walk or quicker access. If that's true for your system, you could use the discounted parking part of Option 1. There needs to be some real benefit for the drivers of the fuel-efficient vehiclesFuel-efficient vehicles have achieved a minimum green score of 40 according to the annual vehicle-rating guide of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. - usually more convenient access or lower cost.

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Markus Henning M.Eng Facility Management LEED AP BD+C Alpha Energy & Environment
May 27 2011
Guest
141 Thumbs Up

Preferred Parking special parking lots

In our new project we provide 65 parking lots. To achieve the credit requirements we must provide 4 parking lots for low emitting vehicles. We provide 3 special parking lots for SMART cars. My question is can we count these SMART parking lots if we label them as low emitting parking space? The SMART parking space is not directly to the staircase but only 6 parking lots away.

The credit requirements say 5% of the total parking lots must be provide to achieve the credit requirements for preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system.. My question is must we include the number of motorbike parking lots for the calculation?

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Ryan Gaylord Director, CTG Energetics, Inc. Jun 06 2011 LEEDuser Expert 662 Thumbs Up

These are two good questions. To address the first, the intent of this credit is to encourage the use of low-emitting vehiclesLow-emitting vehicles are classified as zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) by the California Air Resources Board. by all employees and visitors of the building. Without knowing any details about the SMART car program, it sounds like the use of these spaces might be limited to a certain group of users or a certain vehicle type. In general, these spaces must be made available to any drivers of qualified low-emitting vehicles in order to meet the credit intent.

To answer the second question, the credit requirements use the word "vehicles" instead of "cars," therefore one might interpret this to include motorbikes. Since motorbike parking takes up space in the parking lot that could otherwise be used for cars, the conservative approach would suggest that they should be included in the total parking count. Unfortunately, I am not aware of any precedent on this.

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Gabriela Hernández Castillo Architect, LEED AP BD+C SYASA - México
Apr 13 2011
Guest
2399 Thumbs Up

Preferred parking outside the LEED boundary

Our project's parking goes beyond the LEED boundary, since it is a mixed used building with several towers and only one of them will apply for LEED certification. We need to locate the preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. outside the LEED boundary due to space issues. Will do this still comply with the credit requirements?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Apr 14 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17194 Thumbs Up

It depends - if you are providing preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. by offering a discount on parking fees than it should be okay, but if not, then the spaces have to be the closest spaces to the main building entrance for these people. (The only spaces that can be closer to the entrance are ones reserved for disabled users.)

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Gabriela Hernández Castillo Architect, LEED AP BD+C , SYASA - México Apr 14 2011 Guest 2399 Thumbs Up

David, the project will implement preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. spaces for low-eLow-E or Low-Emissivity Coating: Very thin metallic coating on glass or plastic window glazing that reduces heat loss and heat gain through the window; the coating emits less radiant energy (heat radiation), which makes it, in effect, reflective to that heat. In that way it boosts a window's R-value and reduces its U-factor. and fuel efficient vehicles, and, according to the MPR supplemental guidance page 14, "facilities (including parking) outside the leed project boundary used for compliance with specific credits: facilities that are not within the leed project boundary but are used to demostrate compliance with a credit or prerequisite, as allowed per the rating system and reference guide, need not be considered for other prerequisite, credit, or mpr compliance. However those facilities cannot be used to show compliance for other leed projects"

In this case, I am assuming that providing the preferred parking for low-e and fuel efficient vehicles (will obviously have to be close to a building entryway) but outside the LEED boundary, will be sufficient to comply with the credit's requirements.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Apr 14 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17194 Thumbs Up

I understand your situation a bit better now - if all the parking is outside the LEED boundary, but the preferred stalls are still closest to the entry, I think you would be fine.

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Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer, Skanska Sweden Apr 27 2012 LEEDuser Member 2076 Thumbs Up

David and David
How did it go with this issue? I have two projects that will be built on top of an existing underground garage. Garage will not be included in project scopes. If we through a contract reserve a number of off-site parkingspaces for each building, can we achieve this credit by having preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system.? Or even charging stations?

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Rachel Nicely
Apr 07 2011
LEEDuser Member
279 Thumbs Up

Electric Charging Vehicles

I have a client that would like to install charging stations for SS 4.3 Option 2 compliance. How do you demonstrate vehicle fueling capacity per station when each electric vehicle charges at a different rate?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, GBD Architects Apr 14 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17194 Thumbs Up

Not sure if I understand your question - the credit requirements are only looking at "capacity" as the number of parking spaces, and providing 3% of that number of spaces as ones reserved for fueling or charging alternative fuel vehicles. We don't need to provide info about the rate or capacity of power being provided - except that actual charging equipment does need to be installed (not just 120 V outlets) Does that answer your question?

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Alicja Bieszyńska Skanska Dec 05 2011 LEEDuser Member 991 Thumbs Up

In LEED v3 the reference guide sais "prepare information about the number of fueling stations provided, the alternative fuel station type, manufacturer, model number, and the fueling capacity per station" (documentation guidance).
In LEED CS v2.0 it sais even more: "confirm the fuel type, number of stations, and fueling capacity for each station for an 8-hour period".
So I guess we need to specify the power of charging equipment. As far as I am concerned, different electric vehicles need different plugs and voltage...
Any idea how detailed the specification needs to be?
Thanks!

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Jan 06 2012 LEEDuser Member 869 Thumbs Up

Hi, Alicja!

If you install 240 volt charging stations, then the assumption is that you are offering what is considered a "rapid charge," and that an electric car could fully charge in at least 8 hours. As far as documentation goes, you would need to show the number and location of the refueling/recharging stations, as well as the specifications for the type of station being provided (with the intent of proving that you are providing at least 240 volt outlets). Hope that helps!

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Michelle Cottrell President Design Management Services
Jun 23 2010
LEEDuser Member
670 Thumbs Up

Preferred Parking strategies

If there is above ground parking available for all building occupants and below grade parking with limited access available, is the restricted garage required to have preferred parkingPreferred parking, available to particular users, includes designated spaces close to the building (aside from designated handicapped spots), designated covered spaces, discounted parking passes, and guaranteed passes in a lottery system. stalls if the above ground, surface parking lot includes all of the preferred parking spaces closest to the building?

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