EBOM-2009 EAp1: Energy Efficiency Best Management Practices

  • EBOM EAp1 Type1 Energy Efficiency BMP Diagram
  • Achievable prerequisite

    This prerequisite is highly achievable, and worth doing, because it will give you valuable information on the performance and efficiency of your operations.

    It’s all about documentation

    You’ll need to develop documentation that incorporates operational best practices to earn this prerequisite. The focus is on documenting standard operating procedures (SOPs) and best practices for building personnel and establishing a baseline approximation of building energy efficiency, major end-uses, and potential opportunities to reduce energy consumption.

    You’ll need to provide the following documents:

    • Building Operating PlanA general documentation summarizing the intended operation of each base building system described in the systems narrative; the building operating plan may also be known as "Owner's Operating Requirements" or similar. The operating plan includes the time-of-day schedules for each system for each of the eight day types (Monday to Sunday plus holidays), the mode of operation for each system when it is running (occupied vs. unoccupied; day vs. night, etc.), and the desired indoor conditions or setpoints for each schedule or mode. The operating plan accounts for any differences in needs or desired conditions for different portions of the project building, as well as any seasonal variations in operations patterns. The plan accounts for all the monitored space conditions used to control the base systems, i.e., air temperature, relative humidity, occupancy, light level, CO2 levels, room pressurization, duct static pressure, etc.
    • Systems Narrative
    • Sequence of Operations
    • Preventive Maintenance Plan
    • Summary Report of an ASHRAE Level I Walkthrough

    The ASHRAE Level I Walkthrough

    The ASHRAE Level I Walkthrough involves examining utility records and mechanical systems to identify opportunities to reduce building energy consumption and operating costs. Note that the ASHRAE Level I Walkthrough is typically performed by a qualified third-party consultant, but you can also do it with in-house staff if they have the right background. The process requires you to gather energy consumption data for the entire building to derive performance indicators and identify low-cost and no-cost opportunities and capital improvement measures to improve overall performance.

    If the ASHRAE audit is performed by in-house staff, refer to the ASHRAE “Procedures for Commercial Building Energy Audits” document. Guidelines for creating ASHRAE audit documentation can also be found in “EBOM ASHRAE Audit Documentation.” (See Resources for information on both documents.)

    Pursuing EAc2.1: Existing Building Commissioning?

    If you plan to pursue EAc2.1: Existing Building Commissioning—Investigation and Analysis, you have the option of meeting that credit with completion of an ASHRAE Level II: Energy Audit. (The other option is to commence building commissioning.) If you choose the auditing option for EAc2.1, complete the requirements for both the Level I and Level II audits at the same time. 

    Consider these questions when approaching this credit

    • Is relevant building information in written form or at least ready to be developed and documented? Is it accessible to all relevant building personnel? Once you develop operational best practices, it’s an effective practice to make sure the whole staff has access to them. 
    • Has an ASHRAE Level I Walkthrough been conducted in the last five years? If so, you may not need to conduct another Level I Walkthrough during your performance period. However, the audit report must be updated to reflect any significant changes in operating procedures or building systems.
    • If the ASHRAE audit has not occurred, are you in a position to perform the work in-house, or do you need to bring in an outside party?

    FAQ's on LEED-EBOM EAp1

    How do you generate the annual energy use breakdown by end-use?

    There is more than one way to generate the annual energy use breakdown by end-use, and in most buildings it will require a combination of strategies. Start by identifying the major end-uses, and then consider which of the following strategies will work best for each end-use.

    Submeters

    If you have submeters installed in your building for one or more end-uses, simply track this data over a year. For end-uses that are the sole sources of consumption of a given energy type, the main building readings can be uses (e.g., if natural gas is only used for space heating).

    Electric consumption in office building

    Consumption Analysis

    Generating a bar graph of consumption over the course of the year can be used to evaluate end-uses that only occur during certain months. (See graph.)

    Spot Metering

    Consider using spot meters to measure end-use energy consumption at the system level and extrapolate the information for a year, taking into account operational and seasonal variations. This works especially well for loads that follow a constant or regular schedule—for example, exhaust fans that run continuously all year at a constant speed.

    Calculations

    A final option is to determine the rated demand of equipment and estimate energy use based on run time, hours of operation, and operational and seasonal variations. You can cross-reference your results against your utility bills to confirm that your estimates are accurate (even if your bills only provide monthly totals). 

    What’s the difference between demand and consumption, in terms of energy costs and energy cost savings?

    Demand describes the rate of electricity use and is measured as kW. Consumption is based on the actual electrical energy used, and is measured as kWhA kilowatt-hour is a unit of work or energy, measured as 1 kilowatt (1,000 watts) of power expended for 1 hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu.. Utilities generally levy separate charges for each, and some energy conservation measures will help to reduce both demand and consumption for electricity. Considering both paints a more accurate picture of potential cost savings and makes the results of the low-cost and no-cost improvement assessment more meaningful and useful.

    Who can perform the ASHRAE Level I audit? Can it be done in-house?

    Yes, the ASHRAE Level I audit can be performed in-house. The auditor must have the skills necessary to perform the audit, but otherwise does not need to hold specific credentials or be a third-party. Audits for LEED-EBOM projects or commonly conducted by a third-party auditor, commissioning agent, or building engineerA qualified engineering professional with relevant and sufficient expertise who oversees and is responsible for the operation and maintenance of mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems in the project building.

    To what degree is it necessary to follow the ASHRAE Procedures document? Is this provided as a general, optional guide, or must it be followed precisely, using the ASHRAE forms and completing the audit using the ASHRAE methodology?

    The expectation is that the audit methodology outlined in the ASHRAE “Procedures for Commercial Building Energy Audits” be used to guide the audit procedure and the approach to understanding building performance, energy use and opportunity for improvement. However, teams are not required to use the ASHRAE forms for reporting results. Refer to the Reference Guide and the LEED Online EAc2.1 credit form for checklists and outlines of documentation that is required for LEED documentation. Audit reports commonly are flagged for not including certain data required by the credit form, such as demand savings and maintenance cost savings.

    How is the target EUI established?

    It’s up to the project team to determine what target performance to set for the building. Target EUI can be based on a combination of audit results, project building goals for energy use and consumption, benchmarking against other similar buildings, etc. Ideally, the target should be set to a level that will require some real effort to achieve, but that is attainable and realistic.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

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  • You’ll need to organize the following documents for this prerequisite, before the performance period. Start by collecting  information on standard procedures used to operate and maintain building HVAC, lighting, and control systems.

    • Building Operating Plan—Provides setpoints and operating schedules in a single table, so that building personnel can tell at a glance what the intended operating conditions are for mechanical equipment in all of the building spaces. These setpoints and operating schedules should include seasonal variations.
    • Systems Narrative—Summarizes the HVAC, domestic hot water, humidification and dehumidification, and lighting systems in your building, so that system functions and controls are clearly identified. Include descriptions of all system controls and account for differences in different portions of the building.
    • Sequence of Operations—Helps define the optimal operational states for base building systems under typical operating conditions and give specific information on operating phases (warm-up, occupied, unoccupied), set points and controls, and feedback systems to monitor performance.
    • Preventive Maintenance Plan—Describes the ongoing maintenance tasks that keep equipment running smoothly, and lays out the schedule for these recurring activities.

  • Closely follow the LEED Reference Guide’s requirements for these documents. The Reference Guide does a good job of explaining the requirements and providing format examples.


  • You may have documentation of existing operating procedures, but there’s no guarantee that the existing documentation reflects actual practice. Gather feedback and input from all relevant personnel to capture information that may better codify or improve proper building operations as well as informing the submittal documents. You may find unwritten rules—“that’s just how we’ve always done things”—that have a big impact (good or bad) on building performance.


  • If your building does not use in-house staff to maintain mechanical equipment, make contracted vendors aware of your current plans and allow them to have input into changes. Building staff who deal with vendor relationships should be responsible for distributing operational plans and communicating changes.


  • Consider creating other forms of documentation that could aid operations staff in doing their jobs effectively. For example, videotape the start-up procedures of mechanical equipment to use as a training tool for new personnel.


  • Develop and maintain an annual review procedure to update these operational documents. Specify the personnel who should be involved, and define the types of events that should trigger updates outside the review cycle. These events may include, but are not limited to:

    • Changes in space uses
    • Changes in occupancy levels
    • Installation of new systems
    • Commissioning activities or changes to mechanical equipment that occur after occupant feedback or monitoring system alarm.

  • Operational documentation may be created entirely by in-house staff to minimize overall costs. You can also hire commissioning agents or energy auditors to develop these documents if doing the work in-house is not possible.

During the Performance Period

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  • Put all documented operating procedures into use during the performance period.


  • Ensure that all relevant building personnel have access to operational documentation. Put documentation online in a company intranet site or organize all documents in a binderGlue used in manufacturing wood products, such as medium-density fiberboard (MDF), particleboard, and engineered lumber. Most binders are made with formaldehyde. that is readily available in the appropriate office.


  • Complete an ASHRAE Level I: Walkthrough as defined in “Procedures for Commercial Building Energy Audits.” (See Resources.) This ASHRAE document describes the general procedures to guide a proper walkthrough and provides a uniform method of reporting the required information.


  • The ASHRAE Level I Walkthrough evaluates a building’s energy performance and energy consumption by analyzing building energy bills and conducting a brief visual survey. You’ll need to gather energy consumption data for the entire building to derive performance indicators and identify low-cost and no-cost opportunities and capital improvement measures to improve overall performance.


  • If a Level I analysis has been conducted within the last five years, you don’t need to repeat the procedure during the performance period; however, you must update the audit report to reflect any significant changes in operating procedures or building systems.


  • It is common for the Level I analysis to be performed by a qualified third-party consultant; however, knowledgeable in-house staff can also do it.


  • If performing the analysis in-house, closely review the “Procedures for Commercial Building Energy Audits” (see Resources) before beginning the process to ensure that you will be collecting the proper data during your building walkthrough.


  • Produce an audit report that details the findings and specifically documents the following for your LEED application (see the Documentation Toolkit for an example):

    • A breakdown of annual energy consumption by end-use category. End-use categories refer to a breakdown of consumption by building system and process—such as lighting—rather than by floor, tenant, building space, or energy source. This breakdown may be compiled using any combination of utility bills, sub-metering device or spot-metering. Estimation of end-use loads based on product specifications is also acceptable—for example, estimate the energy consumption of a lighting fixture and lamp based on specifications.
    • A summary of findings related to the building’s Energy Use Intensity (EUI), including a comparison of your EUI with similar buildings, and potential cost-savings that could be realized by improving your energy efficiency to reach a target EUI. Although you can use an Energy Star Statement of Energy Performance to document your building’s EUI and benchmark against the national average, you still need to produce a target EUI and corresponding analysis of the possible cost savings if that target is reached. If you upload the Energy Star data, remember those additional pieces.
    • A list of opportunities for no- and low-cost energy efficiency and conservation upgrades in your building—and the expected annual savings for energy consumption, energy demand, and the energy and maintenance cost savings that would result from these improvements.

  • If you plan to pursue EAc2.1: Existing Building Commissioning—Investigation and Analysis, you have the option of meeting those credit requirements with completion of an ASHRAE Level II: Energy Audit. EAc2.1 can also be earned by starting a commissioning process, but this is unrelated to EAp1 requirements. If you do choose the auditing option for EAc2.1, coordinate your efforts now, and complete the requirements for both the Level I and Level II audits at the same time. 


  • The ASHRAE Procedures document clearly defines the required tasks for both a Level I: Walkthrough and the Level II: Energy Audit. The Level II Audit requires a more detailed building survey and cost-benefit analysis of all practical measures to improve energy efficiency, including identified capital improvements, and also requires that you explain your rationale if you deem certain capital improvement opportunities impractical.


  • Take photos and make video during your walkthrough to document current conditions and opportunities for upgrades to mechanical equipment. This type of documentation may be used to help convince building owners and operators of the need for improvements or as a training tool for new hires.


  • Research opportunities for rebates or incentives to perform energy audits in your facility. Local power utilities often offer rebate programs for companies making an effort to improve energy efficiency.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    EA Prerequisite 1: Energy efficiency best management practices - planning, documentation and opportunity assessment

    Required

    Intent

    To promote continuity of information to ensure that energy-efficient operating strategies are maintained and provide a foundation for training and system analysis.

    Requirements

    Document the current sequence of operations for the building.

    Develop a building operating planA general documentation summarizing the intended operation of each base building system described in the systems narrative; the building operating plan may also be known as "Owner's Operating Requirements" or similar. The operating plan includes the time-of-day schedules for each system for each of the eight day types (Monday to Sunday plus holidays), the mode of operation for each system when it is running (occupied vs. unoccupied; day vs. night, etc.), and the desired indoor conditions or setpoints for each schedule or mode. The operating plan accounts for any differences in needs or desired conditions for different portions of the project building, as well as any seasonal variations in operations patterns. The plan accounts for all the monitored space conditions used to control the base systems, i.e., air temperature, relative humidity, occupancy, light level, CO2 levels, room pressurization, duct static pressure, etc. that provides details on how the building is to be operated and maintained. The operating plan must include, at a minimum, an occupancy schedule, equipment run-time schedule, design set points for all HVAC equipment, and design lighting levels throughout the building. Identify any changes in schedules or set points for different seasons, days of the week and times of day. Validate that the operating plan has been met during the performance period.

    Develop a systems narrative that briefly describes the mechanical and electrical systems and equipment in the building. The systems narrative must include all the systems used to meet the operating conditions stated in the operating plan, including at a minimum, heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting and any building controls systems.

    Create a narrative of the preventive maintenance plan for equipment described in the systems narrative and document the preventive maintenance schedule during the performance period.

    Conduct an energy audit that meets the requirements of the ASHRAE Level I walk-through assessment. [Europe ACP: EN 16247]

    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    Europe ACP: EN 16247

    Projects in Europe may use the energy audit procedure defined in EN 16247-2:2014.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Pilot Alternative Compliance Path Available

    This credit has an alternative compliance path available for the use of ISO 50001: Energy Management Systems. For more information see Pilot ACP 86: LEED 2009 EBOM ACPs for ISO 50001.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Prepare a building operating planA general documentation summarizing the intended operation of each base building system described in the systems narrative; the building operating plan may also be known as "Owner's Operating Requirements" or similar. The operating plan includes the time-of-day schedules for each system for each of the eight day types (Monday to Sunday plus holidays), the mode of operation for each system when it is running (occupied vs. unoccupied; day vs. night, etc.), and the desired indoor conditions or setpoints for each schedule or mode. The operating plan accounts for any differences in needs or desired conditions for different portions of the project building, as well as any seasonal variations in operations patterns. The plan accounts for all the monitored space conditions used to control the base systems, i.e., air temperature, relative humidity, occupancy, light level, CO2 levels, room pressurization, duct static pressure, etc. that specifies the current operational needs of the building and identify building systems and other practices necessary to meet those needs. Outline the current sequence of operations to identify and eliminate any inefficiency.

    Develop and implement a preventive maintenance program to regularly monitor and optimize the performance of mechanical equipment regulating indoor comfort and the conditions delivered in occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space..

Publications

Procedures for Commercial Building Energy Audits

This reference defines best practices for energy survey and analysis for purchasers and providers of energy audit services. This new, full-color edition provides updated guidance and tools for energy consulting engineers, LEED professionals, real-estate professionals, building owners and building managers. Expanded since its LEED-referenced 2004 publication, this version details energy-auditing methods and provides new sample forms and templates that illustrate the content and arrangement of a complete, effective energy analysis report.


Building Owners and Managers Association, Preventive Maintenance and Building Operation Efficiency

This manual from BOMA gives insight into the newest developments in building operating efficiency and preventive maintenance. 


ASHRAE Procedures for Commercial Building Energy Audits, 2nd. Edition

ASHRAE’s guide for conducting Level I, II, and III energy audits.

Organizations

California Commissioning Collaborative

The organization’s retrocommissioning toolkit provides templates, sample documents, and examples of many typical retrocommissioning deliverables and reports. 

Technical Guides

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual

This manual is a strategic guide for planning and implementing energy-saving building upgrades. It provides general methods for reviewing and adjusting system control settings, plus procedures for testing and correcting calibration and operation of system components such as sensors, actuators, and controlled devices.

Web Tools

ASHRAE Service Life and Maintenance Cost Database

This database provides current information on the service life and maintenance costs of typical HVAC equipment.

Documentation Package for ASHRAE Building Audits

This sample template includes sample language and guidance on crafting the Energy End-Use Profile (for EAp1), the Low-Cost Energy Efficiency Upgrades Summary (for EAp1), the ASHRAE Energy Audit Summary Report (for EAc2.1), the Sample Energy Cost Reduction Measures (ECRM) Summary (for EAc2.1), and the Performance Summary Report (for EAc2.1).

LEED Gold Project Documentation

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of EAp1 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

Sequence of Operations

The sequence of operations should provide detailed system-level documentation for each base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). system that defines what operational states are desired under which conditions in the building. This  template provides a structure for developing a LEED-compliant building operating planA general documentation summarizing the intended operation of each base building system described in the systems narrative; the building operating plan may also be known as "Owner's Operating Requirements" or similar. The operating plan includes the time-of-day schedules for each system for each of the eight day types (Monday to Sunday plus holidays), the mode of operation for each system when it is running (occupied vs. unoccupied; day vs. night, etc.), and the desired indoor conditions or setpoints for each schedule or mode. The operating plan accounts for any differences in needs or desired conditions for different portions of the project building, as well as any seasonal variations in operations patterns. The plan accounts for all the monitored space conditions used to control the base systems, i.e., air temperature, relative humidity, occupancy, light level, CO2 levels, room pressurization, duct static pressure, etc..

Systems Narrative Template

A general, summary description of each of the certain base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). systems installed in the project building is required. This template provides a structure for developing a LEED-compliant systems narrative.

Building Operating Plan Template

The building operating planA general documentation summarizing the intended operation of each base building system described in the systems narrative; the building operating plan may also be known as "Owner's Operating Requirements" or similar. The operating plan includes the time-of-day schedules for each system for each of the eight day types (Monday to Sunday plus holidays), the mode of operation for each system when it is running (occupied vs. unoccupied; day vs. night, etc.), and the desired indoor conditions or setpoints for each schedule or mode. The operating plan accounts for any differences in needs or desired conditions for different portions of the project building, as well as any seasonal variations in operations patterns. The plan accounts for all the monitored space conditions used to control the base systems, i.e., air temperature, relative humidity, occupancy, light level, CO2 levels, room pressurization, duct static pressure, etc. should provide general documentation summarizing the intended operation of each base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). system described in the systems narrative; the building operating plan may also be known as “Owner’s Operating Requirements” or similar. This template provides a structure for developing a LEED-compliant building operating plan.

LEED Online Documentation

LEED Online documentation for achievement of EAp1 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 project.

LEED Online Forms: EBOM-2009 EA

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

122 Comments

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Muzammal Abbas LEED AP (BD+C) MEP Engineer Pakistan Green Building Council
Feb 03 2017
Guest
68 Thumbs Up

LEED Platinum

Project Location: Pakistan

We had submitted one of our LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. V4 project final review and received 72 points. We had accepted the review and received Certified Gold Level. Now after some duration our client is compelled to go for Platinum Certification by achieving additional credits.

What procedure shall be required to achieve our goal?

Thanking you in anticipation of your prompt response in this regard.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 03 2017 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

Hello Muzammal,

First of all, congratulations on your LEED v4 Gold certification.

To get to Platinum you will need to register for recertification and submit all credits in your initial submission + 8 additional points worth of credits. Not seeing your scorecard I am unable to provide direction as to which credits should be added.

You can submit for recertification as soon as one year after your initial certification.

Or you could check out ARC and determine if this may be a path.

Apologies that I am unable to provide more direct guidance.

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Gina Dederer URS Deutschland GmbH
Apr 05 2016
LEEDuser Member
64 Thumbs Up

ISO 50001 ACP Timeframe

Project Location: Ireland

Our project has completed a full ISO 50001 certification last year and is not due for a renewal until 2018. The ACP for the ISO 50001 certification states that the certification had to be completed within the last 12 months.
That timeframe likely falls within our performance period but probably not in the actual submittal stage. I would estimate we will be about 14 or 15 months past the actual certification.
Does anyone know from when the 12 months count?
Thank you!

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Apr 05 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

The 12 months are the maximum length between the date the onsite audit occurred (not the time of report report writing) and the date of submission to the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). for review.

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Gina Dederer URS Deutschland GmbH Apr 25 2016 LEEDuser Member 64 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the quick reply! We'll be right outside of that timeframe then - too bad. They only do the full certification every three years.
So, I have one follow-up question then: The project will be undergoing a surveillance audit for the ISO 50001 certification which will likely fall into the performance period. Would that documentation be usable?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Apr 26 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

Without knowing what is exactly included within your surveillance audit I cannot comment.

If the audit performed during the performance period includes review/confirmation of building operating planA general documentation summarizing the intended operation of each base building system described in the systems narrative; the building operating plan may also be known as "Owner's Operating Requirements" or similar. The operating plan includes the time-of-day schedules for each system for each of the eight day types (Monday to Sunday plus holidays), the mode of operation for each system when it is running (occupied vs. unoccupied; day vs. night, etc.), and the desired indoor conditions or setpoints for each schedule or mode. The operating plan accounts for any differences in needs or desired conditions for different portions of the project building, as well as any seasonal variations in operations patterns. The plan accounts for all the monitored space conditions used to control the base systems, i.e., air temperature, relative humidity, occupancy, light level, CO2 levels, room pressurization, duct static pressure, etc., systems narrative, sequence of operations, and preventative maintenance plan then yes it would be usable.

If the audit performed during the performance period includes elements of a Preliminary Energy Use Analysis and/or Walk-Through Analysis then yest it would be usable.

Hope this helps.

Post a Reply
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Sabine Hoffmann CES clean energy solutions GesmbH
Jan 25 2016
LEEDuser Member
16 Thumbs Up

Change energy consumption data after Preliminary review

We are in the process of pursuing LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. certification, for a project located in Europe. We have submitted the documentation for preliminary review. Following the client´s decision, initially they wanted to exclude one building part form the certification. At this point, and after we have submitted the project for preliminary review, we are thinking of including this part of the building into the project boundary as well.
Is this still possible to add/change energy consumption data after the project is already submitted for preliminary review? Would this require us to repeat the performance period of 12 month?
For the building part that we are thinking on adding, we have all documentation and consumption data ready, as we have been documenting everything together with other building part that have been initially included in the certification.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jan 25 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

Not understanding the reason for excluding, here is the LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. rule with respect to excluding information:

-----All prerequisites (except EQp2) and all credits offer a 10% floor area exemption option for multi-tenanted buildings. If it is not possible to gather the necessary tenant data for these credits, or the applicant does not have control over the required element, the project team can exempt up to 10% of the building's gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.). If the LEED reviewer realizes you excluded a portion of the building from prereq or credit requirements they may ask you to provide a narrative listing the management, occupancy, and floor area of exempted space(s) and require you to summarize the attempts the team has made to acquire the data from the excluded floor area(s).------

It is possible to revise information with your final submission. As always, provide a narrative explaining why information submitted in the final review does not match the information submitted in the preliminary review.

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant DCarbon
Oct 26 2015
LEEDuser Member
1766 Thumbs Up

Maintenance Costs Savings

Further to a project review it was commented by the reviewer that” the list of potential low-cost/no-cost energy efficiency and conservation upgrades and programmatic changes did not include the
maintenance cost savings resulting from these improvements and requested that we provided revised documentation containing all potential savings resulting from each potential improvement”. However, the potential low-cost/no-cost energy efficiency and conservation upgrades will result in energy savings but savings in maintenance costs are not expected. How should we manage this issue, as arbitrarily estimating maintenance costs where those are not expected cannot be a solution to the problem. Would it be accepted if we clearly clarify that no maintenance cost is expected from the energy savings occurred due to the potential energy efficiency upgrades?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Oct 26 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

If no maintenance cost is expected from the energy savings due to the potential energy efficiency upgrades, then simply state this within the report.

The LEED reviewer will accept this.

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant, DCarbon Oct 26 2015 LEEDuser Member 1766 Thumbs Up

Great David, thanks!

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant DCarbon
Oct 12 2015
LEEDuser Member
1766 Thumbs Up

Target Index

Project Location: Greece

Further to a preliminary review of project located outside the U.S. we are asked to provide a summary of findings relating to the generation of the project building site Energy Utilization Index identifying a target index and the potential cost savings that might be met by achieving the target index. However, the project meets EAp2 using the Energy Star Portfolio Manager tool. Additionally, according to EAp1 LEED Online form: “If the project team has used the ENERGY STAR's Portfolio Manager to perform the comparison of the energy use intensity against similar characteristics, the EA Prerequisite 2 documentation may be referenced from the ASHRAE Level 1 data upload, and #1 and #2 above do not need to be explicitly included in the ASHRAE Level 1 data upload”. It is noted, that unless using the Energy Star Portfolio Manager Tool, the target index cannot be calculated since using the Target Index Finder alone does not allow to use non-U.S. weather stations.

From our understanding we need to submit the Statement of Energy Design IntentA written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. (1 page pdf document) from the project profile within the Energy Star Portfolio Manager. Is this the only documentation required?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Oct 12 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

For most of our projects the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager is used to benchmark the building's energy consumption and perform the comparison of energy use intensity against similar characteristics. Within our energy audit report we reference the EAp2 uploaded documents. The EAp2 uploaded documents include the SEP, data verification checklist, and copies of the utility bills.

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant, DCarbon Oct 12 2015 LEEDuser Member 1766 Thumbs Up

Thanks David, however doesn't it seem unclear why the reviewer is asking to provide the Energy Utilization Index since we have used ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager to document EAp2? This was our understanding of the relevant instruction in EAp1 form.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Oct 12 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

Without seeing your completed LEED Online templates or uploaded documents my suspicion is that you did not complete the Preliminary Energy Use Analysis within the ASHRAE Level I Energy Audit correctly.

Here is an excerpt from one of our Preliminary Energy Use Analysis reports:

"The first step to understanding a building’s energy consumption and cost efficiency is to gather and tabulate building information. This information can be used to generate the Energy Utilization Index (EUI) of the building.

The next step is to compare the EUI of the project building to similar buildings located in similar climates. This will allow the project team and building owner to evaluate if the project is above average or below average with respect to energy consumption. Projects that consume more energy than similar buildings should provide more options to reduce energy consumption.

A target EUI must be derived for the project building from a database of similar buildings located within similar climates. More than 50% of the building is designated as office space, and supporting office functions, therefore the online ENERGY STAR® Portfolio Manager has been used to benchmark the facility. The ENERGY SCORE of the project building is 79 (based on SEP generated May 20, 2013 for period ending March 31, 2013). The target Energy Utilization Index was arbitrarily selected by the Energy Auditor. The target EUI was selected to increase the current ENERGY Score up to 84.

Finally a calculation was performed to demonstrate to the owner how much money could be saved each year if the target Energy Utilization Index was achieved by the project team. Costs for electricity has been calculated. (other energy sources – natural gas, fuel oil, purchased chilled water, steam, etc.. - are not supplied to the building). Cost calculations include on-peak, off-peak and demand charges.

The Preliminary Energy Use Analysis performed by this project followed the procedures and forms provided by the “ASHRAE Procedures for Commercial Building Energy Audits 2nd Edition”.

TARGET ENERGY SCORE GENERATION

The Statement of Energy Performance Summary calculated the site Energy Utilization Index of the project building to be 81 kBtu/ft2/year.

The selected target ENERGY SCORE of 84 correlates to a site Energy Utilization Index of 75 kBtu/ft2/year. This would provide an annual reduction of energy consumption by 8% when compared to the current energy consumption.

ANNUAL ENERGY SAVINGS if target score is achieved:

81 kBtu/ft2/year – 75 kBtu/ft2/year = 6 kBtu/ft2/year"

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Tom Liebel Principal Marks, Thomas Architects
Jul 20 2015
LEEDuser Member
58 Thumbs Up

TAB Report and Calculations

Project Location: United States

We have just received a request for additional clarification during our final review of our LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 submission, asking us to confirm the date of our TAB report, and pointing us to the the Calculations section of the Reference Guide where it notes that 'Outdoor air testing generally must occur during the performance period (maximum of 2 years).' Our TAB report was generated during the design phase, just prior to the performance period so we could confirm our calculations prior to the start of the performance period, but within 2 years of the conclusion of the performance period. Is there any way to avoid the creation of another TAB report (and its associated cost) after the fact? Given that we were confirming our baseline condition in close proximity to the performance period to make sure we would be compliant, this appears to meet the intent of the prerequisite language.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jul 20 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

Hello Tom,

EAp1 does not include TAB work (I believe this to be a EQp1 related question).

However what i would do is back-date the performance period for EQp1 to include the date that the TAB was performed. Be sure to include the PM logs for these additional months as well.

Hope this helps!

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Tom Liebel Principal, Marks, Thomas Architects Jul 20 2015 LEEDuser Member 58 Thumbs Up

David, you are correct IEQp1, not EAp1. Our challenge is that I do not believe we have all of the data we would need to extend the performance period back further. But I'll check. Thanks!

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Anna Korinkova
Apr 16 2015
LEEDuser Member
2199 Thumbs Up

Occupancy hours vs. Building Operating Plan

Project Location: Serbia

My question is regarding to operating hours of the building and the Building Operating PlanA general documentation summarizing the intended operation of each base building system described in the systems narrative; the building operating plan may also be known as "Owner's Operating Requirements" or similar. The operating plan includes the time-of-day schedules for each system for each of the eight day types (Monday to Sunday plus holidays), the mode of operation for each system when it is running (occupied vs. unoccupied; day vs. night, etc.), and the desired indoor conditions or setpoints for each schedule or mode. The operating plan accounts for any differences in needs or desired conditions for different portions of the project building, as well as any seasonal variations in operations patterns. The plan accounts for all the monitored space conditions used to control the base systems, i.e., air temperature, relative humidity, occupancy, light level, CO2 levels, room pressurization, duct static pressure, etc. (BOPThe Building Operating Plan (BOP) is a document outlining on-going preventive and/or predictive maintenance and operations protocols for the intended operation of base building systems. ). We filled out "Weekly Operating Hours" in the ENERGY STAR's Portfolio Manager with 8 hrs/day for offices which is the main usage of the building. On the other hand in the BOP we identified that the building is conditioned for its users from 6AM to 8PM (14 hrs/day). The tenant lease agreement describes fixed working hours of 8 hrs/day. In addition, it is allowed for users to come to offices before-hours and to leave after-hours.
I hesitate what should be written in the BOP under operating hours. Does anybody have any experience with this issue? What is the best way how to describe the building operations?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Apr 16 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

Hello Jiri,

The Building Operating PlanA general documentation summarizing the intended operation of each base building system described in the systems narrative; the building operating plan may also be known as "Owner's Operating Requirements" or similar. The operating plan includes the time-of-day schedules for each system for each of the eight day types (Monday to Sunday plus holidays), the mode of operation for each system when it is running (occupied vs. unoccupied; day vs. night, etc.), and the desired indoor conditions or setpoints for each schedule or mode. The operating plan accounts for any differences in needs or desired conditions for different portions of the project building, as well as any seasonal variations in operations patterns. The plan accounts for all the monitored space conditions used to control the base systems, i.e., air temperature, relative humidity, occupancy, light level, CO2 levels, room pressurization, duct static pressure, etc. contains both the occupancy schedule and the equipment run-tim schedule. The occupancy schedule should match what has been entered into the Portfolio Manager. The equipment run-time schedule should match the hours the equipment is in the "occupied" mode. The occupancy schedule and equipment run-time schedule may not always match, this will not trigger a LEED review comment however this is our most common energy conservation measure....to match the equipment's run-time to the building occupancy hours. In your case, the building equipment runs 6 hours every day outside of lease hours.

As for after-hours usage, you can explain the situation within the BOPThe Building Operating Plan (BOP) is a document outlining on-going preventive and/or predictive maintenance and operations protocols for the intended operation of base building systems. . Allowing for after-hours use does not require a revised occupancy schedule. You should also note if after-hours equipment overrides are available to the occupants.

Hope this helps!

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Mathilda Jonsson Environmental Certification Engineer (LEED AP BD+C) Skanska
Jan 28 2015
LEEDuser Member
1329 Thumbs Up

ASHREA audit though newly renovated

Project Location: Sweden

Hello

Five years ago my project building were LEED EB:OM certified and now with new tenants and a renovation taken place we are recertifying. Since the building is renovated with new HVAC system, do we need to do the ASHRAE level 1 and 2 audit? We have commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. reports done recently for this system, could this be enought to show compliance?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jan 28 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

Hello Mathilda,

Recert projects must follow the recertifcation guidance document. It can be downloaded at: http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-existing-buildings-operations-amp-ma...

The Level I walk-through must be performed every five years. If the Level I was performed less than five years ago, but more than two years ago, the original Level I report simply needs to be updated with the current building information.

I do not believe the LEED reviewer would allow the commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. reports to take the place of an ASHRAE Level I report.

Hope this helps!

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Johanna Hendricks
Oct 09 2014
Guest
87 Thumbs Up

Golf Course Clubhouse Certification

Project Location: United States

Hello,

We have a client that has approached us about the possibility of certifying a golf course clubhouse via LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.. I was wondering if anyone else has had past experiences with this and can recommend a route to take for achieving this prerequisite and the points attached to EAc1. It appears that creating an ENERGY STAR portfolio manager account and using the case 2 calculator would work best. However, I am uncertain what to classify the space type as in Portfolio Manager. I am thinking maybe "Entertainment/Public Assembly" seems appropriate. Any advice is appreciated, thanks!

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Oct 09 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

Hi Joanna,

I'd call it Social/Meeting.

Perhaps post this to the EAp2 and EAc1 forums.

good luck!

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Michelle Bracewell-Musson Owner, LEED AP Green Expectations Sustainability Solutions
Aug 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
1665 Thumbs Up

Commissioning Agent or Authority-Difference & Does Size Matter?

Hello,

I have researched, and for some reason have missed the boat when it comes to the difference between a CommissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. Agent and Authority and when (which prerequisites and credits) you must use a third party rather than the on-site contractor. My project is 250,000 sf manufacturing facility and I remember seeing a 50,000 sf minimum, but that may have been in NC and I am doing EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems..
Thank you!

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Aug 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

For EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. projects there are no requirements imposed by LEED as to who can provide commissioing services for EAp1, EAc2.1, and EAc2.2.

The Commissioning Authority is the entity the provides oversight and guidance for the commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. team. The Commissioning Agent is the technician who performs the functional testing. The two descriptions are used interchangeably by project teams though.

Hope this helps!

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James Doyle Owner ConServe
Jun 16 2014
Guest
216 Thumbs Up

EBOM 2009 EAp1 L-9 upload document

The credit template form for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 EAp1 on page 2 requests "Upload L-9. Provide a breakdown of total project building annual energy consumption by major end uses or applications. The end use breakdown may take the form of a data table or a graphical summary."
Question: Is L-9 a form and where do I find an example of the document text that is being requested for upload?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jun 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

L-9 is not a form, rather a place to upload the energy breakdown of the project building. There is an example on page #19 of EAp1's referenced standard "Procedures for Commercial Building Energy Audits" and a more detailed example on page #43 of the standard.

We always use the chart on page #43 to illustrate the energy breakdown.

Hope this helps.

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Shelendra Kumar
Jun 13 2014
Guest
163 Thumbs Up

EA Pr-1, EB O&M

Hi,
my concern is about EA Pr-1, our Energy Score is of 86 (based on performance perios, 12 months data) where minimum required is 75.
A furtehr clarification asked about target index i.e. mentioned below, can you please suggest what would be the target index and how this can eb done?

-----provide a supplement to the EUI analysis that quantifies the potential cost savings that might be realized by enchancing energy efficiency to achieve the target index, as directed by the level I Analysis.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jun 16 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

If your ENERGY STAR score is 86, I'd suggest setting a target of 90. This can be done through the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager.

Based on the EUI associated with the target ES and the energy rates of the project building you will be able to calculate the cost savings if the target is achieved.

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Ilona Johnson, PE, CEM, LEED AP Associate, Lilker EMO Energy Solutions Jun 16 2014 Guest 568 Thumbs Up

Hi Shelendra,
The reviewer also wants to see you quantify the cost savings of your target. If your target is 90, your energy auditor should report the energy consumption and cost savings associated with achieving that target.

Or you can approach the question with an inverse approach. Use the results of the energy audit to identify what would be a reasonable Energy Star target. If the report shows you can reduce energy consumption by xx,000 kWhA kilowatt-hour is a unit of work or energy, measured as 1 kilowatt (1,000 watts) of power expended for 1 hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu. per year, you can evaluate what the impact will be on your Energy Star score. Use the portfolio manager TargetFinder tool.

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Shelendra Kumar Jun 17 2014 Guest 163 Thumbs Up

Thank you your suggestions.....

ya but if i fix the target of 90 so it would be for next year only and via energy manager tool, all details can be produced, i am concerning about award of point. if i will submit the details (with 90 target),....would points be awarded based on my score of 86 (achieved in performance period). please suggest...

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jun 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

LEED points are awarded based upon the current ENERGY STAR score, the target score.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jun 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

"not the target score"

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Omar Delgado Mechanical Engineer EnerMech
Apr 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
340 Thumbs Up

Energy Auditor requirements

Are there any specific requisites for the person performing the energy audit (certifications, experience, etc.)?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Apr 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

No requirements imposed by LEED. However it is recommended the owner impose some requirements of the energy auditor.

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Martha Norbeck President C-Wise Design and Consulting LLC
Jan 29 2014
LEEDuser Member
467 Thumbs Up

Sequence of Operations

Hello LEEDuser forum,
I am doing the documentation for a small building (4,500 sq. ft) with a small mechanical system. I have made my way through the documentation requirements for EAp1, but the Sequence of Operations has me stumped. All the examples I have found are for much larger systems than the one I am working with. Any suggestions?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jan 31 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3877 Thumbs Up

Hi Martha, for smaller / less complex mechanical systems the sequence of operations is typically quite simple. For example:

OCCUPIED
Outside air damper opens, supply fan energizes, heating/cooling cycles to maintain space temperature.
UNOCCUPIED
Supply fan is off, outside air is closed, heating cycles to maintain space setback temperature.

Hope this helps.

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Magda Aghababyan CEO Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd.
Aug 13 2013
LEEDuser Member
1203 Thumbs Up

Question about what to include in systems narrative

Our project only have ventilation, cooling and lighting system from the systems mentioned in the credit description. We have included them and also we added boiler as another system in the systems narrative.

Apart from the above the facility has some machines and I don't see them as a system to include in the narrative. So do you think having ventilation, cooling, lighting and boiler will suffice for systems narrative?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 08 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Magda, you don't give us much information about the machines in your building but I would consider including them in the narrative. It sounds like they might give a more complete picture of the energy systems in the building.

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David Hubka Director of Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jan 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 5309 Thumbs Up

The systems narrative must include heating, cooling, ventilating, lighting, domestic hot water, controls, and onsite renewable systems. This includes both base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). and tenant specific equipment/systems.

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ESD Singapore
Jul 30 2013
LEEDuser Member
623 Thumbs Up

System narrative

Hi all,

I am currently working on a retail mall that starts operating from 10am to 10pm. So it is quite straightforward that the main centralised chilled water plan system starts operating from 10am to 10pm. However, the mall has a small chiller that starts slightly earlier, say 730am to 10am, just to cool down the building spaces before the building starts operating. In my opinion, i think we should be able to omit this "pre-cool" system from the system narrative, building operation plan and sequence of operation. However, is there anyone else with more experience can share with me if they think that the "pre-cool" system should be included into the system narrative, building operation plan and sequence of operation?

Thank you very much on the sharing of views.

Cheers,
YingYing

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Jul 31 2013 LEEDuser Member 2371 Thumbs Up

Hi YingYing

You should definitely include this precool in your systems documentation. It seems like it could be a fairly easy addition, that I see could map to the following documents accordingly:
- Systems narrative: include one sentence similar to what you explained above detailing that there is an X-ton unit that precools the building in the morning.
- Building Operating PlanA general documentation summarizing the intended operation of each base building system described in the systems narrative; the building operating plan may also be known as "Owner's Operating Requirements" or similar. The operating plan includes the time-of-day schedules for each system for each of the eight day types (Monday to Sunday plus holidays), the mode of operation for each system when it is running (occupied vs. unoccupied; day vs. night, etc.), and the desired indoor conditions or setpoints for each schedule or mode. The operating plan accounts for any differences in needs or desired conditions for different portions of the project building, as well as any seasonal variations in operations patterns. The plan accounts for all the monitored space conditions used to control the base systems, i.e., air temperature, relative humidity, occupancy, light level, CO2 levels, room pressurization, duct static pressure, etc.: Using the BOPThe Building Operating Plan (BOP) is a document outlining on-going preventive and/or predictive maintenance and operations protocols for the intended operation of base building systems. template on LEEDuser, modify it to include one line for the main chillers operating schedule and another line for the start-up chiller operating schedule
- Sequence of Ops: you only have to include two system excerpts here, so you don't necessarily have to include chillers in your documentation. But if you do, format your sequence of ops to start when the building starts. In other words, include a sentence at the beginning that states something along the lines of "A small chiller precools the building at 7AM, prior to the main building chillers that go on at 10AM"

And be sure to also include these chillers in your preventative maintenance plan.

Hope this helps

Hannah

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Kendrick Stalnaker
Jul 18 2013
Guest
120 Thumbs Up

Systems Narrative

For the systems narrative I have the rooftop unit operations broken down as well as the variable air volume boxes. Are these considered part of the same system or do they count as two different systems?

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Jul 31 2013 LEEDuser Member 2371 Thumbs Up

Hi Kendrick

You can lump these two systems under a general title like HVAC or Ventilation.

Thanks

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Lucy Williams Principal Lucy C. Williams, Architect
May 24 2013
LEEDuser Member
702 Thumbs Up

EAp 1 Performance Period

I am working on an international facility that is pursuing LEED-EB. We initially kicked-off the commissioningThe process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. process in November of 2011 with reports delivered by the Retro-Commissioning Agent in February of 2012. The findings of the commissioning report and related benchmarking were that the facility was performing very inefficiently; we were performing 30% below similar office buildings in the region and LEED requires a facility to operate 19% below the benchmark as a minimum, thus we had a 50% gap to make-up. The prerequisite was not met and we had a long way to go. The infrastructure of the facility appears to have been neglected for quite a long time, and thus the findings were enlightening. We have been working to implement major energy savings measures and investing in the facility infrastructure to correct the issues; we have improved by +/- 20% to date. However, as these are large-scale improvements with substantial financial cost, the timeline is looking as though it will exceed the 24 months from when we kicked-off commissioning. We do not anticipate being ready to submit until spring of next year based on the installation of a new building automation system, replacement of chillers and a few other major projects that require time and capital. By that time, our time clock will have been running from November 2011 until April or so in 2014, resulting in 30+ months. The LEED Reference Guide states the Performance Period cannot exceed 24 months. Will the Owner have to re-commission the facility and start all over, which would be very expensive, or has anyone had the experience of working with the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). to extend a Performance Period timeline, so all of our hard work is not lost? If we can meet the prerequisite by next spring, that is a pretty great achievement to reduce a building's energy by 50% in 30 months. I would hate to see the Owner penalized for taking the time to invest properly in their facility. Please advise if you have encountered a similar scenario or can offer any advice. Thank you!

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Katherine Carlin May 28 2013 Guest 664 Thumbs Up

Hi Lucy, I've been reading up on performance periods for LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. here: http://www.leeduser.com/topic/performance-period. The short of it is that you can toll the EAp2 performance period at your discretion so long as it is 12 continuous months AND all of your other performance periods end within a thirty day window of the end of the EAp2 period. I am new to this as well, so please don't take my word for it. Instead refer to that link I posted for you above; it should clear this up for you.

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Ilona Johnson, PE, CEM, LEED AP Associate, Lilker EMO Energy Solutions May 09 2014 Guest 568 Thumbs Up

Lucy,
Have you considered the pilot alternative compliance path? Buildings with poor energy performance can earn the prerequisite by reducing their energy consumption 20%. Refer to: http://www.leeduser.com/credit/EBOM-2009/EApc67

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Indochine Engineering Vietnam Ltd Indochine Engineering Vietnam Ltd
Jan 16 2013
Guest
724 Thumbs Up

Enery audit level 1 and 2 for factory project

Our project is a Factory in Vietnam and the client wants to persue LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.. However, we are encountering some difficulties during conducting energy audit in EA p1 and EA c2.1.

QUESTION 1: LEED EBOM is applicable to existing buildings of all kind but requires to follow ASHRAE Procedure for Commercial Building Energy Audits. So, was there any possibility if my factory would adhere to the ASHREA guide. If it would not, what reference source can we refer to?. In general, with regard of other buildings which are not commercial (ex. residential buildings) can we still use ASHRAE ?

QUESTION 2: in PEA stage, when comparing to EUI and ECI of the building with similar charactestics, we figured out that it is nearly impossible to find the information of the similar factory in Vietnam due to the absence of statistic from authority body. Therefore, can we compare to the US building from suggested sources in LEED EBOM ?

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Jan 30 2013 LEEDuser Member 2371 Thumbs Up

Hello

For Question 1: Yes, you can still use the ASHRAE Procedure for Commercial Building Energy Audits if your project is located in Vietnam.

Fore Questions 2: This is a little trickier, but you have some options for comparison:
1. If you own similar buildings, you could compare these buildings to your project, normalizing for things like occupants and hours of operation.
2. You can use ENERGY STAR to benchmark your building. To do this, you will need to classify the predominate space type as "Other." Additionally, you will need to select the nearest city - I just checked on ENERGY STAR and Hanoi is listed in their database.

Regardless of your approach for Question 2, I think the most important part is to explain your reasoning and rationale within the Energy Audit report.

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Indochine Engineering Vietnam Ltd Indochine Engineering Vietnam Ltd Feb 26 2013 Guest 724 Thumbs Up

Thank you Hannah, your guidance is so helpful. I used ENERGY STAR portfolio manager but the project is ineliglible to receive rating because of its type building. However, after I updated historical bill of electricity and LPG, my portfolio displayed the several results in "Change from baseline" column. I would like to ask:

1/Will the numbers in "Change from baseline" column be the proposed EUI saving for the project? if yes, which one can I use among "Change from baseline: energy use intensity", "-adjusted energy use intensity" and "-porfolio adjusted percent energy use"?.

2/I also generated the Statement of Energy Performance in which it illustrates the default number of National median site/source EUI for "Other" type. So is it another way to calculate the EUI saving? Many thanks!

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Mar 23 2013 LEEDuser Member 2371 Thumbs Up

Hi

Glad I could help. Here is some additional follow up regarding your questions:

1. The "Change from Baseline" column is just a column indicating how your building's performance has changed due to updated in ENERGY STAR. So, if you provide updated energy data, updated space data, or revise data entries, this column will also change as your EUI changes to reflect these updates. This is not intended to be used for the proposed EUI savings.

2. The Statement of Energy Performance does indeed show the default number for National Median energy. This is useful because it shows the "average" for building types.

What I would do to calculate the proposed EUI savings is determine how many ENERGY STAR points you'd like to improve to, and then calculate the energy savings required to get there. For example, if your project currently has a rating of 75 in ENERGY STAR, what amount of energy savings are required to improve the score to a 78? This would be your proposed EUI savings.

Thanks

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ESD Singapore Apr 03 2013 LEEDuser Member 623 Thumbs Up

Hi Hannah,

Pardon me as i am a new user for Energy Star Portfolio manager.
1) How can i check if Singapore is qualified for Energy Star rating?
2) Since Singapore is not a 4 season country, are we still qualified for Energy Star? We are considering which compliance path is easier for the Singapore project to justify for the Energy efficiency for EAP2 and EAC1. However, reading through the way how Energy star rates the building, i was wondering would it still be relevant for a Singapore project to apply for Energy Star when it has to be compared against the similiar types of buildings in US (a 4 season country)? Will it be still accepatable for USGBC?

Looking forward to your advice.

Thank you so much!

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Apr 03 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6187 Thumbs Up

It's a good question and yes, international buildings that are made up of a ratable space type (i.e. office space) can still get an ENERGY STAR rating and have to pursue Case 1 for EAp2/EAc1. See eligible space types here http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=eligibility.bus_portfoliomanager_e... and also see related FAQ and discussion threads under EAp2 on LEED User.

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ESD Singapore Apr 10 2013 LEEDuser Member 623 Thumbs Up

Hi Ben,

That reply is really helpful and glad that I can still use energy star rating for Singapore projects. However, the project i am dealing with is a retail mall with a portion office spaces and a supermarket within the entire mall, does energy star rate this type of building? How should i go about if it is like a mixed use type of building like this?

Thank you for the response.

Cheers.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Apr 10 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6187 Thumbs Up

Retail malls are not eligible for an ENERGY STAR rating and so your project should follow Case 2 and use the EAp2 Case 2 calculator, likely applying Option 2B - Historic Data or Option 2C - Historic Data plus Comparable Buildings.

But, you will still need to use ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager to track the building energy use over time and generate the building's source energySource energy is the total amount of raw fuel required to operate a building; it incorporates all transmission, delivery, and production losses for a complete assessment of a building's energy use. use intensity to use for benchmarking on the Case 2 calculator.

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Apr 11 2013 LEEDuser Expert 10502 Thumbs Up

I'm working on a project very similar to this one and wanted to clarify an element of Ben's response. Because CBECSThe Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. CBECS data is used in LEED energy credits. has national average source EUI data for both malls and supermarkets (in addition to offices), it is my understanding that you would be required to use Option 2A within the Case 2 calculator; Options 2B or 2C would not be available. Option 2A allows you to benchmark against a virtual building with the same space types in the same ratios as your building, but using the CBECS national average SEUIs. I don't think 2B or 2C would come into play unless there was something wholly unique about the building. Perhaps I've misunderstood the situation but that's my take on it.

Hope that helps,

Dan

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Nena Elise
Oct 18 2012
LEEDuser Member
5089 Thumbs Up

Best Timing for ASHRAE Audit?

What is the best timing for the ASHRAE Level I walkthrough audit? We have our energy star label already, are working on getting our tracking in place for the other credits. We have just sent out our transportation and occupant comfort survey. We are getting ready to complete our ASHRAE calcuations and measurments for IEQ p1. Should we wait till we have done our calcs and measurments for IEQ p1 and/or have all our other credits ready to begin tracking? Or is it good the get the Audit done early? Would love any tips!! Many thanks!

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David Hubka Director of Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Oct 18 2012 LEEDuser Expert 5309 Thumbs Up

It is advantageous to perform the audit earlier rather than later in the process towards LEED Certification. No-cost / Low-cost energy conservation measures identified by the audit can then be implemented by the project team during the performance period thus helping to improve the energy score, and contributing to EAc2.2.

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Ashley Chiang Sustainability and Climate Analyst UC Merced
Sep 07 2012
Guest
220 Thumbs Up

Clarification: Portfolio Manager - Energy Audit

Most University buildings are not eligible for Energy Star Ratings. Since P2 says that I need to conduct an "Energy Audit" isn't that covered in my P1 when I get an ASHRAE level 1 or 2?

My main question is for those who are not eligible for Energy Star Ratings, Is P1 and P2 practically the same thing if I have to conduct an "Energy Audit" since I cannot be Energy Star Rated? (AKA ASHRAE Level 1 Energy audit)

Also if I can show 21% reduction for Credit 1 that means I automatically should be fine for P1 and P2?

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Kay Sieck LEED-AP O&M Spokane Convention Center & INB Performing Arts Center Spokane Public Facilities District
Jul 16 2012
Guest
424 Thumbs Up

Level 1 audit

We are just completing our first in-house audit, I am still fairly new to LEED as an AP, would anyone be willing to share a completed Level one audit with me. I just want to make sure I have it correct before I submit. This is my last credit to finish......
Thanks!!

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David Hubka Director of Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Aug 16 2012 LEEDuser Expert 5309 Thumbs Up

I have one if you are still interested, my e-mail is dave.hubka@transwestern.net

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Jessica Long Commercial Portfolio Coordinator The JBG Companies
May 22 2012
LEEDuser Member
134 Thumbs Up

Energy Usage Breakdown

The book states that 24 hour load profiling data is "available from the utility company"? Is this a valid way to back into the total load usage data? And if so has anyone had success at getting this information from the utility?

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Steve Loppnow Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jun 19 2012 LEEDuser Expert 3308 Thumbs Up

It really depends on what is available from the utility. If this information is available from the utility in a form that is relatively easy to process and summarize on an annual basis, it certainly can be used to establish the energy use breakdown for the year. Some utilities may not have this information available. Others may provide an excessive amount of data to reasonably process and summarize. I unfortunately can't give you direction on how to get access to this information from the utility but would check with your account rep. and see what is available.

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Julia Kraege Project Manager
Mar 19 2012
LEEDuser Member
226 Thumbs Up

Demand in Energy Use Analysis

Hello, we are currently confused regarding the distinction between consumption and demand within the total energy cost saving calculation. All our investigations were based on the actual metered consumption. Does the distinction in the Reference Guide mean that seperate, theoretical demand calculations are required or does the demand just stands for the projected energy cost savings?
It would be nice to receive some clarification, Thank you

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Mar 19 2012 LEEDuser Expert 9419 Thumbs Up

Julia, Most utilities have two separate charges for electricity....one for demand charges (kW), and one for consumption charges (kWhA kilowatt-hour is a unit of work or energy, measured as 1 kilowatt (1,000 watts) of power expended for 1 hour. One kWh is equivalent to 3,412 Btu.). The LEED requirement makes you consider any cost savings associated with both reduced demand and reduced consumption, as you can't accurately calculate payback without consider all sources of cost savings.

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Joey Jiao Apr 09 2012 Guest 201 Thumbs Up

Hi, Jenny, for the 25% process cost , how should we calculation the Process cost if a building with demand charges?
Assume one building that the demand charges is 1$/year and the consumption charges is 3$/year, should I must get a 1$/year from consumption charges as process load if I use the 25% rule?
Thank you so much.

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matthew strong
Feb 28 2012
Guest
408 Thumbs Up

EAp1 Review Comments

We recently received review comments asking us to list energy demand savings and maintenance cost savings for our EEMs. The ASHRAE Assessment was conducted by another firm and only includes estimated energy consumption and associated cost savings for the EEMs. Are estimated demand savings/maintenance cost savings within the scope of an ASHRAE Level I Audit and is this something that reviewers should be asking for? Thanks!

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Mar 19 2012 LEEDuser Expert 9419 Thumbs Up

Hi Matthew, In my experience this is really standardly required by reviewers. The credit form includes a a checkbox near the bottom explicitly stipulating that all ECMS must be analyzed for energy consumption, energy demand, costs savings for each and overall, and maintenance cost savings.

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Paola Figueiredo, Newton Figueiredo SustentaX
Aug 09 2011
Guest
1182 Thumbs Up

EA credit 3.2 & EA Pre-requisite 1- Submetering

Please,
We are not pursuing the credit EA - 3.2 - System Level Metering, therefore how can we estimate a project energy consumption divided by categories (for EA Pre-Requisite 1) if it doesn't have submeters installed on? Should we estimate these measures, having the equipment consumption (by categories) as basis?

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