EBOM-2009 IEQc2.2: Controllability of Systems—Lighting

  • EBOM IEQc2.2 Type3 Lighting Controls Diagram
  • Got a light switch or task light?

    The requirements of this credit—providing lighting controls for at least 50% of occupants—are not technically difficult to achieve. Virtually all existing buildings have at least two light settings in group spaces, and task lighting is common, easy, and affordable

    Documentation may be time-consuming

    You will need to conduct a thorough inventory of lighting controls to verify compliance. This documentation effort is doable, but can become tedious and time-consuming for large buildings with many different types of spaces or multiple tenants. 

    Energy savings and improved comfort

    Adding lighting controls is a great strategy for reducing energy consumption and improving occupant comfort and productivity. They allow occupants to adjust lighting levels to their specific needs, rather than relying on a broadly over-lit space. 

    OfficePlug-in task lighting is provided at individual workstations at Trinity Real Estate headquarters in New York, which earned this credit. Photo – YRG SustainabilityHowever, simply meeting this credit’s requirements does not ensure that you’ll meet either of those objectives. To truly achieve these outcomes, plan to go beyond the minimum requirements of this credit and provide lighting controls that provide flexibility and comfort to specific conditions, that address appropriate visual tasks, and that smoothly integrate the electric lighting system with available daylight. 

    Consider these questions when approaching this credit

    • What types of spaces are in the building? Clearly identify which spaces are considered individual workstations and which are multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations..
    • Did the project already earn the credit related to lighting control under LEED NC or LEED for Schools? If so, follow the D+C streamlined path.
    • Is information available on original lighting design and controls? Who maintains and upgrades the building’s lighting systems? Who currently furnishes task lighting—building owner, tenant, individual occupants? Gathering data on existing controls either from  the original design or from records on lighting upgrades and improvements can help inform the start of an inventory.
    • How will data be collected and who will collect it? How much information on lighting controls can be collected through an energy audit? Will this credit require an occupant survey or a building walkthrough? 
    • What type of lighting controls will improve both occupant comfort and energy performance? What are the critical visual tasks, such as reading, computer work, meetings, and presentations, in each type of space?
    • Do lighting efficiency improvements have the potential to significantly contribute to the building’s energy performance rating under EAp2 and EAc1? If so, can lighting control upgrades be made before or during the project’s 12-month performance period for recording energy data in order to contribute to those credits?

    FAQ's for LEED-EBOM IEQc2.2

    I have a conference room that only has an on-off switch. Is this compliant with the credit requirements? If not, how can I improve lighting controllability in this space and also be compliant with LEED?

    Although this requirement not explicitly stated in the LEED Reference Guide, project teams are now being asked to demonstrate that at least two levels of control are provided in multi-occupant spaces (like conference rooms). A single on-off switch is not compliant, and an on-off switch with an occupancy sensor is no longer compliant either. Examples of the most common compliant scenarios for multi-occupants spaces include: two (or more) lighting zones with on-off switches; an on-off switch combined with window blinds; and an on-off switch with a dimmer.

    We have a lot of visitors in certain parts of our building, but we don’t necessarily want them to have controllability over lighting whenever they want. What do we do for these spaces? Can we still earn this credit?

    This scenario, which is common to museums, visitor centers, cafeterias, and fitness club, falls under the “special-use space” category. In special-use spaces where visitors are given limited access to lighting controls, you can meet the credit requirements by specifying that building staff will be available to adjust lighting conditions as necessary. Provide a clear narrative describing the details of the space and how building staff are available and instructed to adjust lighting.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

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  • Projects that have earned the credit related to lighting control under LEED for New Construction or LEED for Schools can follow the D+C Streamlined Path for documenting this credit. You must submit a copy of the official LEED scorecard and confirm that the design and construction elements that contributed to the previously earned credit are either still in place or explain that minor changes do not put into question the potential achievement of this credit. If no major changes have occurred, no further action is necessary to achieve this credit. If there have been significant alterations to the building’s lighting controls, the project must follow the documentation requirements of the O&M submittal path.


  • Perform an inventory assessing the number, type, and location of current lighting controls. See the Documentation Toolkit for a spreadsheet you can use, along with an example inventory.


  • The inventory can be performed in tandem with similar space-by-space audits required by other LEED credits, such as an energy walk-through audit (EAp1), an IAQ audit (IEQc1.1) a green cleaning audit (IEQc3), and a daylight and views study of the building (IEQc2.4).


  • Doing an early inventory has some advantages, although you may do it anytime, before or during the project’s performance period. If you document existing lighting controls and then assess opportunities for improvement before or early in project’s 12-month performance period for recording energy data, you can help the project's energy performance as measured for EAp2 and EAc1.


  • Include in your credit calculations any spaces in which a person is likely to cumulatively spend a large part of the workday. These are considered “regularly occupied.” 


  • Exclude from your credit calculations any spaces used for storage, circulation, or bathrooms, as these are not considered “regularly occupied.”


  • To meet credit requirements, task lighting does not need to be hardwired. Plug-in lamps or task lighting built into cubicles or office furniture is the most likely method of compliance.


  • Private offices with at least one on-off switch comply.  


  • Workstations in large open rooms are considered individual, not group, multi-occupant workspaces.


  • Multi-occupant spaceIn multi-occupant workspaces the credit requires that controls are "adjustable to suit group activities and allow flexibility for different uses." It used to be that occupancy sensors with manual overrides plus an on-off switch would count, but that's not the case anymore. Project teams are now being held to demonstrating at least two levels of control in these spaces. Compliant scenarios could include having two or more lighting zones separately controlled by on-off switches, an on-off switch combined with blinds on windows, or an on-off switch with a dimmer.


  • Although occupancy sensors do not offer occupants as much direct control, LEED allows occupancy sensors as a substitute to other lighting controls due to the energy efficiency benefits. 


  • In special-use spaces—such as museums, visitor centers, or fitness clubs—where visitors have limited access to lighting controls, meet the credit requirement by specifying that building staff will be available to adjust lighting conditions as necessary.  


  • OfficeTo meet the lighting control requirements for this credit, these individual workstations would require task lighting in addition to the overhead light fixtures shown. Photo – YRG SustainabilityDetermine the upgrades and complete the modifications necessary to meet credit requirements. To achieve this credit lighting controls must be provided for at least 50% of individual workstations and 50% of multi-occupant space in the building.


  • Since the credit sets a very achievable threshold, also consider additional opportunities to enhance building performance and occupant comfort. For example, add lighting zones based on specific types of visual tasks and the availability of natural daylight and consider dimming or “stepped” lighting systems tied to daylighting sensors. 


  • Take a holistic approach to lighting upgrades. In addition to improving controllability, consider improvements and trade-offs related to comfortable light levels and color temperatures, efficiency and performance, mercury content, and other factors. There may be easy, low-cost opportunities to do things like install more efficient lamps and upgrade fixtures.


  • For projects pursuing MRc4: Sustainable Purchasing—Reduced Mercury in Lamps, ensure that any lamps purchased for lighting upgrades or additions do not exceed the maximum level of mercury permitted.  

During the Performance Period

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  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    IEQ Credit 2.2: Controllability of systems - lighting

    1 Point

    Intent

    To provide a high level of lighting system control by individual occupants or groups in multioccupant spaces (e.g., classrooms and conference areas) and promote their productivity, comfort and well-being.

    Requirements

    For at least 50% of building occupants, use lighting controls that enable adjustments to suit the task needs and preferences of individuals for at least 50% of individual workstations, and for groups sharing a multioccupant space or working area for at least 50% of multi-occupant space in the building.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Implement system and occupant control of ambient and task lighting to suit individual preferences and the needs of specific tasks.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

Web Tools

UC Davis California Lighting Technology Center

The CLTC works to advance energy-efficient lighting and daylighting technologies through technology development, demonstrations, and outreach. The CLTC website is an excellent resource for original research and case studies detailing effective lighting retrofit solutions.


Lighting Research Center

This research center provides evaluation of lighting solutions, studies of the effects of light on human health, manufacturer-specific information and performance data, and guidelines for how to use task lighting effectively.

Publications

Saving Energy with High-Tech Lighting Systems

This article provides useful discussion of sophisticated lighting controls.


Lighting Handbook Reference

This handbook provides IESNA guidelines for selecting appropriate luminance levels for visual tasks.

LEED Gold Project Documentation

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of IEQc2.2 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

Inventory of Lighting Controls

Assess your project building's compliance with this credit with an inventory of the number, type, and location of current lighting controls. You can work with the spreadsheet here, along with an example. (The sample floorplan illustrates the example given in the spreadsheet.)

Lighting Control Floorplan

A floorplan like this is not required for credit documentation, but if available, it is helpful for mapping out credit compliance.

LEED Online Forms: LEED-EBOM IEQ

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.-2009 IEQ credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

v06 forms (newest):

v04 forms:

v03 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

48 Comments

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Ryan Hoffman Heapy Engineering
Apr 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
4 Thumbs Up

Illustrating Compliance using representative sampling?

All,

We are working with a client in a 1.2 mill. SF office building with three towers connected by a central core. The towers are essentially identical; all conference room or multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. have multiple levels of lighting (dimming, shading etc.) In addition, most if not all, individual workstations have task lights, and it is company policy to provide task lighting if requested.

Given the effort associated with calculating compliance at the workstation and room level in each tower across such a large SF, does anyone have any thoughts regarding the acceptability of providing data for a representative sample of rooms or single tower? We believe the project complies with the intent of this credit, but feel the effort to document may present a challenge.

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Victoria Bauer
Mar 27 2014
LEEDuser Member
23 Thumbs Up

Environmental Labs in Office Building

Hi, I am working on a LEED project in an office building that has environmental labs. Some of the labs have workstations to input data, but not a permanent desk for an occupant. First question..
Do I consider these workstations as "individual occupant work spaces"?

A couple labs do have permanent desks for occupants, but no additional light controls because the lab environment requires certain lighting.
Would I consider these exempt?

I looked on the Space Matrix and for Office Buildings there is no mention of labs.
Would I therefore consider all spaces exempt?

I'd love some feedback!

Thanks!

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Mar 31 2014 LEEDuser Expert 18072 Thumbs Up

You may come across a review response that says "regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. are those You may come across a review response that says "regularly occupied spaces are those where people stand or sit as they work" so workstations aren't limited to permanent desks. A work station doesn’t have to be occupied for the majority of a shift to be counted, it has more to do with the type of activity done there and how important it is for an occupant’s work.

In the IEQ space matrix you’ll finds Labs listed in Educational Facilities and Health Care Facilities where they are expected to comply with IEQc6. The matrix is titled for BD&C and ID&C, but I think many people have assumed it would apply to EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. IEQc2.2 as well.

So although the spaces are probably not exempt, would it be possible to provide local task lights at these work areas? That’s probably what the reviewers would look for.

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Boon Wah Chong Ascott International Management (2001) Private Limited
Feb 24 2014
LEEDuser Member

For Hotel Project

As it wasn't mentioned anywhere. I would like to enquire, for Hotel project, if there are individual switches for each light or set of lights. Such as 1 light switch for the entire bedroom, would such a set-up qualify for this credit.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Mar 31 2014 LEEDuser Expert 18072 Thumbs Up

For this credit the guest rooms would probably be okay since they usually have multiple light switches. But we also need to provide light controls for 50% of the hotel employees, which can be harder. Employees that work at desks would need task lights. Conference rooms and event rooms would need lights on dimmers that the occupants can control.

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Magda Aghababyan CEO Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd.
Jul 13 2013
LEEDuser Member
583 Thumbs Up

Production line with both skylight and artifical lights

We have a production line with about 2000 workers that has both a skylight system and an artificial lighting system that only works when the daylight level goes below a specified limit. This design allows lot of energy efficiency and at the same time maintain the light level in the production line above a minimum required level.

We have a guideline of the minimum light levels to be maintained and annually an independent party comes to assess whether that levels are maintained. Will this scenario be eligible for this credit given that in such a big production line the most important aspect is the required level of lighting for the process efficiency and safety of the workers?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 31 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Magda, the system you describe sounds like it makes sense for the application, but I don't see it has a good fit for this credit. The key idea is controllability, and the workers in this case don't have control over the light levels. If they had some feedback mechanism, that would help.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Jan 28 2014 LEEDuser Expert 18072 Thumbs Up

Magda,
It’s not an easy credit to earn in a production facility, but we've seen this credit earned in by doing two things.

Some of the most promising case studies on the role of daylight or good lighting controls have come from production facilities where it been possible to measure error rates or output before and after lighting upgrades, so don’t underestimate the potential for real financial benefits!

1. Assemble a table with all the spaces and steps in the production line. For each space, describe the activity, level of visual acuity required (Hi, Med, Low); lighting provided (Ambient only (footcandles); Task+ Ambient (fc1. A footcandle (fc) is a measure of light falling on a given surface. One footcandle is defined as the quantity of light falling on a 1-square-foot area from a 1 candela light source at a distance of 1 foot (which equals 1 lumen per square foot). Footcandles can be measured both horizontally and vertically by a footcandle meter or light meter. 2. The non-metric measurement of lumens per square foot, one footcandle is the amount of light that is received one foot from a light source called a candela, which is based on the light output of a standardized candle. A common range for interior lighting is 10 to 100 footcandles, while exterior daytime levels can range from 100 to over 10,000 footcandles. Footcandles decrease with distance from the light source. The metric equivalent of a foot candle is 10.76 lux, or lumens per square meter.); Type of lighting controls.

2. Provide and describe task lights or localized lighting controls at areas where higher visual acuity is needed.

For example, see the fork lift operator question below - headlights to see materials, and a task light for doing paperwork. Or a station on a production line for inspecting items could have spot lights on separate controls to supplement the ambient lightingLighting in a space that provides for general wayfinding and visual comfort, in contrast to task lighting, which illuminates a defined area to facilitate specific visual work..

Hope that helps!,

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Melissa Schifman Principal Sustology
Jul 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
141 Thumbs Up

Forklifts as Individual Workstations

I am working on certifying a warehouse, and would like to consider the forklifts as individual workstations, as the warehouse employees are each assigned one (in lieu of a desk) and allowed to personalize it, as well as spending the greater part of their day on them. The warehouse is outfitted in high bayA bay is a component of a standard, rectilinear building design. It is the open area defined by a building element such as columns or a window. Typically, there are multiple identical bays in succession. lights on occupancy sensors, and each of the forklifts is equipped with headlights and map/task lights. Do you see any reason why this approach wouldn't work?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 31 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Melissa, that's a novel approach and I would like to think it would work. It really seems to me to make sense—can't think of any issues. I would be sure to explain in your narrative why you are taking this approach and how it is justified.

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Lyle Axelarris Civil/Structural Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, O+M Design Alaska
Feb 25 2013
LEEDuser Member
753 Thumbs Up

blinds for individual workstations

For multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations., a compliant option mentioned in the Bird's Eye View is to have an "on/off switch combined with blinds for a window." Is the same true for individual workspaces?
If overall lighting levels are determined by overhead area-wide lighting, but the individual workstations each have a daylight window with blinds, can these workstations count toward achieving this credit?
Thank you.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Mar 08 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4680 Thumbs Up

I've never seen that approach attempted but I don't think that it would be accepted. The reference guide speaks to task lighting for individual workstations and so I think a reviewer would key in on that. Also, the blinds option for multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. requires control over an on/off switch too, which it sounds like the individual workstations in your case wouldn't have.

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Lyle Axelarris Civil/Structural Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Design Alaska Mar 08 2013 LEEDuser Member 753 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Ben. I understand your point, but just to take the discussion further - we want daylighting to replace electrical lighting, so what is wrong with considering an individual daylighting device (i.e. window, Solatube, etc.) as a form of "task lighting"? If you agree with this, then wouldn't a control for this daylighting device (i.e. blinds, Solatube "daylight dimmer control", etc.) count towards this credit?

My understanding is that only one individual lighting control for an individual workstation is required for a workspace to count toward achieving this credit (vs. the two lighting controls required for multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations.). Is this correct?

If all of the above statements are correct (indiv. daylight device = "task lighting"; indiv. daylight control = "indiv. lighting control"; only one indiv. lighting control is needed for compliance), then would a set of blinds for a window at each individual workstation count towards meeting the requirements of this credit?

Thank you for insight.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Mar 08 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4680 Thumbs Up

It seems possible but my guess is that you would need to submit a project specific CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide to have a chance at earning the credit with that type of strategy. Another consideration for the strategy that you've lined out is what type/level of control do individuals have when there's insufficient daylight available for normal tasks (early morning, evening, seasonally short daylight days, overcast days, etc.)? That makes it seem like a challenging approach with respect to earning this credit as well.

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Lyle Axelarris Civil/Structural Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Design Alaska Mar 08 2013 LEEDuser Member 753 Thumbs Up

Thanks for talking it through with me, Ben.

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American University Sustainability, American University Nov 20 2013 LEEDuser Member 927 Thumbs Up

Quick clarification on this: Does a private office with an overhead light switch and adjustable blinds comply with the requirements? I could see why cubicle work spaces need task lighting, but for private offices, does the switch and blind offer enough control?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Nov 20 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8952 Thumbs Up

The private office you've described does indeed comply Emily. I think you've got the logic down exactly.

Hope that helps,

Dan

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability
Feb 07 2013
LEEDuser Member
2429 Thumbs Up

Clarification for Conference Room

Hi All, For a convention center building where over 90% of the building consists of "multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations." i.e. conference rooms, meeting rooms, exhibit halls, do they need to be included in this case? The controls are present in all of these spaces listed but unsure if they need to be cataloged for this. These are by no means "regularly occupied" such as the other multi occupant spaces used by staff for internal meetings and functions. Thank you!

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Mar 28 2013 LEEDuser Expert 18072 Thumbs Up

Jeff,
You are right that the building staff would need adequate lighting controls in their offices and internal meeting rooms. Exhibition spaces are not specifically addressed in the credit language, but I think they would need to be included.

When you look at the IEQ space type matrix, it says that auditoriums, conference rooms, and exhibition halls should be included in the spaces that need to comply with this credit. They might be considered "regularly occupied" because they are frequently and primarily intended to be used as an auditorium, or meeting, conference, exhibit space.

The question then is what kinds of controls are needed? That’s not entirely clear. It would be important for the organizer of an event to be able to adjust the lighting for each space to suit the activity and users. (You’ve probably attended a session on green building or IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. in an event space with no windows or user controls...) The event organizer would want the ability to adjust the lighting levels in a space before the program begins, and ideally during the session as well.

You might be able to document this with an electrical narrative that describes how lighting can be controlled in individual spaces once they have been set up for events. (Some DALI controls assign IP addresses to individual fixtures on a networked lighting system and thus don’t have to have all lighting scenarios hardwired in place.)

This sounds like a question you could submit to GBCI technical support that tristan describes over at:
http://www.leeduser.com/blogs/gbci-invites-direct-inquiries-do-your-home...
the more specifics you can include about your lighting controls, the better!

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American University Sustainability American University
Sep 11 2012
LEEDuser Member
927 Thumbs Up

Non-Regularly Occupied Spaces such as Bathrooms and Corridors

Unfortunately, I believe bathrooms and corridors have to be included in the IEQc2.2 calculations. The EB:OM IEQ space type classification document (http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=10539) clearly has a Y in the column for "Lobbies, corridors, restrooms" in Office spaces meaning that "The space must be included in the credit requirements."

Unless I'm reading something wrong it seems that almost all spaces, regularly occupied or not still must be included in the IEQc2.2 credit requirements.

Perhaps simply a motion sensor in those spaces would be enough to comply with the credit requirements, but they must be counted nonetheless. If I'm wrong, please clarify. Thanks!

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Sep 11 2012 LEEDuser Expert 8952 Thumbs Up

Notwithstanding the document Emily cited, (which, I agree, seems to suggest that restrooms & corridors should be included) I can't see how including restrooms and corridors would make any sense. There's no 'indoor environmental quality' value in providing multiple lighting controls in a corridor or bathroom, nor do occupants need, want or benefit from modulating light levels in those areas. Energy benefits, perhaps, but that's not what this credit is about.

For what its worth, in many years of submitting and reviewing EB applications I don't think I can remember ever expecting restrooms or corridors to be included under this credit. The BAS credit, absolutely, but not here.

Dan

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SON NGUYEN VAN Electrical engineer Intel
Jul 04 2012
Guest
23 Thumbs Up

Two on/off switches for multi-occupant space

Our building had two types of power source, one is normal power, one is essential power (back up by genset) and also supply two kind of power for lighting system. Each multi occupant space (library, pantry, clinic, restroom, mother room, gym, corridor, lobby, conference rooms) has two on/off switches, one control for normal light and the other for essential light (same fixture but different power source). I want to know is it considered to comply with credit's requirement.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Sep 04 2012 LEEDuser Expert 18072 Thumbs Up

Can the people in the multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. change the lighting levels at any time they want? Or are the switches there only for times when the back-up genset is running?

If having two switches lets them adjust the lighting levels for more or less light any time the building is being used, then it sounds like it meets the credit requirement. But if the switches only help when normal power is disrupted, then it doesn't sound like they meet the requirements.

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American University Sustainability American University
Jun 27 2012
LEEDuser Member
927 Thumbs Up

Dorm Rooms

We're pursuing EB:O&M on several campus buildings including residence halls, classroom buildings, and office buildings. Office and classroom buildings are obvious to me when talking about "work space" and multi-occupant space" but what about dorm rooms? I believe they all come standard with one desk for each resident. There is a light switch that controls overhead lighting in the room and in some cases a built in light on the desk. Do you think the room light switch would count? Do we seriously have to go into ever dorm room and check if they have a desk lamp? Or would dorm rooms not necessarily include a "workspace" as LEED intends it. Thanks.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Sep 04 2012 LEEDuser Expert 18072 Thumbs Up

Take a look at the Space Classifications zipped spreadsheet from the IES Lighting Handbook, 10th Edition and listed under Resources at:
http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=221

On the BO+M tab, for Dormitories/ Residences, Bedrooms, Reading & Study Areas are defined as Individual Occupant spacesIn individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces.. in the table above, . In the NC EQc6.1 forum, there's a discussion about task lights and two-bedroom dorm rooms that's relevant.

In the Birds Eye View at
http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/IEQc6.1
bedrooms in an apt just need one switch, but "workstations" need a task light. It's not clear which standard to apply here.

A dorm room might be seen differently than a multi-family residential bedroom, especially if the dorm room houses more than one person. There are several possible interpretations: in a 1 person dorm room, a single light switch and operable blinds/ window shades might be seen as sufficient, or perhaps the reviewer would insist on one task light per person in addition to the general light switch.

Since this space matrix was referenced more recently than some projects were registered, there's a heated discussion over at NC 2009 EQc6.2 on it's applicability, and a USGBC staffer did chime in to say they are working on an updated space matrix for IEQ credits, possibly for the Oct 1, 2012 addendum.

In the meantime, you might consider doing a random survey of a reasonable number of dorm rooms to see how many have task lights, and clarify the number of occupants per dorm room. Given the ambiguity of the requirements and even the newer referenced space matrix, seems like a representative survey rather than inspecting every single room would be reasonable.

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Ramon Gomez Puerto Rico Energy Manager Janssen Ortho LLC
May 23 2012
LEEDuser Member
81 Thumbs Up

Control Lightning

We are currently working in a facility that that has a system called "Softswitch" from the Lutron Electronics Co.

The systems provides automated control of lighting to optimize energy efficiency in small offices and open spaces. Turn lights on and off based on time of day, occupancy or feedback from a building management system for simple, convenient control. System flexibility lends control over numerous lighting zones to optimize energy savings. Individual zones can be programmed to highlight exterior architectural features.

The problem that I'm having is that using the LEED Template my percent for individual workstations are not complying with the minimum. But I do have this system, can this system help meet the minimum percent for indivual workstations in some way?..

Thank in advance.

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Jun 06 2012 Guest 7989 Thumbs Up

Ramon,

For individual workstations, the easiest way to meet this credit is with individual task lamps. Your Lutron system is great, but I don't think it will give 50% of your workstation occupants control over their individual lighting...

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Geoffrey Tomlinson Vaha Sustainable Energy
May 14 2012
Guest
742 Thumbs Up

Lighting Controls in Multi-occupant Spaces

I'm confused about the credit requirements.

Reviewer comment: Per the Calculations section of IEQc2.2 in the LEED Reference Guide, provide a narrative to describe the lighting controls in the conference room and ensure that the space allows for more than two levels of lighting.

LEED Reference Guide: No specific types or numbers of controls are required.

I can not find anywhere in the LEED addendum, reference guide, etc that lists requirements for more than two levels of lighting. But I found that exact statement in an online pdf from the GBCI: LEED Project Submittal Tips: EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009.

Which standard should I be using, the LEED Reference Guide or the pdf from GBCI. Or is there a source of LEED changes that I'm missing.

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David Hubka Director of Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services May 22 2012 LEEDuser Expert 4661 Thumbs Up

It's best to use the sample template forms available for viewing at LEED Online; these provide the most current, complete, and correct information that must be provided by the project team. The LEED reference guide is not as current as the LEED Online templates.

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Benoit Gosselin Energy solutions development specialist
Mar 30 2011
Guest
61 Thumbs Up

HIGHER EDU. PROJECT

We are currently working in a higher education campus where there are several space types such as pools, cafeterias, stores, laboratories, studios, residences, workshops, lounges and a radio studio.

Do we include all of them in our evaluation as special-use space type?
Or is it best to just concentrate on typical workspaces that there are in this type of building (classrooms, offices, ...)?

Thank you

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Apr 25 2011 LEEDuser Expert 18072 Thumbs Up

You'll need to consider all workstations, not just the typical office ones. You can see a related discussion over at the NC 2009 EQc6.1 forum topic - there is a comment I posted on March 29, 2011 that describes an approach that would probably apply to your situation.

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Jenny Carney Principal YR&G
Mar 07 2011
LEEDuser Expert
8210 Thumbs Up

Control types in Group Multi-occupant Spaces

All,

Word on the street is that there's a new standard teams are being held to for the types of controls that are allowed in group spaces. Historically, pretty much any kind of control was allowed, including on/off switches, and the current Reference Guide seems to promote that by saying “no specific types or numbers of lighting controls are required.”

In very recent times, only more advanced controls like dimmers have been allowed. Unfortunately, there's not very much clear information about what's going to be allowed in the new lighting control world order, but I've heard that tiered lighting, dimmers, and (curiously) on/off switches + blinds to daylight window are okay.

Just a heads up, and maybe people can chime in the types of controls that seem to be getting accepted as of late.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Mar 14 2011 LEEDuser Expert 18072 Thumbs Up

Very timely heads up, Jenny. We recently saw similar comments for this credit:

"Lighting controls must enable adjustments to suit task needs....Please provide documentation demonstrating that the group multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. have controls that are adjustable to suit group activities and allow flexibility in different uses. On/off controls and occupancy sensors alone are not sufficient to meet credit requirements."

Again, they're not specifying the types of controls, but this does suggest dimmers, stepped dimming, separately switched banks or zones, or bi-level switching. The BD&C Reference Guide for IEQc6.1 has a list of these controls in Figure 2 on page 524, which would seem to apply here as well.

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Mar 16 2011 LEEDuser Expert 8952 Thumbs Up

I've always found the occupancy sensor allowance in this credit to be odd (and inconsistent with occupant control, even if its consistent with energy savings) but I'm surprised by this kind of mid-course correction. Isn't it incumbent on USGBC/GBCI to make a formal announcement of this kind of policy change, and to exempt buildings registered before the announcement? I dare say that many projects may have elected not to change control regimes because they were considered compliant even a few weeks ago.

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Andrea Marzullo LEED Specialist, OSC/CFEEA Sep 26 2011 Guest 342 Thumbs Up

I agree with Dan on the compliance issue. Anyway, this is what I have to add in this thread from my review received 9/20/2011: "Various switches for different lighting levels, dimmer switches, or a simple on/off switch accompanied by blinds on the windows are examples of acceptable lighting controls for multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations."

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Wendy Gibson
Sep 03 2010
Guest
1514 Thumbs Up

multi-occupant spaces

We have some rooms in our buildings that were originally intended to be office spaces, but due to downsizing or new tenant configurations tenants have made them (very) small conference rooms by throwing in two chairs and small round table. I have two questions regarding these small multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations..

1. You mention in your "bird's eye view" and Checklists sections that multi-occupant spaces should have at least two switches, however, in the reference guide (pg 399, under calculations) it states that "no specific types or numbers of controls are required." I understand that one switch may not be the flexible in large conference rooms, but these smaller conference rooms, one lighting switch appears to very flexible and it appears LEED does not have an actual standard, so they should comply with the credit?

2. At any moment one of our tenants could decide to turn these spaces back into an office, their intended use. Therefore complying the credit. Do we even need to count these as actual conference rooms?

Any thoughts would be appreciated! Thank you!

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Natalie Bodenhamer Associate, Altura Associates, Inc. Sep 14 2010 Guest 846 Thumbs Up

Hi Wendy, good questions.

1. You are correct. As the Reference Guide states, “no specific types or numbers of lighting controls are required.”

2. I advise treating the rooms based on their current function. As they are being used for groups of two or more to meet, they should be considered as multioccupant spaces for the calculation.

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Pablo Fortunato Suarez Principal ESD Consultant/Architect GreenArc Sustainable Building & Architecture
Aug 18 2010
Guest
3016 Thumbs Up

cafeteria as special use space?

Pardon the re-post. This was included in an earlier thread but might have been over-looked:

1) Is it safe to assume that cafeterias fall under "special use spaces"? Special-use spaces mentioned were defined above as spaces "where visitors have limited access to lighting controls. In relation to this, we can claim that "staff will be available to adjust lighting conditions as necessary" since there is sufficient staff in the area to do this.

2) If not what are the requirements for this space to meet this credit for cafeterias? does the space lighting need to be zoned?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 20 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

I would say a cafeteria is a special-use space, yes.

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Sherri Santellan Civil Engineering Coordinator Commerce Construction Co., L.P.
Jun 16 2010
Guest
94 Thumbs Up

Warehouse lighting

Is this credit achievable for a warehouse? The offices certainly can have controls/task lighting. But the majority of the building is high-stack racks and lighting is accomplished with natural skylights and usually high, overhead lamps. Does LEED disregard this space? It is multi-occupant and it is regularly occupied (not really an unoccupied storage space). The guide says multi-occupant spacesConference rooms, classrooms and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. Individuals using these spaces share the lighting and temperature controls and they should have, at a minimum, a separate zone with accessible thermostat and an air-flow control. Group multi-occupant spaces do not include open office plans that contain individual workstations. are "e.g., classrooms or conference areas." We do not conceive any means of bringing direct control of lighting to 50% of the warehouse occupants, primarily persons on forklifts loading/unloading from truck trailers or train cars to stacks.

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Natalie Bodenhamer Associate, Altura Associates, Inc. Jun 17 2010 Guest 846 Thumbs Up

Good question Sherri. As the issue is not addressed in the LEED EB O+M Reference Guide, I searched past CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide (Credit Interpretation Requests) for insight. The issue of including warehouse space is addressed in a LEED NCv2.2 CIR. The CIR response is, “Manufacturing floor, warehouse, and shipping/receiving spaces that are, in fact, regularly occupied must be considered regularly occupied for the purpose of this credit.” I understand that it may not be reasonable to allow for occupant controlled lighting, however the CIR states that “if functional or safety requirements do not allow for occupant control in majority of the spaces with 80% of the occupants, then those spaces, and by consequence, this building, does not meet the intent or the requirements of the credit.” I hope this helps.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Mar 14 2011 LEEDuser Expert 18072 Thumbs Up

For a warehouse or manufacturing facility with high bayA bay is a component of a standard, rectilinear building design. It is the open area defined by a building element such as columns or a window. Typically, there are multiple identical bays in succession. lighting alone, this credit may not be achievable. One strategy we've seen accepted in the past for similar project types is to provide task lighting at certain locations and different lighting controls for different sub-spaces.

The credit was documented with a detailed analysis of all spaces and functional tasks within the space and showed for each space and function the number of users, duration of use, nature of task being performed, lighting requirement (ambient only, task only, task + ambient, dimmable, high iluminance, daylight, etc), the lighting strategy provided, and the controls provided.

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Oscar Enguita thecnician lavola
Jun 02 2010
Guest
81 Thumbs Up

spaces to consider

We are trying to certified an offices building from our company. I was considering if I need to take in account all the areas of the buiding. Icluding toilets, corridors, ... or the credit only concerns to workspaces.
In this case, Do I have to define a specific space for these uses in the form?
Thanks in advance!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 02 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Oscar, you'll find that this question is clearly answered in content available to our members above in the Checklists section.

Please review that guidance and check back with more specific questions on your project.

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Rachael McClain
Apr 05 2010
Guest
1353 Thumbs Up

One on/off switch for private offices

I was reading the requirements above, and it says for for private offices the requirements can be met with only one on/off switch. That doesn't seem very flexible for the occupant. Is this information correct? They do not require task lighting for private offices only overhead lighting?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 05 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Rachael, it seems like your question is about what is a "best practice" vs. what meets the LEED requirement.

An on-off switch meets the requirement by providing "flexibility," and so does task lighting (both discussed in a bit more detail in the Checklists section above).

To your point, I think it would be smart, however, to focus beyond LEED to what actually provides a benefit to the occupants and for energy efficiency.

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RASHID HAMEEN
Mar 16 2010
Guest
653 Thumbs Up

OVER HEAD CEILING LIGHTS

Our factory is equipped with both task lights at the machinery and with overhead ceiling lights. I want to know whether is it necessary to use control switches both to those or will it be sufficient enough if we use individual controls to machine task lights?
Please submit your views on this.....

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 17 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, just having the ability to adjust the task lights is sufficient here. The intent is to give occupants the ability to make adjustments for comfort, but total control over on/off for the whole interior is not necessary.

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