CS-2009 SSc5.2: Site Development—Maximize Open Space

  • Schools_SSc5-2_Type1_Open Space Diagram
  • Why open space?

    This credit is intended to promote sites with large areas of vegetated open space that promote biodiversity and recreation—which can also add an amenity to your project, help with natural stormwater management, and mitigate the urban heat islandA densely populated area in which pavement and buildings absorb, store, and release solar energy, making the vicinity warmer than it would be if the pavement and buildings were not present. effect.

    Difficulty varies by location

    It’s generally quite easy for rural and suburban projects to meet the requirements of this credit—this is especially true for schools, particularly those that have sports fields onsite. Urban projects have a harder time with this credit, but can achieve it through strategies like green roofs and pedestrian-oriented hardscapes, which are allowed if the project also achieves SSc2: Development Density and Community Connectivity.

    Documentation is a breeze

    It’s easy to document this credit for LEED Online—you only need to provide the site area and a site plan showing the dedicated open space. The civil engineer, landscape architect, or architect typically provide the documentation.

    New requirement may be a sticking point

    Despite the easy documentation, there is one frequent sticking point—the owner must sign the LEED Online credit form stating that the open space will remain open space for the life of the building. This is a new requirement for LEED 2009 and it gives pause to some building owners, because they may anticipate future development that would affect this space, or because they find they are simply unable to control what happens in the future.

    In urban areas earning SSc2, green roofs and pedestrian-oriented hardscape can count as open space. Photo – YRG SustainabilityParticularly in rural sites with open space that would be valuable for conservation, you might want to consider having a conservation plan or easement put in place to support ongoing protection, although this is not required for credit compliance. 

    Native species are optional, but come with benefits

    The credit calls for vegetated open space, but unlike SSc5.1: Site Development – Protect or Restore Habitat, it does not require that the vegetation be native or adapted. Turf grass, for example, would be allowed under this credit. But keep in mind that limiting the amount of turf grass in favor of native and adapted species can offer additional aesthetic and environmental benefits, while also contributing to SSc5.1 and WEc1: Water Efficient Landscaping

    Guidelines for wetlands and ponds

    For all compliance paths, wetland or pond areas can count toward the open space requirement—as long as the side slope is vegetated and the incline ratio of the slope is 1:4 (vertical: horizontal) or less. The rationale here is to avoid giving credit to projects that may have a fenced, concrete detention basin that does not enhance biodiversity or recreation activity. 

    Don’t confuse with SSc5.1

    It’s easy to confuse the requirements of this credit and those of SSc5.1: Site Development—Protect or Restore Habitat. They both are intended to promote open space and biodiversity, but their approaches diverge considerably. 

    Open space in developmentUnlike SSc5.1, open space for this credit does not have to use native and adpated species.This credit focuses on increasing the quantity of open space with respect to local zoning requirements and has no restrictions on the type of vegetation installed—lawns or playing fields with turf grass are fine, for example, or even pedestrian-oriented hardscapes—approaches that would not work for SSc5.1. Site disturbance from construction activity is also strictly limited under SSc5.1, but is not under SSc5.2.

    Consider these questions when approaching this credit

    • What are the project goals for providing occupants with vegetated open space, plazas, picnic areas, or outdoor recreational activities?
    • Consider how open space can contribute to access to pleasant views. Can your project provide views of this open space from indoors?

    FAQs for SSc5.2

    I'm confused about the difference between SSc5.1 and SSc5.2. Can I earn them both?

    Yes. Many projects earn both credits due to their inherent overlap. The key distinction is that SSc5.1 is looking at habitat for animals, while SSc5.2 is looking at all kinds of open space. See more in LEEDuser's guidance above.

    Can roof terraces contribute to SSc5.2?

    Roof terraces can count towards SSc5.2 as long as they are accessible and open to all occupants of the project. Private balconies do not count towards the credit requirements.

    How should I count planters and vegetation on balconies?

    If counting vegetation on balconies and roof areas, only consider green roof and open-bottom planters towards SSc5.2 vegetation requirements. Closed bottom planters do not count towards the credit.

    What if my local code has a landscaping requirement? Is this the same as an open space requirement?

    If a local code does not have an explicit ‘open space’ zoning requirement or the ‘open space’ requirement also includes a ‘landscaping requirement,’ use the landscaping requirement to determine the compliance path. The local code open space requirement may be more general and allow for more than vegetation, and may not be in line with the intent and focus on vegetation to meet credit requirements.

    How can artificial turf contribute to the credit requirements?

    Artificial turf can contribute to hardscape areas and help your project achieve SSc5.2 as long as you are already achieving SSc2. It is unlikely the turf can contribute to the vegetated area calculations.

    Can permeable paving count as hardscape or vegetation towards SSc5.2 calculations?

    There is not a clear and explicit approach for calculating how permeable paving contributes to SSc5.2. However, it is reasonable to count some of the permeable paving if it is an open grid system that is predominantly open-grid/vegetation. To calculate the permeable paving contribution, consider using a percentage of the total permeable paving area as vegetated—for example, if you have 1,000 ft2 of open grid, consider 500 ft2 as vegetation.

    Can interior courtyards contribute to vegetation requirements?

    Yes, interior courtyards, if vegetated, can contribute to the open space requirements as long as they are open and accessible to all occupants. Additionally, if your project is achieving SSc2, any pedestrian-oriented hardscape within the courtyard can likely contribute to the credit as well.

    Can a project designate open space off-site and not within the LEED project boundary to meet the credit requirements?

    To date, we are not aware of a project using LEED 2009 being able to achieve the credit requirements by allocating open space outside of the LEED project boundary. This is also not allowed as an exception under MPR3, although campus settings with no local zoning requirements do have an exception noted in the LEED Reference Guide. The credit requires the open space be adjacent to the building and within the project boundary. However, this approach has been used to meet SSc5.1 credit requirements. This approach has also been used successfully on LEED-NC v2.2 campus projects.

    Which approach should a project take if the LEED project boundary covers two areas with different zoning requirements?

    Although there is not an explicit approach for this situation, it is best to evaluate each area separately and meet the credit requirements using the appropriate compliance path for each area.

    The credit requirements state the open space area must be ‘adjacent’ to the project. Does the designated site area need to be right next to the project building?

    Although the credit requirements state the open space is to be adjacent to the project building, most projects simply make sure that the designated areas are near the building, and certainly within the LEED project boundary.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

Expand All

  • Research your site’s zoning requirements to see if you are required to provide open space; this will help you determine how much open space is required for credit compliance. The compliance path you follow is not open to choice—it depends strictly upon your local zoning regulations.

    • Case 1: If you have a local zoning requirement for open space, you will need to provide 25% more open space than what is required by that ordinance.
    • Case 2: If you have no local zoning requirements, you will need to provide open space that is equal to or greater than the building footprint. The most common situation for locations with no zoning are school campuses or military bases.
    • Case 3: If you have local zoning requirements, but no requirement for open space, you will need to provide open space equal to 20% of the total project site area.

     


  • The architect typically knows what the zoning requirements are. If not, check with local zoning office or city planning department. Some cities or counties provide this information online. 


  • Determine the rough development footprint and consider ways to increase the area of vegetated open space.  


  • If you have a small site, consider building up rather than out. This minimizes your building footprint and can help provide the open space needed for this credit and for SSc5.1: Site Development—Protect or Restore Habitat (if the vegetation is native or adapted). 


  • Avoid delays by determining your zoning option early in the design process. Typically, planned unit developments (PUDs) or contract zones (with negotiated amounts of open space) have some gray areas surrounding zoning requirements in cases where such zoning requirements were negotiated with the zoning department. If you’re unsure of the correct compliance path, check with GBCI. 


  • Documentation for this credit is relatively easy and straightforward, and will not take much time. As applicable for the different zoning options, you will need to determine the zoning option for the project site, provide the acreage required by zoning, building footprint, total site area, designed vegetated acreage, and a site drawing delineating the vegetated open space.


  • The owner will need to sign off on the LEED Online credit form as part of the documentation, stating that the open space is intended to remain open for the life of the building. 


  • Determine your project goals for vegetated open space and pedestrian-oriented hardscapes. 


  • Discuss the potential for future build-out and make sure the areas delineated as open space for credit compliance will not be compromised in the future. 


  • There will be minimal additional costs for this credit if open space was already planned. If the team was not planning on including open space, or was only planning a limited area, then adjusting the building footprint could result in a cost increase or less buildable square footage.  


  • Designing a project with ample open space can increase the value of the property and may increase rents, especially in areas that do not generally provide these amenities to building occupants. From a purely economic standpoint, however, buildable square footage typically adds more value than open space. 

Schematic Design

Expand All

  • Define your LEED project boundary to determine how much area you must designate as open space. The LEED project boundary encompasses a contiguous area that includes all areas affected by the project pursuing certification. Refer to the Rating System document (p. xvii) for specific guidelines on how this is determined. (See Resources.) 


  • Will your project achieve SSc2: Development Density and Community Connectivity? Find out as soon as possible. Pursuing SSc2 makes the open space credit easier, because you can count pedestrian-oriented hardscapes and green roofs towards your open space area.


  • Make sure that all vegetated and hardscape open spaces are included in the LEED site boundary, and that the boundary for this credit is consistent with the boundary for all LEED credits. 


  • If you are counting pedestrian-oriented hardscapes in your credit calculations (through SSc2), you need to make sure that at least 25% of the total open space area is vegetated. Be sure that you calculate the vegetated area based on ground coverage and not using tree drip lines.


  • Typically, pedestrian-oriented hardscapes include areas for passive and active recreational use. This includes plazas, usable roof decks, and courtyards. A roof deck only counts as a pedestrian-oriented hardscape if it is accessible and usable by all building occupants. Private balconies, for example, do not count. 


  • Many urban projects find this credit difficult to achieve without a green roof or pedestrian-oriented hardscape.  


  • Adding a green roof to meet this credit could be costly, but it will help with many other LEED credits and green building strategies. (See LEEDuser’s green roofs strategy page for more detail.)


  • Once you have outlined your LEED project boundary, determined your project’s open space zoning requirements, and know whether or not you are achieving SSc2, then you can begin incorporating the required amount of open space into the design.

    • Case 1: If your project has zoning requirements for open space, provide open space that exceeds this requirement by 25%.
    • Case 2: If your project does not have zoning requirements, provide open space equal to the area of the building footprint.
    • Case 3: If your project does have zoning requirements but there are no requirements for open space, provide open space equal to 20% of your project site’s area. 

  • If your project does not achieve SSc2, then all of the open space must be vegetated—consider providing pocket parks or sports fields.


  • You can use ponds or wetlands as part of the open-space calculation, but only if they have vegetated slopes with an incline ratio of 1:4 (vertical: horizontal) or less. The rationale here is to avoid giving credit to projects with a fenced, concrete detention basin that does not enhance biodiversity or offer a recreational amenity.


  • Open-bottom, pervious planters count as open space; however, closed-bottom planters do not. (Closed-bottom planters are not thought to provide the same biodiversity that open-bottom planters can.) 


  • Consider eliminating or reducing the area of onsite surface parking. You can do this by placing parking under your building, building a parking garage instead of a lot, or sharing parking facilities with nearby buildings. These strategies can also help you earn SSc4.4: Alternative Transportation—Parking Capacity and SSc7.1: Heat Island Effect—Non-Roof


  • Consider limiting the surface area of sidewalks and other hardscapes, replacing them with vegetated areas. 


  • Consider attempting the extra point for Exemplary Performance through IDc1 by doubling your vegetated open space over the credit requirements. 

Design Development

Expand All

  • Design your project with a small footprint, and provide open space for occupant use meeting or exceeding the credit requirements. 


  • To aid in restoring habitat (for SSc5.1) and providing a water-efficient landscape (for WEc1), consider using only native and adapted species that require little or no irrigation for some or all of the open space you provide. 


  • To help with stormwater management (for SSc6.1 and SSc6.2) and to reduce the heat island effect (for SSc7.1), consider installing porous pavement for all hardscapes, designing wetlands for stormwater mitigation, and incorporating a green roof. 


  • Run calculations to verify that the credit requirements are being met. The requirements are based on your project zoning ordinances, and are influenced by the LEED project boundary and the achievement of SSc2. 

     


  • If you are relying on pedestrian-oriented hardscapes or green roofs to meet the open space requirements, verify that the requirements for SSc2 are still being met. 


  • Clearly define any areas of open space on project drawings; these need to be included with your LEED documentation. 

Construction Documents

Expand All

  • Upload documentation to LEED Online. You need to provide a site plan that delineates the areas of open space, green roof, and pedestrian-oriented hardscape, as applicable. It is also a good idea to include the total project site area and the total open space area on the site plan.


  • The owner needs to sign off on the LEED Online credit form stating that the area delineated as open space will remain open space for the life of the building. 

Construction

Expand All

  • Verify that the area designated as open space is maintained during construction, or confirm that disturbed areas will be restored and reclaimed as open space. 

Operations & Maintenance

Expand All

  • Continue to protect the areas designated as open space for the remainder of the building’s life. 


  • Consider the use of a master site plan or legal mechanism to protect this open space. Organizations like the Trust for Public Land (see Resources) may be able to help with financing by purchasing a conservation easement on a portion of the land in order to maintain perpetual open space and offset the cost of the land that is not being built on.


  • Work with the management team to ensure that continued protection protocols are put in place, to help preserve the open space. 


  • Installing signage to educate building occupants about the value of protected land helps ensure that natural areas remain respected and protected. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Core and Shell Development

    SS Credit 5.2: Site development - maximize open space

    1 Point

    Intent

    To promote biodiversity by providing a high ratio of open space to development footprintThe development footprint is the total area of the building footprint and area affected by development or by project site activity. Hardscape, access roads, parking lots, nonbuilding facilities, and the building itself are all included in the development footprint..

    Requirements

    Case 1. Sites with local zoning open space requirements

    Reduce the development footprintThe development footprint is the total area of the building footprint and area affected by development or by project site activity. Hardscape, access roads, parking lots, nonbuilding facilities, and the building itself are all included in the development footprint.1 and/or provide vegetated open space within the project boundary such that the amount of open space exceeds local zoning requirements by 25%.

    Case 2. Sites with no local zoning requirements (e.g. some university campuses, military bases)

    Provide vegetated open space areaOpen space area is usually defined by local zoning requirements. If local zoning requirements do not clearly define open space, it is defined for the purposes of LEED calculations as the property area minus the development footprint; it must be vegetated and pervious, with exceptions only as noted in the credit requirements section. Only ground areas are calculated as open space. For projects located in urban areas that earn a Development Density and Community Connectivity credit, open space also includes nonvehicular, pedestrian-oriented hardscape spaces. adjacent to the building that is equal in area to the building footprintBuilding footprint is the area on a project site used by the building structure, defined by the perimeter of the building plan. Parking lots, parking garages, landscapes, and other nonbuilding facilities are not included in the building footprint..

    Case 3. Sites with zoning ordinances but no open space requirements

    Provide vegetated open space equal to 20% of the project’s site area.

    All cases

    For projects in urban areas that earn SS Credit 2: Development Density and Community Connectivity, vegetated roof areas can contribute to credit compliance.

    For projects in urban areas that earn SS Credit 2: Development Density and Community Connectivity, pedestrian-oriented hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. areas can contribute to credit compliance. For such projects, a minimum of 25% of the open space counted must be vegetated.

    Wetlands or naturally designed ponds may count as open space and the side slope gradients average 1:4 (vertical: horizontal) or less and are vegetated.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Perform a site survey to identify site elements and adopt a master plan for developing the project site. Select a suitable building location, and design the building footprintBuilding footprint is the area on a project site used by the building structure, defined by the perimeter of the building plan. Parking lots, parking garages, landscapes, and other nonbuilding facilities are not included in the building footprint. to minimize site disruption. Strategies include stacking the building program, tuck-under parking and sharing parking facilities with neighbors to maximize the amount of open space on the site.

    FOOTNOTES

    1. Development footprintThe development footprint is the total area of the building footprint and area affected by development or by project site activity. Hardscape, access roads, parking lots, nonbuilding facilities, and the building itself are all included in the development footprint. is defined as the total area of the building footprint, hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios., access roads and parking.

Organizations

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities

This nonprofit industry association consists of individuals and public and private organizations committed to developing a market for green roof infrastructure products and services across North America. 


Trust for Public Land

This organization can help with the purchase of conservation easements. 

Site Plan –

Case 1: Sites With Local Zoning Open Space Requirements

Use a site plan like this example to demonstrate that open space meets or exceeds the credit requirements.

LEED Online Forms: CS-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CS-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions on these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

37 Comments

0
0
Ahmed Mian Founder Studio Subtractive
Feb 12 2014
Guest

Project Boundary

Hi. We are trying to assess the feasibility for LEED certification for a factory to be constructed on a developed footprint of 1.5 Acres on a site measuring 33 Acres. The site has been Master Planned to have more development of other factory units in future. How does one assess the Site credits for a project like this. Will the entire site be considered as part of the project compliance for LEED or just within the boundaries of the current project.

1
1
0
Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Feb 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2315 Thumbs Up

The form for SSc5.2 will ask you to confirm that all open space counted towards credit compliance be preserved for the life of the building. Because of this, I would suggest you draw your boundary to align with the current project only.

Post a Reply
0
0
Emmanuel Gee Project Architect Buell Kratzer Powell
Jan 09 2014
LEEDuser Member
9 Thumbs Up

Clarification on SS Credit 5.2

Our project is in a dense urban area and we will meet the guidelines for SS Credit 2. Our local zoning ordinance allows us to build to the lot line, but we do require to have a 12' setback to to an adjacent residential district. My first question is do we calculate 25% of what our setback requirements are or 20% of our project's site area? We will through a variance not conform to the setback and build to the lot line. My second question is regarding a green roof. If we get Credit 2 does the vegetative roof need to be occupiable or can it just be Extensive?

Thanks!

1
1
0
Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Jan 09 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2315 Thumbs Up

I don't think I would count the setback requirements to be the same thing as open space requirements and would calculate the 20% of the total site area. The green roof can count towards open space requirements regardless of whether it is accessible or not - it still fulfills the intent of the credit by promoting biodiversity.

Post a Reply
0
0
Markus Henning M.Eng Facility Management LEED AP BD+C Alpha Energy & Environment
Jul 17 2013
Guest
133 Thumbs Up

SSc5.2 Case 3 including Pedestrian Hardscape

Im working on a project in the pre design phase with the following spaces.

Total site area: 12000m²
Vegetated open space: 800m²
Pedestrian HardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios.: 3550m²

The project fullfill the requirements of open space (36%) required 20%but not the requirement of vegetated space (18,5%) required 25%.

My question is if i count only 2000m² of pedestrian hardscape the project will fullfill both requirements. Can i count only a partition of pedestrian hardscape or must i include the total area of pedestrian hardscape?

Thanks in advance for your help.

1
1
0
Michal Marszalek Green Business Coordinator, Skanska Property Poland Jul 18 2013 LEEDuser Member 20 Thumbs Up

Hi Markus

I had the same problem on my certification, but now I know (after design review) taht we must count TOTAL area of pedestrian hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. and from this area count vegetated space. (see below similar question from my side)

Post a Reply
0
0
JOSE RAMON TAGLE COMMISSIONING & LEED AKF MEXICO SRL DE CV
Jun 24 2013
LEEDuser Member
157 Thumbs Up

No open Space, just footprint.

“We have a project (North Tower) within the site of a project (South Tower), same owner, but each project would have their own certification. The North Tower was excluded from the South Tower LEED boundary, which includes all the open space, because was considered as a future expansion; therefore the site of the North Tower just includes the building footprintBuilding footprint is the area on a project site used by the building structure, defined by the perimeter of the building plan. Parking lots, parking garages, landscapes, and other nonbuilding facilities are not included in the building footprint..

We don´t have open space, so can we achieve this credit with the North Tower project just through a percentage of roof-garden? Or can we use part of the open space that correspond to the South Tower LEED boundary proyect knowing that both towers are in the same site and have the same owner?”

Regards! And thanks for your comments!

1
3
0
Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Jun 24 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2315 Thumbs Up

If you haven't yet submitted either project, could you look at revising the LEED boundaries so that each project gets some open space? You are not allowed to use open space within the South Tower's project boundary for the North Tower because that would be double dipping. You could use roof garden area to comply if you are in a dense enough area to meet SS credit 2 (either option).

2
3
0
JOSE RAMON TAGLE COMMISSIONING & LEED, AKF MEXICO SRL DE CV Jun 24 2013 LEEDuser Member 157 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much Ellen!

It seems that roof garden option would be the best alternative to achieve the point. But, one more question if we applied to credit 5.1 by donating offsite land in perpetuity, can we use that donated area in the calculations to achieve this credit (5.2), taking into acount that the area is located a few steps from the proyect?

Thanks again!

3
3
0
Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Jun 25 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2315 Thumbs Up

Hi Jose - according to the FAQs above, it doesn't appear that you can use any land outside of your LEED boundary to achieve SSc5.2.

Post a Reply
0
0
Ioannis Rizos Environmental Consultant ChapmanBDSP
May 09 2013
Guest
35 Thumbs Up

Parking Lots count as open space?

We have a shopping center located in an semi Urban area, in which there is no local zoning requirement.

I was wondering if a) carpark lots count as open space for the purposes of this credit, and b) if I need to provide vegetation for 25% of the project's total open space areaOpen space area is usually defined by local zoning requirements. If local zoning requirements do not clearly define open space, it is defined for the purposes of LEED calculations as the property area minus the development footprint; it must be vegetated and pervious, with exceptions only as noted in the credit requirements section. Only ground areas are calculated as open space. For projects located in urban areas that earn a Development Density and Community Connectivity credit, open space also includes nonvehicular, pedestrian-oriented hardscape spaces..

Your help will be greatly appreciated
thanks

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 09 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Ioannis, the requirement is for "vegetated open space," so a parking lot will not qualify.

Post a Reply
0
0
GABRIEL MORALES Architect Grupo Syasa
Nov 26 2012
LEEDuser Member
553 Thumbs Up

pedestrian aerea

Hello,
we have a project with terraces, each includes a deck for pedestrian and green roof, we have approximately 50% of area deck and 50% of green roof system.

We are applaying SSc2, can we considerer the deck of pedestrian in our calculations, option 1?

1
1
0
Ellen Mitchell Sustainable Design Manager, HKS, Inc. Nov 26 2012 LEEDuser Expert 2315 Thumbs Up

Hi Gabriel,
You should be able to include both the vegetation and hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. square footage in your calculations if you can comply with SS2.

Post a Reply
0
0
Michal Marszalek Green Business Coordinator Skanska Property Poland
Nov 03 2012
LEEDuser Member
20 Thumbs Up

CASE 3 - pedestrian-oriented hardscape area & 25% vegetated area

Hi

I have a question about this description: pedestrian-oriented hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. areas can contribute to credit compliance. For such projects, a minimum of 25% of the open space counted must be vegetated.

In this case pedestrian-oriented hardscape should be EQUAL to 20% of the project's site area and then minimum of 25% of the open space counted must be vegetated (even if I have more hardscape area I only count for LEED 20% of site area)

OR

I count total pedestrian-oriented hardscape on project site and then I try to achieve 25% vegetation?

example:
site area: 10 000 sf

required pedestrian-oriented hardscape area: 10 000 * 0.2 = 2000 sf
min. vegetated open space: 2000 * 0.25 = 500 sf

or

total pedestrian-oriented hardscape area on site: 5000 sf
min. vegetated open space: 5000 * 0.25 = 1250 sf

Thanks

1
4
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 24 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

The 25% is relaive to the pedestrian-oriented hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios., not the whole site.

2
4
0
Jay Murray LEED Administrator, Commercial Construction Consulting Jun 06 2013 LEEDuser Member 153 Thumbs Up

Hi Tristan, still confused. Which scenario is it for Michal's example? 500 sf or 1250 sf? I am faced with the same exact question. Knowing if Michal should use the 500 or the 1250 value will determine if I should or should not go for this credit. Thanks, Jay

3
4
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 06 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Jay, there are two requirements that are being referenced. One is the percentage of the total site that must be open space. Then there is a percentage of open space that must be vegetated.

The credit language at the top of the page breaks this down pretty well on a case by case basis. Let me know if there is still any confusion.

4
4
0
Michal Marszalek Green Business Coordinator, Skanska Property Poland Jun 07 2013 LEEDuser Member 20 Thumbs Up

Hi All

I'm after Design Review and a second scenario is correct (we count vegetated open space from TOTAL pedestrian-oriented hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. area (if we contribute pedestrian-oriented hardscape to credit compliance)):

total pedestrian-oriented hardscape area on site: 5000 sf
min. vegetated open space: 5000 * 0.25 = 1250 sf

Post a Reply
0
0
Gabriela Hernández Castillo Architect, LEED AP BD+C SYASA - México
Feb 23 2012
Guest
2219 Thumbs Up

How to determine the building foorprint?

Our project is a building that literally crosses another building. It consists of a 40 stories building (the LEED building) that comes out of a 3 stories mall (not applying for certification.

The first three floors of the LEED building, due to the fact that is inside another building, have different shapes, and the fourth floow is the one that has the biggest area.

In order to calculate the building footprintBuilding footprint is the area on a project site used by the building structure, defined by the perimeter of the building plan. Parking lots, parking garages, landscapes, and other nonbuilding facilities are not included in the building footprint., should we superimpose the perimeter line of the first four floors and calculate the area like this?

Any comments would be apprecciated.

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 05 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

David, that would be my take on it—to superimpose as you said. I"m sure you've done this, but combing through the LEED MPR supplemental guidance document for any other hints or direction on this would be a key step, as well. Finally if you're worried about how GBCI will look at it, I would send them an email.

Post a Reply
0
0
Stéphane Paris
Feb 21 2012
Guest
148 Thumbs Up

Misunderstood case 1

I'm working on a project in an urban space that have Local Zoning Ordinance. In this Local Zoning Ordinance, it is written that 40% of the open space must be vegetated.

Does it means that there is 'Open Space Requirements' or the 'Open Space Requirement' is only for the surface of the Open space?

To my point of view, I'm situated in Case 3 because the Local Zoning Ordinance doesn't said anything about the size of the open space.

If not, in the case 1, the 25% asked is for 'open space size' or 'vegetated open space size'?

I hope my question is clear.

Thanks in advance for your help.

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 21 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

I would agree that you are in Case 3, since there is zoing but no requirements around the size of open space.

Post a Reply
0
0
Nándor Kovács
Jul 22 2011
Guest
97 Thumbs Up

0% Open Space Requirements

I'm working on a project located in high density urban area which means 100% of the site can be built in the ground floor. How do i have to calculate 25% in this case? (The building footprintBuilding footprint is the area on a project site used by the building structure, defined by the perimeter of the building plan. Parking lots, parking garages, landscapes, and other nonbuilding facilities are not included in the building footprint. equals 89% and there are additional green roofs as well)

1
2
0
Nándor Kovács Jul 26 2011 Guest 97 Thumbs Up

I'm sorry for the dumb question, I found the answer but: why only vegetated open space is applicable in this case?

2
2
0
Devon Bertram Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jul 28 2011 LEEDuser Member 3338 Thumbs Up

You can also use pedestrian-oriented hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. to help you meet the credit requirements (assuming you are achieving SSc2). In order to meet the credit requirements, however, make sure the vegetated green roofs you noted make up at least 25% of your open space areaOpen space area is usually defined by local zoning requirements. If local zoning requirements do not clearly define open space, it is defined for the purposes of LEED calculations as the property area minus the development footprint; it must be vegetated and pervious, with exceptions only as noted in the credit requirements section. Only ground areas are calculated as open space. For projects located in urban areas that earn a Development Density and Community Connectivity credit, open space also includes nonvehicular, pedestrian-oriented hardscape spaces..

Post a Reply
0
0
Rubén Morón Rojas Codirector CIVITA
Jun 03 2011
LEEDuser Member
790 Thumbs Up

Pedestrian Area

Does pedestrian areas located in the roofs count as open space?

1
1
0
Devon Bertram Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jul 27 2011 LEEDuser Member 3338 Thumbs Up

If your project is achieving SSc2 Development Density and Community Connectivity, you can include vegetated roof areas as part of your calculation.

Post a Reply
0
0
Xavi B
Dec 01 2010
Guest
2251 Thumbs Up

Setting a LEED boundary

I have a CS project within a large area of future grow. There will be three different buildings on site. The only one pursuing LEED certification is this CS. There will be a central chiller plant, sewer treatment plant, fire protection and potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. pumping station to serve all those buildings. This is a serice area oustide of the CS building. The question is, can I set the LEED boundary leaving this service area with the associated roads and walkways outside of the LEED boundary? I'm planing to set the boundary just for the buidling, parking space right next to the building and a green area to restore. Is this aproach of setting the LEED boundary to my convenience OK?

1
5
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 06 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

It sounds to me like this LEED boundary is appropriate, since you are including the areas supporting and affected by the current project.

I would recommend you review the LEED MPRs and updated campus guidance for more background, however, to be sure.

2
5
0
Xavi B Dec 06 2010 Guest 2251 Thumbs Up

This is really confusing to me Tristan, I'm sorry. I have reviewed a lot of information regarding MPR's and AGMBC, and still with doubts.
This is a new project that was registered under regular CS 2.0, no LEED campus approach was thought at that time, the owner only wanted one building to be certified, the first one. The other three wouldn't be certified but would share the same services.
I want to keep it flexible, in case he wants to certify another building later. What I'm really concern about is that at this time the boundary is set so the services (sewer treatment plant, central plant, storm drain treatment, potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. pumping, etc) are within the boundary. It is not clear to me that if I want to certify the other buildings, then I wouldn't be able because the services are part of an already certified building, regardless that they are servicing these new buildings. So do you think in order to keep it flexible, it will be better to leave these services out of the boundary?

3
5
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 07 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

I agree, it is complex. What are you reading in the MPRs or AGMBC that makes you unsure what to do?

4
5
0
Xavi B Dec 07 2010 Guest 2251 Thumbs Up

What's your personal opinion regarding the last paragraph,

"I want to keep it flexible, in case he wants to certify another building later. What I'm really concern about is that at this time the boundary is set so the services (sewer treatment plant, central plant, storm drain treatment, potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. pumping, etc) are within the boundary. It is not clear to me that if I want to certify the other buildings, then I wouldn't be able because the services are part of an already certified building, regardless that they are servicing these new buildings. So do you think in order to keep it flexible, it will be better to leave these services out of the boundary?"

5
5
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 07 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

What you're worried about is not an issue, in my opinion. The usual problem with LEED boundaries is that people leave something out that should be included. That is what the MPRs are guarding against. I would say it's the right move to include all those services now. If they're included in LEED calculations now, you shouldn't be penalized for not including them in the future since they are already certified. But please review the campus guidance to make sure you understand how to approach this comprehensively.

Post a Reply
0
0
Xavi B
Sep 26 2010
Guest
2251 Thumbs Up

Local zoning requirements

On CS V2.0.
According to my Country's local zoning requirements, you should build a maximum of 70% of the total land, but if you have pervious paving you can count that as open space. So you could have 100% of the property with a pervious paving and you still meet the requirement.
So according to Option 1, I should exceed by 25% the LZR.
Clearly the intent of the credit is to have vegetated open space. But there is a conflict on the definition of open space cause it reads: "is the property area minus the development footprintThe development footprint is the total area of the building footprint and area affected by development or by project site activity. Hardscape, access roads, parking lots, nonbuilding facilities, and the building itself are all included in the development footprint. OR AS DEFINED BY LOCAL ZONING REQUIREMENTS". The conflict is because for my LZR, pervious paving is open space and for LEED it would count as part of the development area, but at the same time according to the upper case definition, it is fine because you are meeting LZR.
So what should I do, should I count pervious paving as open space or not??

1
2
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 29 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Does it affect your credit compliance?

I would consider the intent of the credit and tty to not count the paving as open space, at least not all of it.

The following piece of the credit language also seems very relevant here:

For projects in urban areas that earn SS Credit 2. Development Density
and Community Connectivity, pedestrian-oriented hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. areas can
contribute to credit compliance. For such projects, a minimum of 25% of
the open space counted must be vegetated.

2
2
0
Xavi B Sep 30 2010 Guest 2251 Thumbs Up

Yest it does affect my credit compliance.
Thanks for your advise.
Regards.

Post a Reply

Start a new LEED comment thread

Apr 24 2014
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2014 – BuildingGreen, Inc.