CS-v4 SSp1: Construction activity pollution prevention

  • Standard practice generally achieves the prerequisite

    Complying with this prerequisite is standard practice in most urban and suburban areas in the U.S., where most or all of the EPA Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. (CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.) requirements have been adopted and implemented at the state or county level. Regulators at those levels often threaten heavy fines for not complying with CGP requirements, so most projects do so without the added incentive of the LEED prerequisite.

    Compare your local code to the requirements of the CGP early in your project timeline to determine which is more stringent. If your local code is more stringent, then you will meet the prerequisite just by following that. If it is less stringent, follow the CGP to achieve the prerequisite. 

    If your project is located outside of the U.S., it’s possible that the local code requirements are comparable to or more stringent than the EPA CGP. Be sure to compare the two early in your project timeline. Projects outside the U.S. do not have to comply with the permitting aspects of the CGP.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • The EPA CGP referenced version was updated from 2003 to 2012.

    FAQs

    Is there a table that summarizes the changes that were introduced by the 2012 version of the standard, as compared to 2003?

    No, not exactly. Because the CPG 2003 was not an immediate predecessor to 2012, there is no resource available that explicitly compares the two. However, there are resources online that compare the 2008 iteration to the 2012 CPG, including this page from EPA.

    If a project decided to pursue LEED after the completion of demolition but before construction, can we prove ESC measures were implemented through pictures, without having an explicit ESC plan?

    Yes. Simply do your best to demonstrate that ESC measures were undertaken, while acknowledging that an ESC plan was not in place at the time.

    How do I know if my local code is more or less stringent than the EPA CGP?

    USGBC has not identified specific standards for judging this, or defined certain codes as compliant with the credit, or not. The stringency of other codes relative to EPA's Construction General Permit is judged on a case-by-case basis.

  • SS Prerequisite 1: Construction activity pollution prevention

    Intent

    To reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation, and airborne dust.

    Requirements

    Create and implement an erosion and sedimentation control plan for all construction activities associated with the project. The plan must conform to the erosion and sedimentation requirements of the 2012 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Construction General PermitEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. (CGPEPA's Construction General Permit. Outlines the provisions necessary to comply with Phase I and Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.) or local equivalent, whichever is more stringent. Projects must apply the CGP regardless of size. The plan must describe the measures implemented.

    SITES-LEED Equivalency

    This LEED credit (or a component of this credit) has been established as equivalent to a SITES v2 credit or component. For more information on using the equivalency as a substitution in your LEED or SITES project, see this article and guidance document.

3 Comments

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Daniela Mendez Civil Engineer
Apr 18 2017
LEEDuser Member

belated project registration / certification process feedback

Project Location: Mexico

Our project is a possible CS, comprised of office, residential and commercial spaces located in Mexico City. The project is not yet registered but is still in construction (since 2012), and we are looking for feedback from other projects that have been in this same situation. Has anyone decided to pursue LEED v4 certification in such a late stage of the project? which were your greatest challenges? Fortunately the project seems to be complying with every prerequisite, but the Construction Activity Pollution Prevention seems a little tricky, do you have any recommendations? We are planning to certify only the office and commercial portions of the building.

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Anaïs P
Feb 03 2016
Guest
57 Thumbs Up

Erosion and Sedimentation Mesures dunring demolition

During demolition works, should the Erosion and Sedimentation measures be implemented?
The Reference Guide only refers to construction works...

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 17 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes. Demolition is part of the entire construction scope of a project.

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May 25 2017
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