CS-2009 SSc9: Tenant Design and Construction Guidelines

  • CS_SSc9-Type3-Tenant Guidelines Diagram
  • Encouraging tenant sustainability efforts

    This credit is intended to help Core and Shell projects educate tenants about the base building sustainable design and ways tenants might enhance the sustainability of their tenant spaces, including support for earning LEED-CI.

    Tailor your guidelines to fit your project

    Support comes in the form of tenant guidelines, which LEED-CS projects must write and submit in order to earn this credit. The guidelines could entail information about lighting efficiency and design, non-toxic paints, water-efficient fixtures, and numerous other topics covered by LEED.

    Some projects write fairly stringent guidelines and require that tenants comply as a condition of their lease; other projects write fairly loose guidelines and make tenant compliance optional. You can use the LEEDuser template found in the Documentation Toolkit and customize it for your project and your tenants.

    “Guidelines” does not mean “requirements”—unless you say so

    A common misconception is that the tenants must comply with the guidelines. Actually, for the purposes of SSc9, the LEED-CS team only has to write and distribute the guidelines. Including specific requirements in the guidelines is optional.

    Argonaut building The Argonaut Building in New York is pursuing LEED-CS Gold certification in part through the use of tenant guidelines via SSc9.This situation gets a bit more nuanced when you bring in other LEED credits, however. For example, if your project is attempting IEQc5: Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control, you may need to require your tenants to install entryway mats. The SSc9 tenant guidelines are a logical place to make a note of that requirement, but not the required place. 

    In any case, keep in mind that a tenant sales and lease agreement is not enough to satisfy the requirements of this credit. You must write guidelines specifically designed with this credit in mind. 

    Sustainability guidelines can be a selling point

    Sometimes building owners will hesitate to pursue this credit because they worry about how tenants may respond—that’s usually due to a misunderstanding of the requirements. Part of the function of the tenant guidelines is to inform tenants about the environmental aspects of the project, which can be a useful marketing tool during the leasing process.

    Office buildingThis LEED-CS Gold office building at 3055 Roslyn in Denver wrote tenant guidelines and achieved SSc9. Photo courtesy YRG sustainabilityTenants, even those who did not initially consider it, often find the guidelines an extremely valuable tool in helping them attain LEED-CI certification. 

    Coordinating input takes time

    This credit is not usually a costly one, but it can take a lot of time to compile product information, systems data, and coordinate the individuals contributing to the guidelines. Gather this information throughout the design process to avoid scrambling at the end of the project.

    Consider these questions when approaching this credit

    • What type of tenant will your project be targeting?
    • Will this be a single-tenant or multi-tenant building?
    • Are there materials or equipment used in the core-and-shell project that the commercial-interiors project should know about? For example, if you are using low-emitting paints and coatings, do you want to inform the CI project about these products and recommend them?

    FAQs on CS SSc9

    Are tenants required to comply with the tenant guidelines?

    No. For the purposes of SSc9, tenant guidelines are for reference only.

    Can I use tenant guidelines to demonstrate compliance with other LEED credits besides SSc9?

    No. While the Core & Shell rating systems does allow projects to earn credits for future tenant work, those credits must be documented with a binding tenant lease or sales agreement. See Core & Shell Appendix 4 (“Tenant Lease or Sales Agreement”) in the LEED Reference Guide for more information on credits that can only be achieved through the use of a tenant lease or sales agreement.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Discuss with your project team what type of tenants the building expects to attract and whether the building will be multi- or single-tenant. Doing so will help you determine your approach to writing the tenant guidelines. 


  • If the project is designed for a single tenant, you may want to encourage the tenant to pursue LEED-CI certification, and help them in determining which credits are best to pursue. Information and guidance on these credits could be included in the tenant guidelines.


  • The tenant guidelines can help build a sense of partnership on sustainability goals between the LEED-CS and LEED-CI teams. As one benefit to this, the tenant may be willing to split the cost of certain items that will help attain LEED-CI. Some items to consider splitting costs on may include:

    • water-efficient fixtures,
    • measurement and verification or submetering systems,
    • bike racks and showering and changing facilities,
    • upgraded lighting or mechanical equipment,
    • or commissioning.

  • If the project is a multi-tenant building, you may want to use your LEED-CS certification as a marketing tool to attract tenants. If this is the case, providing thorough tenant guidelines is a great starting point.  


  • Determine whether you will provide any designs or systems to help tenants in the achievement of LEED-CI. An example of this could be, the extent of the CS measurement and verification or submetering plan or water-efficient fixtures. 


  • Review the LEED CI rating system to determine how the core-and-shell project could aid tenants pursuing LEED CI. If the core-and-shell building pursues the following credits you may aid in the tenants pursuing LEED-CI certification:

    • If the core-and-shell building pursues EAc5.2: Measurement and Verification—Tenant Submetering, then your tenants can more easily achieve LEED-CI EAc3: Measurement and Verification. 
    • The inclusion of low-flow and low-flush fixtures in compliance with WEp1 and WEc3: Water Use Reduction will help tenants who will not be installing their own fixtures. 
    • Installing extra bike racks (or working with the tenant to determine their required number of bike racks) and providing tenants with access to shower or changing rooms will help them achieve SSc3.2: Alternative Transportation—Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms. 
    • Installing an area for the collection and storage of recyclables (as required under MRp1 for LEED-CS), helps tenants automatically achieve MRp1 for LEED CI.

     


  • Who will write the tenant guidelines? It could be the developer’s marketing team, the architect, sustainability consultant, owner, or any combination thereof. A collaborative effort is best. Each group has a great deal to offer and can provide varying perspectives and knowledge sets. Your marketing team may know how best to present the information to possible tenants, and your mechanical engineer should be able to explain the energy savings from mechanical equipment. See the Schematic Design section below for more detail on what needs to be included in the tenant guidelines, which can help you decide who should write them. 


  • Decide early which parties are responsible for creating the tenant guidelines, and include this task in contractual language describing the scope of their services.


  • Development of the guidelines involves virtually no capital cost, but they may take a while to write, and you may have to compensate the author’s time. For help getting started, see the Documentation toolkit for samples and a template for the tenant guidelines.

Schematic Design

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  • Develop an outline to determine the extent of the tenant guidelines; you can add details later. See the Documentation Toolkit for an example of a final tenant guideline document, and a template for creating your own.


  • Begin the tenant guidelines with an overall description of the core-and-shell building, including the sustainability objectives and goals. 


  • Illustrations are a requirement for the tenant guidelines, and can be a useful tool in discussing the building. Include images of the actual building, diagrams, or other graphics. 


  • Include information on LEED-CI and how the core-and-shell portion of the building can contribute to the achievement of LEED-CI, as well as how a tenant could incorporate core-and-shell items (such as base mechanical equipment, water fixtures, and submetering) into a CI project. This portion of the guidelines usually comprises the bulk of them and provides tenants with educational information, recommendations for meeting LEED-CI, strategies for sustainability measures, product information, and helpful contacts. It is also helpful to include a LEED-CI scorecard with notes.


  • Projects are required within their guidelines to provide information on the following LEED-CI requirements, where applicable: 

    • Water use reduction 
    • Optimized energy performance—lighting power
    • Optimized energy performance—lighting control 
    • Optimized energy performance—HVAC
    • Energy use and metering
    • Measurement and verification
    • Ventilation and outdoor air delivery
    • Construction indoor air quality management
    • Indoor chemical and pollutant source control
    • Controllability of systems
    • Thermal comfort 
    • Daylighting and views
    • Commissioning
    • Elimination or control of environmental tobacco smoke.

  • Your aim is to help tenants fully understand the core-and-shell building systems and design, as well as how they can benefit from and contribute to sustainability within the building through achievement of LEED-CI. Some project teams share all cut sheets and product data used on the core-and-shell building as a way to encourage the use of the same or similar materials and systems within tenant spaces. Others require (in tenant guidelines and lease agreements) specific materials and systems that mirror relevant LEED requirements. Some projects stick with more general information and simply meet the credit requirements.


  • You may find that, in order to attain LEED-CS certification, you must require tenants to meet certain performance or prescriptive requirements, such as energy and ventilation requirements, installation of walk-off mats, or refrigerant charge specifications. You might want to include the required measures in the tenant guidelines and the lease agreement, along with suggested recommendations. Doing this is not required for complying with SSc9, but may be necessary for other credits where the requirements cannot be fulfilled with the core-and-shell project alone. It is important to clearly define in the guidelines what is required versus what is recommended. Discuss this piece early in the design process to allay the fears of owners who may be hesitant to require tenants to meet specific standards.


  • Providing tenants with submetering capability and making them responsible for their own energy use can help to lower the building’s energy consumption as well as assist tenants in earning LEED-CI certification. Doing so also, contributes to earning EAc5.2 for your LEED-CS certification. 


  • If you require tenants to purchase specific materials and systems, or to meet certain performance standards, you may achieve better environmental performance, but may also narrow your selection of tenants.


  • Consider including a section in your tenant guidelines that discusses sustainable operations and maintenance, and encourages the entire building to pursue LEED-EBOM. This is more likely for single-tenant buildings. 

Design Development

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  • Start developing the tenant guidelines by providing an outline of materials and systems essential to the sustainability of your CS building. Details of energy and water savings and exact products used can be filled in once they are finalized. Many projects choose to structure their guidelines in a credit-by-credit list. 


  • Be as specific as you can. For example: “We have provided X number of VAV boxes, giving you the ability to control your individual spaces if you are interested in pursuing LEED-CI IEQc6.2: Controllability of Systems—Thermal Comfort.”


  • If including cut sheets in the tenant guidelines, the design team should track and collect product data sheets on all low-emitting materials, as well as those containing recycled content, and regional materials; FSC-certified wood; water-efficient products; energy-efficient systems; and IEQ features.


  • Having this information readily available streamlines the documentation process and makes for less work when incorporating the information in tenant guidelines.  


  • Providing tenants with cut sheets for your paint selections and other products will help them both understand the environmental benefits of your building, and help them select similar items for their own spaces.  


  • Start the process early and make sure that everyone on the team understands roles and requirements, as it can be difficult to get the design team to provide specific information, and many owners are reluctant to review the guidelines. 


  • If you plan to use the tenant guidelines for marketing purposes, make them a priority early in the process. 


  • During the leasing process, provide each tenant with the guidelines. They will need the guidelines before beginning their fit-outs.


  • Consider how LEED-CS prerequisites impact tenant fit-outs and communicate this to tenants before build-out. For example: 

    • Many tenant spaces use publicly available restrooms and have little control over the water efficiency of their space. If your CS building provides efficient water fixtures, this helps them in earning WEp1: Water Use Reduction. Let them know the flow- and flush-rates of all applicable fixtures. 
    • Depending on the scope of the core-and-shell building, you may also need to inform the tenants of any HVAC equipment energy and ventilation parameters that your LEED-CS project met. 
    • Depending on which of the two options you’ve chosen for IEQp2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control, you could either have a simple tenant-non-smoking policy or need for the tenant to install a compliant HVAC design. 

     


  • You can also let tenants know that the facilities for collection and storage of recyclables are available to them, automatically earning MRp1 for LEED-CI.

Construction Documents

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  • Go back to your outline and fill in missing details on products, systems, actual goals met, and illustrations. The Documentation Toolkit provides a sample tenant guidelines outline and template. 


  • Confirm that all LEED-CS efforts that contribute to the achievement of LEED-CI are properly documented in the tenant guidelines. It’s a good idea to include a LEED-CI scorecard that spells out these areas.   


  • Upload the tenant guidelines to LEED Online. Someone, typically the owner or owner’s representative, will also need to sign the LEED Online credit form, verifying that the guidelines meet the requirements of the LEED credit. 


  • Use the tenant guidelines for marketing purposes. Many tenants that are already planning on achieving LEED-CI certification will seek out LEED-CS buildings that aid in their achievement of LEED. Providing these tenants with a list of the LEED-CS credits attempted and guidelines may help attract them to your building. 

Construction

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  • Provide all tenants with the guidelines.


  • If the tenant guidelines include any requirements on the part of the building owner, be sure to collect any required verification of tenant compliance. 


  • Encourage your tenants to attempt LEED-CI certification.


  • Tenants that work toward LEED-CI certification can benefit from reduced operational costs and better productivity.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Make sure that future tenants are aware of these guidelines and consider incorporating them into a leasing package. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Core and Shell Development

    SS Credit 9: Tenant design and construction guidelines

    1 Point

    Intent

    To educate tenants about implementing sustainable design and construction features in their tenant improvement build-out.

    Tenant design and construction guidelines benefit the Core & Shell certified project in 2 important ways: First, the guidelines will help tenants design and build sustainable interiors and adopt green building practices; second, the guidelines will help in coordinating LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors and LEED 2009 for Core and Shell Development certifications.

    Requirements

    Publish an illustrated document that provides tenants with the following design and construction information:

    • A description of the sustainable design and construction features incorporated in the core & shell project and the project’s sustainability goals and objectives, including those for tenant spaces.
    • Information on LEED for Commercial Interiors and how the core and shell building contributes to achieving these credits.
    • Information that enables a tenant to coordinate space design and construction with the core and shell’s building systems. Specific LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors credits to be addressed when applicable include the following:
    • Water use reduction.
    • Optimize energy performance, lighting power.
    • Optimize energy performance, lighting controls.
    • Optimize energy performance, HVAC.
    • Energy use and metering.
    • Measurement and verification.
    • Ventilation and outdoor air delivery.
    • Construction indoor air quality management.
    • Indoor chemical and pollutant source control.
    • Controllability of systems.
    • Thermal comfort.
    • Daylighting and views.
    • Commissioning.
    • Elimination or control of environmental tobacco smoke.
    • Recommendations, including examples, for sustainable strategies, products, materials, and services.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Provide a copy of the tenant design and construction guidelines to tenants.

Publications

Green Office Guide: Integrating LEED Into Your Leasing Process

From the USGBC website: "The keys to successful green projects have always been preparation, committment and collaboration among all interested parties, and the Green Office Guide: Integrating LEED Into Your Leasing Process is specifically focused on helping tenants and landlords collaborate. This resource will help office tenants integrate green decision-making throughout the leasing process—encompassing team selection, site selection, negotiations, lease language, build-out and the tenant's ongoing operations within the leased space. The information and tools in this guide have been developed to assist tenants and their service providers (brokers, consultants, attorneys, design professionals) in reducing the environmental impact associated with real estate decisions and operations. The information contained within will also be useful for landlords and developers interested in preparing for negotiations with an understanding of the needs of tenants focused on obtaining LEED certification for their build-out."

Tenant Guidelines

This template, along with a sample from an actual project, provides a guide and sample language for teams writing tenant design and construction guidelines.

LEED-CI Checklist

The tenant guidelines must include a LEED-CI checklist, like this LEED 2009 checklist from USGBC.

LEED Online Forms: CS-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CS-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions on these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

35 Comments

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Belén Valladares López Mrs Valladares Ingenieria
Jul 01 2014
LEEDuser Member

Non english version

Hi,
I'm working in a C&S project located in Madrid. As tenants should be spanish Do I have to translate the whole document?. Could it be reasonable to provide full spanish version with an english summary?

Thanks

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Daniel LeBlanc Senior Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jul 01 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1030 Thumbs Up

I think you could just provide an english summary. Translating the whole document seems unreasonable. Plus, GBCI likely has someone on staff who could read the spanish version.

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Derek Breuninger
Nov 08 2013
LEEDuser Member
6 Thumbs Up

LEED-NC 2009 with a future tenant space

Our building project has a very small future tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space.. Under review we were asked to provide SSc9 Tenant Design and Construction Guidelines to ensure that future tenants can comply with the requirements and prerequisties and credits achieved by the LEED-NC project. I am using the LEED User template (thanks by the way it is very helpful!) and had a questions. In your template you state that
"A tenant applying for LEED for Commercial Interiors (LEED-CI) certification automatically gains five credits simply by choosing to be a tenant in the LEED-CS ----------building."
Does a tenant applying for LEED for Commercial Interiors (LEED-CI) certification also automatically receive 5 credits for choosing a building Certified using LEED NC 2009? Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes—see CI SSc1.

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Daniel Joseph GLHOMES
Aug 05 2013
Guest
29 Thumbs Up

LOCAL ORDINANCE LEED CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

Dear LEEDusers,

Im currently working on a Medical Office Building that we are currently pursuing certification under the Core and Shell rating system. Unfortunately our Tenant Leaseing agreement does not specifically address the key credits we are seeking outside our scope as conditional requirements nor does it include any detailed appendix. Instead, we have included a generic clause our Tenant has agreed to which refers to strict compliance with the Local County ordinance as it relates to tenant improvements. The county's ordinance calls for this project to be LEED certified contingent to a zoning reclassification planned unit development (PUD) board decision. My approach is to develop a tenant guideline program which will not only educate our Tenant as to the high performance capacity this building was designed for but also provide a suggestive approach to county compliance at a minimum. Will this suffice the Tenant Sales/ Leasing Agreement?

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Ante Vulin Sustainability Manager, YR&G Aug 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1108 Thumbs Up

Hi Daniel. The guideline you describe "which will not only educate our Tenant as to the high performance capacity this building was designed for but also provide a suggestive approach to county compliance at a minimum" should satisfy the requirements of SSc9. However, it will not suffice as a sales or leasing agreement necessary to meet credits that fall into Case B or C as detailed in the C&S Appendix 4 of the BD+C Reference Guide.

While the county may require tenants to pursue LEED certification, future tenants may be able to comply without meeting an individual C&S credit that your project is attempting. You will to clearly document how the county ordinance will require tenants to meet each specific Case B/C C&S credit you are pursuing.

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CRolim Engenharia
Feb 27 2013
Guest
66 Thumbs Up

Residential building

hi,

My project is a residential building. It is necessary to put information about LEED CI project in tenant and construction guidelines, even if the project is not for commercial interiors?

Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 27 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Whether ot not the tenant fit-out will pursue LEED-CI, your LEED-CS needs to put certain things in the tenant guidelines and lease agreements in order to earn prerequisites and credits that you might be attempting. I'd recommend that you review the CS Appendix 4 in the LEED Reference Guide.

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Melissa Merryweather Director Green Consult-Asia
Nov 27 2012
LEEDuser Member
2061 Thumbs Up

Tenant commitment for Residential Building in NC Certification

I am looking at a mixed-use high-rise project with a residential portion. The credit is normally only for Core and Shell certifications, but has anyone out there had it approved for a highrise Residential building in an NC Certification? If so can you let me know how it went?

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Ante Vulin Sustainability Manager, YR&G Nov 27 2012 LEEDuser Expert 1108 Thumbs Up

Melissa, I am not familiar with any projects that have pursued this credit in NC. If the spaces in your building are not undergoing substantial additional work, then your project might not fit the intent of the credit. However, you could probably make a case to use tenant guidelines as one of the options for the Green Education credit.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Nov 27 2012 LEEDuser Member 2061 Thumbs Up

Ante, that sounds like an interesting option. Where I am the tenant spaces are normally not fitted out to a high level, thus my interest in potentially adapting the credit (if that's possible). However I think your suggestion may be more reasonable. If they do intend to do a "light" fit-out I will check the CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide list more carefully and if there is nothing there I might see if the client is interested in pursuing a CIR. If we do that I'll post the result.

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Mark Mechling Mechling Engineering & Consulting, Inc.
Sep 21 2012
Guest
19 Thumbs Up

LEED 2009 CS Appendix 4

Hello,
Does anyone know where I can find a template for the Tenant Lease or Sales Agreement discussed in LEED 2009 CS Appendix 4?

Thank you
Mark

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 21 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Mark, have you checked out the template in the Doc Toolkit here on LEEDuser? I'm not sure it's exactly what you're looking for, but it's a pretty good resource.

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Mark Mechling Mechling Engineering & Consulting, Inc. Sep 21 2012 Guest 19 Thumbs Up

Thank you for the speedy response Tristan. Yes, I had reviewed the template in the Doc Toolkit. That will fit the bill for CS SS9. I was looking for a lease or sales agreement that others may have used as a starting point to meet the requirements for an ID credit per CS Appendix 4.

Thanks again,
Mark

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Julie McLaurin Project Manager, O'Brien Atkins Sep 24 2012 Guest 13 Thumbs Up

Where can we find an example lease or sales agreement?

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Yetsuh Frank Director, YR&G sustainability consulting, education and analysis Sep 26 2012 LEEDuser Member 648 Thumbs Up

Julie,

Typically the performance requirements would be listed in an appendix that is attached to the standard owner/tenant lease agreement, rather than being included within the body of the lease agreement itself. Owners typically have their own highly evolved lease they prefer to use, so rather than editing that, these requirements are attached to it. And the requirements vary depending on the project. Does that make sense?

Tenant guidelines are a different story. These need to be distributed to building tenants but need not be attached to a lease, or made mandatory in some other way.

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Marci Schreiber Interior Designer, ALSC Architects Nov 12 2012 Guest 62 Thumbs Up

Can anyone tell me where I can find "the template in the Doc Toolkit here on LEEDuser" referenced above? Or do I need to be a paid member to access the Doc Toolkit? Thank you, Marci

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 12 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Hi Marci, yes, members of LEEDuser have access to the Documentation Toolkit tab near the top of the page with templates like the one mentioned. We are currently offering a free trial membership in connection with a special report on LEED v4, by the way.

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Melissa Merryweather Director Green Consult-Asia
Jul 24 2012
LEEDuser Member
2061 Thumbs Up

tenant pursuing LEED certification

This seems obvious but I am humoring my client: If the main tenant is submitting for LEED CI can the Core & Shell owner just make tenant guidelines for the other two small tenants in their building and still satisfy this credit? My understanding is that all tenants must sign a tenant agreement. (in fact it should be easier for these two parties to agree such a document--they just want to save on the paperwork)

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 30 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Melissa, I think so. I'll try to double-check with someone else.

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Ante Vulin Sustainability Manager, YR&G Sep 14 2012 LEEDuser Expert 1108 Thumbs Up

Melissa, we would usually create one set of tenant guidelines, which the owner provides to all tenants. The guidelines under this credit are different from the tenant agreements which may be required to achieve other CS credits.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Sep 14 2012 LEEDuser Member 2061 Thumbs Up

Sure, that's what I figured. Thanks for your replies.

Best wishes

Melissa

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ZEB Tech singapore ESD Consultancy ZEB-Technology Pte Ltd
Jun 06 2012
LEEDuser Member
2233 Thumbs Up

Tenants scope of responsibility in Core and Shell certification

We understand that the tenant guidelines are just recommendations and not requirements. And the items that the owner would want to enforce will be included in the legal tenant and lease agreement. However, which credits in CS requires to be followed by the tenants also(to score a point under that resspective CS credit) ? For E.g., for Paints & coatings, to score 1 point under CS, does the tenant spaces should also be following the criteria for 'paints & coatings'? In that case of mandatory requirement for the tenant to follow, that will be obviously in the legal lease agreement. Please advise.

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Ante Vulin Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jun 27 2012 LEEDuser Expert 1108 Thumbs Up

In the Reference Guide, Core & Shell Appendix 4 tells you which credits would require a tenant lease agreement.

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Sandra Silla
Mar 12 2012
Guest
744 Thumbs Up

Tenant requirements to achieve LEED Gold?

Is there an ID or EP point available in CS that would require a tenants to commit to LEED Gold?

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Apr 05 2012 Guest 7491 Thumbs Up

Sandra,
I have not heard of this. Anyone else?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 21 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Sandra, I don't think this exists. Had you heard about it somewhere?

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Jul 24 2012 LEEDuser Member 2061 Thumbs Up

It doesn't, but might it be worth pursuing it as a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide? --There is an ID point available for requiring tenants to achieve exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. for SSc8, EAc2, IEQ c3 or IEQc4, but they also have to be achieved by the Core & Shell project. According to the LEED 2009 manual only one needs to be achieved this way for ID so requiring the tenant to achieve Gold seems a much higher bar. I had a client ask the same question, because they don't want their Gold rating "diluted", not because of the ID point. I'm still debating whether this is a reasonable request.

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Udana Ratnayake
Sep 13 2011
Guest
981 Thumbs Up

Tenant Lease Agreement

what are the LEED specific information that should be included in a tenant lease agreement? is it required to include all credits mentioned under case A,B & C of LEED NC rating system? thanks in advance.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 20 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Udana, you would need to include any credits that you are attempting, yes.

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John Harrington
Aug 19 2011
Guest
114 Thumbs Up

The tenant sales and lease agreement - Lighting

Does anyone know if the developer/owner can specifiy a requirement for a tennant to design lighing Power Density (%5) or more below

ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 - Table 9.6.1 Lighting Power Densities Using the Space by Space Method.

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Susann Geithner Global Sustainability Manager, Predictive Service Aug 19 2011 LEEDuser Member 11261 Thumbs Up

Yes. You can do that and you can also require certain controls like occupancy sensors in space, where it's not already required per ASHRAE. I do however recommend listing Watts per square feet per space type instead of just 5% below ASHRAE. That just makes it easier for tenants to understand what that means.
Also the design guide is just a recommendation and guideline for the tenant not a requirement. Your tenant sales and lease agreement is separate from that and binding for the tenant.

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Omar Katanani
Mar 03 2011
LEEDuser Member
7708 Thumbs Up

Combining Tenant Lease Agreement with the Tenant Guideline

Dear all,

My project is a retail mall, and we are going for this LEED SS Credit 9.

I was wondering if I can combine both of the following in 1 document:
1) Tenant Guidelines (for the sake of this credit)
2) Tenant sales and lease agreement (for the sake of other credits such as water fixtures, smoking policy, CO2Carbon dioxide sensors...)

It is clearly stated in the notes above that both documents do not include the same content ("...a tenant sales and lease agreement is not enough to satisfy the requirements of this credit.")

My question is:
Can I develop 1 general document, which includes a section for the tenant obligations followed by a section giving guidelines for the purpose of SS Credit 9?

I do not see a problem in this (as long as the requirements are distinguished from the suggested guidelines), but I was wondering whether any of you had previous experience, where the Tenant Guidelines had to be a document distinct from the Tenant Sales and Lease Agreement.

Many thanks!

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Daniel LeBlanc Senior Sustainability Manager, YR&G Mar 15 2011 LEEDuser Expert 1030 Thumbs Up

George,

I've never submitted these documents in the way you are suggesting, but I think these should be two distinct and separate documents.

The tenant sales and lease agreement, because it is a legal document, will have much more specific requirements about what needs to be adhered to in order to remain in compliance with the agreement. By contrast, the tenant guidelines should also far more suggestive in tone concerning which measures the tenant should pursue, offering reasons why it would be a good practice to install water efficient fixtures, improved mechanical systems, etc... It should also contain some narrative and background information about sustainability and LEED.

So I would separate these documents for clarity, both for the reviewers and for the tenants.

Thanks,
Dan

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Omar Katanani Mar 16 2011 LEEDuser Member 7708 Thumbs Up

Many thanks Daniel! I would like to further clarify the following:

The issue is that there several documents that need to be provided to a potential tenant, such as "Lighting Agreement", "Methods of Payment", etc. Hence, the client proposed to issue 1 LEED-related document that would contain a strict binding section for the tenant lease agreements, followed by a suggestive section for the sake of SS Credit 9 (the distinction between what is required and what is advised will be very clear as they are 2 different sections).

Thanks again and best regards!

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Aug 22 2014
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