EBOM-2009 IEQc3.4: Green Cleaning—Sustainable Cleaning Equipment

  • EBOM_IEQc3-4_Type3_CleaningEquipment Diagram
  • Challenging for projects new to green cleaning

    This credit can be one of the more challenging to achieve if your project is not currently using compliant cleaning equipment—and many projects are not, particularly those that are paying attention to green cleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. for the first time.

    The credit requirements are actually fairly straightforward. You must use at least one piece of cleaning equipment in order to be eligible, 20% of all your cleaning equipment must comply with the equipment-specific criteria, and 100% of equipment purchased during the performance period must comply with the criteria.

    Two things to watch

    There are two things you have to pay attention to in order to comply with this credit:

    1. Equipment inventory: A list of all equipment used in the building for cleaning, including equipment from outside vendors. 20% of this inventory must meet the applicable stainability criteria.

    2. Buying new equipment: You may need to add equipment to your inventory in order to bump it up to the 20% threshold, or you may just need new equipment, but in either case, make sure it meets the applicable stainability criteria.

    It’s fairly common to have a piece of equipment that meets some but not all of the criteria—the noise limit, for example, can be difficult to achieve. See the chart below for a list of equipment types addressed in this credit and the credit criteria for each.

    Remember that this credit does not pertain to permanently installed cleaning equipment, such as dishwashers and washing machines. It regulates only the following portable equipment:

    • vacuum cleaners 
    • carpet extraction equipment 
    • powered floor-maintenance equipment (including battery-powered floor buffers and burnishers)
    • propane-powered floor equipment
    • automated scrubbing machines. 

    The other primary challenge for this credit is getting the right product information from vendors. Working with a knowledgeable, trusted vendor is good, but it’s not enough—you’ll still need to investigate their recommendations to make sure that the equipment is LEED-compliant.

    Start with compliant vacuums

    If you need to purchase more equipment to make your equipment fleet 20% compliant, you might try focusing first on purchasing compliant vacuums. Vacuums often make up a large component of the cleaning equipment fleet, are less expensive than most other types of floor maintenance equipment, and they need to be replaced more often.

    Consider these questions when approaching this credit

    • How is your project team currently sourcing equipment?
    • Who can supply an inventory of equipment currently used in your building? 
    • If your team is currently sourcing equipment through a vendor, does the vendor have access to credit-compliant equipment? If compliant equipment is not currently used in your project building, can you make the shift to compliant equipment?
    • Is your project team willing, and authorized, to take over purchasing if the current vendor is not on board?
    • How much of a cost premium is your team willing to pay to achieve compliance? This will vary according to how much equipment you need to purchase in order to meet the 20% threshold. 
    • How obsolete is your current inventory of cleaning equipment? Have there been regular complaints about any particular pieces of equipment from either maintenance personnel or occupants? If obsolete equipment needs to be replaced anyway, that can present a good opportunity to earn this credit.

    FAQs for LEED-EBOM IEQc3.4

    In a multi-tenant building, some tenants have their own cleaning contractor. Does their equipment need to be included in the calculations for this credit?

    Yes, all vendors’ equipment is included in this credit. That said, for multi-tenant buildings, up to 10% of the floor area may be exempted from almost any credit if the area is not under management control. If you do not control the cleaning in more than 10% of your building, you will have to work closely with your tenants in order to achieve the relevant green cleaning credits. For IEQp3, on the other hand, the scope of the green cleaning policy can be limited to the areas directly controlled by building management. This applies to the IEQp3 policy only, and not to IEQc3.4.

    How often do I need maintain equipment in order to meet the credit requirements?

    A prescriptive frequency for equipment isn’t established within the credit requirements. So, it’s up to your team to determine the appropriate frequency. However, it is important to demonstrate that there is a maintenance program in place for all of the equipment in your documentation. For example, vacuums will need bag replacements or filter changes. Examples for other less frequent maintenance will include inspections of or replacement of electrical components of equipment.

    Does the project building need to make any purchases during the performance period?

    No equipment purchases need to be made during the performance period in order to earn the credit as long as your current inventory is at least 20% compliant. Note however that any purchases made during the performance period must comply with the sustainability criteria.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

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  • Begin by creating an inventory of the portable powered cleaning equipment currently in use at your project facility. The inventory should include the name, manufacturer and model number of each type of equipment, the number of pieces of each type of equipment, the date each piece was purchased, and the price at which the equipment was purchased.


  • Be sure to include vendor-provided as well as building-provided equipment in your inventory. Some vendors have a master list of all the equipment they use and can provide this. If your vendor can provide such a list, work together to highlight the specific equipment types, names, manufacturers, numbers, and dates of purchase applicable to your project building.


  • If you already have a comprehensive list of equipment currently in use, this will save time. If not, you'll need to schedule some time to compile your inventory. 


  • Each type of equipment is subject to specific sustainability criteria. Check your equipment inventory and equipment spec sheets against these criteria, and document in the tracking form on LEED Online.


  • By the end of the performance period, at least 20% (by cost or number of pieces) of all cleaning equipment used in your project building must comply with the rating system criteria. 


  • Teams usually use the number of pieces to demonstrate compliance, though cost is an acceptable approach. If you have several relatively inexpensive pieces of non-compliant equipment and one very expensive compliant piece, it may make sense to run the numbers to see if you meet the 20% threshold by cost, if you can’t meet it by number of pieces. If you don’t have cost data for existing equipment and you want to demonstrate compliance by cost, work with suppliers that carry the equipment to gather the cost data.


  • If at least 20% of the cleaning equipment currently used in your project building does not comply with the criteria, you’ll have to purchase enough cleaning equipment to meet this benchmark by the end of the performance period in order to earn the credit. This can make the credit costly.


  • Establish a purchasing goal, based on the details of your current inventory, to meet the 20% overall inventory requirement―so that you'll know exactly what purchases need to be made to meet the threshold.


  • Establish a system for tracking the cost and number of pieces of cleaning equipment purchased during the performance period. Remember, to earn this credit, 100% of cleaning equipment purchased during the performance period must comply with the associated criteria. You are not required to set up a tracking system, but you will need to provide this information, so it’s good to have a tracking infrastructure in place before you start making purchases.


  • Before your team takes on hours of research to identify credit-compliant equipment, consult with your vendor. Many suppliers and vendors are familiar with compliant equipment and may be able to offer guidance on which models best suit your facility’s needs as well as meet the credit criteria. However, always verify vendor claims by asking for product literature that demonstrates its credit-compliant attributes. 


  • If your team does not currently purchase cleaning equipment through a supplier, you'll need to research compliant alternatives yourself. Begin by looking into the equipment offered by your current distributors. Some popular manufacturers offer compliant cleaning equipment. You can also find a list CRI Green Label compliant products on the Carpet and Rug Institute’s website (see Resources).  


  • Your project team must obtain manufacturer data (through the supplier or your own research) demonstrating that your equipment complies with the equipment-specific standards listed in the LEED rating system. Just because the label says that cleaning equipment is “green,” ergonomic, or has safeguards that minimize damage to building surfaces, does not mean that the equipment meets all of the credit requirements. 


  • Manufacturer literature often does not specify the environmental standards with which the piece of equipment complies. This may be the case even for compliant equipment. If the manufacturer’s literature does not contain information regarding LEED criteria, secure further documentation that includes this information—such as a letter from the manufacturer verifying compliance.  


  • Generally, there's no cost premium associated with compliant cleaning equipment.


  • Dispose properly of your old cleaning equipment in an appropriate fashion. Certain equipment, such as battery-powered machines, may require special disposal procedures.


  • Consider testing new equipment before committing to a large bulk purchase in order to make sure that the equipment meets your facility's needs.


  • Implementing green alternatives may require staff retraining. Alternative equipment may require different techniques, frequency of use, etc.


  • Establish a system for tracking all maintenance and repairs performed on  cleaning equipment during the performance period.


  • The LEED Reference Guide language describing the criteria for the different types of cleaning equipment is a bit confusing—it is not always clear which criteria apply to which equipment types. All equipment must be ergonomically designed to minimize noise and vibration, and must have safeguards such as rollers or rubber bumpers to minimize damage to building surfaces (this is something you’ll have to look into for yourself, since the certifications do not address ergonomics and safeguards). The following is a summary of specific cleaning equipment that IEQc3.4 addresses and the associated compliance criteria.

     

During the Performance Period

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  • Since all equipment purchased during the performance period must comply with the associated criteria, make sure to track all equipment purchases throughout the performance period. 


  • Be sure to track all equipment maintenance and repair activities during the performance period. Such activities include, but are not limited to, vacuum bag replacement, mechanical repairs, and cleaning the machines.


  • If your vendor is responsible for repairing and maintaining the cleaning equipment, make sure that the vendor knows how to track all relevant activities in an easy-to-use log.


  • It's a good idea to track your purchases on an Equipment Inventory tracking sheet separate from the LEED Online credit form so that the documentation is easily accessible throughout the performance period. See the Documentation Toolkit for an example you can use. 


  • Shipping and handling costs must be consistently included or excluded in your calculations if you decide to track by cost. 


  • Cleaning staff may be averse to using new equipment. It is crucial to work with them to help them understand that compliant equipment is a viable alternative. Communicate the benefits of green compared to conventional equipment. For example, green equipment captures more particulates, is quieter, and has less negative impact on indoor air quality. Also, engage staff in testing equipment replacement options.


  • Your project team should submit manufacturer data for all equipment purchased during the performance period. Although you are not currently required to do so in the original submission, you may be asked to provide manufacturer’s data for all compliant equipment during the review process.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    IEQ Credit 3.4: Green cleaning - sustainable cleaning equipment

    1 point

    Intent

    To reduce the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous chemical, biological and particulate contaminants that adversely affect air quality, human health, building finishes, building systems and the environment, from powered cleaning equipment.

    Requirements

    Implement a program for the use of janitorial equipment that reduces building contaminants and minimizes environmental impact. The cleaning equipment program must require the following:

    • Vacuum cleaners are certified by the Carpet and Rug Institute “Green Label” Testing Program for vacuum cleaners and operate with a sound level of less than 70dBA.
    • Carpet extraction equipment used for restorative deep cleaning is certified by the Carpet and Rug Institute’s “Seal of Approval” Testing Program for deep-cleaning extractors.
    • Powered floor maintenance equipment, including electric and battery-powered floor buffers and burnishers, is equipped with vacuums, guards and/or other devices for capturing fine particulates and operates with a sound level of less than 70dBA.
    • Propane-powered floor equipment has high-efficiency, low-emissions engines with catalytic converters and mufflers that meet the California Air Resources Board (CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it.) or Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for the specific engine size and operate with a sound level of less than 90dBA.
    • Automated scrubbing machines are equipped with variable-speed feed pumps and on-board chemical metering to optimize the use of cleaning fluids. Alternatively, the scrubbing machines use only tap water with no added cleaning products.
    • Battery-powered equipment is equipped with environmentally preferable gel batteries.
    • Powered equipment is ergonomically designed to minimize vibration, noise and user fatigue.
    • Equipment is designed with safeguards, such as rollers or rubber bumpers, to reduce potential damage to building surfaces.

    Keep a log for all powered cleaning equipment to document the date of equipment purchase and all repair and maintenance activities and include vendor specification sheets for each type of equipment in use.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Develop, implement and maintain a policy for the use of low-impact powered cleaning equipment. Evaluate the powered cleaning equipment currently being used and make a plan for upgrading to powered cleaning equipment that reduces building contaminants and minimizes environmental impact.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

Organizations

California Air Resources Board

CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it. establishes standards for emissions from small engines. 


Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

The EPA has set standards for emissions from propane-powered floor equipment.

Web Tools

Carpet and Rug Institute

The CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. website lists labeled vacuums and deep-cleaning extractors. Search for approved products under Cleaning and Maintenance. 

LEED Gold Project Documentation

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of IEQc3.4 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

Cleaning Equipment Inventory

Use this spreadsheet to inventory your cleaning equipment and evaluate it against relevant sustainability criteria. A sample inventory is included, along with the basic credit criteria.

Equipment Maintenance Log

Use this form to track cleaning equipment maintenance, and to demonstrate that equipment was maintained throughout the performance period.

Product Cut Sheets

Carefully review product cut sheets to determine credit compliance, and follow up with manufacturers to check vague or incomplete information. Shown here are two cut sheets—one that required follow-up, and was found to be noncompliant, and one that provided all compliance information in the cut sheet, and met the credit requirements.

LEED Online Forms: LEED-EBOM IEQ

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

52 Comments

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cathy keagle
May 07 2015
LEEDuser Member
604 Thumbs Up

dry shampooer

What category does a dry shampooer fit into?

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Kimberly Schlaepfer Sustainability Coordinator LEED AP O+M, BD+C, YR&G May 07 2015 LEEDuser Expert 920 Thumbs Up

Hi Cathy,
Are you referring to the dry shampoo itself, or the machine that does the dry shampooing?

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cathy keagle May 11 2015 LEEDuser Member 604 Thumbs Up

The machine is the Onyx Natural Clean N20.

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Kimberly Schlaepfer Sustainability Coordinator LEED AP O+M, BD+C, YR&G May 11 2015 LEEDuser Expert 920 Thumbs Up

Hi Cathy,
Based on the product information sheet, on the Onyx Solutions website, this machine would fit into the category "Carpet Extractor".

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Jessica Tyler Architect Mead & Hunt
Sep 22 2014
Guest
22 Thumbs Up

Using EBOM credit as an ID credit for NC 2009 submittal

Project Location: United States

I would like to use this credit as an Innovation and Design credit for a New Construction (NC 2009) submittal. My project is obviously set up as a NC format online, and I do not have access to the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. forms for this credit. How do I gain access to these forms so that I might use all of this information for the ID submittal?

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CT G Sep 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 733 Thumbs Up

Jessica,
You can find the forms and samples in the section "Documentation Toolkit".
In addition you can download sample forms here: http://www.usgbc.org/sampleforms/v3.
I hope it helps you.

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Gabriel Frasson Project Manager OTEC
Jul 21 2014
Guest
276 Thumbs Up

System CRI certified

if the cleaning company says that the cleaning system is certified it would be accepted by LEED?
Or only the equipments ?
Because I found some companies that work with certified system, however, the equipment used in that system is not certified.
I'm little bit confuse about that

Other question is about some different certifications that I found, like Woolsafe, Patenturkunde and BMGF.
They meets the IEQ 3.4 criteria ?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jan 02 2015 LEEDuser Expert 6003 Thumbs Up

Hi Gabriel, the individual pieces of equipment need to meet the requirements. In other words, if there's a piece of equipment in use that is covered by the credit, it needs to individually meet the credit requirements.

The certifications that you've listed would not be accepted by the reviewer because they are not approved criteria - only the criteria outlined in the credit requirements are applicable. If equipment meets another certification it may be beneficial, but it isn't recognized by LEED.

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Victoria Bauer
Feb 03 2014
Guest
135 Thumbs Up

What if I don't know when/how much the vacuum was purchased for?

The building that I am currently working on getting LEED certification holds a contract with a janitorial service. They use the equipment that was there before their contract, and are unsure of when it was purchased, and for how much.

It is fair to estimate that the equipment was purchased the year prior to their contract, and just overestimate the price that the model is sold for today?

Thanks!

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 04 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6003 Thumbs Up

Hi Victoria, you can estimate the date of purchase if the equipment was purchased before the performance period began.

If you're not attempting to comply with the credit based on cost (and instead your metric is number of pieces of equipment), you can leave the cost section of the form blank.

Trista

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Terry Gorski via Greengrade LEED Management Software
Jan 23 2014
Guest
690 Thumbs Up

Recertification - Changed Cleaning Contractors

For a recertification, if the building management switches cleaning contractors partway through the performance period, and now completely different cleaning equipment is being used at the building, do both the old company’s and the new company’s maintenance logs need to be uploaded, even though the old equipment is no longer being used - but was in use during the recertification performance period? Do we still need to upload manufacturer spec sheets for the old vendor’s equipment that was purchased during the performance period, even though it is no longer in use at this building? And for the LEED Online Form, I believe we only provide purchase/cost data for equipment currently in use – is that correct? Thanks in advance for your help.

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6003 Thumbs Up

Hi Terry,

I would double check the latest recertification guidance for this specific credit to see the time frame that you’re required to submit documentation for. I think if the vendor switch happened prior to when you need to provide documentation, you could be spared the hassle of providing information about both sets of equipment, repair logs, etc. That said, I’d keep a copy of all documentation just in case the reviewers ask for additional documentation.

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Elizabeth Felder
Jan 07 2014
Guest
541 Thumbs Up

Equipment Eligibility

Hello, would an escalator cleaner apply to this credit? The brushes are motor-powered.

Thanks!

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 04 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6003 Thumbs Up

Hi Elizabeth, this is an interesting question. I think an escalator cleaner could be considered a type of automated scrubbing machine, which is covered by the credit.

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Elizabeth Felder Jul 18 2014 Guest 541 Thumbs Up

Thanks Trista! We will include it in our calculations.

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Marcia Gibson Architect Chenevert Architects
Nov 19 2013
LEEDuser Member
1684 Thumbs Up

percentage thresholds....

We are attempting to implement a green cleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. program in a LEED-NC project that will satisfy the LEED Innovation in Design credit.

Im posting here rather than LEED-NC forum - because it lacks a category for this. I thought some of you may know.

The language for LEED-EB green cleaning credits have alot of thresholds such as 20% of equipment must conform to criteria, but 100% of equipment acquired during performance period must conform to the critera.

For LEED-NC projects seeking ID credit, would the percentages always be 100%?

In the

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Nov 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6003 Thumbs Up

Hi Michael,

I think the same threshold requirements would apply to your situation. Any new equipment that’s purchased for the building would need to be compliant. It’s sort of like you’re starting your performance period now with the first purchase of any new equipment. But equipment that’s already been purchased (like if the cleaning vendor already owned equipment that they’ll bring on-site) - this equipment isn’t required to meet the criteria, as long as 20% of all equipment used in the building complies. Does that make sense?

Trista

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Timothy Casper Voith & Mactavish Architects
Jun 04 2013
Guest
315 Thumbs Up

Manual Equipment

Can manual equipment (ex: a carpet sweeper) that is used in place of powered equipment (ex: a vacuum) be counted when trying to achieve the 20% threshold for compliant inventory equipment?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jun 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6003 Thumbs Up

Hi Timothy,

This credit looks at the sustainability criteria met by powered equipment only to determine compliance. LEED performance metrics are intended to be the most reliable way to compare performance across different projects. Using your example, it would get a little tricky for teams to prove that they would have used a vacuum but chose to use a carpet sweeper (and difficult for reviewers as well to confirm those claims). And for this credit in particular, switching out powered equipment for manual equipment may not be better for building cleanliness and indoor air quality, making it tough to determine whether different manual cleaning methods would qualify as environmentally preferred over powered methods.

Thanks,
Trista

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Robin Obaugh Vice President - Engineering Hines
Feb 15 2013
Guest
399 Thumbs Up

Recertification Tracking

I have a question concerning Part 1 of the form and how it is to be used for a property that achieved this credit and is in it's 2nd performance period.

"Existing Equipment Log": Should the equipment on this list be the combined total of the original existing equipment list and any equipment purchased during the orginal PP? Bascially we have a new beginning list.

Also, do we enter a negative value under the existing list when old, less sustainable, devices are discarded?

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Megan Meiklejohn Sustainability Operations Director, East Coast , Healthy Buildings Mar 26 2013 Guest 1029 Thumbs Up

Robin, are you referring to Table IEQc3.4-1? In this table, you only need to identify the equipment that is currently in use at the project building. Therefore, if equipment that was used in the initial certification but has since been discarded, you should not list that equipment for re-certification (an do not use negative values).

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Kaeryn Gregory Sustainable Building Specialist Stantec
Jul 09 2012
LEEDuser Member
43 Thumbs Up

Are all carpet extractors considered equal?

My client is a school board and they have recently purchased a dry carpet extraction machine and cleaning product program, the machine is not CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. certified. The products used in the process are all green seal certified. The cleaning approach is quite different than the “deep restorative cleaning approach” and the carpets are easily dry within 24 hours. They have used this program with success in other schools.
Is the dry extraction machine comparable to the traditional wet extraction carpet machine and therefore must meet the requirement of being CRI certified?

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Megan Meiklejohn Sustainability Operations Director, East Coast , Healthy Buildings Sep 04 2012 Guest 1029 Thumbs Up

Hi Kaeryn,
Carpet extraction equipment must be certified by the Carpet and Rug Institute’s (CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100.) Seal of Approval testing program. Since your cleaning program is a bit different, I would submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide to the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). explaining the program, why it is sustainable, and the reason the extractor is not certified by CRI.

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Kelly Witosky Building Analyst Chelsea Group
Apr 13 2012
Guest
127 Thumbs Up

Wet/Dry Vacuums - What Product Category

I am hoping for some guidance on what product category wet/dry vacuums fall into. In the past we have called them "Vacuums", but the CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. (Carpet and Rug Institute) doesn't appear to certify wet/dry vacuums. It wasn't much of a problem because the properties had already met the 20% threshold with their other equipment so one or two wet/dry vacuums didn't hurt them. However, now we have projects that have been certified and are planning for recertification. If there is a need to purchase a wet/dry vacuum prior to the recertification it must meet sustainable criteria since 100% of equipment purchased during the Performance Period must comply.

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Megan Meiklejohn Sustainability Operations Director, East Coast , Healthy Buildings Nov 26 2012 Guest 1029 Thumbs Up

Hi Kelly,
Sorry for the delayed response! I’ve looked into wet/dry vacuums and they are not eligible for the CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. Seal of Approval – yet. CRI is currently developing a program for wet/dry vacs. So until the these vacuums are eligible for the Seal, any purchased wet/dry vacs should meet the other listed criteria for this credit (noise levels less than 70 dBaA decibel (dBA) is a sound pressure level measured with a conventional frequency weighting that roughly approximates how the human ear hears different frequency components of sounds at typical listening levels for speech. (ANSI S12.60–2002), vacuum guards, etc.). To be sure though, I highly recommend emailing the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). before purchasing a new wet/dry vac.

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Agnes Vorbrodt Principal VvS | Architects & Consultants
Apr 05 2012
Guest
356 Thumbs Up

Vacuum cleaners - CRI certification alternative for Europe?

I was wondering if any project managed to successfully document compliance with this credit in Europe (or outside the US) where CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. certified vacuum cleaners were unavailable. Thanks!

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Samantha Harrell LEED Project Reviewer certificate holder Apr 10 2012 Guest 3270 Thumbs Up

Hi Agnes,

The CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. website indicates that compliant vacuums are available from some vendors/manufacturers in Mexico and Canada. Perhaps there are also manufacturers in Europe willing to apply to have their products certified under CRI's Seal of Approval testing program.

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Susann Geithner CEO, Geithner Consulting Apr 10 2012 LEEDuser Member 13921 Thumbs Up

The teams in Europe, which I consult aren't applying for those credits, because there aren't any products or very few available. And you don't want to import your cleaner from the US. The USGBC is working to address issues like this and allow products with comparable certificate (European Eco label), but it's not there yet. Check the ACPs for international projects for updates in that regard.
My recommendation as of now, stay away from the credit. It's not feasible in Europe.

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Jaida Holbrook Enivronmental Engineer, Skanska Sverige AB Aug 06 2013 Guest 1507 Thumbs Up

In July the ACP's were officially published for international projects (Europe), but the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. publication still does not highlight this credit.

Am I missing something here?! Or will we have to wait till the next publication?

I would like to see this credit back on the table for European projects.

thanks!

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Gina Dederer URS Deutschland GmbH Jun 14 2016 LEEDuser Member 79 Thumbs Up

Has there been an update to the above discussion? Or are there any teams who have attempted using labels such as the EU Ecolabel for vacuum cleaners for documenting IEQc.3.4? The ACPs only refer to IEQc3.3, stating that the EU Ecolabel will be accepted as an alternative compliance path.
Can someone help?
Thank you.

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Kimberly Schlaepfer Sustainability Coordinator LEED AP O+M, BD+C, YR&G Jun 14 2016 LEEDuser Expert 920 Thumbs Up

Hi Gina,
Unfortunately, there has not been any update to the conversation on ACPs for IEQc3.4 for European countries. USGBC has not published guidance in any form that allows European projects to use alternate certifications for cleaning equipment. I wish I had better news for you!

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei
Aug 17 2011
LEEDuser Member
5539 Thumbs Up

Recertification & Performance Period Purchase

The credit requires all equipment purchased during the performance period to be 100% compliant to sustainable criteria. Does this imply during the recertification performance period of as long as 1 year to 5 years, all cleaning equipment purchases need to comply to the standards? and as the on-going process goes on, eventually all equipment inventory would be replaced with sustainable equipment?

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Oct 10 2011 LEEDuser Member 2418 Thumbs Up

Hi Jason

Yes, that's the idea! Eventually, your entire inventory would consist of equipment that meets the credit's sustainability criteria. But also be sure to maintain equipment maintenance logs throughout this timeframe as well. Good luck!

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Elizabeth Felder Jan 16 2014 Guest 541 Thumbs Up

Hello!

A property purchased a carpet spotter soon after the initial certification that does not have the CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. seal of approval. The spotter is much smaller and less expensive than a full-fledged extractor. It does have a mini-extractor wand, but would it necessarily be considered an extractor or an electric-powered floor equipment?

Thank you.

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Mayra Portalatin Project Manager Facility Engineering Associates, PC
Aug 11 2011
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289 Thumbs Up

Question about Scrubber Criteria

When reading requirements in the guide, it states that the sustainable criteria to be met by an automated scrubbing machine is:

"Automated scrubbing machines are equipped with variable-speed feed pumps and on-board chemical metering OR they use only tap water with no added cleaning products"

The scrubbing machine in question at the facility does not meet these two criteria, but it does meet the following:

1. Equipment is designed with safeguards (i.e. rollers, rubber bumpers) to reduce potential damage to building surfaces.
2. Battery-powered equipment use (gel batteries)

I entered the information on the form to see what would happen and it does appear to accept the environmnetally preffered gel battery-powered and records the equipment as meeting a sustainable criteria. Is this correct? Or is this maybe a glitch in the form within LEED Online?

Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 14 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Mayra, have you learned anything more about this? My understanding is that the criteria you checked are required for ALL equipment, but that scrubbers must also meet the additional criteria.

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Feb 16 2012 LEEDuser Member 2418 Thumbs Up

Yes, Tristan is right. That appears to be a glitch. The variable speed pumps AND/OR water-only cleaning are additional requirements for automated scrubbers. Good luck, Myra!

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Jared Silliker Owner Silliker + Partners
Jan 25 2011
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1259 Thumbs Up

CRI vs. noise level for vacuums.

In responding to review comments on a recent project I'm realizing that the vacuum requirement contains two separate elements, which I previously saw as one. The way the rating and online form are worded, I assumed that the dBAA decibel (dBA) is a sound pressure level measured with a conventional frequency weighting that roughly approximates how the human ear hears different frequency components of sounds at typical listening levels for speech. (ANSI S12.60–2002) rating was part of the CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. certification. Apparently, this is not the case. CRI confirmed that they do not test for noise levels, which puts the responsibility back on the manufacturer. Unfortunately, I'm now having trouble verifying the dBA level for a CRI-certified vacuum.

Any other suggestions besides purchasing a Consumer Reports subscription?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 23 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Jared, I guess the obvious question is whether you've checked with the manufacturers to see if they provide this information? I'm not sure that Consumer Reports or any other organization offers this kind of data.

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Jared Silliker Owner, Silliker + Partners Feb 24 2011 Guest 1259 Thumbs Up

Yep ... manufacturer turned out to be no help. Consumer Reports has the data, but will not release it despite a formal request to the Testing Director. They confirmed that they record dBAA decibel (dBA) is a sound pressure level measured with a conventional frequency weighting that roughly approximates how the human ear hears different frequency components of sounds at typical listening levels for speech. (ANSI S12.60–2002) levels to do their sound ratings, but they keep the raw data confidential. Lesson learned ... CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. and sound are separate metrics, to be documented separately.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 24 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

If you do find a source for information, please post about it here. Good luck.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 26 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Jared, this might be cold comfort, but I confirmed with a colleague that most manufacturers do list this data. If the cut sheet doesn’t list it and the manufacturer can’t tell him what the dBAA decibel (dBA) is a sound pressure level measured with a conventional frequency weighting that roughly approximates how the human ear hears different frequency components of sounds at typical listening levels for speech. (ANSI S12.60–2002) level is, unfortunately you probably are out of luck for that product.

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Alice Cook
Jan 07 2011
Guest
707 Thumbs Up

LEED compliant vacuum - safeguards for facility?

Our cleaning crews purchased a vacuum that is has a built-in design feature to protect/safeguard for facilities from damage. The brochure states: 'Reduce possible damage to the facility and/or merchandise with durable polyethylene construction that bends and gives.' This is not a bumper or roller as listed in LEED requirements, but it is a safeguard to protect facilities. Will this pass review? It meets all other requirements: CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. Green Label Plus, 69 DBAA decibel (dBA) is a sound pressure level measured with a conventional frequency weighting that roughly approximates how the human ear hears different frequency components of sounds at typical listening levels for speech. (ANSI S12.60–2002), etc.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 09 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

I think this should be allowed. The LEED credit language (see above) lists bumpers and rollers as examples, not as absolute requirements.

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John Ida President Urban Works, Inc.
Oct 04 2010
LEEDuser Member
1135 Thumbs Up

Equipment Maintenance Log

The Reference Guide states that the project needs to "Keep a log for the repair and maintenance of any cleaning equipment used at the project site". The sample maintenance log shows equipment type, daily, weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, and quarterly maintenance. However, the description of a "log" implies that dates or initials would be required. This seems over the top for LEED to require signatures for daily tasks... should we follow the LEED reference guide sample? Or is it implied that initials and dates are also necessary?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 08 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Usually when they give a sample in the reference guide it's pretty safe to follow that.

I think the key thing is doing what works for your project. Would the reference guide example work on your project, or should dates be required in the log, to make sure that maintenance happens?

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Rachael McClain
May 24 2010
Guest
1516 Thumbs Up

rented equipment

We rent equipment to do interim cleanings in-house, for example carpet cleaners can be rented. As long as the rented carpet cleaner meets the sustainable criteria we are still meeting the intentions of this credit, right? We do not have to actually purchase a carpet cleaner that meets the sustainable criteria?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 24 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, I think your approach should work. The IEQc3.4 credit language calls for a program meeting the criteria, not for specific purchases. The same situation would also occur with vendors.

The LEED Online form for this credit, however, is a little less flexible on this point—it seems to assume that you must purchase equipment. You may need to check the box and supply alternative documentation.

If you go this route, let us know how it turns out.

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Carey Paul
May 04 2010
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174 Thumbs Up

Cleaning Equipment in Multi-family Residential

We are going for LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. with a multi-family (senior housing) residential building with approximately 80 units. There is limited community space and mostly outdoor corridors. Is it necessary for each occupant to use cleaning equipment the complies in order to achieve this credit or is it just the building janitorial staff that must use compliant equipment? Would that also be the case for IEQc3.3? Any advice is much appreciated!

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC May 05 2010 LEEDuser Expert 10588 Thumbs Up

Wish I had a definitive answer on this but I haven't seen enough M-F residential projects go through the review process to confidently predict the outcome. One might reasonably argue that only the building janitorial staff is within the bounds of this credit (effectively the areas of the building within management control) as it is functionally impossible to control the equipment choices of individual tenants. On the other hand, GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). might conclude that without control over resident spaces (the majority of the building SF), awarding the credit would violate the basic credit intent. I see validity in both arguments, but until formal guidance exists on using EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. for residential projects, you may just have to take a shot at this with the awareness that its a 50/50 at best.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 05 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

It's worth noting that for this credit (as opposed to IEQc3.3, which you're also concerned about), the only regulated cleaning equipment that tenants are likely to have is vacuum cleaners. Maybe it would not be much to ask for tenants to comply with the credit requirements for vacuum cleaners.

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Corinna Kester Consultant, Sustainable Buildings and Operations, KEMA May 05 2010 Guest 555 Thumbs Up

Hi all - one thing you might want to check out would be two EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. CIRs for residential projects, which may shed some light on this issue. Look at the EBOM 2008 CIRs for MRc1 and MRc2. It looks like no similar CIR was submitted for any of the EQ credits, but these might give insight into an acceptable compliance path.

However, it should be noted that previous CIRs do not set precedence for EBOM 2009 projects, so you will definitely want to submit a project-specific CIR outlining any proposed compliance paths.

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