EBOM-2009 EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance

  • EBOM EAc1 Action Steps Diagram
  • Improving operational energy performance

    After having documented your project building's energy performance for EAp2: Minimum Energy Efficiency Performance, EAc1 will require you to focus closely on improving operational performance and, in some cases, upgrading to more efficient equipment. Use your energy audit results from EAp2 to develop your strategy. Identify and implement no-cost and low-cost opportunities to reduce energy consumption, such as changing heating and cooling set points by one or two degrees and reminding occupants to turn off lights and office equipment when not in use. Capital investments may see relatively prompt paybacks because of reduced utility costs and the likelihood of incentives through federal or regional programs.

    Track at least 12 months of energy data

    All project teams are required to use EPA’s Energy Star Portfolio Manager to track a minimum 12 months of data for all energy consumption. The data is then benchmarked based on source EnergySource energy is the total amount of raw fuel required to operate a building; it incorporates all transmission, delivery, and production losses for a complete assessment of a building's energy use. Use Intensity (EUI) to show compliance. Source EUI incorporates efficiency factors into an analysis of the total amount of raw fuel (or “source energy”) used to operate the building, rather than using the more limited measure of site energy, which reflects the amount of utility heat and electricity consumed at the building. Most buildings will benchmark through Energy Star and document the prerequisite through Case 1. Those not eligible for an Energy Star rating will use summary data generated in Portfolio Manager in conjunction with protocols provided by USGBC to complete benchmarking calculations and document the prerequisite and credit through Case 2.   

    Energy Star eligibility

    Points available for EAc1 in EBOM.

    Twelve building space types are eligible for Energy Star ratings. Typically, if at least 50% of the building’s gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) (excluding parking lots and garages) is classified as one of the following space types, the project is eligible and must use Case 1:

    • bank or financial institution
    • courthouse
    • dormitory
    • hospital
    • hotel (upper upscale, upscale, midscale with food and beverage, midscale without food and beverage, and economy and budget properties)
    • K–12 school
    • medical office
    • office
    • retail store
    • supermarket or grocery store
    • warehouse (refrigerated and nonrefrigerated)
    • wastewater treatment plant

    To ensure national comparability, climate data is used to normalize energy consumption to compare the project building to similar buildings in similar climate zones, eliminating potential regional variations. However, it may be easier in certain regions to improve a building’s efficiency based on city or state policies. For example, savings achieved through energy-efficiency improvements may qualify your project for state and local utility incentive programs. Ask local utility providers about incentives and rebate programs.

    Electric meterEAp2 and EAc1 require that you keep close track of your energy consumption for at least 12 months.

    Consider these questions before pursuing this credit

    • Is the project building eligible to receive an Energy Star rating using Portfolio Manager? If not, will the project building use Option B or Option C?
    • Are all sources of energy serving the project building, including that consumed by district energy systems, metered? Are consumption data points available for intervals no longer than 65 days?
    • Do you have at least 12 consecutive months of metering data for all types of energy used in the building?
    • What opportunities are there for improving energy performance through operational changes identified by an ASHRAE Level 1 Walkthrough Audit? What opportunities exist for improving energy performance through equipment upgrades?
    •  Is comprehensive commissioning likely to uncover significant energy savings opportunities?
  • FAQs for LEED-EBOM EAp2 and EAc1

    Our building includes a large laboratory space. Can our project benchmark under the Labs21 program?

    The updated Case 2 calculator (see resources section) uses Labs21 to facilitate benchmarking for buildings with laboratory spaces. The calculator includes specific directions to walk you through the process.

    We have an international project and the space type is eligible for an Energy Star rating. Can we pursue Case 1 to demonstrate compliance given the recently released alternative compliance paths for international projects?

    Yes, international projects that are comprised of ratable space under Energy Star must still pursue the EAp2/EAc1 via Case 1.

    We have a number of buildings on a single campus that we would like to certify at the same time. Is it possible to benchmark the buildings at the campus level?

    Generally, it is not possible to benchmark multiple buildings as a single entity on Portfolio Manager for Case 1 or for Case 2. Each building must be separately benchmarked as a standalone entity according to either Case 1 or Case 2 depending on the space type associated with each building. USGBC’s Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Projects is a good resource to reference in this type of scenario.

    I have a mixed-use building and am wondering if it is possible to pursue the prerequisite through Case 1. How do we proceed?

    The first step is to enter the building and associated space characteristics on Portfolio Manager to see if the building is eligible for an Energy Star rating. If it is, you go with Case 1 and if not, go to the Case 2 calculator. Energy Star has published additional guidance for mixed-use buildings that is a great resource in this circumstance.

    We have a building that consists of two attached structures and it’s unclear if we have to consider it a single building or if it should be certified as two separate buildings and benchmarked accordingly. How should we proceed?

    In this case it is a good idea to (1) reach out to Energy Star directly to determine if the structures should be benchmarked as a single building or two and then (2) reference the LEED Supplemental Guidance to the Minimum Program Requirements. If it is still unclear after those two steps are taken, it’s also a good idea to communicate with USGBC directly to confirm the best approach.

    How long is an Energy Star label valid to use with a streamlined approach for Case 1?

    In order to use an Energy Star label for the streamlined path, the Label must have been awarded within 12 months of the LEED application submittal date. For example, if you receive label award notification from Energy Star on March 5, 2012, you can use the score associated with the label as long as you submit your application to GBCI on or before March 5, 2013.

    Our building includes heavy process loads that significantly increase the overall energy use in the building. If we submeter these loads, can we exclude this energy use for benchmarking purposes?

    Process loads generally may not be excluded from the building’s energy use for benchmarking purposes. However, depending on the appropriate compliance path, you may be able to normalize the energy use from process loads based on the relative activity level of the building operations. For example, if the building is a manufacturing facility, part of the benchmarking process will involve normalizing energy use based on the relative output of the facility. Use of CIRs in the case of special benchmarking for buildings with process loads is recommended.

    We have installed submeters on our building but the utility bill includes energy use from several other buildings located on the same campus. How do we reconcile this during the LEED review process?

    For the LEED submission, provide a summary of submetered energy use for the project building along with the utility bills for the campus. Include a narrative summarizing the sub-metering approach and explaining the difference between the utility bills and the submetered energy use data included on Portfolio Manager, which commonly includes a spreadsheet showing the deductions from the total consumption used to show the energy attributable to the project, or how submeter readings for each separate entity add up to the whole reflected in the utility bills.

    When is it possible to exclude up to 10% of the building from EAp2?

    If you have a space that is submetered, is under separate management, and does not support the typical operations of the remaining portions of the building, this space may be excluded from the prerequisite.

    What do I do if the number of building occupants, operating hours, or vacant space changes during the performance period?

    When applicable variables change during the performance period, these changes must be recorded on Portfolio Manager to ensure accurate benchmarking of the building. When making updates to the space characteristics on Portfolio Manager, make sure to select “update” rather than “correct” and note the date when the updated space characteristic was first true. By selecting “update” the change in the building characteristic is only counted for the appropriate portion of the performance period rather than the whole thing. For example if 20% of the building space becomes vacant half way through the performance period, update the vacant space on Portfolio Manager so that the building was 100% occupied for half of the performance period and 80% occupied for the other half. In these circumstances, it is a good idea to provide a copy of the “Revision History” for affected spaces along with the prerequisite submittal.

    If you pursue the streamlined path for an Energy Star label, should the performance period for EAc6 match the 12-month time frame of the label?

    For EAc6, the performance period should fall within 30 days of the latest performance period end date for all other credits and prerequisites. It should not follow the period of the Energy Star label associated with the streamlined path for EAp2.

    How do I account for computers with multiple monitors on Portfolio Manager?

    The number of monitors in the building does not impact the number of computers entered into Portfolio Manager. The value for computers should reflect the total number of personal computers and servers in the office space. For example, if the office space includes 10 PCs, 5 laptops, and 25 monitors, the input for Portfolio Manager is 15 PCs.

    How should I treat vacant space on Portfolio Manager?

    For office buildings, if the vacant space is greater than 10% of the building area use the following guidance as indicated in the USGBC Reduced Occupancy Guidance document. For all other space types, no other changes are required for this credit.

    • Completely vacant or unused space must be entered separately from fully occupied or partially occupied space.
    • Completely vacant or unused space must be entered with zero workers, zero operation hours (even if the space is conditioned), and zero personal computers.
    • Fully occupied and partially occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space. are entered using normal procedures.
    • If occupancy conditions change over time during the performance period, average occupancy levels of all spaces must be kept up to date in Portfolio Manager.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

Expand All

  • Assess current performance and Energy Star eligibility. Benchmark current performance based on the option that applies to the project building. Make operational improvements or equipment upgrades to meet minimum energy performance requirements.


  • Benchmarking can typically be managed by in-house staff, reducing capital investment.


  • Review “15 O&M Best Practices for Energy-Efficient Buildings,” a helpful document published by Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. (PECI) to assist facility managers and building owners with basic energy-efficiency issues.


  • Provide building operators with access to BOMA’s BEEP (Building Energy Efficiency Program) training webinars to maintain regular and effective training for personnel responsible for daily building operations.


  • Collect energy metering data for a minimum period of the most recent twelve months.


  • Portfolio Manager Quality Control using graphingBe sure that information is copied accurately from utility bills, including start and end dates of the statement period, and that you are using actual meter readings as opposed to estimated readings whenever possible. Replace estimated meter readings with actual meter readings once those statements are received. Exporting data inputs from Energy Star and graphing the utility data can help uncover data entry errors through visual comparison.


  • Energy Star requires precise data to describe the different space types in the building, including the square footage, number of occupants and computers, and other characteristics of daily operations. Careful inventory of these variables will result in a more accurate rating.


  • Energy metering data may be excluded for up to 10% of the building’s gross floor area if that space is sub-metered and used for an independent purpose unrelated to typical business operations, such as a cafeteria; or used as a computer data center.


  • LEED defers to Energy Star practices and standards to generate a Portfolio Manager rating or score. Where questions arise regarding this score, review Energy Star technical guidance documents and contact Energy Star customer service to facilitate the process.


  • If you initially get a low Energy Star score, start your process by identifying no- and low-cost operational changes to reduce energy consumption. If your building is an energy hog, it’s more likely that these opportunities will exist, and focusing on them to start with will help you go the distance. For instance, simply changing heating and cooling set points by one or two degrees and getting into the practice of turning off lights and office equipment when not in use will have dramatic effects on overall building energy use.


  • Building owners can reduce overall operating costs by optimizing energy performance; many operational energy-efficiency improvements will provide instant or short-term paybacks.


  • Pursuing commissioning through EAc2 will help identify energy-efficiency improvements, and will pay off particularly well in inefficient buildings.


  • Many state and federal agencies offer rebates or other financial incentives to companies that undertake energy-efficiency initiatives.


  • For building types covered by Energy Star but located outside the U.S., use Case 1. Portfolio Manager proivdes a list of non-U.S. locations, but it is not complete. If the location for an international project is not listed, consult ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Appendices B and B to determine a comparable U.S. city.

During the Performance Period

Expand All

  • Case 1: Projects Eligible for Energy Star Rating


  • Provide documentation of the Energy Star rating or certificate award from the EPA.


  • You must generate an Energy Star score if the building type is listed as an eligible space in Portfolio Manager. Case 2 is not allowed for buildings eligible for Energy Star.


  • Case 2, Option 1: Adjusted Benchmark Score

     


  • Complete the EAp2/EAc1 Case 2 Calculator to demonstrate the building’s level of energy efficiency.


  • Use figures generated in Portfolio Manager to complete the EAp2/EAc1 Case 2 Calculator spreadsheet.


  • If the building type is listed in Portfolio Manager, but is not eligible for an Energy Star score, then you will most likely be able to use the Option 1 of the EAp2/EAc1 Case 2 Calculator. Complete the “Eligibility” Tab of the Option EAp2/EAc1 Case 2 Calculator to confirm which option you should use.


  • Case 2, Option 2: Alternative Score


  • Provide one of the following data summaries:

    • C1: Streamlined Baseline – Use the weather-normalized source EUI value generated in Portfolio Manager to determine whether the project building meets the minimum requirements.
    • C2: Energy Baseline Including Historical Data – Add at least three consecutive years of historical energy use data into Portfolio Manager to determine the EUI for each year.
    • C3: Energy Baseline Including Historical Data plus Comparable Buildings – In addition to data entered for Option C2, provide energy use data for at least three other buildings with similar uses in order to establish the “average energy performance of a similar building in a similar climate.”

  • Continue entering monthly metering data into Portfolio Manager to update the building data.


  • If determining the Energy Baseline Including Historical Data, the three years of data must fall within six years of the beginning of the performance period.


  • Closely monitor energy consumption and correct any conditions contributing to energy waste.


  • If the project building type is not listed in Portfolio Manager, and more than 10% of the building space must be entered into Portfolio Manager as “other,” then you will most likely need to use the Option C calculator. Complete the “Eligibility” Tab of the EAp2/EAc1 Case 2 Calculator to confirm which option you should use.


  • Track any changes in occupancy or space uses, if any, to adjust Portfolio Manager inputs accordingly.


  • Industry reports may provide useful benchmarking comparisons and eliminate the need for you to locate three comparable buildings on your own. The International Facility Management Association (IFMA) publishes benchmarking reports that are available on its website.


  • Expect no costs for in-house calculations or tracking and minimal costs when using a consultant to complete calculations using provided data.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    EA Credit 1: Optimize energy efficiency performance

    1–18 Points

    Intent

    To achieve increasing levels of operating energy performance relative to typical buildings of similar type to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.

    Requirements

    Case 1. Projects eligible for Energy Star rating

    For buildings eligible to receive an energy performance rating using the EPA’s ENERGY STAR’s Portfolio Manager tool, achieve an energy performance rating of at least 71. If the building is eligible for an energy performance rating using Portfolio Manager, Option 1 must be used.

    Achieve energy efficiency performance better than the minimum requirements listed above; points are awarded according to the table below.

    The minimum energy cost savings percentage for each ENERGY STAR threshold is as follows:

    EPA ENERGY STAR Energy

    Performance Rating

    Points

    71

    1

    73

    2

    74

    3

    75

    4

    76

    5

    77

    6

    78

    7

    79

    8

    80

    9

    81

    10

    82

    11

    83

    12

    85

    13

    87

    14

    89

    15

    91

    16

    93

    17

    95

    18



    Have energy meters that measure all energy use throughout the performance period of buildings to be certified. Each building’s energy performance must be based on actual metered energy consumption for the LEED project. A full 12 months of continuous measured energy data is required.

    Calibrate meters within the manufacturer’s recommended interval if the building owner, management organization or tenant owns the meter. Meters owned by third parties (e.g., utilities or governments) are exempt.

    Case 2. Projects not eligible for Energy Star rating

    For buildings with a primary space type not eligible to receive an energy performance rating using Portfolio Manager, comply with 1 of the following:

    Option 1

    Demonstrate energy efficiency performance that is better than 71% of similar buildings (71st percentile or better) by benchmarking against national source energySource energy is the total amount of raw fuel required to operate a building; it incorporates all transmission, delivery, and production losses for a complete assessment of a building's energy use. data provided in the Portfolio Manager tool as an alternative to energy performance ratings. Projects outside the U.S. may use a local benchmark based on source energy from their country's national or regional energy agency. Follow the detailed instructions in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

    OR

    Option 2

    For buildings not suited for Case 2, Option 1, demonstrate energy efficiency performance by determining an alternative rating score using the Portfolio Manager tool to report the building's energy use data from the performance period. Follow the detailed instructions in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

    Option 2a. Streamlined baseline (EAp2 only – 0 points)

    This option is only available through EAp2. Enter energy use data during the performance period for at least 1 year into Portfolio Manager to determine the “weather-normalized source energy intensity”. Use this value in the offline calculator to determine the percent reduction from the streamlined baseline.

    Option 2b. Energy baseline including historical data (up to 9 points)

    Enter at least 3 consecutive years of historical energy use data into Portfolio Manager in addition to the current year’s data to determine the “weather-normalized source energy intensity” for each year. Use these values in the offline calculator to determine a baseline using the historical energy use data of the project building.

    Option 2c. Energy baseline including historical data plus comparable buildings (up to 18 points)

    In addition to the historical data used in Option 2b, provide energy use data for at least 3 other buildings with similar uses over at least a 2-year period to determine the “average energy performance of a similar building” in Portfolio Manager. Enter this data into the offline calculator.

    AND

    Achieve energy efficiency performance better than the minimum requirements listed above; points are awarded according to the table below.

    Have energy meters that measure all energy use throughout the performance period of all buildings to be certified. Each building’s energy performance must be based on actual metered energy consumption for both the LEED project and all comparable buildings used for the benchmark. A full 12 months of continuous measured energy data is required.

    Calibrate meters within the manufacturer’s recommended interval if the building owner, management organization or tenant owns the meter. Meters owned by third parties (e.g., utilities or governments) are exempt.

    Use the Portfolio Manager tool available on the ENERGY STAR website to benchmark the project even if it is not eligible for an EPA rating: http://www.energystar.gov/benchmark.

    Percentile level above the national median

    (for buildings not eligible for ENERGY STAR energy performance rating

    Points

    21

    1

    23

    2

    24

    3

    25

    4

    26

    5

    27

    6

    28

    7

    29

    8

    30

    9

    31

    10

    32

    11

    33

    12

    35

    13

    37

    14

    39

    15

    41

    16

    43

    17

    45

    18



    Pilot Alternative Compliance Path Available

    This credit has an alternative compliance path available for the use of ISO 50001: Energy Management Systems. For more information see Pilot ACP 86: LEED 2009 EBOM ACPs for ISO 50001.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Existing building commissioning and energy audits will help identify areas of building operations that are not efficient. Implement energy-efficient retrofits and energy-saving techniques to reduce the building’s energy use. Energy-efficient equipment such as office equipment, maintenance equipment and appliances will aid in the reduction of energy waste. Employ the use of meters on major mechanical systems to effectively monitor the energy consumption of each.

    In addition to efficiency improvements, consider renewable energy options as a way to minimize the building’s environmental impact.

Publications

Environmental Tobacco Smoke

This EPA document summarizes environmental tobacco smoke research and provides information on national laws targeting the issue.

Technical Guides

EPA’s Energy Star Portfolio Manager

EPA's system for helping you track and improve energy efficiency across your entire portfolio of buildings.


2010 Professional Engineer

A helpful guide for use of Portfolio Manager to track energy utility data.


PECI’s 15 Operations & Management Best Practices for Energy-Efficient Buildings

A helpful guide to assist facility managers with best practices for common energy-efficiency issues.


Treatment of Distric or Campus Thermal Energy in LEED v2 and LEED 2009 (Updated August 13, 2010)

Required reference document for DES systems in LEED energy credits.

Web Tools

Portfolio Manager Eligibility Guidelines

Portfolio Manager explains the eligibility requirements for tracking and benchmarking energy use over time in commercial and institutional buildings.


USGBC LEED EB:O&M 2009, EAp2 and EAc1 Case 2 Calculator

Calculator for LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems., optimizing energy efficiency performance.


International Facility Management Association (IFMA)

IFMAInternational Facility Management Association is the largest international facilities managers' organization.


BOMA Energy Efficiency Program (BEEP)

The Building Owners and Managers Association International (BOMA) has a program called BOMA Energy Efficiency Program (BEEP). BEEP


Energy Star Training

ENERGY STAR offers free online training to help you improve the energy performance of your organization.

Statement of Energy Performance

Case 2.1

The Energy Star Portfolio Manager Statement of Energy Performance verifies your project building’s energy use intensity (EUI), as well as the national average for buildings of similar usage. You’ll need to submit this, as well as the EAc1 Option B/C Calculator, to show that your building’s energy efficiency is at least 21% better than the national average.

Portfolio Manager

Case 1: Projects Eligible for an Energy Star Rating

Provide documentation of the Energy Star rating or certificate award from the EPA.

LEED Online Forms: EBOM-2009 EA

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.-2009 EA credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

v06 forms:

v04 forms:

v03 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Sample LEED Online Form

This annotated sample of the LEED Online form demonstrates how to document EAp2 and EAc1.

118 Comments

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Johanna Hendricks
Oct 09 2014
LEEDuser Member

Golf Course Clubhouse Project Advice

Project Location: United States

Hello,

We have a client that has approached us about the possibility of certifying a golf course clubhouse via LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.. I was wondering if anyone else has had past experiences with this and can recommend a route to take for achieving this prerequisite and the points attached to EAc1. It appears that creating an ENERGY STAR portfolio manager account and using the case 2 calculator would work best. However, I am uncertain what to classify the space type as in Portfolio Manager. I am thinking maybe "Entertainment/Public Assembly" seems appropriate. Any advice is appreciated, thanks!

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Wendy Lao LEED Sustainability Intern County of Santa Clara
Jul 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
92 Thumbs Up

Performance Period - Retrofits and Changes to # of Credits?

My building is aiming to be LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. Silver and received a preliminary audit from PG&E in 2011 which resulted in a score of 80 in Energy Star Portfolio (or 9 LEED points). My building now wants to undergo some energy retrofits by August 2014 to achieve a score of 85 (13 points).

The performance period requires 12 months of tracking, but we want our performance period to end by November 30, 2014. So we were expecting to use 9 months of old data (Nov 2013 – July 2014) and 4 months of new data (Aug 2014 – Nov 2014).

My question is, will the energy efficiency from the new retrofits beginning Aug 2014 be reflected in our Energy Star Portfolio and thus LEED score? Will this be “prorated” on a monthly basis or somehow incorporated? Or will our EAc1 score be a maximum of 9 LEED points only, unless if we change the performance period?

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Julia Weatherby Senior Mechanical Engineer, Lindgren & Sharples, P.C. Jul 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 1616 Thumbs Up

Wendy-

Your EAc1 score will be based on the twelve months or more of data reported to Energy Star Portfolio Manger during the performance period. Assuming a step improvement in energy efficiency in Aug. 2014, your score would be a weighted blend of the 8 months with the new 4 months of data.

Theoretically, the longer you can wait to submit (up to at least 12 months) after the energy retrofit is in place, the better your score will be.

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Wendy Lao LEED Sustainability Intern, County of Santa Clara Jul 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 92 Thumbs Up

Thank you Julia. We wish we could delay the submission to reflect the energy savings, but unfortunately LEED requires all credits to have the performance period end within the same 30 day period, and so we must complete our project by Nov. 31. (Or am I mistaken?) Again, thank you.

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Julia Weatherby Senior Mechanical Engineer, Lindgren & Sharples, P.C. Jul 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 1616 Thumbs Up

Yes, you are correct that the end of each performance periods needs to be coordinated to fall within a 30-day period. So if there are other credits where it will not work to lengthen the performance period, then the energy data 1-year period can't be rolled forward either.

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satheesh M
Jul 03 2014
Guest

Documentation for a single building in multi building campus

we would like to pursue the LEED EB certification for 2 buildings in a multi building campus. can we register the project as a single building?

we have energy bills for whole campus only, please explain the documentation requirement for this credit.

Post a Reply
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Gustav Alfaro Mechanical Engineer
May 23 2014
LEEDuser Member
124 Thumbs Up

Core and Shell Building

Hi, we are trying to certify a core and shell office building which has an electrical meter for the common areas and independent meters for the tenants, but we don't have access to the electricity consumption records of the tenants. The question is, how should we benchmark the building energy consumption, can it be performed just for the common areas or must it be done for the whole building including the tenants?

Post a Reply
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Janna Nash
Apr 27 2014
LEEDuser Member
537 Thumbs Up

Case 2 Option 2B guidance

Our project is comprised of 93% manufacturing space, which lead us to the Case 2, Option 2 calculator. I was unfortunately confused by the credit language and thought once we had 3 years of energy use we were ready to complete the calculator NOT 3 years PLUS another 12 months for the current year. So 4 years of occupancy and tracking is the real number to go by. The building was constructed in 1996, but the current company (which is pursuing LEED certification) has only occupied it for 3 yrs and 4 months (since January 2011). Are we allowed to enter the building's energy consumption for the prior occupant who also conducted manufacturing in the facility?

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Hatice G. SCHOLZE Consulting
Feb 07 2014
Guest
167 Thumbs Up

Fitness Center with swimming pool

We are certifying a multi tenant building with different types of use.
One of the use is a fitness center with an indoor swimming pool. Should I enter the ftness area separate from the swimming pool In ENERGY STAR?

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Feb 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1409 Thumbs Up

Hi Hatice

The way I understand the function of ENERGY STAR's Portfolio Manager is that a pool is entered as a component function of the overarching space-type. So you would have to enter the Fitness Center space in order to enter the pool attributes. Here's the definition of a pool from the Portfolio Manager glossary: "In order to enter buildings associated with a Swimming Pool, the main property use must be entered (e.g., K-12 School, Hotel, Fitness Center/Health Club/Gym, etc)."

Regardless of my guidance, I would suggest submitting an inquiry ticket to ENERGY STAR about this question. When I have unique situations like this, I will submit a ticket because they have a quick turnaround (usually a couple of days, but under a week) and their guidance tends to be the end-all for guidance on how to establish your profile.

Good luck,

Hannah

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James Doyle Owner ConServe
Sep 12 2013
LEEDuser Member
123 Thumbs Up

Energy Performance Period - ATC Operation & Programing Problems

On an upcoming LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. project approaching the performance we have had lots of problems with the exclusive ATC contractor (a major international company) correcting control and programing problems for years. We have the ability to remotely operate the facility, ID problems, request ATC corrections and meet the energy savings through operational overrides during the performance period. We are a seasoned commissioning provider and will be using Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. documentation but the client does not want to pursue Cx credits at this time as financial limitations are limiting them to certified level only.
If we can have in place an improved maintenance contractual agreement such that the ATC provider will make “timely permanent” corrections from now through the performance period and we document their compliance through an Issues Log corrections list. Would this be an acceptable performance period process for EAp and EAc1 requirements?

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Lili Pan LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Managing Director , L GEES 智利捷达 Oct 15 2013 LEEDuser Member 208 Thumbs Up

EAp2 and EAc1 does not have correction requirement as long as the annual energy performance grant you compliance with EAp2 and credit under EAc1.

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Manasi Kulkarni
Aug 16 2013
Guest
73 Thumbs Up

Query for Minimum Energy Performance

Our project is a Mall Building wherein the Owner of the Mall is trying for certification. There are 100's of retailers occupying the building. As per the preliminary review, we have been asked to use Option 2, Case-2 calculator. In this there are 2 further options which seems possible –
· Option 2B - comparing with historic data of the same building

· & Option 2C – comparing building energy data with other similar building.

The power supply in Mall building is such that each retailer gets an individual bill from the supply company. Summation of all retailer bills along with the Mall common area energy consumption will give total energy consumption of the building.
However the project is facing a typical challenge in collecting historical bills, particularly from all the retailers who occupy the building.
Energy Bills for the Mall common area along with energy figures of all the retailers is available with the project team.
We have collated energy data of the entire building backed by samples of retailer bills for current performance period. Also Historic energy consumption is available.
However historic energy bills of last 3-years of large number of retailer who occupy the building is not available.
Thus in such cases, is there any exempt available in documentation particularly submitting bills of the retailers.
Also is there an exemption from submitting Historical Bills for last 3-years of retailers?
Even using Option 2C will have same issues. Is Option 2C calculator without energy bills from the comparative buildings accepted?

Documents requirement in template is unclear where it is mentioned that energy bills of atleast 3-months of current performance period is required. But there is no mention of historic bill requirement.

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Nov 07 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1409 Thumbs Up

Hi Manasi

I'm sorry for your struggle with this prerequisite. Unfortunately, it was designed more-so for office buildings, and therefore it is often difficult or tedious to achieve for different building types, including malls.

Based on your description, it sounds like you will not be able to use Option 2B (historical) to meet the prerequisite. However, I'd look into using Option 2C (comparable building) for your project. I'd look for bills from a building with similar function and in a similar climate as yours, normalized for things like square footage or number of retailers.

Because this prerequisite requires documentation of all energy used in the building, projects that have individual meters often face the issue you're describing. As an alternative, you could install a master meter that meters the entire building's energy use, wait 12 months, and then reapply for certification using this data.

Hope this helps

Hannah

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager YR&G
Jun 24 2013
LEEDuser Expert
1679 Thumbs Up

Energy Star shutdown

Hi all

Heads up that Energy Star's Portfolio Manager website will be completely unavailable from midnight June 26 through July 10!! The downtime is due to Energy Star launching a new Portfolio Manager tool, and it's not completely clear at this point how much your Energy Star score might change. It's a good idea to save PDFs of your Statement of Energy Performance and site/source EnergySource energy is the total amount of raw fuel required to operate a building; it incorporates all transmission, delivery, and production losses for a complete assessment of a building's energy use. Use Intensities, just as an insurance policy. You can read FAQ's about the upgrade here: http://portfoliomanager.supportportal.com/link/portal/23002/23010/Articl...

Trista

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 31 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Has anyone seen changes to their scores since the new platform was launched? And how is the new platform working?

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Julia Weatherby Senior Mechanical Engineer, Lindgren & Sharples, P.C. Jul 31 2013 LEEDuser Member 1616 Thumbs Up

No changes to scores on my Portfolio Manager buildings. Platform seems to be working fine so far, if maybe a bit slow. I had to re-enter some of my contact info, but that was about it.

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Aug 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8020 Thumbs Up

We've seen scores move in all directions, or stay the same. There was also at least one terrifying instance involving a hotel where inputs that affect the score were overridden with bizzaro default numbers, which led to a large score drop that wasn't so bad after the correct values were re-input.

One client with a large portfolio across the US saw scores drop on average by about 3 points over about 100 properties, with some extreme changes including large jumps (up 39 points) and large decreases (down 13 points). Energy Star responded to an inquiry that they did not expect the adjustments they made with weather normalization and site to source ratios to have such a dramatic effect, so they are investigating.

Aside from the weather normalization and site to source adjustments, there were adjustments on the back end that would affect buildings with enclosed parking areas.

If you've seen a wild score change, I'd recommend checking your inputs to see if they have been overridden, and then getting in touch with Energy Star as a next step if necessary.

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Timothy Casper Voith & Mactavish Architects
Jun 12 2013
LEEDuser Member
245 Thumbs Up

Normalizing Baseline

Given our unique project conditions we are pursuing this credit via Case 2, Option 2B. This option allows for normalization of historical energy data for things such as, changes to occupancy, operating schedules, space use.

How do we derive the multipliers that should be used for normalizing our data? One reviewer we spoke to indicated that an energy model was not needed and the calculations could be done much more simplistically. Can we use linear relationships such as twice the number of occupants equates to an assumed 2x energy usage? Or, there was an addition to the building, so would a 20% increase in conditioned space volume equate to an assumed 20% increase in energy usage? And what about less quantifiable aspects like space type changes?

Does anyone have experience with this? Any tips or resources for this endeavor is greatly appreciated! We are trying to get this turned around quickly.

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Aug 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8020 Thumbs Up

Hi Tim,

It's true that an energy model is not needed to further normalize consumption data. But, I would also caution against using unproven generic linear relationships in the normalization, and would recommend starting by identifying variables that have a strong correlation to consumption in this specific building.

EUI on a weather normalized source kBtu / SF will generally be your starting point, and would cover scenarios such as the building addition you mentioned.

Space type changes would be the most difficult to accurately account for, and it would really depend on the specific situation.

For occupancy changes, I would recommend starting by performing correlation tests between occupancy levels and EUI. If there is a strong correlation (high r^2 value), you can use the equation associated with that regression to perform the normalization. If there is not a strong correlation, as would likely be the case in buildings with high process loads, you can use this regression to justify a decision to not do further normalization. This just takes basic statistics skills, and can be performed in an Excel spreadsheet.

If you have multiple variables you believe are influential, the most legitimate approach would be to do a multivariate regression analysis, but this requires more stats know-how and specialized software.

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Timothy Casper Voith & Mactavish Architects
Jun 02 2013
LEEDuser Member
245 Thumbs Up

Case 2 Calculator - Space Types

Our project is a mixed use building used by community groups and has several different space types within it (theater, classrooms, event areas, kitchen, offices). Can I break these spaces out on the Case 2 calculator by square footage essentially creating a weighted average for the building's adjusted national average EUI?

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Jun 27 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8020 Thumbs Up

Tim, The last time I saw a similar situation (which was a while ago now), it was not standardly allowable to break up space types in the Case 2 calculator in this way, though in some situations it might be allowable / appropriate.

At a minimum, I would recommend reaching out to GBCI once the project is registered to get clearance on this approach. I've found that when it comes to the Case 2 calculator in particular, they are willing to engage prior to the official review process to sort out thorny situations.

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Ryan Gardner LEED EBOM Coordinator Rincon Consultants
Feb 14 2013
LEEDuser Member
143 Thumbs Up

Scored High in Prerequisite

Hello, my project recieved an Energy Star rating of 95 in the prerequisite stage. We have not identified any cost effetive ways to improve this number. Do we need to do another Energy Star analysis for this credit or can we use the same one from the Prerequisite?

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Feb 22 2013 LEEDuser Member 2357 Thumbs Up

Hi Ryan, this credit is one in the same with EAp2. In simple terms EAp2 is the benchmark and EAc1 is how well you do on the ES scale. Congrats on 95 which is impressive. Keep it up and keep your profile updated. Make sure that you are positive everything is completed properly and that the score is legitimate. Good Luck!

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Sofia Otterheim
Oct 19 2012
Guest
180 Thumbs Up

international project outside US

Hi all
we are doing a international project outside US. when we started to prepare for this credit we used the energy star portfolio to get a rating for project building. we filled in all the required information in energy star portfolio and it generated automatically a rating for it. However what bothers us right now is that even though we got a rating for it, it showed a message ** not eligible : Facility must be located in United States and or one of its territories under the column Eligibility for Energy Star in the upper right table named General information

What I undertood from the begninng was that even though the project building was not qualified to apply for a Energy Star certificate due to the fact that it is located outside US, project building can still use Energy star Portfolio for benchmarking and procuring this credit according to case 1 described in the LEED reference Guide for E&B..

Am I still right about this ? Could anyone here confirm me that we can continue to apply energy star portfolio for a rating in line with case 1 no matter where the building is located as long as the building is comprised of ratable spaces. ? I really appreciate if some of you can answer my question!!!!!

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Oct 19 2012 LEEDuser Expert 43836 Thumbs Up

It appears as if you can. See the most recent global ACPs here - https://new.usgbc.org/resources/leed-existing-buildings-global-acp-redli...

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Sofia Otterheim Oct 22 2012 Guest 180 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your response.

In other words, is it correct that we can obtain an Energy Star Rating from Energy Star Portfolio Manager Tool (and use it for LEED purposes) without being eligible for an Energy Star Certification?

Also, our project was registered in February 2012 which means that the most recent ACP which you refer to (from July 2012) was not applicable yet. However, they both say case 1 must be used if an Energy Star Rating can be obtained. Correct?

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Oct 22 2012 LEEDuser Expert 43836 Thumbs Up

Correct - even US based EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. projects are not required to obtain Energy Star certification.

The way LEED works is projects can always use the latest version and interpretations. They are only required to do so for information released prior to their registration date.

You can use case 1.

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Galen Staengl Principal Staengl Engineering
Jun 19 2012
Guest
67 Thumbs Up

Building Occupancy for Performance Period

Is there a minimum building occupancy % for the 12 month performance period? I am working on an office tower that has slowly increased it occupancy over the last year. I am wondering when we can legitimately start the monitoring period.

Thanks!

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Jun 19 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7272 Thumbs Up

Yes, the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) mandate at least 50% occupancy over the previous 12 months (55% for hotels) under the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. Rating System. You can review a summary of the MPRs here: http://www.leeduser.com/strategy/minimum-program-requirements

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Julia Weatherby Senior Mechanical Engineer Lindgren & Sharples, P.C.
Jan 18 2012
LEEDuser Member
1616 Thumbs Up

On Site Solar Power

Energy Star Portfolio Manager requires that power produced and used on site be included when submitting for an Energy Star rating. (This may be a new requirement as of sometime in 2011; I'm not certain.) But the FAQ section on the Energy Star site says that on site solar power gets a source multiplier of 1.0, which makes it better than utility power at around 3.3 or thereabouts if I recall.

My question is that EA Credit 1 says on site wind and solar are not included in the energy calculations for the credit. Does that mean I should leave out the solar power meter when entering data in Energy Star Portfolio Manager? Or has LEED updated the credit requirements to correspond with the fact that solar and wind are included in Energy Star ratings now, albeit it with a favorable source multiplier?

Thank you.

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Feb 23 2012 LEEDuser Expert 8020 Thumbs Up

My understanding is that Energy Star made the update that requires inclusion of onsite solar after the LEED citation you mentioned was issued. Generally, LEED adheres closely/identically to the rules put forth by Energy Star when it comes to benchmarking, and I believe you should follow the up-to-date guidelines from Energy Star for this matter.

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Jiri Dobias
Dec 13 2011
LEEDuser Member
1235 Thumbs Up

Energy Star Portfolio Manager for intenrational projects

Hi all,
We are working on a project in Belgrade - Serbia. Have I understood correctly that an international project is eligible for Energy Star rating but just cannot get Energy Star because it is an international project?
Therefore we can go for CASE 1?

Thank you in advance and sorry for stupid question.

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Marcus Sheffer LEED Fellow, 7group Dec 13 2011 LEEDuser Expert 43836 Thumbs Up

Yes the October version of the rating system indicated that international projects were not eligible to use Case 1 but the November version dropped that exclusion.

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Alexis Thompson Building Scientist Chelsea Group, Ltd.
Dec 02 2011
Guest
409 Thumbs Up

ENERGY STAR vs PIf3 Occupant Count

Our project is currently pursuing LEED. We received an ENERGY STAR label for the 12-month period ending June 30th 2011 with a rating of 81. We plan to submit for our LEED certification in May 2012. The value that was used on our ENERGY STAR portfolio for that 12-month period for Workers on Main Shift was significanlty higher (7000) than the occupancy FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. count we are going to use on the Project Information Form 3 for our LEED submittal (4000). Just recently, upon beginning our pursuit of LEED, a new occupant count survey was conducted and it turned out to be much lower than the figure on the ENERGY STAR portfolio under which we received a stamped SEP and label. We want to submit our LEED application with the most accurate and up-to-date data however we are nervous that the LEED reviewer may see the difference and flag us for the inconsistency. Should we still submit with our active ENERGY STAR label/score, but use the more accurate occupant count on the PI form even though the numbers will be different? Or, in an effort to remain consistent, should we use the old occupant count (higher than actual occupancy) on the PI form so that it matches our ENERGYSTAR portfolio? Or, should we try an alternative compliance on the EA credit and not submit using the labeled score but another reflecting the new occupancy count? Your advice is appreciated! Thank you!!

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Jubilee Daniels, MLA, LEED AP O+M Consultant, Sustainable Buildings and Operations, Jubilee Environmental Consulting Dec 13 2011 Guest 287 Thumbs Up

It is extremely important that you use consistent (accurate) numbers throughout your LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. application. Reviewers will likely ask questions, if your numbers are not consistent throughout the different credits. Secondly, you can’t use an Energy Star Portfolio Manager score from June 2011 unless your Performance Period ended in June (and in that case you would have needed to submit your application within 60 days). All credits must end within a week of each other (See the introduction section of the LEED EBOM 2009 Reference Guide. You will need to use your current Energy Star Portfolio Manager Score at the end of your Performance Period. Before you say wait, we are not eligible for a new energy star label, LEED EBOM does not require the official label from Energy Star; they require an official score. (The EPA Portfolio Manager website has an option of printing your score for purpose other then an energy star label). I would suggest you input your accurate FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. count into EPA Energy Star Portfolio Manger and see what your new score is. Continue to input your energy use every month. Your Energy Star Portfolio Manager score at the end of the performance period is the information you will need to submit with your application.

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Alexis Thompson Building Scientist, Chelsea Group, Ltd. Dec 16 2011 Guest 409 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the comment! I agree the reviewers will likely question inconsistencies in the data, based on review comments we have received on other properties. It is unfortunate that this property is experiencing inconsistencies since they are not intentional. I am confused by your statement about not being able to “use an ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager score from June 2011”. Perhaps I wasn’t clear, this property has already received the ENERGY STAR Label. To meet the requirement of EA Pr2 using the streamlined path, a project building that has been ENERGY STAR-labeled within the 12 months preceding the LEED-EB: O&M application date, can simply “Provide the award certificate, congratulatory letter or similar official program correspondence confirming that the project building earned the label, the date of the label and the performance rating achieved in Portfolio Manager.” One other point of clarification, the window for the end of all performance periods was changed to 30 days in the November 3, 2010 Addenda to the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations and Maintenance. As anyone who has worked on an EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. project can attest, even 30 days can be a challenge sometimes. Thanks again!

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Jubilee Daniels, MLA, LEED AP O+M Consultant, Sustainable Buildings and Operations, Jubilee Environmental Consulting Dec 28 2011 Guest 287 Thumbs Up

I apologize. I did not recall that in the newer version of LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. 2009 you are now allowed you to use the streamline path of just using your energy star certificate from the previous 12-month period at least for EAP2. If you are trying to earn points under EAC1 to be on the safe side, I would update your energy star portfolio manager with your new accurate occupancy data and see what you new energy star portfolio manager score is. This way you know how many points you can really count on achieving if your occupancy levels are questioned. It sounds like you have experience doing LEED EBOM so I am sure you already know this, but I would highly encourage the project to continue to work on lowering the buildings energy use and improving your buildings energy star portfolio manager score until you complete your performance period. In most cases, conducting and implementing results of retro-commissioning can pay for the whole LEED EBOM project with the reduced energy bills.

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gwenedd murray Project Consultant Sustainable Design Consulting
Oct 26 2011
Guest
346 Thumbs Up

Not Eligible for ENERGY STAR rating- Case 2 option 1 calculator

Our project is below 5,000sf which makes it automatically not eligible for an ENERGY STAR rating. There are two distinct space types, office + K-12 classroom. Based on this information, the project team is required to use option 1 from the offline LEED calculator. The calculator determined the combined benchmark source EUI to be 179.

This is where I get confused, or the math part of my brain is not working today. The project team is striving to reach a target of 35% better than the benchmark. If I calculated this, the project building should aim for a target of 116 ( 179 *.65). The calculator, on the other hand, determined the project building should be 86. I'm scratching my head on this....Does the calculator take into account other variables?? Thanks.

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Nov 20 2011 LEEDuser Expert 8020 Thumbs Up

The calculator is set up to show the percentile change in consumption, not percent reduction, which is why it seems like the math isn't working. Energy Star, and the Case 2 calculator, both work on the use of percentile points.

If you imagine a bell-shaped curve distribution, the distance between one percentile point on the curve and the next varies depending if you are near the top, along the steep sides, or down in the tails. Which means you can't just calculate the percent reduction (where the EUI difference between a reduction 35% to 36% is the same as from 36% to 36%) and have it equal the same amount of change in the percentile points.

Which is a confusing way to say that if you want to set a target EUI for your building, decide on the percentile you want to hit, and then adjust the EUI input in the calculator until is shows that you've hit your goal.

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Joshua Peterson
Sep 15 2011
LEEDuser Member
108 Thumbs Up

LEED Offline Calculator Space Type Definitions/EUI's

Is there a resource that further defines the activity space types as listed on the Case 2 LEED Offline Calculator and thier respective Source EUI's? Specifcally is there a defintion of how these space types are defined/categorized and a explanation as to where the national average data is compiled and calculated?

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Sep 15 2011 LEEDuser Member 2357 Thumbs Up

Hi Josh,
Yes the most complete set of data is the CBECSThe Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. CBECS data is used in LEED energy credits. Database. This is what Energy Star Portfolio Manager is based off of. There you can find and inventory of what you are looking for. Here is the link. Hope this helps.
http://www.eia.gov/emeu/cbecs/

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Joshua Peterson Oct 05 2011 LEEDuser Member 108 Thumbs Up

Hi Jeff,
Thank you for the info. I understand where CBECSThe Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. CBECS data is used in LEED energy credits. and Energy Star Portfolio Manager get their data. My question is where the USGBC's Case 2 LEED Offline Calculator obtains its data as it does not exactly match the CBECS data. Specifically I would like to know where the Case 2 Calculator's space types are defined and the rationale behind the calculator's national average EUI's are further detailed/explained. Can anyone provide this data? Any info helps.

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Jessica Bruscato
Aug 10 2011
LEEDuser Member
182 Thumbs Up

EAp2 Case 2B Fulfillment

Being that my project is a convention center, it does not qualify for energy star. Therefore, I am using the EAp2 Case 2 offline calculator in conjunction with the EPA portfolio manager tool online. Option 2B Historic Data appears to apply to us since we have already compared our facility with 5 other convention centers. The result of that comparison were not helpful since they were all approx. 300 EUI less, due to all being previously LEED certified. My question is: how do I go about fulfilling option 2B? Upon inputting the EUI for the last four years, the offline spreadsheet continues to say N/A for the "Approximate percentile above National Average."

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Aug 10 2011 LEEDuser Member 2357 Thumbs Up

Jessica, we are working on a convention center as well and taking this approach. Your best bet is to not use LEED certified facilities. Have you joined the working group on Energy Star? Can we take this conversation offline, we have been through the ringer on this credit because of the data and calculator. Please email me at jeff@ecopreserve.net. Look forward to talking with you

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Paola Figueiredo, Newton Figueiredo SustentaX
Aug 04 2011
Guest
980 Thumbs Up

Protfolio Manager Analysis

We are working on projects for LEED EBO&M and have some doubts related to the credits EApre1& EAc1. The Portfolio Manager Analysis is unable to classify the energy consumption of the plant within the standards of buildings. Thus, the use of a spreadsheet according to LEED is also unable to classify the energy consumption. Therefore we have some questions to ask you:
1 - Is it possible not to consider energy spent for the industrial process and utilities, considering only energy spent for building´s systems (HVAC, elevators etc)?
2 - If option one (1) is not possible, can we consider the energy consumption per unit of production (for example, kWhA kilowatt-hour is a unit of work or energy, measured as 1 kilowatt (1,000 watts) of power expended for 1 hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu. / kg produced rather than kWh/m2)?
3 - We would also like to know if is it acceptable to use Energy Star Index for industrial plants?

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Aug 10 2011 LEEDuser Member 2357 Thumbs Up

Hi Paola, not sure how much my reply will help you but seems like your issue right now is "pre-LEED". I would start with Energy Star as it has pretty strong support when it comes to industrial facilities. I would reach out to buildings@energystar.gov directly on best practices and strategies how to correctly benchmark.
Once you have cleared that up, visit this LEED user area again and check out the offline calculator in the documentation toolkit section. You may end up having to use this if the facility cannot earn an Energy Star score.

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Austin Evans Temporary Worker Scroll Compressors LLC
Jul 07 2011
Guest
418 Thumbs Up

Calculator

In the Case 2 Option 2 tab for the offline calculator the cells are locked up on the option III enter current year EUI score as far as I can tell. I have downloaded the calculator from USGBC and LEEDuser and it does the same thing. The cells are protected.

Anyone else have any problems with this before?

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Oct 05 2011 LEEDuser Expert 1409 Thumbs Up

Hi Austin

I think I understand what you're describing and have encountered it before when I use the calculator to establish a historical benchmark. Unfortunately, due to the spreadsheet being locked and us not being able to see the macros, I often have to complete many of the cells under in the first options to the best of my ability in order for the correct cells to fill in under the other options.

I hope this helps.

Hannah

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Austin Evans Temporary Worker Scroll Compressors LLC
Jul 06 2011
Guest
418 Thumbs Up

Method Choosing

This is an industrial manufacturing facility, and we have filed our data online with Energy Star as Other-Other. We have the 3 years of historical data, but really feel like it's unfair to be compared to anything else at this point because few facilities like ours have tried for LEED, so the data is limited and other building types likely don't use the same amount of energy.

So 3 questions:
1. In the offline calculator under "Elgibility" it asks are you one of 3 categories and one of those is "other". If yes then choose option 1. The next question ask if you are anything other than the above options. If yes then choose option 2. It seems ridiculous to have 2 "others" so how do we differentiate between choosing option 1 and option 2?

2. Because comparison data is so limited for our facility type does anyone have any experience or knowledge about options for this credit? We were thinking about designing our own baseline and comparing against ourselves from the past.

3. Does Case 2 Option 2 (3 years of historical data) still compare against other building types that are similar to you or does it allow you to compare to yourself?

Thank you.

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Aaron Nelson Aug 15 2011 Guest 77 Thumbs Up

Hi Austin,
We have an industrial property we're working on and while we haven't completed certification yet, I can share our approach.

1. If 10% of the building (by square feet) is classified as 'Other' in Energy Star, use Option 2. One catch, Laboratories are considered Other by Energy Star but not by the USGBC.

2. We're planning to use the historical approach. Additionally, I have contacted other facilities to ask if they would share their energy information. Those that return my calls have not been willing to share that information.

3. We read Option 2 as the historical data for the subject property.

Hope this helps,
Aaron

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gwenedd murray Project Consultant Sustainable Design Consulting
May 16 2011
Guest
346 Thumbs Up

Tracking energy consumption through the performance period

I understand the 12 mos tracking time period can start before the performance period begins but it must also include the performance period. What if your project's performance period is longer than the minimum 3 months, are you required to input energy data into Energy Star Portfolio for the entire performance period?

My project's performance period is 7 months so I'm wondering if I'm required to only track the minimum 3 months or will I be required to track the full 7? Thanks.

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gwenedd murray Project Consultant, Sustainable Design Consulting May 17 2011 Guest 346 Thumbs Up

I actually found out the same project above earned an ENERGY STAR rating of 88 for a 12 mos time period ending August 31,2010. Since Aug 31st 2010 is less than a year from the application date (July 1st 2011), this project is eligible to select "streamlined path" on the LEED online form.

Therefore, when I fill out the performance period start and finish date, do I enter the 12 mos time period from the ENERGY STAR label certification form? The documented performance period for this project does not begin until October 1 2010 and ends April 30th 2011. So, technically the ENERGY STAR label does not represent the building's energy consumption during "LEED's performance period". I'm a little confused about LEED's requirements for this situation, can anyone clarify this for me. thanks.

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Oct 05 2011 LEEDuser Expert 1409 Thumbs Up

Hi

You are correct that if you are submitting with the streamlined path, the label must have been awarded within one year of the LEED application data. The date the label was awarded is the date on the award letter from Energy Star. The LEED application date is the Submit Review Date on the Timeline tab on LEED Online.

As for the performance period, when using the streamlined option, the performance period doesn't really matter because it takes a back seat to the other timing considerations listed above.

Hannah

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Carrie Bradley
May 03 2011
Guest
381 Thumbs Up

Sharing the Portfolio Manager facility profile

LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. v2009 allows you to skip the SEP submittal if you share your Portfolio Manager facility directly with the USGBC review team. The book and LEED Online direct you to share with Portfolio Master Account: "USGBC - LEED_EB:O&M". When I attempted to share with this account, it didn't exist. "USGBC - LEEDPERFORMANCEREPORTING" did, so I shared with them. Does anyone know if this is the right account to share with? -Thanks

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Carrie Bradley Jun 22 2011 Guest 381 Thumbs Up

The review team immediately commented on submittal. The account that building should be shared with is:

"GBCI - LEED_EB:O&M"

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David Hubka Director of Operations Transwestern Sustainability Services
Mar 24 2011
LEEDuser Expert
4562 Thumbs Up

Maximum Points Available

The LEED O&M reference guide states that two points are available under EA Credit #1 for projects that follow Case 2 Option 2A however the LEED online template does not award credits under this option.

Additionally, the LEED O&M reference guide states that seven points are available under EA Credit #1 for projects that follow Case 2 Option 2B however the LEED online template allows up to nine points.

Which is correct, LEED online or the LEED reference guide?

I checked the current reference guide addenda on the USGBC website and it does not address this issue.

Thanks in advance for any insight that can be provided.

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Mar 25 2011 LEEDuser Expert 8020 Thumbs Up

David,

The offline calculator includes this note: The initial 2009 Reference Guide misstated the Streamlined Approach point maximum.

I think it's safe to say that you probably have a version of the RG with this problem, and the form / offline calculator is more accurate.

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Juliane Muench
Feb 21 2011
LEEDuser Member
690 Thumbs Up

Office building, Jeddah, Saudi A

We have established a rating for the building based on Case 2 Option 1 - beacause the building is not eligible for an Energy Star rating. Based on last years energy data the EA Credit 1 Case 2 calculator indicates a level of 35 above the national median (13 pts), but it looks as if the calculator is based on US national mean data. Would you consider the calculation reliable for a Saudi 2009 office building?

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Marc Mondor Principal, evolve LLC Mar 08 2011 LEEDuser Member 759 Thumbs Up

Niels,

I almost certain the calculator uses US national Median data; how this might impact the international aspect of your project I am not sure. You might want to consider normalizing energy use for climate region and compare your building's energy intensityThe ratio of consumption to unit of measurement (floorspace, number of workers, etc.) Energy intensity is usually given on an aggregate basis, as the ratio of the total consumption for a set of buildings to the total floorspace in those buildings. Conditional energy intensity and gross energy intensity are presented. The energy intensity can also be computed for individual buildings. to those in the American Southwest.

Best,

Marc

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Marc Mondor Principal evolve LLC
Jan 18 2011
LEEDuser Member
759 Thumbs Up

Case 2 Option 2 (A, B, C)

All,

We are working on a unique facility (production greenhouse) which based on my understanding of EA Pre1 Cr2 can only meet this prerequisite using Case 2 options B--historical data and C- benchmarking; as it does not meet the requirements under Option A generic benchmark of Other.

We have gathered appropriate benchmarking data, but as the facility is part of a campus, in which sub-meters were not originally installed when the project was built 3 1/2 years ago we do not have 3 years of historical building data.

Subsequently sub-meters have been installed, and we have 1 1/2 years of building energy data, we also have 3 + years of campus wide historical data. However it looks as if we need three years of historical building specific energy data in order to fill out portion B of the Case 2 Calculator, and cannot use part C unless we have B finished.

Is there precedent for using only benchmarking data when historical data is not available? Has anyone ever encountered similar issues and developed solutions that GBCI/USGBC will accept? I seem to recall precedents in previous O&M version CIRs that exempted historical data if sub-meters were installed.

Thanks for any insights!

Marc

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Jan 21 2011 LEEDuser Expert 8020 Thumbs Up

Marc, In my experience there are some case when allowances are made for a lack of historic data, but this would need to happen through the CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide process.

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Raphael Sperry Simon & Associates, Inc. Green Building Sonsultants May 23 2011 Guest 423 Thumbs Up

Hello Marc & All,

I have a similar situation with two other buildings that are not eligible for energy star (one is a sports arena, the other is an airport terminal). They both are part of larger complexes with a master electric meter and only started submeteringSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy use within a building attributable to specific end uses or subsystems (e.g., the heating subsystem of an HVAC system). recently. Their is the streamlined Option 2A, but in that case you are compared to the national average "other" buildings, which is not a good comparison for these high-use facilities. So having three years of historic data is a requirement, but it's not clear why, as in the case of these non-ratable buildings it just makes them wait for eligibility for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. without really making the process of measuring their energy consumption any more robust. In fact, if they wait until year 3 to improve energy efficiency, they would score better. Shouldn't they have the incentive to improve energy efficiency as soon as possible, and then to submit as soon as they want?

Anyone else have thoughts on this?

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Jennifer Turchin Principal Coda Group
Jan 17 2011
LEEDuser Member
212 Thumbs Up

LEED EBOM Case 2, Option 1

The project we are working on is a 170,000 SF plus vitamin manufacturing facility with over 10% laboratory space. It does not qualify for an ENERGY STAR rating given too much "other" space. Therefore, we have to use the Case 2 Calculator, which dictates we must use Option 1 for Laboratories and must compare to other lab facilities using the Labs21 Benchmarking tool. There is no guidance for using Labs21 in the reference guide, in the offline calculator, or on Labs21's website. My question is, what does USGBC/GBCI allow us to compare to on Labs21? This makes a huge difference for what the EUI comparison is given if you compare to all types of labs the average is much higher than just those in the specific climate zoneOne of five climatically distinct areas, defined by long-term weather conditions which affect the heating and cooling loads in buildings. The zones were determined according to the 45-year average (1931-1975) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days (base 65 degrees Fahrenheit). An individual building was assigned to a climate zone according to the 45-year average annual degree-days for its National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Division., of which, for us, there is no comparison building. If anyone has any experience with this I would appreciate a response. Thanks.

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Jan 18 2011 LEEDuser Expert 8912 Thumbs Up

Good news Jennifer - the folks at Labs21 have produced a draft guidance document that I think you will find very helpful. I have actually applied their methodology on a number of labs and it seems quite sound.

http://labs21benchmarking.lbl.gov/docs/Applying+Labs21+Benchmarking+for+...

Hope that helps

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susan eguia Jan 18 2011 Guest 1412 Thumbs Up

This is our first time to handle LEED-EB+OM, most of our projects are under LEED-NC, thus we don't understand the EA credit 1-Optimize Energy Efficiency.

Here's my question:
1. Is Title-24 related to EAc1 from LEED-EB+OM requirements? If so, how can we apply this?
2. What is the baseline of 71% EPA Energy Star performance rating?
3. How can we increase the percentile to get higher points?
4. what is EPA's Energy Star's Portfolio Manager tool? Where can we access this?

Appreciate any inputs/clarification on this requirements.

Thanks,
Susan

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Jennifer Turchin Principal, Coda Group Jan 18 2011 LEEDuser Member 212 Thumbs Up

Susan,
Here are some comments on your questions:
1. It is my understanding that Title 24 is applicable to new buildings only, so it would not be applicable for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems..
2. 71% baseline is compared to 71% of all like buildings on a scale of 1-100, so 71 is better than anything below it with 100 being the best. Definitely visit www.energystar.gov and do the Portfolio Manager overview for more information on this.
3. You will have to increase building energy efficiency to increase your percentage and then wait for that efficiency to show up through tracking of utility bills - the easiest thing is more efficient lighting. Isn't a huge investment and shows up right away. Commissioning also can contribute to energy savings. Note that they can't be projected, have to be actually measured with Portfolio Manager.
4. Portfolio Manager is an Energy Star tool to track performance of existing buildings. You can read more about it here http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=evaluate_performance.bus_portfolio... and create your login to start benchmarking.

Hope this information is helpful.

Jennifer

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susan eguia Jan 21 2011 Guest 1412 Thumbs Up

Thanks jennifer for taking time to respond.
Here's my follow-up questions:
1. So, T-24 will not involve for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. projects? The type of our building is warehouse/museum for storage of collection cars, non-insulated, low efficient AC and half of the roof is already using PV system.
2. If i access the portfolio manager energy star, where should i start?
3. what kind of tool is that to increase builidng energy efficiency? Can we play around the data from this system to increase the points?

Thanks in advance.
Susan

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Jan 21 2011 LEEDuser Expert 8020 Thumbs Up

Susan, my $0.02.

1. New building codes like T-24 don't really have any bearing on EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. projects, since EBOM focuses on actual consumption as indicated on utility bills. They only relationship is that theoretically buildings designed to a stringent design code will perform better than national average, and therefore should theoretically fare well in benchmarking via Portfolio Manager (of course, this is not actually always true in reality).
2. If you are a first time user of Portfolio Manager, you might want to spend some time on the web site reading the how-to guides, review the Licenses Profession Guide to Energy Star (http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/evaluate_performance/pm_lp_guide.pdf), or Google for free webinars on the benchmarking process. There's a lot of information out there to help novices.
3. If you are used to design modeling tools, the Energy Star approach is going to seem strange to you. It's not intended to identify the best opportunities for improvements in a specific building, but rather show how you are doing based on actual data. Once you enter the data, you will be able to see how close or far away to a target performance you are, and then would need to devise which strategies are most pertinent in your situation to make progress towards that target. An energy audit, commissioning, investigating utility rebates for upgrades, etc are typical next step. If you monkey with the data to artificially raise your score, the LEED reviewers will notice and it will cause you trouble.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Dec 22 2010
LEEDuser Moderator

LEED-EBOM District Energy Systems (DES) guidance available

Yesterday USGBC posted posted key guidance for your project if it involves a district energy system. Here is the info from the LEED Resources and Tools page:

District and Campus Thermal Energy Treatment - Initial release of guidance for implementing LEED Energy & Atmosphere prerequisites and credits for existing building projects connected to a district or campus thermal energy system.  Includes coverage of both LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: O&M and LEED for Existing Buildings: O&M 2008.

Please discuss below what you think of the new guidance, and what questions you have about DES for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems..

 

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