EBOM-2009 EAp2: Minimum Energy Efficiency Performance

  • EBOM EAp2 Action Steps Diagram
  • How energy-efficient is your building?

    How energy-efficient is your project building compared with the national average for similar building types? If your project building is already performing well, you may only need to document that performance in order to meet the prerequisite. If your building is relatively inefficient, on the other hand, may have to make operational changes or capital investments to make some improvements. Project teams with underperforming buildings may start by performing an energy audit to identify areas of waste, and the best opportunities for improving efficiency. There are a number of federal and regional programs that offer rebates or other financial incentives for energy upgrades, so capital investments may see relatively fast paybacks.

    Portfolio Manager screenshotAccessing the Energy Star Portfolio Manager website.

    Use Energy Star Portfolio Manager

    All project teams are required to use EPA’s Energy Star Portfolio Manager to track a minimum 12 months of data for all energy consumption. The data are then benchmarked based on source Energy Use Intensity (EUI) to show compliance. Source EUI incorporates efficiency factors into an analysis of the total amount of raw fuel (or “source energy”) used to operate the building, rather than using the more limited measure of site energy, which reflects the amount of utility heat and electricity consumed at the building. Most buildings will benchmark through Energy Star and document the prerequisite through Case 1. Those not eligible for an Energy Star rating will use summary data generated in Portfolio Manager in conjunction with protocols provided by USGBC to complete benchmarking calculations and document the prerequisite and credit through Case 2.   

    Eligible building types

    Thirteen building space types are eligible for Energy Star ratings. Typically, if at least 50% of the building’s gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) (excluding parking lots and garages) is classified as one of the following space types, the project is eligible and must use Case 1:

    • bank or financial institution
    • courthouse
    • data center
    • dormitory
    • hospital
    • hotel (upper upscale, upscale, midscale with food and beverage, midscale without food and beverage, and economy and budget properties)
    • K–12 school
    • medical office
    • office
    • retail store
    • supermarket or grocery store
    • warehouse (refrigerated and nonrefrigerated)
    • wastewater treatment plant

    To ensure national comparability, climate data is used to normalize energy consumption to compare the project building to similar buildings in similar climate zones, eliminating potential regional variations. However, it may be easier in certain regions to improve a building’s efficiency based on city or state policies. For example, savings achieved through energy-efficiency improvements may qualify your project for state and local utility incentive programs. Ask local utility providers about incentives and rebate programs.

  • FAQs for LEED-EBOM EAp2 and EAc1

    Our building includes a large laboratory space. Can our project benchmark under the Labs21 program?

    The updated Case 2 calculator (see resources section) uses Labs21 to facilitate benchmarking for buildings with laboratory spaces. The calculator includes specific directions to walk you through the process.

    We have an international project and the space type is eligible for an Energy Star rating. Can we pursue Case 1 to demonstrate compliance given the recently released alternative compliance paths for international projects?

    Yes, international projects that are comprised of ratable space under Energy Star must still pursue the EAp2/EAc1 via Case 1.

    We have a number of buildings on a single campus that we would like to certify at the same time. Is it possible to benchmark the buildings at the campus level?

    Generally, it is not possible to benchmark multiple buildings as a single entity on Portfolio Manager for Case 1 or for Case 2. Each building must be separately benchmarked as a standalone entity according to either Case 1 or Case 2 depending on the space type associated with each building. USGBC’s Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Projects is a good resource to reference in this type of scenario.

    I have a mixed-use building and am wondering if it is possible to pursue the prerequisite through Case 1. How do we proceed?

    The first step is to enter the building and associated space characteristics on Portfolio Manager to see if the building is eligible for an Energy Star rating. If it is, you go with Case 1 and if not, go to the Case 2 calculator. Energy Star has published additional guidance for mixed-use buildings that is a great resource in this circumstance.

    We have a building that consists of two attached structures and it’s unclear if we have to consider it a single building or if it should be certified as two separate buildings and benchmarked accordingly. How should we proceed?

    In this case it is a good idea to (1) reach out to Energy Star directly to determine if the structures should be benchmarked as a single building or two and then (2) reference the LEED Supplemental Guidance to the Minimum Program Requirements. If it is still unclear after those two steps are taken, it’s also a good idea to communicate with USGBC directly to confirm the best approach.

    How long is an Energy Star label valid to use with a streamlined approach for Case 1?

    In order to use an Energy Star label for the streamlined path, the Label must have been awarded within 12 months of the LEED application submittal date. For example, if you receive label award notification from Energy Star on March 5, 2012, you can use the score associated with the label as long as you submit your application to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). on or before March 5, 2013.

    Our building includes heavy process loads that significantly increase the overall energy use in the building. If we submeter these loads, can we exclude this energy use for benchmarking purposes?

    Process loads generally may not be excluded from the building’s energy use for benchmarking purposes. However, depending on the appropriate compliance path, you may be able to normalize the energy use from process loads based on the relative activity level of the building operations. For example, if the building is a manufacturing facility, part of the benchmarking process will involve normalizing energy use based on the relative output of the facility. Use of CIRs in the case of special benchmarking for buildings with process loads is recommended.

    We have installed submeters on our building but the utility bill includes energy use from several other buildings located on the same campus. How do we reconcile this during the LEED review process?

    For the LEED submission, provide a summary of submetered energy use for the project building along with the utility bills for the campus. Include a narrative summarizing the sub-metering approach and explaining the difference between the utility bills and the submetered energy use data included on Portfolio Manager, which commonly includes a spreadsheet showing the deductions from the total consumption used to show the energy attributable to the project, or how submeter readings for each separate entity add up to the whole reflected in the utility bills.

    When is it possible to exclude up to 10% of the building from EAp2?

    If you have a space that is submetered, is under separate management, and does not support the typical operations of the remaining portions of the building, this space may be excluded from the prerequisite.

    What do I do if the number of building occupants, operating hours, or vacant space changes during the performance period?

    When applicable variables change during the performance period, these changes must be recorded on Portfolio Manager to ensure accurate benchmarking of the building. When making updates to the space characteristics on Portfolio Manager, make sure to select “update” rather than “correct” and note the date when the updated space characteristic was first true. By selecting “update” the change in the building characteristic is only counted for the appropriate portion of the performance period rather than the whole thing. For example if 20% of the building space becomes vacant half way through the performance period, update the vacant space on Portfolio Manager so that the building was 100% occupied for half of the performance period and 80% occupied for the other half. In these circumstances, it is a good idea to provide a copy of the “Revision History” for affected spaces along with the prerequisite submittal.

    If you pursue the streamlined path for an Energy Star label, should the performance period for EAc6 match the 12-month time frame of the label?

    For EAc6, the performance period should fall within 30 days of the latest performance period end date for all other credits and prerequisites. It should not follow the period of the Energy Star label associated with the streamlined path for EAp2.

    How do I account for computers with multiple monitors on Portfolio Manager?

    The number of monitors in the building does not impact the number of computers entered into Portfolio Manager. The value for computers should reflect the total number of personal computers and servers in the office space. For example, if the office space includes 10 PCs, 5 laptops, and 25 monitors, the input for Portfolio Manager is 15 PCs.

    How should I treat vacant space on Portfolio Manager?

    For office buildings, if the vacant space is greater than 10% of the building area use the following guidance as indicated in the USGBC Reduced Occupancy Guidance document. For all other space types, no other changes are required for this credit.

    • Completely vacant or unused space must be entered separately from fully occupied or partially occupied space.
    • Completely vacant or unused space must be entered with zero workers, zero operation hours (even if the space is conditioned), and zero personal computers.
    • Fully occupied and partially occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space. are entered using normal procedures.
    • If occupancy conditions change over time during the performance period, average occupancy levels of all spaces must be kept up to date in Portfolio Manager.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

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  • Assess current performance and Energy Star eligibility. Benchmark current performance based on the option that applies to the project building. Make operational improvements or equipment upgrades to meet minimum energy performance requirements.


  • Benchmarking can typically be managed by in-house staff, reducing capital investment.


  • Review “15 O&M Best Practices for Energy-Efficient Buildings,” a helpful document published by Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. (PECI) to assist facility managers and building owners with basic energy-efficiency issues.


  • Provide building operators with access to BOMA’s BEEP (Building Energy Efficiency Program) training webinars to maintain regular and effective training for personnel responsible for daily building operations.


  • Collect energy metering data for a minimum period of the most recent twelve months.


  • Portfolio Manager Quality Control using graphingBe sure that information is copied accurately from utility bills, including start and end dates of the statement period, and that you are using actual meter readings as opposed to estimated readings whenever possible. Replace estimated meter readings with actual meter readings once those statements are received. Exporting data inputs from Energy Star and graphing the utility data can help uncover data entry errors through visual comparison.


  • Energy Star requires precise data to describe the different space types in the building, including the square footage, number of occupants and computers, and other characteristics of daily operations. Careful inventory of these variables will result in a more accurate rating.


  • Energy metering data may be excluded for up to 10% of the building’s gross floor area if that space is sub-metered and used for an independent purpose unrelated to typical business operations, such as a cafeteria; or used as a computer data center.


  • LEED defers to Energy Star practices and standards to generate a Portfolio Manager rating or score. Where questions arise regarding this score, review Energy Star technical guidance documents and contact Energy Star customer service to facilitate the process.


  • If you initially get a low Energy Star score, start your process by identifying no- and low-cost operational changes to reduce energy consumption. If your building is an energy hog, it’s more likely that these opportunities will exist, and focusing on them to start with will help you go the distance. For instance, simply changing heating and cooling set points by one or two degrees and getting into the practice of turning off lights and office equipment when not in use will have dramatic effects on overall building energy use.


  • Building owners can reduce overall operating costs by optimizing energy performance; many operational energy-efficiency improvements will provide instant or short-term paybacks.


  • Pursuing commissioning through EAc2 will help identify energy-efficiency improvements, and will pay off particularly well in inefficient buildings.


  • Many state and federal agencies offer rebates or other financial incentives to companies that undertake energy-efficiency initiatives.


  • For building types covered by Energy Star but located outside the U.S., use Case 1. Portfolio Manager proivdes a list of non-U.S. locations, but it is not complete. If the location for an international project is not listed, consult ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Appendices B and B to determine a comparable U.S. city.

During the Performance Period

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  • Continue entering monthly metering data into Portfolio Manager to update the building data.


  • Closely monitor energy consumption and correct any conditions contributing to energy waste.


  • Track any changes in occupancy or space uses, if any, to adjust Portfolio Manager inputs accordingly.


  • Expect no costs for in-house calculations or tracking and minimal costs when using a consultant to complete calculations using provided data.


  • Case 1: Projects Eligible for Energy Star Rating


  • Provide documentation of the Energy Star rating or certificate award from the EPA.


  • You must generate an Energy Star score if the building type is listed as an eligible space in Portfolio Manager. Case 2 is not allowed for buildings eligible for Energy Star.


  • Case 2, Option 1: Adjusted Benchmark Score

     


  • Complete the EAp2/EAc1 Case 2 Calculator to demonstrate the building’s level of energy efficiency.


  • Use figures generated in Portfolio Manager to complete the EAp2/EAc1 Case 2 Calculator spreadsheet.


  • If the building type is listed in Portfolio Manager, but is not eligible for an Energy Star score, then you will most likely be able to use the Option 1 of the EAp2/EAc1 Case 2 Calculator. Complete the “Eligibility” Tab of the Option EAp2/EAc1 Case 2 Calculator to confirm which option you should use.


  • Case 2, Option 2: Alternative Score


  • Provide one of the following data summaries:

    • C1: Streamlined Baseline – Use the weather-normalized source EUI value generated in Portfolio Manager to determine whether the project building meets the minimum requirements.
    • C2: Energy Baseline Including Historical Data – Add at least three consecutive years of historical energy use data into Portfolio Manager to determine the EUI for each year.
    • C3: Energy Baseline Including Historical Data plus Comparable Buildings – In addition to data entered for Option C2, provide energy use data for at least three other buildings with similar uses in order to establish the “average energy performance of a similar building in a similar climate.”

  • If determining the Energy Baseline Including Historical Data, the three years of data must fall within six years of the beginning of the performance period.


  • If the project building type is not listed in Portfolio Manager, and more than 10% of the building space must be entered into Portfolio Manager as “other,” then you will most likely need to use the Option C calculator. Complete the “Eligibility” Tab of the EAp2/EAc1 Case 2 Calculator to confirm which option you should use.


  • Industry reports may provide useful benchmarking comparisons and eliminate the need for you to locate three comparable buildings on your own. The International Facility Management Association (IFMA) publishes benchmarking reports that are available on its website.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    EA Prerequisite 2: Minimum energy efficiency performance

    Required

    Intent

    To establish the minimum level of operating energy efficiency performance relative to typical buildings of similar type to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.

    Requirements

    Case 1. Projects eligible for Energy Star rating

    For buildings eligible to receive an energy performance rating using the EPA’s ENERGY STAR® Portfolio Manager tool, achieve an energy performance rating of at least 69. If the building is eligible for an energy performance rating using Portfolio Manager, Option 1 must be used.

    Have energy meters that measure all energy use throughout the performance period of all buildings to be certified. Each building’s energy performance must be based on actual metered energy consumption for the LEED project building(s). A full 12 months of continuous measured energy data is required.

    Calibrate meters within the manufacturer’s recommended interval if the building owner, management organization or tenant owns the meter. Meters owned by third parties (e.g., utilities or governments) are exempt.

    Case 2. Projects not eligible for Energy Star rating

    For buildings with a primary space type not eligible to receive an energy performance rating using Portfolio Manager, comply with 1 of the following:

    Option 1. Adjusted benchmark score

    Demonstrate energy efficiency performance that is better than 69% of similar buildings (69th percentile or better) by benchmarking against national source energySource energy is the total amount of raw fuel required to operate a building; it incorporates all transmission, delivery, and production losses for a complete assessment of a building's energy use. data provided in the Portfolio Manager tool as an alternative to energy performance ratings. Projects outside the U.S. may use a local benchmark based on source energy from their country's national or regional energy agency. Follow the detailed instructions in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

    OR

    Option 2. Alternative score

    Demonstrate energy efficiency performance by determining an alternative rating score using the Portfolio Manager tool to report the building's energy use data from the performance period. Follow the detailed instructions in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition.

    Option 2a. Streamlined baseline (Eap2 only – 0 points)

    Enter energy use data during the performance period for at least 1 year into Portfolio Manager to determine the “weather-normalized source energy intensity”. Use this value in the offline calculator to determine the percent reduction from the streamlined baseline.

    Option 2b. Energy baseline including historical data (up to 9 points in Eac1)

    Enter at least 3 consecutive years of historical energy use data into Portfolio Manager in addition to the current year’s data to determine the “weather-normalized source energy intensity” for each year. Use these values in the offline calculator to determine a baseline using the historical energy use data of the project building.

    Option 2c. Energy baseline including historical data plus comparable buildings (up to 18 points in Eac1)

    In addition to the historical data used in Option 2b, provide energy use data for at least 3 other buildings with similar uses over at least a 2-year period to determine the “average energy performance of a similar building” in Portfolio Manager. Enter this data into the offline calculator.

    AND

    Achieve energy efficiency performance better than the minimum requirements listed above; points are awarded according to the table below.

    Have energy meters that measure all energy use throughout the performance period of all buildings to be certified. Each building’s energy performance must be based on actual metered energy consumption for both the LEED project and all comparable buildings used for the benchmark. A full 12 months of continuous measured energy data is required.

    Calibrate meters within the manufacturer’s recommended interval if the building owner, management organization or tenant owns the meter. Meters owned by third parties (e.g., utilities or governments) are exempt.

    Use the Portfolio Manager tool available on the ENERGY STAR website to benchmark the project even if it is not eligible for an EPA rating: http://www.energystar.gov/benchmark.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Pilot Alternative Compliance Path Available

    This credit has an alternative compliance path available for the use of ISO 50001: Energy Management Systems. For more information see Pilot ACP 86: LEED 2009 EBOM ACPs for ISO 50001.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Existing building commissioning and energy audits will help identify areas of building operations that are not efficient. Implement energy-efficient retrofits and energy-saving techniques to reduce the building’s energy use. Energy-efficient equipment such as office equipment, maintenance equipment and appliances will aid in the reduction of energy waste. Employ the use of meters on major mechanical systems to effectively monitor the energy consumption of each.

    In addition to efficiency improvements, consider renewable energy options as a way to minimize the building’s environmental impact.

Technical Guides

EPA’s Energy Star Portfolio Manager

EPA's system for helping you track and improve energy efficiency across your entire portfolio of buildings.


2010 Professional Engineer

A helpful guide for use of Portfolio Manager to track energy utility data.


PECI’s 15 Operations & Management Best Practices for Energy-Efficient Buildings

A helpful guide to assist facility managers with best practices for common energy-efficiency issues.


Treatment of Distric or Campus Thermal Energy in LEED v2 and LEED 2009 (Updated August 13, 2010)

Required reference document for DES systems in LEED energy credits.

Web Tools

Portfolio Manager Eligibility Guidelines

Portfolio Manager explains the eligibility requirements for tracking and benchmarking energy use over time in commercial and institutional buildings.


USGBC LEED EB:O&M 2009, EAp2 and EAc1 Case 2 Calculator

Calculator for LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems., optimizing energy efficiency performance.


International Facility Management Association (IFMA)

IFMAInternational Facility Management Association is the largest international facilities managers' organization.


BOMA Energy Efficiency Program (BEEP)

The Building Owners and Managers Association International (BOMA) has a program called BOMA Energy Efficiency Program (BEEP). BEEP


Energy Star Training

ENERGY STAR offers free online training to help you improve the energy performance of your organization.

Organizations

American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)

ASHRAE publishes widely used standards and publishes the ASHRAE Journal.

LEED Gold Project Documentation

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of EAp2 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

Portfolio Manager

Case 1: Projects Eligible for an Energy Star Rating

Provide documentation of the Energy Star rating or certificate award from the EPA.

Sample LEED Online Form

This annotated sample of the LEED Online form demonstrates how to document EAp2 and EAc1.

LEED Online Forms: EBOM-2009 EA

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

514 Comments

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Eric Johnson Principal Sustainability Project and Cost Manager, Green Future Now Mar 12 2013 LEEDuser Member 5067 Thumbs Up

Stefanie,
Energy Star accounts for differences in weather via HDD and CDDA measure of how hot a location was over a period of time, relative to a base temperature. In this report, the base temperature is 65 degrees Fahrenheit, and the period of time is one year. The cooling degree-day is the difference between that day's average temperature and 65 degrees if the daily average is greater than 65; it is zero if the daily average temperature is less than or equal to 65. Cooling degree-days for a year are the sum of the daily cooling degree-days for that year..
"HDD and CDD are common measures that reflect the heating and cooling requirement of a building, relative to the average temperature. These variables are included in the EPA regression analysis. By including these variables in the regression analysis, EPA can estimate adjustments to reflect the typical relationship between HDD and energy intensityThe ratio of consumption to unit of measurement (floorspace, number of workers, etc.) Energy intensity is usually given on an aggregate basis, as the ratio of the total consumption for a set of buildings to the total floorspace in those buildings. Conditional energy intensity and gross energy intensity are presented. The energy intensity can also be computed for individual buildings. and between CDD and energy intensity. In most rating models, HDD and CDD are determined to have statistically significant impacts on energy use. Therefore, they are included and adjusted for in EPA ratings."
While using Energy Star to benchmark the energy performance of buildings isn't perfect; it is currently the most robust and statistically valid method I've seen. If you look through the data at the link I sent and compare it to CBECSThe Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. CBECS data is used in LEED energy credits. you'll understand.

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Eric Johnson Principal Sustainability Project and Cost Manager, Green Future Now Mar 12 2013 LEEDuser Member 5067 Thumbs Up

Stefanie,
If you want to compare your building to the education buildings listed in EPA-NR Survey: National context and need for instruments May 2005 (I'm not sure how or what this number includes; see page 3) the average Finnish education building uses 229 kWhm2.

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Stefanie Hoffmann HAAGA HELIA OY Ab Mar 13 2013 Guest 424 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your quick reply, Eric!

the regression analysis itself makes sense to me. Just the fact that Portfolio Manager then uses the results to compare it to U.S. buildings is confusing in my eyes since EAp2 requires the comparison to the NATIONAL average.

Anyways, I'll try to figure out a way to use a local benchmark.

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Eric Johnson Principal Sustainability Project and Cost Manager, Green Future Now Mar 13 2013 LEEDuser Member 5067 Thumbs Up

Stefanie,
You might try Timo Rintala at the Finland GBC who is a member of the LEED International Roundtable and is trying to solve these sorts of issues.

If you manage to find a good source of EU wide building energy usage information please post a link to it.

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Stefanie Hoffmann HAAGA HELIA OY Ab Mar 13 2013 Guest 424 Thumbs Up

I contacted someone from FIGBC a couple of weeks ago but he couldn't help. But thank you for the hint. I'll get in touch with Timo.

And sure, as soon as I find useful information, I'll post it here!

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Ravi Bajaj Education Manager, San Diego Green Building Council Apr 02 2013 Guest 131 Thumbs Up

Stefanie, Eric,
This is always such a complex aspect for LEED for Existing Buildings projects not eligible for the conventional Energy Star score (or National Energy Performance Rating). Fortunately, it is to a project's own benefit to understand the best possible benchmark with which to compare your building. In my minimal international project experience, I can offer the two notes below:
- Regarding the space type you have: if 70% of your space type is "Education", you should also include the gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. for any "ancillary support areas" (storage, admin, lobby, office, etc) under the "Education" space type. You should split other space types out only if they do not directly support the Education function, or if there is at least a 10% difference in operating hours in any enclosed spaces.

- For international projects, the two compliance paths for this prerequisite are listed in the LEED ACP (or Alternative Compliance Paths for Projects Outside the US):
1 - Benchmark against any national energy data (if available)
2 - Compile source energySource energy is the total amount of raw fuel required to operate a building; it incorporates all transmission, delivery, and production losses for a complete assessment of a building's energy use. data for at least three comparable buildings, and demonstrate energy efficiency at least 19% better than this baseline
3 - there exists a pilot credit called "Energy Jumpstart" that allows you to create an energy baseline using 5 years historical data, against which you must demonstrate energy efficiency improvements.

Hope this helps, and please feel free to email me (ravi@usgbc-sd.org) for any clarifications or anything. Seems like Eric is also a great resource for international work as well.

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Emilio Rovira Sustainability Planner DoD US Marine Corps
Nov 19 2012
Guest
160 Thumbs Up

Pool Complex EAp2

We have a 7,000 sq ft. LEED NC building which is now in the beginning phases of attempting LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. and Guiding Principles compliance (Federal Installation). The project submittals for the LEED NC certification included a 50 meter heated outdoor training pool. The pool equipment (pumps, motors, and solar heating) are separately metered but are housed within the 7,000 sq foot building. For the Energy and Atmosphere points (Prerequisite 2/EA Credit 1) associated with the pending LEED EB certification there are two questions:

1) If the team decides to submit the pool as part of the LEED EB project, is it allowable for them to enter the pool as a space type associated with the 7,000 sq ft building, even though the pool pumps, motors, and solar heating are separately metered? The Space Type definition for “Pool” in Portfolio Manager seems to indicate that only pools on the same energy-use meter as the primary facility should be entered into the building profile. But it seems to me one could add both the building and pool meters and then use the “meter information” feature to assign meters to the appropriate spaces.

2) If the team decides not to submit the pool as part of the LEED EB project, but still desires to enter the building in Portfolio Manager for ENERGY STAR Certification and Guiding Principles Compliance, could they choose to leave the pool out of the building profile since it’s separately metered, even though the pumps and motors are included in the building structures? Or, should they enter the pool?

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Mike Opitz Director, Energy Conservation Services, RECURRENT, LLC Nov 26 2012 LEEDuser Expert 598 Thumbs Up

Hello Emilio, the first thing I'll say is that I suggest you focus first on your strategy for Portfolio Manager, because if it's acceptable there then it is virtually assured to be acceptable in EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems..

With that said, I need to ask you a follow-up question in order to respond directly: what space type do you intend to use in PM as the primary space type of your building?

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Ravi Bajaj Education Manager, San Diego Green Building Council Nov 26 2012 Guest 131 Thumbs Up

I am working with Emilio on this project, and the problem we are running into is that there is a very high energy consumption (on the order of 1100 kbtu/sf), rendering us an extremely low Energy Performance Rating through Portfolio Manger (when we choose standard building types).

As the complex includes a pool, and the equipment is housed within the building, the total EUI for the building reflects the pool's energy consumption in addition to normal operating demand (currently pool sf is NOT included in our Portfolio Manager for the building).

That being said, to respond directly to your question, we have the option of choosing either Office, Classroom or Storage (warehouse) based on the sf breakdown. No single type is above 50% of sf, however including "ancillary support areas" in one of the above space types will bring us over the 50% threshold for "Primary Space Usage Type" (as recommended by EnergyStar).

If I may, I have two followup questions:

1. Are you familiar with the energy 'allowances' for a pool, and is there a possibility that if we chose Office for example, with an attached pool, this could raise our Energy Performance Rating?

2. If the option described in my question 1 is not the option we want, we have an energy model assuming the Pool Pump/Chlorine Production/Heating needs annually. Is it acceptable to subtract out these assumed Pool power loads from the building's annual consumption, in order to benchmark the standard space usage types alone?

Look forward to your response.
Thanks,
Ravi

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Mike Opitz Director, Energy Conservation Services, RECURRENT, LLC Dec 17 2012 LEEDuser Expert 598 Thumbs Up

Emilio and Ravi:

I'm afraid I have no direct experience with a situation similar enough to yours. Because of all the nuances in your project, my best recommendation is that you submit an inquiry to ENERGY STAR customer service asking them the best way to proceed. There are just too many variables interacting together.

However, I can say that Ravi's option #2 is very unlikely to be accepted by ENERGY STAR or LEED. The reasons is that they both want to see actually metered energy usage; simulation results are disallowed. They might accept the sub-metered data for Ravi's purpose of deducting the pool loads, but unless someone else on this forum has had success doing this I still recommend you ask ENERGY STAR directly and get their formal response.

Good luck.

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Ravi Bajaj Education Manager, San Diego Green Building Council Jan 24 2013 Guest 131 Thumbs Up

While we are still waiting for an option to benchmark the pool complex's energy consumption, we did find an addenda for LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems., EAp2 that came out New Years Day.

Your EnergyStar boundary can differ from your LEED boundary in order to benchmark your space in certain cases, now acceptable to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)..

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Emilio Rovira Sustainability Planner, DoD US Marine Corps Feb 08 2013 Guest 160 Thumbs Up

For those who are interested in the "blog" thread... We are still waiting for USGBC/GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). to determine the eligibility of the project's prerequisite!

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David Eldridge Project Manager, Grumman/Butkus Associates Feb 14 2013 LEEDuser Member 795 Thumbs Up

Although you have some work ahead of you for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems., you could use the energy model to demonstrate compliance with Guiding Principles "Optimize Energy Performance" topic based on my past experience with GP.

Regarding the connection of the pool to the building, is it associated with the building or is the building only housing the equipment out of necessity?

What I'm getting at is that you didn't mention "recA Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) is a certificate representing proof that a given unit of electricity was generated from a renewable energy source such as solar or wind. These certificates are able to be sold, traded, or bartered as environmental commodities, where an electricity consumer can buy the renewable energy attributes of electricty to support renewable energy, even if they are consuming generic grid-supplied electricity that may be supplied by nonrenewable sources. center" in the options above -- office, classroom, and warehouse. You might have some argument to exclude it from benchmarking if it isn't connected to the purpose of the building and it can be deducted with submeteringSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy use within a building attributable to specific end uses or subsystems (e.g., the heating subsystem of an HVAC system)..

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Julie Pollack Co-Founder/Principal e2e Sustainability Consultants, LLC
Nov 19 2012
LEEDuser Member
226 Thumbs Up

Changing the Building Data Administrator in Portfolio Manager

We are working on a LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. project and having trouble with changing the Administrator for the building's Energy Star Portfolio Manager. The PM for the building was set up by previous owners with one of their employees as the Administrator so the current owners are unable to fully access the PM. We have tried following the "Transfer Facility Access" link in PM but because we don't have the Administrator's code, we can't make the transfer. We have submitted the question to Energy Star but they take a long time to respond so we are hoping you might be able to advise us.

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Mike Opitz Director, Energy Conservation Services, RECURRENT, LLC Nov 26 2012 LEEDuser Expert 598 Thumbs Up

Julie, you've done the right thing and since you don't know the old code I know of no better way. All I know to do is wait for ENERGY STAR to respond.

Sorry.

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David Eldridge Project Manager, Grumman/Butkus Associates Nov 26 2012 LEEDuser Member 795 Thumbs Up

If the building isn't too complex, and depending on your history in Portfolio Manager, and if you have "view" access, it may be worth investing a few hours to create a new PM entry and abandon the old one.

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Julie Pollack Co-Founder/Principal, e2e Sustainability Consultants, LLC Nov 30 2012 LEEDuser Member 226 Thumbs Up

Thank you for the feedback. We were finally able to reconcile it with Energy Star.

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devin saylor
Nov 06 2012
Guest
21 Thumbs Up

Submeter Installation for Data Center in Office Building

We are experiencing problems with an office building that has a data center. We cannot find a subcontractor that is willing to install submeters on the power output (instead of input). Also, the tenant is a bank so there is huge concern on their end about installing on the output as there is a risk of downtime with servers and data loss. Anyone have any advice?

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Mike Opitz Director, Energy Conservation Services, RECURRENT, LLC Nov 26 2012 LEEDuser Expert 598 Thumbs Up

Devin, did your stakeholders give you any more details? I.e., why do the installers shy away from putting the meters on the output? Generally meters can be installed wherever you want them, and generally they're unobtrusive and don't interfere with the existing circuits, so it's unclear to me why they'd be this concerned.

Can you tell: are their concerns well-founded or is it just that they haven't done it this way before?

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David Eldridge Project Manager, Grumman/Butkus Associates Nov 26 2012 LEEDuser Member 795 Thumbs Up

There are some concerns with having a downstream device that might fail or need to be replaced at some point. Also there may not be a suiitable location to install a meter without downtime?

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Mike Opitz Director, Energy Conservation Services, RECURRENT, LLC Dec 17 2012 LEEDuser Expert 598 Thumbs Up

Well, from what you've said, even if the meter fails it should not interfere with normal operation of the circuits, but maybe I'm missing something. If you, the tenant, or landlord regularly work with a local Master Electrician then they should be able to provide the needed assurances.

The tenant is correct, some downtown will be required at installation time, but it can be short if the installer is a good one. As long as all parties are willing to cooperate in planning for and scheduling this downtime it should work out - the tenant can create and execute a temporary shutdown in the name of "needed maintenance" so they'll have no data loss. If they have redundancy from another location then they can even keep their services up and running during installation.

If your stakeholders are unwilling to take steps like these then it's possible they are simply not that interested in complying with ENERGY STAR.

Good luck!

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Apr 04 2013 LEEDuser Member 3853 Thumbs Up

It is not clear to me from the portfolio manager documentation whether the energy consumption of the data center should be treated as a building sub-meter or whether it should be treated as a main meter (and the consumption netted out of the total building consumption.)
When entering a Facility Energy Meter I have the option to assign the meter consumption to a specific space and to indicate whether it is added to the facility's total energy use.
When I set up the IT energy meter in the Data Center space, I can only select the type of meter but can not indicate whether the meter is to be added to the facility's total energy use.

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Jessica Hawley Sustainability Consultant EBI Consulting
Oct 25 2012
LEEDuser Member
1084 Thumbs Up

Include fuel oil usage from emergency generators?

On past LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. Certifications, GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). has required us to input fuel oil used in our emergency generators. So we did. But we recently posed this question to EnergyStar and got the following response:

Ticket Information:
Ticket #: 23002-335420
Date Created: 6/27/2012 11:57 AM EDT
Summary: [PM Feedback]
Question: Comments/Issue: Do we need to account for fuel oil used by back up generators?

***************** RESPONSE **********************

Dear [ ],

Thank you for contacting us. Fuel oil used for safety generators only, can be excluded from your energy consumption. You can select "no" in Portfolio Manager for backup generators fuel used. If you have any other questions, please contact buildings@energystar.gov.

Thank you,
Cara Pearson
ENERGY STAR Support

I will include this documentation of future projects, but wanted to share it here in the hopes that GBCI will see this and stop asking for this info.

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American University Sustainability American University
Oct 25 2012
LEEDuser Member
1349 Thumbs Up

Case 2 calculator vs. Statement of Energy Performance

When I generate a Statement of Energy Performance for a non-rateable building, the SEP tells me that my building uses 23% less energy per square foot than the national median. 2 points, yay!

When I plug the Site EUI into the Case 2 calculator, I am only 18% above the national average and don't even meet the prerequisite, boo! What gives? Can the SEP figure be used instead of the case 2 calculator? Why are they different?

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Oct 25 2012 LEEDuser Expert 5562 Thumbs Up

Boo! is right but alas, the Case 2 calculator is the authority here. One reason for the difference might be that the Case 2 calculator assesses the percentile points above the national median rather than the percent reduction from the national median. The relationship between the percent reduction to the percentile points above the national median is not a linear one. But, at least the building is very close to meeting the prerequisite.

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Feb 22 2013 Guest 2829 Thumbs Up

Hi Emily, Are you benchmarking your classroom buildings under Other - Educational or Just Other-Other. We are starting to work on a University project and thought you would be the best person to verify that with. Thanks

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SENGATHIR SELVAN HEAD - OPERATIONS airdesign engineered solutions
Oct 22 2012
Guest
48 Thumbs Up

Further normalized EUI

Hi there,

in our efforts to achieve LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. certification for a production facility (garment washing plant) in Dhaka, we have implemented energy conservation measures. However, the source EUI has increased beyond historical average, since our production also got increased by 60%, due to market demand.

Now we have further normalized the weather-normalized EUI based on production level, as suggested by normalization procedures in “Guidance for Normalizing Environmental Performance Results”, published by Environmental protect agency (Refer page no 9 of 25)..

We have used following formula:

1) Production Normalizing factor = production in current year ÷ production in baseline year

2) Production normalized EUI = Weather normalized EUI ÷ Production Normalizing factor.

Though we have followed the guidelines, still not sure whether we are on right course for GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). acceptance.. Or is there any other complicated calculations involved? Is there any other guidebooks accepted by GBCI?

Thanks in anticipation..

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Oct 25 2012 LEEDuser Expert 5562 Thumbs Up

Your methodology looks sound and we are currently using a similar normalization approach with a manufacturing facility, though the project has not gone through the review process yet. See a relevant LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. here that provides confirmation that normalizing for production, in addition to weather and size, can be an acceptable. https://www.usgbc.org/leedinterpretations/LIDetails.aspx?liaccessid=5184

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ravi singh
Oct 15 2012
Guest
79 Thumbs Up

EA P2 data requirement

Can anyone help me regarding the EA C1 performance period. My project is already certified under LEED NC now going for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. , then what will be my performance period for EA C1. Can i use the previous 9 month before registration and next 3 months after registration. Please guide. Thanks in advance.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Oct 16 2012 LEEDuser Member 3853 Thumbs Up

Yes. You need a total of 12 months for the EAc1 performance period but there is no link to the registration date. This is true of the remainder of the performance periods as well - if you want a performance period to be longer than 3 months (up to 24 months is allowed) it can begin prior to the project registration.

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SENGATHIR SELVAN HEAD - OPERATIONS airdesign engineered solutions
Oct 13 2012
Guest
48 Thumbs Up

Weather data

Hello there, I have an issue with EPA energy star portfolio, not sure whether I can address in this forum.

My project is in Dhaka,Bangladesh & it is a factory building. We are working on option C (historical readings) to establish minimum energy performance.

While I was entering our meter readings, I get an error message like this:

"Weather data is not yet available for December 2010 - A rating cannot be computed until the most current weather data is available from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC)."

Is there any way to get around this?

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Oct 15 2012 LEEDuser Expert 5562 Thumbs Up

Getting an Energy Star rating is not necessary for option C but you will have to collect the weather normalized source energySource energy is the total amount of raw fuel required to operate a building; it incorporates all transmission, delivery, and production losses for a complete assessment of a building's energy use. use intensity for the historic and current years.

I would contact Energy Star directly to see if they can help with a solution to get the weather normalized EUI from Portfolio Manager. If not, you could potentially gather historical weather data for the area then do your own weather normalization for the factory's historical energy use. If you need go this route it may be beneficial to submit a LEED interpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. to get prior approval from GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)..

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SENGATHIR SELVAN HEAD - OPERATIONS, airdesign engineered solutions Oct 15 2012 Guest 48 Thumbs Up

Thanks Ben. Alternatively I tried an option of choosing climate condition from the nearest city (Calcutta / kolkotta, India - 240 Km away) & There has been no change in weather normalized source EUI, for sample verification of data.

Will this be acceptable to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).?

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Oct 16 2012 LEEDuser Expert 5562 Thumbs Up

Yes, it should be acceptable if the climate condition in Calcutta roughly matches that of your project location. If it's very different, it would be better to select a different city with a closer match for climate.

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Rosana Correa Director, Casa do Futuro Oct 17 2012 Guest 568 Thumbs Up

We are having the same problem, our project is in Rio de Janeiro, and Energy Star has no current weather data available for this location. The nearest city is Sao Paulo, but the climate is very different. We already have the historical weather data, does anyone know if there is a way to insert them in the Energy Star database?

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Guilherme Ramos Oct 17 2012 Guest 157 Thumbs Up

Try looking for similar climate zones in the US. I think you can set it as a city in Florida. According to ASHRAE 90.1-2007, apendix B1 & B3, climate conditions there (in some cities) matches with Rio de Janeiro conditions.

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Rosana Correa Director, Casa do Futuro Oct 17 2012 Guest 568 Thumbs Up

We made that to calculate the score that the building would receive. Rio de Janeiro is 1A, same as Miami. But we have a doubt about this path: will LEED accept Energy Star documentation submitted with a location different from the real one?

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David Eldridge Project Manager, Grumman/Butkus Associates Oct 17 2012 LEEDuser Member 795 Thumbs Up

I don't know if that will work, Rio being in the opposite hemisphere as Miami the weather normalization won't be using the correct season. São Paulo should at least be having summer at the same time.

It would be an interesting experiment to use Miami while transposing the actual monthly utility usage data to match the seasons, but in this case the daily/weekly values won't match even though the annual degree days are similar.

Best option may be to find out how São Paulo got in there and supply the data. Not sure how long that process would take.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Oct 25 2012 LEEDuser Expert 5562 Thumbs Up

I agree that reaching out to Energy Star directly to try and determine when the weather data will be available for Sao Paulo is a good option. If the data won't be available soon, Energy Star may also be able to provide guidance on acceptable alternatives to generating a score for that location.

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Chris Miller Chief Mechanical Engineer Design Alaska
Sep 25 2012
LEEDuser Member
1274 Thumbs Up

"Site energy" usage for a multiple building project

A small site has two office buildings, a storage building and parking lot. For this multiple building project (not campus) seeking LEED EB-O+M certification, energy usage data from each building must be entered in Portfolio Manager separately, and each building must meet EAp2 individually. So each building will be submetered, but what about the electricity for the storage building (and more importantly) for the parking lot headbolt heaters, which account for 6% of the site's total electrical consumption?
the headbolt heaters are submetered, but do I split up that energy data between the two buildings based on FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.? or square footage? or just split it evenly? Should headbolt heaters (needed to keep cars from freezing up in Fairbanks, AK) even be included in the building energy usage?
I appreciate your feedback. Thank you.

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Sep 25 2012 Guest 2829 Thumbs Up

The storage building is not pursuing certification and is attached from the building so it should not be part of the benchmark but you must decide whether or not it will be in the boundary. You should refer to the LEED MPRs for guidance on multiple buildings. As for the heaters, they do not serve the building function or mechanical systems so my suggestion is that they are not included. my suggestion is to stick to the guidance offered by Energy Star in bench marking these to buildings appropriately. Hope this helps!

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Chris Miller Chief Mechanical Engineer, Design Alaska Sep 26 2012 LEEDuser Member 1274 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Jeff. For clarification: the storage building is not attached. Also, it is used in the summer as a materials testing lab (concrete and aggregate testing). The annual average FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. is 0.25, so it is ineligible for LEED certification, per MPR#5.
So, from my reading of MPR#3, it seems that the storage building can be treated "as an extension of the certifying building" (this is from the "NON-LEED CERTIFIABLE BUILDING ON SITE" paragraph on p.26 of the MPR Supplemental Guidance, Revison #2)
Can you please tell me if I am applying the MPR guidance correctly? I also now see that there is a 'parking lot' space type in PM, so I think I should include the headbolt heaters in that space type. Does that sound right?
Finally, somewhere in the MPR guidance, it mentions dividing up supporting land (parking, hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios., etc.) proportionally if it is shared with another building. Using that logic, should I proportionally assign the electrical usage of the parking lot (headbolt heaters) to each building, according to the FTE breakdown?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Sep 26 2012 LEEDuser Expert 10101 Thumbs Up

So I'll leave the MPR question to folks better qualified than myself to answer, but on the headbolt heater question I would agree that the energy used by those heaters should be included in your PM energy analysis just as you would parking lot lights. I have no idea how common or rare those are in Alaska, but theoretically PM Tool's climate normalization should be comparing your building to building's in a similar climate, and therefore dealing with a similar issue of getting cars to start.

That being said, Alaska is likely the extreme end of that climate zoneOne of five climatically distinct areas, defined by long-term weather conditions which affect the heating and cooling loads in buildings. The zones were determined according to the 45-year average (1931-1975) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days (base 65 degrees Fahrenheit). An individual building was assigned to a climate zone according to the 45-year average annual degree-days for its National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Division. and I'm not confident there would be many buildings in Fairbanks in the CBECSThe Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. CBECS data is used in LEED energy credits. data set. So if your Energy Star Rating seemed off, I'd take a second look at it with the headbolt heaters pulled out and consider requesting an interpretation from GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). if that situation seemed more accurate.

Tough one!

Hope that helps,

Dan

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Chris Miller Chief Mechanical Engineer, Design Alaska Sep 26 2012 LEEDuser Member 1274 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much, Dan. I think you are exactly right about the climate zoneOne of five climatically distinct areas, defined by long-term weather conditions which affect the heating and cooling loads in buildings. The zones were determined according to the 45-year average (1931-1975) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days (base 65 degrees Fahrenheit). An individual building was assigned to a climate zone according to the 45-year average annual degree-days for its National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Division. and the lack of CBECSThe Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. CBECS data is used in LEED energy credits. data sets - that's a typical problem with "national" standards and design principles applied to our climate. Since this will be the first EB-O+M project in the Alaskan Interior, the issue will likely be new to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)., as well. Since this question affects all EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. projects in this region, do you think it would be a LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. instead of a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide? Thanks again, Dan.
By the way, vehicle "plug ins" are installed on every car in Alaska (and they usually improve vehicle emissions and reduce idle times).

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Eric Anderson Technical Customer Service Specialist, GBCI Sep 27 2012 Guest 1821 Thumbs Up

Unlike the rest of the MPRs, MPR 5 (re: min FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.) is not a make-it-or-break-it requirement for LEED eligibility, which often leads to confusion. If a building has less than 1 annualized FTE, it simply means that building is not eligible for any IEQ credit points, not that it is "non-LEED-certifiable". Usually, a building is only truly "non-LEED-certifiable" if it has less than 1,000 sf of gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) (and, thus, cannot meet MPR 4).

That said, in some cases there are structures that solely support the normal operations of the main LEED project building that also happen to contain 1,000 sf or more of gross floor area. In that case it is not always clear-cut whether these should be treated as separate buildings or extensions of the main project building. These are project-specific, special circumstances which are best addressed in advance of the certification review via the formal inquiry process (https://www.leedonline.com/irj/go/km/docs/documents/usgbc/leed/config/co...).

It would be the project team's option whether to submit these issues as CIRs or LIs. It seems like the topics could be framed in such a way as to have broad-enough applicability that they would be appropriate to either type of inquiry. USGBC will refund the LI portion of a formal inquiry fee if they deem the inquiry too project specific and, therefore, are unwilling to issue a public LI ruling on the matter. Please refer to the LI FAQ for more guidance (https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=8858).

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Chris Miller Chief Mechanical Engineer, Design Alaska Sep 27 2012 LEEDuser Member 1274 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your attention, Eric. The ancillary building in question is less than 1,000 sf. Given that information, is my understanding correct that it is "non-LEED-certifiable"? Further, am I correct in understanding that this building can be treated "as an extension of the certifying building"? Finally - does this mean I should include its energy use (and square footage and PC) in Portfolio Manager? Thank you.

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Paulo Pinheiro Sustainability Consultant
Sep 25 2012
Guest
42 Thumbs Up

High cost of energy improvements

Our building don´t have a good energy efficiency, the commissioning process indicate many ways to obtain a good energy efficiency, we are doing first the low cost way and after the high cost way, but we think that the implementation of all improvements will spend more than two years. Can we start the LEED EB process before the implementation of all improvements? In the EAp3 we can do a phasing out process because the cost involved in this case is very high, in our EAp2 case the cost is high too, can we obtain the LEED EB certification before the end of application of all energy improvement, before two or three years? Tks.

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Sep 25 2012 Guest 2829 Thumbs Up

Hi Paulo, although not recommended if you have these many barriers with finances, you can of course start with the process but just know that the success of certification will be weighing on the energy performance of the building. You may want to look at this guidance for buildings that do not meet the LEED thresholds in EAp2 http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=2625.

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Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 26 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Hi Jeff,

Thanks for pointing Paulo to that "Energy Jumpstart" pilot prerequisite. This is exactly the situation that it should apply to. I'm curious if anyone has tried it, or considered using it. 

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Paulo Pinheiro Sustainability Consultant Sep 26 2012 Guest 42 Thumbs Up

Hi Jeff, thank you for your quick answer. I think that the Pilot Credit 67 is really interesting, but our building is a Laboratory and in not an Energy Star eligible building. Do you think that is possible try the Pilot Credit 67 for a certification LEED EB of a Laboratory? Tks!

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Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 26 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Hi Paulo. That changes things. The language is pretty clear that "Those pursuing Pilot Credit 67 must be an ENERGY STAR-eligible building type."

However, if you want to still explore this option further you might try asking the question on LEEDuser's page for that pilot prerequisite, and see if anyone from USGBC responds. 

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David Eldridge Project Manager, Grumman/Butkus Associates Sep 26 2012 LEEDuser Member 795 Thumbs Up

And/or contact the USGBC directly! I wouldn't necessarily wait in case someone happens to see the post on the message board.

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Paulo Pinheiro Sustainability Consultant Sep 26 2012 Guest 42 Thumbs Up

Thanks Nadav and David for your help, we will try our best to have the LEED EB certification and the information of this discussion is a great help.

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Jill Ziegler Program Manager for Sustainability Initiatives Forest City Enterprises, Inc.
Sep 07 2012
Guest
197 Thumbs Up

Retail Mall Meter Data

We are undertaking the difficult task of LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. certification for a mall with many retail tenants that are metered separately and pay their own utllities directly. There are numerous smaller "inline" tenants as well as a few large "anchors." The utility provided us with meter data for all of the inline tenants, but not for the anchors, and I'm not sure we'll be able to get it. Can we exclude them from our LEED boundary or will that raise red flags?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Sep 07 2012 LEEDuser Expert 10101 Thumbs Up

Red Flag City Jill! Those anchor tenants are a major source of energy consumption for the building, and their data 100% definitely must be included for EAp2/c1 purposes. All energy consumed by the building must be included. Malls pose an interesting challenge for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems., and this is one of the most significant ways. I hope you can work with the tenants to collect that information - best of luck to you.

Dan

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Jill Ziegler Program Manager for Sustainability Initiatives, Forest City Enterprises, Inc. Sep 20 2012 Guest 197 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Dan, I totally agree, but work with some folks who recall the days of LEED when you could be more "creative" with drawing your own boundaries, espeically for NC, and wanted to get some outside opinions! The good news is that we have since obtained the anchors' meter data and determined that we meet the Prereq with a couple points to spare for EAc1.

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Frantisek Macholda Sustainability Consultant EkoWATT
Aug 29 2012
LEEDuser Member
226 Thumbs Up

Temporarily empty building

Hello,
we have an office building in Slovakia that was occupied by one tenant till this summer. Now, the tenant left the building and an owner prepares a partial reconstruction (cooling system that was extremely unsufficient, there were no server rooms cooling, etc.). The reconstruction begins in Jan/2013 and will be finished in some 3 months.
This is not a case of major reconstruction, the rest of building will be unchanged.
The building will be used as a multi-tenant after the reconstruction.
We have energy and water data several years ago.
I would like to ask how to handle with EAp2 because:
- there is no tenant now
- the previous energy systems were extremely inefficient but the total consumption was relatively low because of missing cooling systems.
Is the EB:OM the appropriate scheme at all? (NC is not applicable because the building is older and there is no chance to fulfill all the ASHRAE requirements).
How to compare the previous and the future consumption? The new consumption will be optimized after the reconstruction and there will be no decrease during first year of occupancy.
Thank you for any advise.
Frantisek

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Eric Johnson Principal Sustainability Project and Cost Manager, Green Future Now Aug 29 2012 LEEDuser Member 5067 Thumbs Up

Frantisek,
You can read this - Reduced Occupancy Guidance for LEED 2009 Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance and LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance v2008 - http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=6292 or just give me a call.

This one is handy also - LEED Rating System Selection Guidance - http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=6292

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Aug 29 2012 LEEDuser Member 3853 Thumbs Up

Eric beat me to the answer - you need to have 50% occupancy throughout the performance period. This means you really can't begin the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. certification process until 12 months after the building reaches 50% occupancy as you need a 12 month performance period for EAp2.

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Frantisek Macholda Sustainability Consultant, EkoWATT Aug 29 2012 LEEDuser Member 226 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much. This is what I have suspected.
Really is there not any possibility to compare the year before reconstruction and the year after (assuming at least 50% occupancy after reconstruction) or take the last "fully occupied year" for comparison? The building was fully occupied before reconstruction and data is available. The problem is in the reconstruction period only.

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Eric Johnson Principal Sustainability Project and Cost Manager, Green Future Now Aug 29 2012 LEEDuser Member 5067 Thumbs Up

Frantisek,
Maybe you could use one of the Global Compliance paths or request an alternative compliance method / CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide? - https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=19178:
Projects outside the U.S. may use a local benchmark based on source energySource energy is the total amount of raw fuel required to operate a building; it incorporates all transmission, delivery, and production losses for a complete assessment of a building's energy use. from their country’s national or regional energy agency.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Aug 29 2012 LEEDuser Member 3853 Thumbs Up

If you have a new tenant coming in when the renovation is done then there should be a way to deal with the down time.

How does the historical data look in Portfolio Manager?

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Frantisek Macholda Sustainability Consultant, EkoWATT Aug 29 2012 LEEDuser Member 226 Thumbs Up

Thanks for reply. We have not analyzed data yet, we are at the beginning of the process and trying to estimate milestones and schedule for the project. The data analysis will be probably very useful information. If the energy consumption looks good, can we use this information as a proof of EAp2 even if the building is under reconstruction now? Again - the last data with full occupancy are several months old.

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Carolina Vergnano LEED AP Concremat
Aug 23 2012
Guest
1782 Thumbs Up

Data center consumption and the EAp2 - Case 2 – Option 1 Labs

We are trying to certify a laboratory in Brazil, and we are using the USGBC Calculator and the LABS21. Analyzing the Case 2 – Option 1 – Labs we identified that the USGBC Calculator use two specific data to calculate the Energy Efficiency of the laboratory, the Source EnergySource energy is the total amount of raw fuel required to operate a building; it incorporates all transmission, delivery, and production losses for a complete assessment of a building's energy use. Use Intensity (from Portfolio Manager) and the National Average (from Labs21), the both data are the building energy consumption per space (kBtu/sf). If we try to do the simulation using just the Portfolio Energy, when is possible by the building type, I can introduce the Data Center consumption, that help me to improve the Current Rating, but in the case of Laboratory (that use the USGBC Calculator), introduce the Data Center consumption in the Portfolio Manager don´t change the result of the simulation, because use just the energy consumption of the building (of the bill energy) per space. The building that we are trying to certify is 66% laboratory and 34% headquarter office of a big laboratory company, and the Data Center spends 18% of the building energy, can we separate the Data Center consumption of the building consumption and use just the building consumption for the EAp2 Case 2 simulation? Tks.

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Reid Middlebrooks Sustainability Director Apollo BBC
Aug 07 2012
Guest
513 Thumbs Up

separate the office building from the manufacturing area?

The project is a 3 story office building with interior fit out and 3 level garage. Within the building there is manufacturing portion which consumes a huge amount of electricity and mechanical energy, and we feel with the huge amounts of power getting the building to be LEED Silver certified may not be possible. So my question, is there a way we can separate the office building LEED credit from the manufacturing area even though they are within the same footprint?

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Yetsuh Frank Director, YR&G sustainability consulting, education and analysis Aug 07 2012 LEEDuser Member 863 Thumbs Up

Tim,

Unless I am missing some nuance in your question the answer is no. LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. requires that you certify the whole building. LEED EBOM also includes an Energy Star threshold of 71 which it sounds like this building might have trouble achieving. Per the LEEDuser guidance above, you should check that before you pursue certification.

You mention a "tenant fit-out" in your description. If this work is happening now it might be eligible LEED for Commercial Interiors.

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Reid Middlebrooks Sustainability Director, Apollo BBC Aug 07 2012 Guest 513 Thumbs Up

Frank,

Originally when I submitted the question I thought it was for an existing building turns out it is for a new one. The way the architect phrased the question led me to believe it was existing.

so you would suggest a commercial interior? This is a new building. That I am aware of no tenants yet therefore I'm not sure how commercial interiors would work? The architect would like to shoot for Silver but due to the manufacturing portion and the large consumption of energy is there any possible way to make that space it's own entity even within the same footprint of the building?

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Yetsuh Frank Director, YR&G sustainability consulting, education and analysis Aug 08 2012 LEEDuser Member 863 Thumbs Up

Tim,

If it is a new building and there are no tenants than it sounds like the Core & Shell standard might be the most applicable. Depending on the % of the manufacturing portion and the relationship to the building ownership that portion may not have to be included (meaning, you might be able to treat it like a tenant.) Take a look at the requirements for C&S as well as NC to determine which is applicable. When you have determined that you should post your questions over on the appropriate forum- this is the string for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. projects. Happy to help with those questions when you have decided on a direction.

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Eric Anderson Technical Customer Service Specialist, GBCI Aug 08 2012 Guest 1821 Thumbs Up

Hi Tim, While they may have less impact than spaces that are directly affected by the LEED-CS project Owner's scope of work, tenant spaces cannot be entirely excluded from the analysis of a LEED-CS project. Just like EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems., the BD+C rating systems (such as NC & CS) are intended for 'whole buildings' even if they contain mixed uses or spaces under another party's control (e.g. tenant spaces). You may find it helpful to review the LEED Rating System Selection Guidance (www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=6667) if you have not already done so. As noted there, per the 40/60 Rule, at least 40% of the total gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) of the building (including the tenant spaces in this calculation) must be undergoing new construction &/or major renovation in order to use the LEED-CS rating system.

It would also be good to note that there are pretty stringent criteria that must be met (including not only separate Space Use Type or Management, but also separate Ownership, for example) for project teams wanting to certify a major renovation of a portion of a single structure as a separate LEED BD+C project. Please refer to pages 14-17 and page 22 of the LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance (http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=10131) for full criteria and additional details on this topic.

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Alicia Silva CEO Revitaliza consultores
Jul 17 2012
LEEDuser Member
2155 Thumbs Up

EAP2 case 2 Our project cannot use Portfolio Manager

We are trying to certify a conference center that has NO category under portfolio manager. We are using the calculator found at the USGBC how ever our occupation and energy use varies depending on how much the conference center is leased. they have worked on several energy imporvements and we are currently performing ongoing commissioning how ever non of the calculatiosn give a true picture of how the energy is being saved because it is consumed more because the conference center is being more succesfull atraccting clients so we spend more energy how ever more efficiently
do you know if we can have a per person per even use and justify our improvements compared with previous years

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