CS-2009 SSp1: Construction Activity Pollution Prevention

  • NC_Schools_CS_SSp1-Type3-ConstructionPollutionPrev Diagram
  • Generally standard practice, anyway

    In general, complying with this prerequisite is standard practice in most urban and suburban areas, where most or all of the EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. (CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.) requirements have been adopted and implemented at the state or county level. Regulators at those levels often threaten heavy fines for not complying with CGP requirements, so most projects do so without the added incentive of the LEED prerequisite.

    Early on in project planning, compare your local code requirements to the CGP to determine which is more stringent. If your local code is more stringent, then you will meet the prerequisite just by following that. If it is less stringent, follow the CGP to achieve the prerequisite.

    Create an ESC plan

    The CGP extends compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters.) stormwater regulations to construction activities. It has three main categories that need to be addressed as you create an erosion and sedimentation control (ESC) plan:

    • Prevent the loss of topsoil during construction. Proper staging of earth-moving activities and the preservation of mature vegetation can aid in preventing topsoil loss and controlling stormwater pollutant discharge. Stabilization methods such as seeding, mulching, and the use of geo-textiles should also be included in your plan.  
    • Prevent the sedimentation of receiving streams. Your plan should outline the placement of planned structural control measures such as silt fences, drainage swales, and storm drain inlet protection. 
    • Prevent air pollution by particulate matter. Your plan should describe measures to prevent the tracking of soil onto paved surfaces off-site and the generation of dust from construction vehicles—for example, gravel skirts at drive entries and exits, transit ways for heavy vehicles, and wash stations for trucks.

    Simply put, your ESC plan implements good housekeeping on a site-wide basis, minimizing the impact of construction on local environmental resources and surrounding properties. 

    As written, the CGP applies to sites of one acre or larger. However, all projects pursuing LEED certification must meet the requirements of the CGP, regardless of size. 

    Often the civil engineer is responsible for creating the ESC plan, which is then implemented by the general contractor. Smaller projects may find the contractor is the one providing the plan, often one that is standard for their company.

    Documenting your plan

    The ESC plan may be submitted as documentation, in the form of a site plan or a narrative report. 

    Inlet protectionInlet protectionTo demonstrate that your ESC plan was implemented, your projects will also be required to provide one of the following: 

    • An inspection check list―signed, and dated periodically. 
    • Date-stamped photos of the following:  
    • measures to prevent topsoil loss including staging of earth-moving activities and stabilization techniques; 
    • measures to prevent sedimentation of nearby streams including structural controls and inlet protection;  
    • measures to prevent air pollution including tracking control at entrances and exits.
    • Description of corrective actions taken in response to problems with the performance of ESC measures.

    Zero lot lines

    Many urban projects have zero lot lines and, therefore, no associated “site.” If your project is like this, you are not exept from developing and implementing an ESC plan. However, strategies and BMPs will differ from those implemented on projects with site area. Inlet protection will still be required, even if storm drains are not immediately on site and within your LEED boundary. Tenting work areas and using temporary enclosures can prevent dust and airborne particulatesTotal suspended particulate matter found in the atmosphere as solid particles or liquid droplets. Chemical composition of particulates varies widely, depending on location and time of year. Sources of airborne particulates include: dust, emissions from industrial processes, combustion products from the burning of wood and coal, combustion products associated with motor vehicle or non-road engine exhausts, and reactions to gases in the atmosphere. (EPA) from leaving the project site. Vehicle tracking and concrete washout will also need to be addressed, and washout will likely have to be managed onsite somehow. Don't forget to include staging areas.

    Concrete washoutConcrete washoutDocument the plan with a narrative report explaining which CGP requirements don’t apply to your project conditions, which do, and how you plan to implement them.

    FAQs for SSp1

    Am I exempt from this prerequisite if I have a zero-lot-line building? What if the site work is minimal due to the scope? What about a renovation? What if the excavation and foundation work is minimal due to the construction materials I am using?

    No. You must always do an ESC plan according to the credit requirements. We have yet to hear of a project that didn't have some issues to address. See the above section titled "Zero lot lines."

    What are BMPs for steep slopes?

    BMPs for steep slopes should address soil retention, but not water retention. These could include silt fencing and straw wattles, hydro seeding and stabilized mulching, geotextiles and mats, and most importantly, preservation of natural vegetation.

    I have a technical question about a specific control measure and whether LEED requires it. What guidance is available?

    LEED does not offer specific requirements on ESC control measures, beyond the standards that it references, and the documentation requirements. LEEDuser recommends working with a civil engineer who understands the LEED and EPA requirements, and relying on the professional judgment of the engineer for specific technical questions. LEEDuser has not heard that LEED reviewers are deeply scrutinizing ESC plans and coming back with highly technical questions.

    Is there a preferred method for documentation?

    This prerequisite offers several options for documentation, including date-stamped photographs, a narrative describing the ESC plan implementation, or a builder declaration of periodic inspection and documentation of ESC implementation. You can rely on project specifics to choose the best option for you—LEED has no preference.

    What suffices as far as a date-stamped photo?

    Ideally, use your cameras to imprint a visible date on a corner of the image. Most cameras offer this option. Digital files also typically encode a date when the file was created, or encode that date in the file name, and while these methods aren't ideal, some project teams have reported success submitting this type of documentation.

    Can I still earn the prerequisite if the project started considering LEED after work began?

    As long as the project has been actively implementing an ESC plan during the current development of the project site, you should be okay. If that's not the case, then the outcome will depend on project specifics, and you will likely need official guidance from GBCI.

    LEEDuser has advised teams that in multi-phase projects, it's okay to focus documentation of the ESC plan only on the current phase, when LEED became part of the project scope. In general, if there is some question about whether controls were in place during the LEED project, you may not be able to earn the prerequisite.

    How do I know if my local code is more or less stringent than the EPA CGP?

    USGBC has not identified specific standards for judging this, or defined certain codes as compliant with the credit, or not. The stringency of other codes relative to EPA's Construction General Permit is judged on a case-by-case basis.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Review pages B-1 through B-4 of the EPA Construction General Permit (CGP) (see Resources) to determine if your state administers the CGP requirements for all projects. 


  • In regions where the EPA CGP is not standard practice, compare the local code with the CGP and make adjustments, if necessary, to include all the CGP requirements.


  • Meeting the requirements of this prerequisite is standard practice in many regions and, therefore, no- or low-cost for LEED. 


  • The materials cost to implement these measures is minimal and can potentially save money by preserving the vegetation and topsoil on-site. 


  • Conduct a site evaluation to assess opportunities for minimizing the alteration of the natural stormwater runoff patterns of your site and the disruption of mature vegetation, especially trees. This will save money and time in terms of earth-moving and replanting vegetation. 


  • Ask your civil engineer about soil types and what type of drainage you will have once the topsoil and vegetation are disturbed.

Schematic Design

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  • Establish who will create your ESC and stormwater pollution prevention plans. Usually, the civil engineer creates them, and the contractor is responsible for their onsite implementation. 


  • It is best to include your ESC plan in both project drawings and project specifications so that the intention of the plan is clearly communicated to the project team, especially contractors and subcontractors. 


  • Determine whether the 2003 EPA CGP or local erosion and sedimentation control standards are more stringent―and follow the more stringent standards. Often the state department of environmental protection or equivalent will have a written ruling on the comparison of the CGP standards and the local standards.  


  • A good first step to determine which is more stringent is to review your local code to be sure it contains at minimum the general categories contained in the CGP. If not, you’ll know that you need to follow the CGP. If so, you’ll need to review your local code in detail to be sure that all of the requirements are included. The general categories are as follows: 

    • allowable stormwater discharges
    • allowable non-stormwater discharges
    • limitations on coverage
    • a stormwater pollution prevention plan
    • releases in excess of reportable quantities
    • treatment of spills.

  • If local standards are equal to or more stringent than the CGP,you'll need to provide a narrative report detailing this. Write the narrative when you do the comparison, so that it's fresh in your mind.  

Design Development

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  • For Core and Shell projects, occupant densities can be used to determine the number of full time equivalent (FTE) occupants that should be consistent for this LEED credit as well as WEp1, WEc2, WEc3, and SSc4.


  • All written ESC plans must include the following:

    • an introduction describing the standard being followed, existing site conditions, and responsible parties
    • a list of the temporary and permanent control measures that will prevent loss of topsoil, sedimentation of receiving streams and storm sewers, and air pollution by particulate matter
    • details of the plan for implementation and ongoing maintenance to prove implementation, including one of the following measures: 
      • A checklist or inspection report demonstrating implementation of your ESC plan and providing sample dates, inspection frequency, at least three equally spaced inspections over the project timeline, and a description of any corrective actions taken. (For LEED documentation, you need to upload this document and have the builder or general contractor sign the LEED Online credit form.)
      • Date-stamped photos of implementation and corrective actions, as applicable, including at least three photos from three different monthly inspections equally spaced over your project site's work timeline. (For LEED documentation, you need to upload these images, but there is no specific required signatory for this option.)
      • A narrative outlining the implementation and corrective action taken to effectively implement your ESC plan. (For LEED documentation, you provide the narrative itself; there is no required signatory for this option.) 

  • Determine which path your project will follow to demonstrate implementation compliance: inspection report, photos, or narrative report. 


  • Photos are likely the easiest way to demonstrate compliance, unless an inspection report has already been completed. 


  • Develop a site-wide, earth-moving schedule to minimize the impact on established vegetation and to stockpile topsoil and protect it from erosion. This can also complement your strategy to achieve SSc5.1: Site Development—Protect or Restore Habitat, by limiting site disturbance and maintaining native vegetation.  


  • Proper scheduling and staging of earth-moving activities can lower the costs associated with sediment and erosion controls.


  • Retain as much of the existing vegetation as possible, not only to lower costs for replacements, but also to decrease the cost of structural controls.


  • Careful implementation of the stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP) by the contractor should inform the design and installation of stormwater management systems onsite. This will enable those systems to be integrated to the greatest extent possible during construction, preventing unexpected stormwater discharges into receiving waterways.  


  • If attempting one or both of the stormwater management credits SSc6.1 and SSc6.2 confirm with the contractor that the SWPPP accurately represents the hydrologic characteristics of the site and is performing as anticipated. Check on assumed infiltration rates, suspected rate and quantity of run-off to receiving streams, and discuss potential storage options. Make changes to the stormwater management system accordingly to improve its effectiveness and ensure that the credit calculations are accurate.


  • Create a draft ESC plan drawing or a narrative report that outlines how your project will comply with the requirements of the CGP or the local standard. See the Documentation Toolkit for samples.


  • Make sure that you use the same LEED project boundary as all other LEED credits your project is attempting (this is particularly relevant with other Sustainable Sites credits).


  • A project drawing should include anticipated stormwater flows and indicate the location and type of any planned ESC measures. 

Construction Documents

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  • Review your ESC and stormwater pollution prevention plans to ensure adequate measures will be implemented to meet the CGP, or local requirements. A discussion between the contractor and the civil engineer on the schedule and implementation of planned measures should be part of this review. 


  • Finalize your ESC plan drawings or narrative report. Verify that your plan is in compliance with the CGP or local standards. 

Construction

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  • Review all ESC project drawings and construction specifications prior to construction activities. 


  • Verify that all ESC measures are in place before any construction activities begin. 


  • The general contractor implements the ESC plan until construction is completed and all disturbed areas have been stabilized. 


  • Have a representative from the general contractor’s office onsite daily to monitor and implement necessary measures laid out in your ESC plan.


  • The civil engineer, contractor, or a third party should inspect your ESC plan measures on a weekly basis (bi-weekly if inspections are also conducted after any weather event involving more than 0.5 inches of rain), and submit status reports on ESC plan implementation. These reports should include labeled and dated photographs, an inspection log, or a narrative report describing the performance of the measures implemented. 


  • Provide corrective actions immediately after any rain event.


  • Corrective actions can range from adjusting the placement of silt fencing and removing debris from stormwater catchment basins to replanting areas of temporary seeding and adding material to gravel skirts at entrances and exits.


  • Preserve existing vegetation, especially mature trees, whenever possible. This will decrease costs for temporary stabilization measures and erosion controls. In addition, the vegetation may also be used as part of your landscaping plan. 


  • After completion of all construction activities, document credit compliance in LEED Online by uploading these documents: 

    • A narrative that declares the standard followed (2003 EPA CGP or local). If you used a local standard, write a narrative report detailing how it is equal to or more stringent than the CPG (Phases I and II, NPDES program). 
    • A written ESC plan or project drawings showing the control measures used.
    • Proof of implementation with one of the following: an inspection report with the required signature, nine photos, or a narrative report.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Implement an ongoing stormwater system maintenance plan with the landscape manager. This should include a regular schedule for monitoring the performance of the stormwater management system and guidelines for repairing or modifying site features that are causing problems. These guidelines could include replacing or increasing vegetation, redirecting runoff, and increasing storage.   

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Core and Shell Development

    SS Prerequisite 1: Construction activity pollution prevention

    Required

    Intent

    To reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation, and airborne dust.

    Requirements

    Create and implement an erosion and sedimentation control plan for all construction activities associated with the project. The plan must conform to the erosion and sedimentation requirements of the 2003 EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. OR local standards and codes, whichever is more stringent. The plan must describe the measures implemented to accomplish the following objectives:

    • To prevent loss of soil during construction by stormwater runoff and/or wind erosion, including protecting topsoil by stockpiling for reuse.
    • To prevent sedimentation of storm sewers or receiving streams.
    • To prevent pollution of the air with dust and particulate matter.

    The EPA’s construction general permit outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters.) program. While the permit only applies to construction sites greater than 1 acre, the requirements are applied to all projects for the purposes of this prerequisite. Information on the EPA construction general permit is available at http://cfpub.epa.gov/ npdes/stormwater/cgpEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program..cfm.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Create an erosion and sedimentation control plan during the design phase of the project. Consider employing strategies such as temporary and permanent seeding, mulching, earthen dikes, silt fencing, sediment traps and sediment basins.

Organizations

CIBSE Applications Manual 10-2005

Located in London, this organization publishes a series of guides on ventilation, including natural ventilation.


International Erosion Control Association

Connect with worldwide member based erosion and sediment control community.


Certified Professional in Erosion and Sedimentation Control

Provides certification programs a list of qualified professionals. 

Publications

EPA – Construction General Permit

Referenced Standard.


Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plans for Construction Activities

Resources here include Developing Your Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan: A Guide for Construction Sites, SWPPP Templates, Sample Inspection Form, Example SWPPPs, Key Resources, and Selected State BMPBest Management Practice/Guidance Manuals.


BMP Manual

BMPBest Management Practice Manual.

Technical Guides

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

A variety of Canadian resources on stormwater management and BMPs.

Photos

Take photos like these to document proper implementation of your ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan.

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

LEED Online Forms: CS-2009 SS

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each CS-2009 SS credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions on these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Erosion and Sedimentation Control Plan Drawings

Posted here are sample drawings for erosion and sedimentation control (ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation) plans from a LEED project.

LEED-NC Platinum Senior Housing Sample Documentation

Samples from this LEED Platinum project demonstrate how to document SSp1. This 8-story, 100-unit public senior housing development will use 50% less energy than a comparable code compliant building. Although on a tight urban site, the project also features innovative stormwater management plans, and a pilot graywaterGraywater is untreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater typically includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washer and laundry tubs, though definitions may vary. Some states and local authorities also allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area. reuse system—all on a tight budget under a major urban housing authority.

58 Comments

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Nándor Kovács Project Manager Obuda-Ujlak Zrt.
Aug 18 2014
Guest
106 Thumbs Up

SSp1 description for CS precertification

We are working on a project precertification (v2009) and I was suprised that the precertification credit form requires a description of measures that will be implemented at the project site.
Can someone provide guidance, what to do if a GC has not been appointed yet (and it is the contractor's responsibility to plan and manage those measures)? Thank you.

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Aug 18 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2514 Thumbs Up

If your GC is developing your E&S plan you have two options:

Develop the plan prior to appointing a GC
Submit after the GC is appointed and the plan developed.

There really is no other way around this.

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Megan Bove
May 27 2014
LEEDuser Member
185 Thumbs Up

NYC project

Hi. I have a project in the city where subway grates are found right outside the project fence as well as always a storm drain that is on a very busy street. Are these required to be covered and/or daily sweeping can be used as a measure instead?

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates May 27 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2514 Thumbs Up

Well this is subject to the conditions of your permit and local agency with jurisdiction, but inlet protection is typically required anywhere in the vicinity of the project.

No clue about subway grates.

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Hazem Yusuf Mechanical Team Leader Engineering Solutions Flow
May 03 2014
Guest
2 Thumbs Up

In which construction phase can I certify my building?

Construction phase of an office building is consisting of multi stages. Those stages are including but not limited to; excavation stage, concrete skeleton stage, block work and plastering stage, curtain wall stage, MEP construction stage, interior finishing stage, exterior finishing stage, landscaping and landscaping stage and so on. Now, I bought a new building that its skeleton ONLY had been finished and still the rest of construction stages not developed until now. I am planning to develop that building to be a green building through applying green activities in construction and design phases. I want also to register the building under LEED for Core& Shell rating system v2009.

My question is regarding SSp1: Construction Activity Pollution Prevention. Can I achieve this prerequisite by implementing an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan starting from this stage until the end of construction phase? The current building situation as mentioned is simply a concrete skeleton consisted of two basements, ground and six typical floors.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International
Oct 30 2013
LEEDuser Member
1595 Thumbs Up

Lime powder or cement to improve soil.

A contractors asked us about lime powder or cement and soil contamination.

The contractor would like to scratch the soils surface then spread lime powder or cement, this is for the soil to be improved and more stable. After the lime powder or cement has been applied a concrete slab will be cast on place on top of this improved soil.

Will lime powder or cement powder represent some sort of soil contamination if it is applied this way?

Thank you very much.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, I don't see any LEED issues here.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International Jan 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 1595 Thumbs Up

Thank you Tristan!!

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Jan 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2514 Thumbs Up

Lime is typically used to increase bearing capacity of the soils prior to, among other things, pouring a slab. Provided you local EPA affiliate is fine with this approach, and you can pull the permits, you are good to go.

If your contractor is local to your project, I'm sure he already knows what he can get approved.

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Lilian Seow LEED Manager Vancouver, BC Canada
Aug 15 2013
LEEDuser Member
457 Thumbs Up

Filtration tank unit system

The project is a on a zero-lot site. A mechanical pond - Filtration water system in place since excavation started. The project is currently at above grade stage.At what stage can this system be unplugged? or What is the disconnection criteria? Everyone seems to be baffled by when this system needs to be removed from site and how does the removal impact the erosion and sedimentation plan ?

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Michael DeVuono Senior Staff Designer, T&M Associates Sep 24 2013 LEEDuser Expert 2514 Thumbs Up

Can you provide a link to the manufacturer? I am trying to visualize this, I can probably help if I have a better understanding of what this is, and how it is used.

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Jiri Dobias
Feb 02 2013
LEEDuser Member
1177 Thumbs Up

Storm Water Pollution Plan for Construction Management

How should we implement the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation/Storm Water Pollution Plan in case that the client does not have one GC but various suppliers for various construction phases. In the phase of excavation and groundworks there was only one company with which we prepared the plan. Now during the upper construction works there are about 5 to 18 various companies in one moment on site. I thought I would prepare the plan and all following Revisions and representatives of each of these companies would accept it in writing - is this ok? Which other procedure would you suggest? Is it possible that every supplier has its own waste bins, spill kit etc. for which he is responsible? Do you have any experience with such procedure? Thanks

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International Mar 22 2013 LEEDuser Member 1595 Thumbs Up

We usually keep track of compliance through the construction management company. They make sure all contractor onsite stick to the SWPPP plan and each and everyone take their own photos and provide enough documentation.

At the end the construction management will concentrate all information (reports, pictures, letters, etc) and will create the final report that will be provided to GBCI through LEED Online.

When you have several contractors at the same time it becomes a bit messy, that's why there has to be a "head" which is the constructin management agency, or the general contractor.

We have projects where the construction management and the general contractor are the same figure and some other where they are split.

In your case I would, by means of a contract, make all subcontractors to stick to the SWPPP plan that need to be provided by the LEED-AP or the LEED consultant, and this plan would be comprehensive which means all BMPBest Management Practice need to be there. Depending on the contractors some BMPs will apply to some and some BMP will not apply to all, but we truly recomend to create one single SWPPP.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International
Dec 17 2012
LEEDuser Member
1595 Thumbs Up

Sprayed concrete as a temporary stabilization measure

Our project has around 10 levels of undergrouns parking. A huge ramp for earth-movement vehicles is being created as construction evolves.

The slopes at the sides of the ramp go for more than 40 feet tall so it is a little bit difficult to put something like a plastic or a not-woven geotextile, the contractor sprayed concrete for the first 10 feet and then for the rest a mixture of cement and water (in Mexico is some sort of grout) is poured over the rest of the slope. As excavation goes deeper this mixture is poured over the new slope.

This mixture contains no additive, like I mentioned is only cement and water.

I just wanted to make sure that this is not considered some sort of soil contamination.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, although I am not, as someone who is not a civil engineer, in the position to comment as an expert on this approach, my common-sense answer is that it sounds reasonable and not like soil contamination.

I will also note that I have not heard of LEED reviewers getting really nit-picky about speciic ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation strategies under this credit. LEED seems to defer to your civil engineer.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International Dec 19 2012 LEEDuser Member 1595 Thumbs Up

Thank you Tristan, we also thought no soil contamination is present when you put only cement mixed with wáter (otherwise any slab on ground when demolished would be considered contaminated soil or contaminated debris, it makes no sense).

Thank you for your comments, we really apreciate it.

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Jeremy Theodore Senior Project Architect SHW Group
Nov 29 2012
Guest
126 Thumbs Up

Licensed Professional Exemption - Outside the US

The template for SSp1 allows for "Streamlined Path" in which a "Registered Civil Engineer" signs to accept responsibility that a proper ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation Plan has been created that is equal to or more stringent than the 2003 EPA CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. requirements.

The project in consideration here is in China.

In short, does the USGBC accept China's certification of "registered civil engineers" as equivalent to the US, and thus accept the streamlined documentation path with their electronic signature?

Obviously the same ESC requirements still need to be met, but we do need clarity on what registration is applicable.

Are there other considerations that then result from the signature exemption... IE that the "contractor declaration and documentation" or " project team date-stamped photos" options are preferred as more reliable verification of the plan implementation, instead of the simple "narrative description"? Or is that not the case, the three options are still all available (as seems true because the form does not grey it out)?

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Eric Johnson Principal Sustainability Project and Cost Manager, Green Future Now Nov 29 2012 LEEDuser Member 3421 Thumbs Up

Last I knew only US certification was valid for the LPE.

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Lisa Fabula Sustainable Project Manager, KEMA Services Nov 30 2012 LEEDuser Expert 654 Thumbs Up

The Licensed Professional designation is linked under your account with USGBC and currently states: "the LP must have a U.S. license but it does not have to be issued from the state of the project. LPE is currently not available to users with international licenses".

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Jeremy Theodore Senior Project Architect, SHW Group Dec 04 2012 Guest 126 Thumbs Up

Thank you Lisa and Eric.

Lisa, can you tell me where you found that (IE, what you mean by "linked under your account with USGBC")... ie, at usgbc.org, leedonline.com, or ?

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Eric Johnson Principal Sustainability Project and Cost Manager, Green Future Now Dec 04 2012 LEEDuser Member 3421 Thumbs Up

Here - LEED Online-Home > Welcome to LOv3 Help > Your Account > Personal Information

Personal Information
The information provided in this section of LEED Online v3 should be kept updated as it is used as a source of communication between that person and CBs, USGBC, and GBCI. Also, LOv3 uses account information to automatically populate fields when registering a project or completing forms.
Personal profile features:

Allows users to provide Licensed Professional, LEED Accredited Professional, and USGBC Member information (see image)

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Radwa Amin Mechanical and control Engineer Hill International-North Africa
Oct 24 2012
LEEDuser Member
168 Thumbs Up

LEED pursuing after building the basement level

Hi there,

We have an office building in Egypt, that its developer wants to pursue LEED, after he had built-up its first basement level.

We do have local code which is less stringent than EPA.

Could we still be able to register the building?

Thank you

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Eric Johnson Principal Sustainability Project and Cost Manager, Green Future Now Oct 24 2012 LEEDuser Member 3421 Thumbs Up

Do you have documentation (pictures, design/ construction managements narratives and plans) that can show the project followed erosion and sedimentation control practices that were as stringent as the 2003 EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. requirements? You might have a problem documenting the project meets the requirements to the satisfaction of the reviewers. Of course, I saw one CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide from long ago that said something along the lines of "since it doesn't rain in Egypt we didn't implement a erosion and sedimentation control plan". (That was pre-2009)

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Radwa Amin Mechanical and control Engineer, Hill International-North Africa Oct 24 2012 LEEDuser Member 168 Thumbs Up

Thank you Eric,

unfortunately we do not have such documents, and our local codes are less stringent than 2003 EPA.

We are welling to follow any modification needed by the reviewer, though I am still concerned about eligibility purposes.

In other LEED projects here in Egypt, we do some precautions for rain ( ponds in the lower points of the site)....and I guess this point is still achievable.

I am concerned about the time arrangement and precautions for the site work during excavation and construction, that we have already missed.

Is it still eligible to pursue LEED?

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Eric Johnson Principal Sustainability Project and Cost Manager, Green Future Now Oct 24 2012 LEEDuser Member 3421 Thumbs Up

I would guess you don't have much of a chance, but you could always submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide and see what happens. Others have asked similar questions on the site and I believe the answer hasn't been very positive.

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Radwa Amin Mechanical and control Engineer, Hill International-North Africa Oct 24 2012 LEEDuser Member 168 Thumbs Up

Thank you Eric,I will try the CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide path.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 24 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Radwa, the short answer to your question is that having a local code that is less stringent than EPA does not preclude you from earning this prerequisite. You just need to follow your local code, and modify your practices to also comply with EPA requirements. I'm not saying that will be easy, but it's an option for you.

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Esteban Undurraga Managing Partner Minus S.A
Jun 06 2012
LEEDuser Member
258 Thumbs Up

ESC PLAN Language

Dear all,

I think this question will be useful for people doing LEED outside the US..
Is it posible to upload the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan in SPANISH? or I have to translate the whole document to English?? I mean, is a really extensive document, and the actual implementation is in spanish.
Anyone with some experience on this?
Same question goes to all the Plans or extensive text documents required for other credits along the LEED process...

Thanks a lot.
Regards!

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Eric Johnson Principal Sustainability Project and Cost Manager, Green Future Now Jun 06 2012 LEEDuser Member 3421 Thumbs Up

Use Google Translate.

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Esteban Undurraga Managing Partner, Minus S.A Jun 06 2012 LEEDuser Member 258 Thumbs Up

Eric, I would.. but it works terrible.

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milton muñiz arquitecto, instituto mexicano del edificio sustentable ac Jun 11 2012 Guest 92 Thumbs Up

tenemos el documento en español, y las concordancias con la normas oficiales.

we have the document in Spanish, and the concordance with official standards, so i hope you live in Mexico.

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Esteban Undurraga Managing Partner, Minus S.A Jun 12 2012 LEEDuser Member 258 Thumbs Up

Hi Milton,

I just sent you an internal message but let me thank you here for your generosity. We are working from Chile but would love to exchange experiences and info with Mexico. I´m sure we share more commonalities than differences when it comes to LEED in Latin America.

Saludos cordiales,

Esteban

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Ronald Dean Sumac Inc. Jul 11 2012 LEEDuser Member 1147 Thumbs Up

Saludos, Milton Muñiz, he tenido tambien algunas complicaciones para corroborar el EPA fuera de USA, si fueras tan amable de mostrarnos este documento en español y las concordancias que mencionas.
Agradezco de antemano.

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Gabriela Hernández Castillo Architect, LEED AP BD+C SYASA - México
Aug 04 2011
Guest
2458 Thumbs Up

Scaffolding (release agent)

People use this liquid on scaffolding so when concrete is cured scaffolding can be removed.

I don't know the exact translation of this (desmoldante we say in spanish), but I think the idea is clear.

Can this liquid be somehow considered as a soil pollutant?

If instead of scaffolding, we use wood, is this wood considered a contaminated waste?

Any comments will be really appreciated. Regards

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milton muñiz arquitecto, instituto mexicano del edificio sustentable ac Jun 11 2012 Guest 92 Thumbs Up

Hola David, me permito escribirte en español, ya que te conozco, y de acuerdo a tu pregunta, Si, el desmoldante deberá ser considerado como contaminante, salvo sea de bajo COV´s (Voc´s in english), o bien inocuo al ambiente, (la verdad no conozco uno que sea inocuo), puedes checar si es inocuo al ambiente bajo sus especificaciones, (elementos quimicos que estan compuestos), si me das el nombre te podemos ayudar a investigar esto.
la madera por otro lado no es considerado un contaminante ni por la EPA, ni por la normatividad de ecologia y SEMARNAT, en MÉXICO, ya que esta es materia organica inerte. Cualquier residuo vegetal o animal es materia orgánica, y su descomposición lo transforma en materiales importantes en la composición del suelo y en la producción de plantas. por lo que aporta nutrientes, ver EPA MULCHING. http://cfpub.epa.gov/npdes/stormwater/menuofbmps/index.cfm?action=factsh...
SALUDOS¡¡¡

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International Dec 17 2012 LEEDuser Member 1595 Thumbs Up

Hola Milton!!

Muchas gracias por tus comentarios!!

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Gabriela Hernández Castillo Architect, LEED AP BD+C SYASA - México
May 05 2011
Guest
2458 Thumbs Up

Water filtration

How much filtration is required when discharging rainwater that contains suspended solids?

We have some rainwater acumulation and we would like to know if a simple screening will be enough. For example will a piece of a not woven geotextile at the end of the piping retaining solids be enough?, or do we need to do something else?

Any suggestion will be appreciated.

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Gabriela Hernández Castillo Architect, LEED AP BD+C SYASA - México
Mar 16 2011
Guest
2458 Thumbs Up

Exposed slopes

If the construction site is really "active", that is to say there is earth movement everyday and the slopes are changing every couple of days, do we need to protect them everysingle day?

According to the CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. point 2.13 management practices letter D:

"...stabilization measures must be initiated as soon as practicable in portions of the site where construction activities have temporarily or permanently ceased, but in no case more than 14 days after the construction activity in that portion of the site has temporarily or permanently ceased."

Does this mean we can leave the slopes exposed where construction is taking place and protect them when construction has stop at a particular spot?

Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 28 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

David, I read the CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. point you quote as saying that slopes must not be protected if they are active to the extent you describe.

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Jennifer Marston
Jan 18 2011
Guest
142 Thumbs Up

How much can the LEED AP or GA do?

In order to operate effectively, can our LEED professional prepare the documentation for credits and prerequisites? For example, our team, developer, architects, and engineers meet and create a verbal plan to handle erosion and sedimentation (SSP1). The LEED AP, who is doing, many project management activities, then prepares the drawings and accompanying narrative and uploads this to the LEED system. During Construction, our LEED profession regularly visits the site and in our case documents that the controls have been implemented through photos, narrative, and a sign-off by the contractor. Is this a valid path to implementation of SSP1? Can we operate similarly for other credits and prerequisites?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 20 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Jennifer, every team is different and will find what works for it. With LEED, it's often important to have someone who is championing the LEED documentation piece and making sure stuff gets done—and this person can do a lot.

On the negative side of your plan, most successful LEED and green projects report that a key element of success is having everyone committed to the goals and working as teammates. Green should not be delegated to one person. Some credits also require some technical expertise or on-the-spot knowledge and someone without specific know-how wouldn't be able to document them.

Does this perspective help?

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Jennifer Marston Feb 03 2011 Guest 142 Thumbs Up

Yes your comments are a big help! Our team is super committed to our green initiatives, and it is good to know that our structure will work. Thanks.

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Julian Bott Principal Design Consultant Cundall Hong Kong
Jan 03 2011
LEEDuser Member
814 Thumbs Up

Undeveloped site

Does this Credit have to be applied to works during the "site enabling stage" for an undeveloped site?

Site investigation
Site Formation
Infrastructure and Roads (inc utility, drainage...etc)

Regards,

Julian

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 10 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, it should be, particularly if your LEED project is registered.

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Gabriela Hernández Castillo Architect, LEED AP BD+C SYASA - México
Dec 26 2010
Guest
2458 Thumbs Up

Final stabilization for zero-lot line projects

For projects that use all site for construction, how does the NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters. General Permit consider final stabilization?

Can I consider it when the lower level has been completed? The permit talks about vegetation only.

Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 28 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

David, I don't totally follow the question. What do you mean by the lower level?

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Gabriela Hernández Castillo Architect, LEED AP BD+C , SYASA - México Dec 28 2010 Guest 2458 Thumbs Up

I would like to know what "final stabilization of soil" means when you have a zero-lot line project.

All site surface will be used for construction, no vegetation will be present at ground level.

Hope this is clearer.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 28 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

I think in this situation, you would simply indicate what's going on in your ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan—that final stabilization basically means that the area is built upon. Make sense?

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Gabriela Hernández Castillo Architect, LEED AP BD+C , SYASA - México Dec 28 2010 Guest 2458 Thumbs Up

Yes, it makes all sense, I just wanted to double check.

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Michael E. Edmonds-Bauer Edmonds International Mar 25 2013 LEEDuser Member 1595 Thumbs Up

For a project that has already built its slurry wall in its entirety, up to what extend does the ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan need to be documented?

My question is because the soil final stabilisation has already been reached by building the slurry wall.

We think we should still document what happens with rainwater since it is going down to the last basement level, being filtered and then pump out of the site. Shall we still keep on documenting the plan just because of the rainwater?

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Gabriela Hernández Castillo Architect, LEED AP BD+C SYASA - México
Dec 21 2010
Guest
2458 Thumbs Up

Tire's cleanning

We are implementing several things in a project to comply with this prerrequisite, regarding the cleaning of the vehicle's tires leaving the site we are washing them and then the vehicles go on a bed of rock before they leave the site. However some dirt is still stick to the tires leaving the streets a little bit dirty. We have some workers wipping the dirt but still there are traces of it on the road.

How "clean" does the street need to be in order to comply with this part of the plan?

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Susann Geithner Global Sustainability Manager, Predictive Service Dec 21 2010 LEEDuser Member 11350 Thumbs Up

We have used tire cleaning station in our projects, which was sufficient for the reviewers. I think you will have to do your best to prevent erosion and dirt traveling from your site, but of course you can't entirely prevent it from happening. I have 4 projects just recently certified or finished preliminary review incl. this prerequisite. Al of these projects used tire wash station, which still left some dirt traveling into the street. The streets were regularly cleaned by the contractor. This was approved, so I think yours will be too.

Good luck

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Bilge Ceylan Green Building/Project Management Consultant Individual Entrepreneur
Oct 11 2010
LEEDuser Member
127 Thumbs Up

Compliance with SS Prerequisite 1 for international projects

The procedure, references and the documents to be submitted to GBCI pertaining to this prerequisite are specific for those projects in the U.S. How would an international project pursuing LEED comply with this prerequisite? So far LEED has been adapted only for Italy. How would all other countries demonstrate compliance with SS P1?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 11 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

There is a good discussion on this topic in the NC SSp1 forum. I would recommend you review that and post back with any additional thoughts/questions.

In additon to what's posted there, I do know that USGBC is actively working on this issue; however, there is no official guidance available at this moment.

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Heather Holdridge Sustainability Coordinator Lake/Flato Architects
Jul 23 2010
LEEDuser Member
1286 Thumbs Up

Licensed Professional Exemptions

My project is looking to pursue the LPE streamlined path for this credit, but the template on LEED Online is not populating properly. What documentation do I need to upload if I am pursuing this path? Just the site plan showing all on-site natural areas contributing to credit achievement and highlighting areas of native/adaptive vegetation or other ecologically appropriate features as well as the erosion and sedimentation control measures implemented on site? Or do I need to include additional documentation? Please clarify.

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Lisa Marshall Sustainability Manager, DNV KEMA Energy & Sustainability Jul 26 2010 Guest 622 Thumbs Up

Hi Heather: Typically the contractor is the professional who would sign off on this credit. As the Civil engineer is the professional who sets up the erosion and sediment BMPBest Management Practice's and the contractor must follow these BMP's. Typically you would upload the civil drawings showing the erosion and sediment control measures and as construction is being done, the contractor takes photographs to prove the procedures were followed. The photographs are uploaded as proof. This credit is one of the easier credits to document, so I would recommend against the LPE route. The following is a post from  Tristan Roberts regarding LPE in general that's posted elsewhere on the forum:

The Licensed Professional Exemption is basically a streamlined documentation path that is available for certain credits, particularly design-oriented credits where a licensed professional such as a Landscape Architect or a P.E. would be in a position to judge whether the project is compliance. In most credits this option is not available due to the nature of the credit, e.g. an MR credit that requires actual tracking of purchases.

It basically involves substituting the signature of a professional for some portion of the usual documentation. This is shown in LEED Online in the relevant credits.

Unfortunately, USGBC or GBCI have not released much information on the LPE path, such as a list of the credits where it's an option, and general guidance on using the exemption. There is a small amount of info on it in the LEED Reference Guide.

The benefit of the LPE path is obvious—efficiency. The downside is that in order to feel confidence signing off on a credit, the professional may need to develop all the documentation that LEED would require, anyway, and instead of putting their professional authority on the line, they might as well simply submit the documentation.

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Tom Fik Civil Engineer/LEED AP Carroll Engineering
Jun 07 2010
LEEDuser Member
89 Thumbs Up

SSp1 - New Jersey 5G3 Stormwater Discharge General Permit

The State of New Jersey is the NPDESThe National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a permit program that controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters. permitting authority for all regulated stormwater discharges (not EPA). We received authorization to discharge under a Stormwater Discharge General Permit (5G3) and we received certification from the local soil conservation district for a commercial project. There will be general construction activities including clearing, grading, and excavation. The 5G3 Permit states that the "soil erosion and sediment control plan or requirements constitute the erosion and sediment control component of the facility's SPPP". If we submit the Permit and copies of the approved soil erosion and sediment control plan, do we achieve credit SSp1? Is a separate SPPP document required? Thank you.

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Lisa Marshall Sustainability Manager, DNV KEMA Energy & Sustainability Jun 08 2010 Guest 622 Thumbs Up

Hi Tom: I would include a copy of the SPPP in your uploaded docs area, but you should also have an project specific erosion control plan that highlights those items in the SPPP you are implementing. Also the Civil drawings should show these BMPBest Management Practice's, I would upload these plans and some pictures of these measures being implemented.

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