EBOM-2009 EAc5: Enhanced Refrigerant Management

  • EBOM EAc5 EnhancedRefrigerantManagement Diagram
  • Prerequisite vs. credit

    EAp3: Fundamental Refrigerant Management calls for elimination of CFC-based refrigerants, to prevent ozone depletion. However, that’s just one piece of the environmental puzzle when it comes to refrigerants. Many CFC substitutes act as very strong greenhouse gases, contributing to global warming—and adding that piece of the puzzle is the focus of this credit.

    EAc5 encourages significant reduction or elimination of all refrigerants in base building systems, and at the very least, works to promote use of refrigerants that have the lowest global warming potential.

    Do you use CFCs?

    If your building is still using CFC-based refrigerants, it will be very difficult to earn this credit. Likewise, this credit will be difficult if you are using inefficient base building equipment or if the majority of cooling is satisfied with multiple smaller systems, such as window units.

    You’ll be in the best position to earn the credit with efficient, centralized chiller equipment using refrigerants with low ozone depletion and global warming potential.

    It’s an accounting credit

    This credit is basically an accounting credit to document the refrigerants used in your base building systems, determine the efficiency and leakage rates of your equipment and calculate the overall environmental impact of those refrigerants in terms of ozone depletion and global warming potential. Performing the required calculations will give you your “Total Refrigerant Impact Per Ton” value. That value must be less than or equal to 100 in order to achieve this credit.

    Well-managed buildings should be tracking most of this information already and will simply need to plug all of the data into the provided calculator to determine credit compliance.

    Air conditioner labelA lot of the required data for this credit can be found on a product data tag affixed to the equipment.

    Start with a systems review

    Start by verifying that your building fire suppression systems do not use halonsHalons are substances, used in fire-suppression systems and fire extinguishers, that deplete the stratospheric ozone layer., CFCs or HCFCsHydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are refrigerants that cause significantly less depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer than chlorofluorocarbons.. If you find any of these chemicals, you won’t be able to earn the credit without converting those systems. Alternatives to these materials include HFCs, water, foam, and carbon dioxide.

    If your building uses natural ventilation with no mechanical cooling, you can earn this credit without further analysis.

    If your building uses mechanical or mixed-mode ventilation, collect information on all base building systems that use refrigerants, including manufacturer, model number, installation date, refrigerant type, and amount used in the equipment.

    Retrofits unlikely

    After performing the initial review, if a project finds that it doesn’t qualify for the credit, it’s rare for it to undergo an HVAC retrofit to earn the credit, due to the costs involved. However, the criteria can be a good set of guidelines for future HVAC projects.

    Test and maintain your equipment regularly to minimize refrigerant leakage.Whether or not you are pursuing the credit, keep in mind the following principles:

    • Ideal refrigerants strike a good balance between efficient operation, minimal ozone depletion potential, and minimal global warming potential.
    • The best HVAC equipment is efficient, has low leakage rates, and has a long service life.
    • Implementation of a refrigerant management program will help you to track and minimize refrigerant leakage over the life of the equipment.

    Building engineer must sign off

    The required calculations may be performed internally using the provided calculator in the LEED Online credit form, but a building engineer must review the data and sign off in the designated space on the credit form. You may incur costs based on whether you have in-house personnel qualified to verify the refrigerant calculations or need to use a third party.

    Consider these questions when approaching this credit:

    • Do you keep records of all refrigerants used in base building systems?  Does any of your HVAC equipment or fire suppression systems use CFCs, HCFCs or halons?
    • How efficiently does your base building equipment use refrigerants? Do you have a refrigerant management program in place to minimize leakage?

    FAQs for LEED-EBOM EAc5

    Can a project use default leakage rate values or leakage values specified by the manufacturer for equipment rather than actual leakage rate values based on the credit calculations?

    Always use the actual value for the leakage rate of each piece of HVAC equipment in the project building that has more than 0.5 pounds of refrigerant. You can calculate the actual leakage rate values by tracking the amount of additional refrigerant that has been added during the maintenance activities throughout the performance period. Note that if the actual leakage rate of a piece of equipment is less than 0.5% (i.e. 0%), use the minimum default value of 0.5% in your leakage rate calculation instead of the actual leakage rate.

    Do small appliances (such as refrigerators and water coolers) that have greater than 0.5 pounds of refrigerant have to be included in order to achieve EAc5?

    Yes. If there is no recorded leakage over the last 12 months, you must use 0.5% for the Lr value, which represents the low-end of the allowable range. However, if the equipment is under separate management control (e.g. a refrigerator owned by a tenant), you may use the 10% exemption to exclude that equipment from the credit requirements (up to 10% of the building floor area can be excluded if it is under separate management control).

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

Expand All

  • Ensure that your building fire suppression systems do not use halons, CFCs, or HCFCs.

    If your fire suppression systems use any of these materials, you will not be able to comply with this credit. Verify this information first before moving on to the next step.


  • Alternative chemicals for fire suppression systems include HFCs, water, foam, and carbon dioxide. More information can be found at EPA’s website (see Resources).


  • There may be substantial costs associated with converting fire suppression systems to eliminate the use of these chemicals.


  • If your building uses natural ventilation with no active cooling system, and therefore no refrigerants, and does not use halons, CFCs or HCFCs in the fire suppression systems, you can earn this credit without performing any additional analysis.


  • If your building uses mechanical or mixed-mode ventilation, collect information on all base building systems that use refrigerants, including manufacturer, model number, installation date, refrigerant type, and amount used in the equipment.


  • Equipment that contains less than 0.5 pounds of refrigerant is not considered part of the base building system and is exempt from this prerequisite. Examples include small HVAC units, standard refrigerators and small water coolers. Conversely, any equipment in your building that does use more than 0.5 points of refrigerant must be included in this credit.


  • You will also need to collect the following information in order to complete the calculations in the Credit Form. The following variables are used in the LEED Reference Guide and credit form.

    • N = Quantity of HVAC Equipment Type
    • Q = Cooling capacity of each equipment unit
    • Rc = Refrigerant Charge (pounds of refrigerant per ton of cooling capacity)
    • Lr = Annual leakage rate as a percentage of the equipment's full charge lost over a 12-month period (default value of 2.0%; minimum value of 0.5%).

     


  • Performing the required calculations will give you the value for “Total Refrigerant Impact Per Ton”. Total Refrigerant Impact per Ton must be less than or equal to 100 in order to achieve this credit.


  • Use the EBOM EAp3/EAc5 Refrigerant Inventory (see Documentation Toolkit) to collect refrigerant data, but make sure to use the official LEED Online credit form to perform the actual calculations and to submit your data for the credit.


  • Project teams often confuse CFCs and HCFCs. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been completely phased out of new equipment in the U.S. as of 1996, and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), their transitional substitutes, are being phased out as of 2010. EAp3: Fundamental Refrigerant Management, addresses only CFC use in base building equipment, whereas this credit deals with all refrigerants, including CFCs and HCFCs. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are another class of refrigerants that are used as more environmentally friendly substitutes for CFCs and HCFCs. Currently, there are no federal regulations to phase out the production of HFCs.


  • Common refrigerants and their applications are as folllows:


  • These different categories of refrigerants have different environmental impacts. CFCs have the largest ozone depletion potential (ODP), while HFCs will have an ODP that is essentially zero. CFCs have higher global warming potential (GWP) than HCFCs, but some HFCs have GWP values that are just as high as CFCs. HFCs are also slightly less efficient than CFCs and HCFCs. The dilemma, therefore, is that some refrigerants cause more ozone depletion than others, but the most ozone-friendly refrigerants can have a greater effect on climate change.


  • The Refrigerant Impact Calculator in the LEED Credit Form lists default values for a number of the most common refrigerants (such as R-22, R-134a, and others). However, your building system may use a refrigerant that is not included in the list. If this is the case, select the “other” option in the calculator and consult with a qualified engineer or reputable source to determine the correct ODP and GWP values for your refrigerant.


  • Some HVAC systems use natural refrigerants, including water, carbon dioxide, and ammonia, which have much lower environmental impact.


  • In the context of existing buildings, it is very unlikely that natural refrigerants can be used, due to their low rate of cooling efficiency.


  • This credit also encourages selection of equipment that will last a long time and minimizes refrigerant leakage. Refrigerant charge efficiency, annual leakage rate, and end-of-life refrigerant loss all contribute to your total refrigerant impact per ton. Therefore, equipment selection, as well as refrigerant selection, has a substantial influence on the environmental impact of your HVAC system.


  • These refrigerant calculations may be performed in-house if you have a qualified mechanical engineer to verify the results. You may incur additional costs if you need to hire an engineer to complete the calculations.

During the Performance Period

Expand All

  • Complete the LEED Online credit form to determine your total refrigerant impact per ton.


  • The credit forms for EAp3 and EAc5 are linked. If you are pursuing EAc5, make sure that the credit form version is the same as EAp3. If the credit forms for EAp3 and EAc5 are different versions (which would potentially happen if you attempted the EAc5 in LEED Online at a later date that when you had attempted EAp3) the form for EAc5 will not auto-populate, and you will not be able to complete the credit form. The best thing to do is to request updated forms from GBCI before submitting your application.


  • Equipment listed in EAp3 and EAc5 must be consistent.


  • Be sure to include refrigerants used in data centers and commercial kitchens, which are often left off. Also make sure that the equipment included on the Form is consistent with the equipment listed in the systems narrative and equipment schedule provided with PIf4.


  • Be sure to include the right inputs in the Credit Form.

    • For equipment life (yrs), use the default values provided for different equipment types in the LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. Reference Guide, unless documentation can be provided to justify an alternative value.
    • For days since refrigerant last added, if the days since refrigerant was last added is more than 365 days, use 365 as the input.
    • The end-of-life refrigerant Mr (%) value should be the default value of 10% for all equipment types, unless documentation can be provided to justify an alternative value.



  • If your building does not qualify for this credit, you can still use the criteria as guidelines to help you select equipment and refrigerants during future HVAC conversion and/or replacement projects.


  • Make sure that the Refrigerant Leakage Rate (Lr) values used in your calculations are based on the actual leakage rates experienced in your building. The credit requirements set a default Lr of 2.0% for new equipment.


  • The LEED-EBOM Reference Guide includes helpful guidance and example equations to help you perform the Annual Leakage Rate calculations, but the LEED Online credit form does not provide a calculator to figure out those values. 


  • You may also use the Annual Leakage Rate calculator built into the EBOM EAp3/EAc5 Refrigerant Inventory to calculate the Lr values for your equipment (see Documentation Toolkit).

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    EA Credit 5: Enhanced refrigerant management

    1 Point

    Intent

    To reduce ozone depletion and support early compliance with the Montreal Protocol while minimizing direct contributions to global climate change1. Climate change refers to any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2008) 2.The increase in global average temperatures being caused by a buildup of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This temperature change is leading to changes in circulation patterns in the air and in the oceans, which are affecting climates differently in different places. Among the predicted effects are a significant cooling in Western Europe due to changes in the jet stream, and rising sea levels due to the melting of polar ice and glaciers..

    Requirements

    Option 1

    Do not use refrigerants in base building heating, ventilating, air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) systems.

    OR

    Option 2

    Select refrigerants and heating, ventilating, air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) that minimize or eliminate the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and global climate change1. Climate change refers to any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2008) 2.The increase in global average temperatures being caused by a buildup of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This temperature change is leading to changes in circulation patterns in the air and in the oceans, which are affecting climates differently in different places. Among the predicted effects are a significant cooling in Western Europe due to changes in the jet stream, and rising sea levels due to the melting of polar ice and glaciers.. The base building HVAC&R equipment must comply with the following formula, which sets a maximum threshold for the combined contributions to ozone depletion and global warming potential:

    LCGWP + LCODP x

    105

    100



    Calculation definitions for LCGWP + LCODP x 105 ≤ 100
    LCODP = [ODPr x (Lr x Life +Mr) x Rc]/Life
    LCGWP = [GWPr x (Lr x Life +Mr) x Rc]/Life
    LCODP: Lifecycle Ozone Depletion Potential (lbCFC11/Ton-Year)
    LCGWP: Lifecycle Direct Global Warming Potential (lbCO2/Ton-Year)
    GWPr: Global Warming Potential of Refrigerant (0 to 12,000 lbCO2/lbr)
    ODPr: Ozone Depletion Potential of Refrigerant (0 to 0.2 lbCFC11/lbr)
    Lr: Refrigerant Leakage RateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). (0.5% to 2.0%; default of 2% unless otherwise demonstrated)
    Mr: End-of-life Refrigerant Loss (2% to 10%; default of 10% unless otherwise demonstrated)
    Rc: Refrigerant Charge (0.5 to 5.0 lbs of refrigerant per ton of gross ARI rated cooling capacity)

    Life: Equipment Life (10 years; default based on equipment type, unless otherwise demonstrated)



    For multiple types of equipment, a weighted average of all base building HVAC&R equipment must be calculated using the following formula:

    ( LCGWP + LCODP x 105 ) x

    Qunit

    ≤ 100
    ——————————————————————————————

    Qtotal




    Calculation definitions for [ ∑ (LCGWP + LCODP x 105) x Qunit ] / Qtotal ≤ 100
    Qunit = Gross ARI rated cooling capacity of an individual HVAC or refrigeration unit (tons)
    Qtotal = Total gross ARI rated cooling capacity of all HVAC or refrigeration


    Small HVAC units (defined as containing less than 0.5 pounds of refrigerant) and other equipment, such as standard refrigerators, small water coolers and any other cooling equipmentThe equipment used for cooling room air in a building for human comfort. that contains less than 0.5 pounds of refrigerant, are not considered part of the base building system and are not subject to the requirements of this credit.

    Do not operate or install fire suppression systems that contain ozone-depleting substances such as CFCsChlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are a compound of carbon, hydrogen, chlorine and fluorine, once commonly used in refrigeration, that depletes the stratospheric ozone layer., hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCsHydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are refrigerants that cause significantly less depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer than chlorofluorocarbons.) or halonsHalons are substances, used in fire-suppression systems and fire extinguishers, that deplete the stratospheric ozone layer..

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.



    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Operate the facility without mechanical cooling and refrigeration equipment. Where mechanical cooling is needed, use for the refrigeration cycle base building HVAC &R systems that minimize direct impact on ozone depletion and climate change1. Climate change refers to any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2008) 2.The increase in global average temperatures being caused by a buildup of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This temperature change is leading to changes in circulation patterns in the air and in the oceans, which are affecting climates differently in different places. Among the predicted effects are a significant cooling in Western Europe due to changes in the jet stream, and rising sea levels due to the melting of polar ice and glaciers.. Select HVAC&R replacement equipment with reduced refrigerant charge and increased equipment life. Maintain equipment to prevent leakage of refrigerant to the atmosphere. Use fire-suppression systems that do not contain HCFCsHydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are refrigerants that cause significantly less depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer than chlorofluorocarbons. or halonsHalons are substances, used in fire-suppression systems and fire extinguishers, that deplete the stratospheric ozone layer..

Web Tools

U.S. EPA Significant New Alternatives Policy

SNAP is an EPA program to identify alternatives to ozone-depleting substances. The program maintains up-to-date lists of environmentally friendly substitutes for refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment, solvents, fire-suppression systems, adhesives, coatings, and other substances.


EPA Fire Suppression and Explosion Protection

Provides info on alternatives to halonsHalons are substances, used in fire-suppression systems and fire extinguishers, that deplete the stratospheric ozone layer. in fire suppression systems.

Refrigerant Inventory and Leakage Rate Calculations

Use this worksheet to help track and record information on all building refrigerants, and to calculate refrigerant leakage rates (Lr).

Refrigerant Inventory Data

Check the nameplates on your mechanical equipment, as in this example, for information on refrigerant type and charge.

CFC Phase-Out or Conversion

This template provides a structure for the phase-out or conversion of all HVAC base building systems that used CFC-based refrigerants that contain 0.5 pounds of refrigerant or more.

Sample LEED Online Form

This LEED Online form with sample data and tips demonstrates how to document EAc5.

LEED Online Forms: EBOM-2009 EA

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.-2009 EA credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

v06 forms:

v04 forms:

v03 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

38 Comments

0
0
American University Sustainability American University
Dec 18 2013
LEEDuser Member
864 Thumbs Up

Performance period for leakage rate

I'm wondering what performance period would be acceptable for calculating the leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). (lbs of refrigerant added and over what time frame) for this credit. For instance, does the period over which the leakage rate was calculated also have to end within 30 days of all other credits? Or can the leakage rate be based on, say, the first 6 months of a 1 year performance period.

1
4
0
Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Dec 30 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4408 Thumbs Up

Hi Emily,

Based on the v5 form, the leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). needs to be annualized rate and so the best would be to see how much leakage was experienced in the past year. I don't think extrapolating partial year data would typically work since we're required to report actual leakage rates.

2
4
0
American University Sustainability, American University Jan 02 2014 LEEDuser Member 864 Thumbs Up

Ok - say I only have data for the amount of refrigerant added over a period longer than one year. Is it acceptable to extrapolate from that to a period of a year while maintaining the same actual leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608).? Example: 100 lbs added after 18 months = 67 lbs after 12 months?

3
4
0
American University Sustainability, American University Jan 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 864 Thumbs Up

Sorry, I think I got it. If no refrigerant was added in the last year, we can just use the 0.5% default leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608).. Correct?

4
4
0
Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Mar 10 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4408 Thumbs Up

That's right, if there was no refrigerant leakage in the past year then you can use the 0.5% default. You'll need to include a narrative along with the credit indicating that the leakage was tracked and there was no refrigerant added.

Post a Reply
0
0
Andy Rhoades Partner Leading Edge Consulting
May 20 2013
LEEDuser Member
517 Thumbs Up

Leakage Rate in v5 Form

My understanding is that the minimum acceptable Leakage RateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). is 0.5%, even if the actual data demonstrate a lower leakage rate. The v4 form accommodated this by allowing the Lr to be manually entered but the v5 form only auto-calculates the Lr based on the amount of refrigerant added. If I have units that have not had any refrigerant added within the past year, how can I use a leakage rate that LEED accepts while still reporting accurate data on refrigerant added? Has anyone else experienced this problem?

1
2
0
Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Jul 31 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4408 Thumbs Up

Hi Andy,

Your understanding about the minimum leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). is correct. Can you trick the v5 form by adjusting the amount of refrigerant added until the Lr is 0.5%? That may work.

2
2
0
Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Aug 02 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1497 Thumbs Up

Hi Andy,

I like Ben's suggestion to add refrigerant until an Lr of 0.5% is reached. Another option is to fill out a v4 form and upload it along with a narrative describing the issue with the v5 form.

Post a Reply
0
0
Frank Weiss Hines
Dec 18 2012
Guest
44 Thumbs Up

End of Life MR Leakage rate

The end of life refrigerant loss (MR) has a range of 2%-10%. The reference guide says I can use a lower than the 10% default rate if I can demonstrate how the lower rate is justified. How would I go about trying to justify the use of a lower end of life leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). instead of the 10% default when the equipment is only half way through its anticipated life?

Currently actual leakage rate over 12 years is 0.38%

1
1
0
Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Feb 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4408 Thumbs Up

I haven't seen a project try this but it seems like you would need to provide information from your vendor regarding their procedures to minimize refrigerant leakage at the end of life include recovering and recycling the refrigerant.

In addition, you would likely need some sort of evidence that the vendor had achieved the proposed alternative end of life leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). for a similar piece of equipment before.

Post a Reply
0
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Jun 22 2012
LEEDuser Moderator

2% leakage rate

Since there has been some discussion on this topic on this forum before, I wanted to make sure everyone is aware of the 11/1/11 LEED addendum stating that "If new equipment is being installed, use a default leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). of 2%."

1
3
0
David Hubka Director of Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jul 17 2012 LEEDuser Expert 4403 Thumbs Up

Good point Tristan.
This is also stated on the EAc5 Credit Template on LEED Online. Speaking from experience it is recommended to read every word of the template you are assigned to complete.

2
3
0
Michael Huang Oct 19 2012 LEEDuser Member 9 Thumbs Up

How is "new equipment" defined? If we have equipment installed in 2007 and have not added refrigerant since then, can we use a Lr of 0.5% or is it still "new" with a Lr of 2.0%?

3
3
0
David Hubka Director of Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Nov 07 2012 LEEDuser Expert 4403 Thumbs Up

New equipment is probably defined as equipment that has been installed less than a year from project submission date. This equipment does not have a year of annual leakage established therefore the default Lr of 2% is required.

Post a Reply
0
0
Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability
Feb 28 2011
LEEDuser Member
2299 Thumbs Up

District Energy Documentation

Could someone please confirm the guidance and documentation for projects connected to a third party district chilled water loop? Does the utility (chilled water provider) have to provide any information? These two sources seem to contradict themselves

Guidance from LEED District Energy Addendum
"Scenario 2 – Third Party DES
EAp3 and EAc5 requirements apply to the downstream equipmentDownstream equipment consists of all heating or cooling systems, equipment, and controls located within the project building and site associated with transporting thermal energy into heated or cooled spaces. This includes the thermal connection or interface with the district energy system, secondary distribution systems in the building, and terminal units. but not the upstream equipmentUpstream equipment consists of all heating or cooling systems, equipment, and controls that are associated with a district energy system but are not part of the project building's thermal connection or do not interface with the district energy system. It includes the central energy plant and all transmission and distribution equipment associated with transporting the thermal energy to the project building and site.."

Guidance from 2009 EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. Reference Guide
"For buildings connected to an existing chilled water system, the chilled water supplier must perform the required calculation and submit a letter showing compliance with the requirements."

Thank you!

1
2
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 11 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Since the district energy document came out more recently than the Reference Guide, and since the Reference Guide implementation guidance is not as strictly upheld as actual credit language, I would think that that DES guidance trumps the Reference Guide.

Does that make sense? If that's not enough to go on, there is an email address in the DES document where feedback is invited—I would send a note there, and also to GBCI.

2
2
0
Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Mar 25 2011 LEEDuser Member 2299 Thumbs Up

FYI for those who were confused about the two sources from USGBC related to DES. This is a response from GBCI....

The guidance on page 4 in the more recent document, Treatment of District or Thermal Energy in LEED for Existing Buildings Operations & Maintenance, should take precedence in this case, although following the original approach from page 218 of the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition, would also be acceptable and would better respond to the intent of the credit, especially in the case where no other base building systems use refrigerants.
If you are attempting this credit prior to clarification of this matter, you should include this correspondence with your submittal.

Post a Reply
0
0
Pablo Fortunato Suarez Principal ESD Consultant/Architect GreenArc Sustainable Building & Architecture
Jan 24 2011
Guest
3004 Thumbs Up

refrigerant charge formula for r123

Our supplier who does the recharging of refrigerants has a standard formula for determining the refrigerant charge based on minutes per day of purge pump out operation. The values end up being very small fractions (0.0000n). Are these figures realistic and is this methodology acceptable to LEED?
We have other equipment though that do not use this refrigerant.

1
2
0
Pablo Fortunato Suarez Principal ESD Consultant/Architect, GreenArc Sustainable Building & Architecture Jan 24 2011 Guest 3004 Thumbs Up

In this case do we use 0.5% as minimum default value?
Hoping for some clarification.

2
2
0
Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Sep 12 2011 LEEDuser Expert 4408 Thumbs Up

I think you're asking about the leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). that is used in the EAc5 calculation. If that is correct then the data points that are used in the Credit Form calculator are (1) total pounds of refrigerant added and (2) days since refrigerant was last added.

If the service provider does not track those two data points and uses another methodology like you've described above, then you should submit a narrative along with the credit submission demonstrating that their methodology provides the actual leakage rate over the performance period. This is very important because the credit cannot be earned unless the building team has monitored the actual leakage rates.

If the actual leakage rate is less than 0.5%, you should still enter 0.5% in the credit form as that is the minimum that the review team will accept.

Post a Reply
0
0
John Albrecht Director of LEED Services Sieben Energy Assoc.
Dec 02 2010
Guest
2161 Thumbs Up

Halon fire extinguishers

For a large building, we just found out we have a few older "halon" fire extinguishers--one (Halotron) in the Electronic Media Services main equipment room, two in the Communications room, and one in attic stock. I do not think replacing those 4 extinguishers will happen soon since since the client is very concerned that non-halon FEs in those rooms will damage the equipment. Will this be a fatal problem for EAc5? Can we commit to a phase out ofver time to a green product like Inergen or another refrigerant, or does the change have to be done before LEED submittal? Thanks again.

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 07 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Just based on the credit requirements, I would assume that the change would have to be complete by the LEED submittal. A phase-out plan would be more of a prerequisite-type of approach. For the credit, I think you'd hard-pressed to argue for this allowance.

Post a Reply
0
0
Laura Girard
Nov 16 2010
Guest
107 Thumbs Up

Vending Machines

We have a number of refrigerated vending machines on our facility that are not owned or operated by the building owner. We could not read any nameplates due to installation and safety concerns. These are standard drink machines. Does any one know if these typically carry more than the 0.5lb requirement? And do they need to be included in all refrigerant management calcs?

Thank you.

1
1
0
Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Nov 24 2010 LEEDuser Expert 8728 Thumbs Up

Laura - I'm not an expert on refrigerants, but I do think its reasonable to assume that vendor-owned machines of this type are clearly not part of 'base-building systems' and can be excluded from consideration for this credit.

Post a Reply
0
0
Andrew Barnes
Nov 01 2010
Guest
129 Thumbs Up

Mechanical Engineer Signature Required?

I (not a mechanical engineer) calculated the leakage rates for this credit, but LEED online has a 'Required Signatory' box for this credit. Is this necessary to be signed off on?

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 02 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, it is. Is there a mechanical engineer on the project team in any function? If not, I'm just thinking out loud, but I wonder if you could sign that given that you are acting in that role for this project. I would think so, but not sure.

Post a Reply
0
0
Andrew Barnes
Nov 01 2010
Guest
129 Thumbs Up

Installation Dates for LEED On-line

Good day everyone. For our project site we have listed all of the units,
calculated all of the leakage rates, etc. However there are a few of our units that do not have an accurate (precise day/month/year) installation date - and no one around the place can be more specific than month/year for most. Unfortunately even many of the equipment plates lack the date info. Will this be problematic if we can't document installation dates precisely?

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 11 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Doesn't seem like it should be too problematic, since it doesn't directly reflect on the credit requirements. I would be sure to explain the lack of the data in as detailed a manner as possible in the narrative.

Post a Reply
0
0
Stephen Redding president Redding Linden Burr
Jul 22 2010
LEEDuser Member
156 Thumbs Up

base bldg equipment vs tenant equipment

EAc5 states that it is for 'base bldg' equipment and I have read their definition of base bldg as meaning permanently attached to the bldg, etc.
I think that means that, in a multi-tenant office building , tenant-owned HVAC or refrigeration equipment is excluded
Do you agree ?

1
3
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 24 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Stephen, for this credit LEED defines "base building" equipment as basically anything in the building with more than 0.5 pounds of refrigerant. This is defined and discussed in detail in the Checklists tab above and on page 209 of the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. Reference Guide.

2
3
0
Paul C Sep 14 2010 Guest 2318 Thumbs Up

Under Equipment location - the drop down menu states 'The LEED Project only' or 'Central Plant', I'm assuming if the equipment is within the building to put 'The LEED Project Only'?

3
3
0
John Beeson Chief Mystic in Resident, Catalyst Partners Sep 15 2010 Guest 1284 Thumbs Up

Yeup. :)

Post a Reply
0
0
Reynaldo Castro
Apr 29 2010
Guest
1231 Thumbs Up

Dealing with CFCs

I have York Chillers which are used very rarely and only under extreme hot weather conditions, requiring additional cooling.

Unfortunately these Chillers still use R-11 CFC Refrigerant. They also fall under the criteria of Conversion would not make it Economically Feasable to convert. Including all the supporting documentation for annual controlling leak rate of 5% or less.

Does this mean we get kicked to the curb on this one and thers no way we can qualify. Or is it automatically excepted considering it meets E.A. Preq.3 requirement guidelines for CFC based refrigerants.
Please advise - Rey

1
1
0
Chris Nixon Manager, Sustainable Solutions, BRSC Apr 30 2010 Guest 371 Thumbs Up

I think you're kicked to the curb. I was going to suggest entering your numbers in the template and seeing if it were less than 100. However, when I tried it under an EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. 2008 template, R-11 wasn't even a choice on the drop down menu. I suspect that you could still work the formula by hand (the template normally does it for you) but with R-11 your total will be more than 100.

Post a Reply
0
0
Kevin Kelly
Apr 22 2010
LEEDuser Member
327 Thumbs Up

Leakage Rate

90% of the AC equipment at my building has been replaced in the past 2 years. None of that equipment has had refrigerant recharges. How would I go about entering a leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). if we have yet to have any refrigerant recharges?

Thanks for the help!

1
3
0
John Beeson Chief Mystic in Resident, Catalyst Partners Apr 28 2010 Guest 1284 Thumbs Up

See page 215 of the LEED Reference Guide for the calculations definitions and minimum value for the annual leakage rateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608).. My understanding was that, at a minimum, the annual leakage rate of not less than 0.5% must be used.

2
3
0
Paul C Feb 23 2011 Guest 2318 Thumbs Up

LEED ONLINE CALCULATIONS ISSUE?:

I am confused with the formulas given in the reference guide. The 3 examples given takes the sum of the (LCGWP + LCODP * 10^5) * N * Qunit and divides it by the Qtotal to get the value of less than 100. But in the formula listed next to Avg. Reg. Atmos. Impact in the 3 charts it ignores the N-value.

My project has multiple pieces of equipment so I have to take an average the formula on page 222 confuses me as the Qunit value differs by unit, I assumed the average of the total would have to be less than 100.

Also the LEED Online tool does not provide an average score it only sums up the totals of 3 columns. I dont see an area with a final avg. refrig. atmos. impact score.

Could someone help me out with explaining what I am missing?

3
3
0
Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Apr 26 2011 Guest 7511 Thumbs Up

Hi Paul,

The formulas in the reference guide on page 222, are a bit confusing, but they do not ignore the n-value. The n-value is synonymous with the column titled “units” in the first example on page 222. So the n-value (or number of units) is accounted for in both the last column where each type of HVAC equipment is calculated using “n” in the formula; and in the first and second columns where the Qtotal is calculated. This means that both the subtotal and the Qtotal take n-value (or number of units) into consideration. Then you divide the subtotal by the Qtotal to get the Average Refrig. Atmos. Impact Score. Thus n-value is represented as the Qtotal and it’s also included in the calculations to arrive at the numerator in the equation for the Average Refrig. Atmos. Impact Score.

Regarding LEED Online, the second to last column labeled “Refrigerant Impact per ton” shows the Average Refrig. Atmos. Impact Score, for all of the equipment listed, taking n-value into consideration. The final column labeled “Refrigerant Impact Total” is comparable to the subtotal listed in the example charts in the reference guide. 

 

Post a Reply

Start a new LEED comment thread

Aug 28 2014
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2014 – BuildingGreen, Inc.