EBOM-2009 IEQc3.6: Green Cleaning—Indoor Integrated Pest Management

  • IEQc3.6 diagram
  • Pest management with reduced health impacts

    To earn this credit, you need to design a plan for integrated pest managementIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment. (IPM), and implement it 100% of the time. This approach to pest management limits the negative impacts that conventional pest management often has on the health of building occupants and uses the least-toxic means of pest management possible.

    Put it in writing

    Be sure to incorporate your chosen best practices and integrated methods directly into vendor contracts and standard operating procedures. Many teams are already using compliant practices, like pest monitoring and sanitation. If you’re in that position, focus your efforts on expanding and formalizing your current best practices into a comprehensive plan. Work with your vendors to establish compliant best practices, including:

    • using chemical pesticides only as a last resort;
    • familiarize your team and vendors with the San Francisco list and use only the approved pesticides on the list;
    • and provide appropriate notification to occupants whenever toxic pesticides are applied.

    Your vendor is your friend

    This credit depends heavily on how well you can work with your vendors and make sure that everyone is following compliant practices. If none of your current practices comply, you and your building management and vendor will have to develop a comprehensive plan that meets all of the credit requirements.

    Minimal costs are involved with revising vendor contracts and implementing environmental best management practices. Some green practices or products may carry small premiums. For example, additional site visits by your contractors for proactive pest monitoring may carry additional hourly charges. On the other hand, reduced use of pesticides and better preventive practices may reduce costs.

    If your plan is created by an in-house staff person familiar with and responsible for maintaining the project site, there will be minimal costs associated with creating the credit documentation.

    Two for one

    Streamline your documentation by creating one Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program for both indoor and outdoor pest management, which is covered under SSc3: Integrated Pest Management, Erosion Control, and Landscape Management Plan.  

    Consider these questions when approaching this credit

    • Your project building may already use components of an IPM program, even if it does not yet have an IPM plan.
      • Are pests controlled through mechanical and biological controls rather than chemicals?
      • Are sanitation practices and structural repairs used to resolve pest issues in and around the facility?
      • Are pest populations monitored and inspected?
      • What types of preventive pest management exist at the project building and site?
      • Are chemical controls considered a last resort for managing pest populations?
    • Do existing vendors offer environmentally friendly services? If they don’t, are they willing to learn and adopt new practices?
    • Does the project building have a staff member dedicated to managing pest and landscape issues?
      • If not, it is important to designate at least one point person to develop and implement the comprehensive Integrated Pest Management Plan.
      • If so, it is important to get that designated person involved from the start of the project to ensure that all environmental best management practices are thoroughly developed, included in any related vendor contracts, and implemented on an ongoing basis.

    FAQs for LEED-EBOM IEQc3.6

    If pest management of interior/exterior plants is conducted by a separate vendor, do they have to comply with the IPM requirements?

    Yes, all pesticides and pest management practices conducted at the project building and site should comply with the credit requirements 100% of the time.

    In a multi-tenant building, some tenants have their own cleaning contractor. Does their equipment need to be included in the calculations for this credit?

    Yes. Maybe you can get the companies to compete against each other to improve their practices!

    Most of the chemicals being used for my project are not listed in the San Francisco Reduced-Risk Pesticide List. Does this mean that the credit cannot be achieved?

    It's always good to look into non-chemical and least toxic options prior to applying conventional pesticides; however, many pesticides, including insecticides and herbicides, that are not classified as Tier 3 products on San Francisco's list can be used in and around a project building so long as you issue universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. prior to applying the chemicals.

    We have notified the tenants 72 hours prior to the pesticide application but now the pest control vendor needs to refill the toxic pesticide. Do we need to use universal notification for a refill?

    Yes, occupants need to be notified at each instance of a pesticide application.

    If I’m only applying pesticides to one floor in my building. Am I required to notify all tenants, or can I just notify the occupants on that floor?

    Universal notification requires that all tenants be notified. One approach is to post signs in common areas, such as elevators and lobbies. Another is to provide email notification to tenant representatives in a multi-tenant building.

    What do I do if have a project outside the U.S. where many of the pesticides listed on the San Francisco Reduced-Risk Pesticide List are not available?

    The best thing to do is to compare the active ingredients of your products to those listed on the San Francisco Reduced-Risk Pesticide List. Brand availability varies around the world, so when that isn't the most effective way to monitor these products, check the active ingredient and concentration to determine which tier the product would fall under based on pesticides listed on the San Francisco Reduced-Risk Pesticide List.

    What are the different requirements for implementing the IPM Plan for SSc3 versus IEQc3.6?

    SSc3 requires IPM practices be implemented 100% of the time for the building site and grounds within the LEED boundary, and IEQc3.6 requires IPM practices to be implemented 100% of the time within the building interior.

    Are rodent baits ever considered least toxic?

    Rodenticide is never considered least toxic and therefore universal notification is required for this credit. To avoid using rodenticide, trying less toxic pest management approaches, such as building repairs or changes to cleaning procedures, to address the underlying cause of the rodent problem. Traps are also considered a non-toxic approach to rodent management.

    Is there a required frequency for pest service site visits in order to be considered integrated pest management? How frequent and how rigorous should the inspections be in order to comply?

    There is no minimum required frequency for pest management and based on your building's individual pest management needs. That said, the intent is for the program to be proactive—utilizing integrated pest management practices beforehand in order to avoid the future need for pesticides. Often, a pest management log will include inspections, cleaning, maintenance and monitoring activities, as well as logging any pesticide applications.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

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  • Conduct an inventory of all pest management products and practices currently implemented on the project site and associated grounds. Consider combining outdoor and indoor IPM programs, using one inventory of pest management practices to document compliance with this credit and with SSc3: Integrated Pest Management, Erosion Control, and Landscape Management Plan. The inventory needs to address exterior and interior IPM issues.


  • Revise your inventory to only include pesticides listed as Tier 3 (least-toxic) in the San Francisco Pesticide Hazard Screening List. From your inventory, be sure to communicate those pesticides that shouldn't be used anymore.


  • Even if you do not have a comprehensive IPM plan, you may already conduct one or more of the following activities, making it easier to add additional IPM practices:

    • routine site inspections and maintenance,
    • routine pest inspections,
    • pest population monitoring,
    • substantial evaluation of the need for pest control,
    • and sanitation as a preventative measure for pest infestations.

  • Work with key operations staff and vendors (such as landscaping and pest management) to determine whether any of their current methods qualify as environmental best management practices.


  • Vendors are critical to achieving this credit. Make sure the vendors are up to speed on the requirements. Moreover, have a check-in each time the pest vendor visits the building to ensure best practices are being followed.


  • Integrated pest management (IPM)


  • Indoor and outdoor IPM plans are commonly combined and carried out by a single contractor. Given that an IPM plan focuses on prevention, it makes sense to think of interior pest problems within the context of exterior conditions, including the building envelope and entry points. Additionally, combining outdoor and indoor IPM makes implementing the pest management policy (including future revisions) much easier, as there is only one document to oversee. 


  • If multiple vendors manage a variety of pest issues communicate IPM best practices to all vendors involved and formalize your expectations in contractual language. Designate a staff member who can facilitate communication between multiple vendors and ensure that their processes and methods complement one another.


  • Carefully examine pest management service offerings to verify that IPM is truly applied. Since IPM is still gaining traction in the industry, vendors often claim to practice IPM, even if they don’t fully understand the intent or requirements of it. Also, not all IPM programs are LEED-compliant. For example, if your vendor monitors pest populations, ensures that loading docks and trash receptacles are kept clean, and uses mechanical pest controls most of the time, but doesn’t provide universal notification when applying pesticides, their IPM program does not comply with the requirements.


  • At least one operations staff member with a solid understanding of the LEED requirements and the contents of the San Francisco Pesticide Hazard Screening List, should oversee IPM plan implementation. If no one has been designated the point person for pest-related issues, choose a staff person who has regular interactions with pest management vendors and is willing to learn about and implement nonchemical pest prevention and resolution measures.


  • The San Francisco Pesticide Hazard Screening List (see Resources) is a comprehensive list issued by the city of San Francisco that designates certain pesticides as “least-toxic,” meaning that they are safe enough so that building operators are not required to alert their occupants when these specific pesticides are applied at the project building. The IPM manager should understand how to review the list to determine if the pesticide in question is on the list and considered least-toxic.


  • Create an approval process for vendor proposals of new chemical applications. The facility’s IPM manager should review all proposed chemicals and work with the vendor to consider non-chemical solutions to pest issues before resorting to least-toxic or toxic pesticides. This review process should be included in vendor contract language. 


  • Notification of occupants is a cornerstone of a comprehensive IPM program. Whenever the use of toxic pesticides or rodent baits is deemed necessary to combat an infestation either inside or on the grounds, the IPM manager must issue an alert to all building occupants:

    • at least 72 hours before application of toxic pesticides or baits under normal conditions;
    • or within 24 hours after toxic applications in emergency conditions. 

  • Occupants may object to use of toxic pesticides. Use this as further motivation to avoid pesticide application.


  • Appropriate methods of toxic pesticide or bait application notification include: 

    • Emailing office workers
    • Posting signs for maintenance personnel 
    • If appropriate, communicate in non-English languages
    • Work with a tenant representative to pass along the notification to occupants in multi-tenant spaces.

  • Use the San Francisco Pesticide Hazard Screening List (see Resources) as your guide to determining if the chemical pesticides you use on your site are considered least-toxic or if they will require universal notification prior to administration. Any pesticide that meets San Francisco’s Tier 3 criteria is considered a least-toxic pesticide.


  • Pesticides not listed in the San Francisco Pesticide Hazard Screening List that meet Tier 3 criteria may also be considered least-toxic, but your project team should be prepared to demonstrate equivalency between the products used and the cited standard.


  • Non-rodent pesticides that do not meet Tier 3 criteria but are administered in self-contained baits are also considered least-toxic; no universal notification is required for their use.


  • All rodenticides, including self-contained baits, are always considered toxic and require occupant notification if used anywhere on the project site. 


  • Define the conditions under which your facility will resort to using toxic pesticides—for example, an infestation that poses a threat to the safety or well-being of human occupants. The IPM manager and vendors must understand the circumstances under which universal notification should be carried out. This definition should be included in contractual language with the vendors that handle pest management at the facility. Adopt a stringent definition of “emergency conditions”—times when only 24 hours of advanced notice is required.


  • Adoption of 100% of the IPM plan’s environmental best practices is required, and the program should govern all components of pest management at your project building and site.


  • When mechanical controls or least-toxic chemicals do not sufficiently address pest infestations, you are permitted to use toxic chemicals as a last resort, as long as you provide universal notification that complies with the credit requirements.


  • Work with the key operations staff and vendors to incorporate IPM practices into their operations.


  • Minimal costs are involved with revising vendor contracts and implementing environmental best management practices. Some green practices or products may carry small premiums. For example, additional site visits by your contractors for proactive pest monitoring may carry additional hourly charges. On the other hand, reduced use of pesticides and better preventive practices may reduce costs.


  • If your plan is created by an in-house staff person familiar with and responsible for maintaining the project site, there will be minimal costs associated with creating the credit documentation.


  • Describe, in a clear, detailed manner, how each of your best management practices reduces the environmental impacts associated with conventional practices.

During the Performance Period

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  • Contractors involved in various elements of the IPM plan conduct work according to their contracts and report all relevant activities to building management.


  • Check in each time the pest vendor visits the building to ensure best practices are being followed and only acceptable pesticides are being  used.


  • A designated staff person or vendor logs all pest management activities. In the event that toxic pesticides must be administered, record how and when universal notification was provided.


  • Do not submit service tickets in lieu of a pest management log, as they rarely include all the required information and are often illegible. Required information includes:

    • application date and time;
    • application manager;
    • location of application;
    • target pest;
    • the pesticide trade name and active ingredient;
    • the EPA registration number of the pesticide;
    • and documentation of whether the pesticide used qualifies as least-toxic.

  • The staff person responsible for overseeing your comprehensive plan communicates regularly with all service providers and conducts routine site inspections and evaluations to ensure that the plan is in place and functioning as intended.


  • The designated staff person should review all vendor practices and products prior to contract renewal (or annually) to identify opportunities for improvement and expansion of environmentally friendly practices.


  • When several contractors are engaged simultaneously in various components of the comprehensive plan, the staff member responsible for plan oversight should review all proposed activities before implementation to ensure an effective and coordinated effort.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    IEQ Credit 3.6: Green cleaning - indoor integrated pest management

    1 point

    Intent

    To reduce the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous chemical, biological and particulate contaminants, which adversely affect air quality, human health, building finishes, building systems and the environment.

    To reduce the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous chemical, biological and particulate contaminants, which adversely affect air quality, human health, building finishes, building systems and the environment.

    Requirements

    Develop, implement and maintain an indoor integrated pest managementIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment. (IPM) plan, defined as managing indoor pests in a way that protects human health and the surrounding environment and that improves economic returns through the most effective, least-risk option. IPM calls for using least-toxic chemical pesticides, minimum use of chemicals, use only in targeted locations and use only for targeted species. IPM requires routine inspection and monitoring. The plan must include the following elements, integrated with any outdoor IPM plan used for the site as appropriate:

    • Integrated methods, site or pest inspections, pest population monitoring, evaluation of the need for pest control and 1 or more pest control methods, including sanitation, structural repairs, mechanical and living biological controls, other nonchemical methods, and if nontoxic options are unreasonable and have been exhausted, a least toxic pesticide.
    • Specification of the circumstances under which an emergency application of pesticides in a building or on surrounding grounds being maintained by building management can be conducted without complying with the earlier provisions.
    • A communications strategy directed to building occupants that addresses universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do., which requires advance notice of not less than 72 hours before a pesticide under normal conditions and 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergencies, other than a least-toxic pesticide, is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds that the building management maintains.

    Any cleaning products included in the integrated pest management policy must meet the requirements for IEQ Credit 3.3: Green Cleaning—Purchase of Sustainable Cleaning Products and Materials.

    Develop, implement and maintain an indoor integrated pest management (IPM) plan, defined as managing indoor pests in a way that protects human health and the surrounding environment and that improves economic returns through the most effective, least-risk option. IPM calls for using least-toxic chemical pesticides, minimum use of chemicals, use only in targeted locations and use only for targeted species. IPM requires routine inspection and monitoring. The plan must include the following elements, integrated with any outdoor IPM plan used for the site as appropriate:

    • Integrated methods, site or pest inspections, pest population monitoring, evaluation of the need for pest control and one or more pest control methods, including sanitation, structural repairs, mechanical and living biological controls, other nonchemical methods, and if nontoxic options are unreasonable and have been exhausted, a least-toxic pesticide.
    • Specification of the circumstances under which an emergency application of pesticides in a building or on surrounding grounds being maintained by building management can be conducted without complying with the earlier provisions.
    • A communications strategy directed to building occupants that addresses universal notification, which requires advance notice of not less than 72 hours before a pesticide under normal conditions and 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergencies, other than a least-toxic pesticide, is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds that the building management maintains.

    Any cleaning products included in the integrated pest management policy must meet the requirements for EQ Credits 3.3–3.5.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Use IPM, a safer and usually less costly option for effective pest management. An IPM program employs commonsense strategies to reduce sources of food, water and shelter for pests in buildings and on the grounds and minimizes the use of pesticides.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

Publications

San Francisco Hazard Screening List

The SF Environment website provides links to the SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List, the SF Pesticide Hazard Screening Protocol, and the SF Reduced-Risk Pesticide List. Products listed on the Screening List are considered least toxic for LEED purposes. If your product does not show up on the Screening List, use the Screening Protocol to evaluate your product further and confirm it meets Tier 3 requirements. Any product that is not least-toxic requires universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. prior to application.


U.S. EPA Pesticides

This EPA website provides information on IPM and the environmental effects of pesticides. 

Other

San Francisco Pest Management Program

San Francisco operates a highly regarded IPM program. Through its pest management program, the city has developed comprehensive screening criteria for pesticides and maintains a list of allowable materials that meet the least toxic definition. 

Organizations

Bio-Integral Resource Center

This organization supplies a directory of least toxic pest control products and publications on various integrated pest managementIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment. (IPM) topics. 


IPM Institute of North America Inc.

The IPM Institute is an independent non-profit organization formed in 1998 to foster recognition and rewards in the marketplace for goods and service providers who practice Integrated Pest ManagementIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment..

Integrated Pest Management Plan

Your IPM plan demonstrates the specific environmental best management practices that are implemented at the project building on an ongoing basis. This template provides a structure for an Integrated Pest ManagementIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment. (IPM) plan compliant with LEED requirements. When properly completed, this document can be submitted as evidence of compliance with IEQc3.6 and contribute to compliance with SSc3.

Pesticide Application Log

This template provides an example of a pesticide log for documenting pesticide applications, when they are necessary.

IPM Best Practices

If you're looking to better understand how your practices compare with IPM best practices, this chart compares common standard practices with best practices—plus "optimal practices," for good measure.

Universal Notification

Use flyers like this example to provide universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. of pesticide application, as required by these credits.

LEED Gold Project Documentation

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of IEQc3.6 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

LEED Online Forms: LEED-EBOM IEQ

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.-2009 IEQ credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

v06 forms (newest):

v04 forms:

v03 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

67 Comments

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Elizabeth Felder
Jul 21 2014
Guest
114 Thumbs Up

Proprietary Ingredients

Hello, the herbicide used at one of our properties consists of 98% proprietary ingredients. If the manufacturer will not provide a breakdown, would we be disqualified for this credit? Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Apr 18 2014
LEEDuser Moderator

template update

LEEDuser has updated our IPM template that is available to members in the Documentation Toolkit above. The updated template removes diatomaceous earth and pyrethrins/pyrethrum as approved least-toxic treatments. GBCI has begun flagging these so we hope to save everyone some trouble.

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Ilona Johnson Project Manager, Lilker EMO Energy Solutions May 09 2014 Guest 117 Thumbs Up

I wonder if diatomaceous earth should really be removed from the least of “least toxic” methods. I see Michelle posted that a reviewer rejected diatomaceous earth/silica gel because it is listed in the SF list as a Tier 2 product. The old SF product list only includes one product with silica gel (Drione), and this product also contains PBO. The product is labeled as a Tier 2 product, but I wonder if that the rating is based on the presence of PBO rather than diatomaceous earth. Perhaps diatomaceous earth alone would in fact qualify as a Tier 3 product.

I reviewed diatomaceous earth in the PAN pesticides database and compared it against the criteria listed in Table 3 of the Guide to San Francisco’s Reduced Risk Pesticide List (http://www.sfenvironment.org/sites/default/files/fliers/files/sfe_th_gui...). The criteria include cancer, reproductive toxicity, endocrine disruption, etc. The only flag that comes up is under the acute toxicity rating, which is rated as “slightly toxic.” However, according to Table 3 of the SF Guide, low product toxicity would be classified in the “low” concern category, i.e. the Tier 3 category. Based on this guidance, I would conclude that diatomaceous earth is suitable for Tier 3 classification.

There is also an article by EPA that discusses the use of silica gel as a least toxic pesticide. It’s a little outdated, but it can be found here. http://www.epa.gov/oppsrrd1/REDs/factsheets/4081fact.pdf

Has anyone received any additional feedback on this topic? If you have any other thoughts, I would appreciate it.

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Ilona Johnson Project Manager, Lilker EMO Energy Solutions May 13 2014 Guest 117 Thumbs Up

Following up on this post, I had reviewed the 3 products in Drione using the PAN database, and the ingredient PBO was the only one that raised a toxicity flag. Looking at this again, the issue is probably not PBO, but rather pyrethrin. There have been increasing concerns about impact of pyrethrin on water bodies. But that still leaves the question of whether silica gel and diatomaceous earth not tied up with pyrethrin would be allowed. Thoughts?

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Mark Palmer Senior Green Building Coordinator City of San Francsico
Apr 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
23 Thumbs Up

Pest Prevention by Design guidelines

While it is not yet part of the LEED guidelines, you may find our new "Pest Prevention By Design" guidelines useful. This peer-reviewed resource assembles a long list of building design and retrofit tactics known to prevent pest problems. A pilot credit based on these guidelines is in the works. See:
http://www.sfenvironment.org/news/update/pest-prevention-by-design-guide...

Chris Geiger, with Mark Palmer

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Mark Palmer Senior Green Building Coordinator City of San Francsico
Apr 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
23 Thumbs Up

Clarification on the San Francisco list

Ever since the misprint in the original LEED 2009 EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. Reference Manual, we here in San Francisco have had to answer a lot of questions from confused LEED APs re: our pesticide lists. Many thanks to Trista and others for helping to clear this up. Please see our web page at:
http://www.sfenvironment.org/article/pest-management/least-toxic-pestici...
for further clarification.

I would like to recommend that whoever maintains this page correct the flow chart and text to remove the words "Reduced-Risk Pesticide List," which is NOT the appropriate reference (it is a list only for City government properties). I would also offer my whole-hearted agreement with Jason: The credit does not require the use of Tier III products, and the use of Tier III products does not mean that you are practicing integrated pest managementIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment.. As a matter of fact, as an IPM professional I can tell you that in many situations you will need to use some other products for effective management - for example, in cockroach baits. IPM is a decision making process that begins with prevention, and leaves pesticides - all pesticides - as a last resort.
(Chris Geiger, with Mark Palmer)

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 10 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Chris and Mark—good catch, I am that person and I have updated the diagram above. We updated our other language on the site some time ago, but that slipped through the cracks. Thanks for commenting here!

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American University Sustainability American University
Apr 08 2014
LEEDuser Member
843 Thumbs Up

Acceptable Forms of Universal Notification?

We have rat issues on our urban campus and our grounds staff has some concerns about limiting and slowing application of rodent pesticides in exterior use. Sometimes these applications are not associated with a specific building. Could we make a website that we would keep updated and that would be public for campus to list the date/time/application or does this need to be a flier on a door or email to the whole campus. I guess we use rodent baits and so would be giving notification frequently. Input would be helpful, thanks.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Coordinator Opsis Architecture
Jan 22 2014
LEEDuser Member
446 Thumbs Up

72 Hour Universal Notification conflicts with weather patterns?

I'm working with a Community College that has numerous campuses in the Portland, Oregon area to submit IEQc3.6 as an ID credit for LEED NC. They already have a robust IPM plan, based on Oregon State requirements (ORS 634) . However, only a 24 hour universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. is required by ORS for exterior applied products because the weather conditions change so rapidly. I am told that changing that to a 72-hour policy would be impractical, and lead to constantly changing plans to apply a product. Has anyone else experienced this roadblock before? Do you think it would fly to word the policy in such as way that 72-hours notification shall be given under favorable weather conditions, and a minimum of 24-hours notification shall be given when weather conditions are rapidly changing?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jan 23 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1384 Thumbs Up

Hi Heather,

This is an interesting situation that I haven’t come across before. I think one workaround could be to include this type of scenario (rapidly changing weather conditions that threaten the effectiveness of selected control strategies/products) under your definition of emergency condition. Then you’d be held to the requirement to give notification at least 24 hours after the application. My feeling is that if you then wanted to continue to follow the ORS requirements and give notification 24 hours ahead in this type of situation, that would still continue to meet the LEED universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. requirements. I’d be curious to hear other people’s thoughts on this too.

Trista

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Coordinator Opsis Architecture
Jan 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
446 Thumbs Up

EPA-Exempt Products

How have others handled EPA-exempt products that aren't found on the SF list? It seems you can't rely on the label of the product to determine if it has any of the hazards that would indicate Tier 1, 2, or 3 like you would other products that aren't listed on the SF list. For instance: http://www.envincio.com/essentria/product-dload/Essentria_IC3_label.pdf ?
With the discussion below indicating that DE and pyrethrins aren't Tier 3, it is clear you can't make any assumptions.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Coordinator, Opsis Architecture Jan 17 2014 LEEDuser Member 446 Thumbs Up

I just found on the Reduced Risk Pesticides the Essentria product listed above, listed as Tier 3. This is the list discussed below that we are not supposed to use for LEED. It does not show up in the SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List. In this case, could I reference the unsanctioned list?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Mar 09 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1384 Thumbs Up

Hi Heather,

The Essentria product has the FIFRA 25(b) Exemption per the MSDS1. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) are detailed, written instructions documenting a method to achieve uniformity of performance. 2. A report that manufacturers of most products are required to make available to installers and purchasers, informing them of product information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures, the existence of potentially hazardous ingredients, and providing instructions for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of products because it's so low-risk (http://www.epa.gov/oppbppd1/biopesticides/regtools/25b_list.htm). It should have no problem passing the LEED review since the ingredients are well-established least-toxic options. I'd provide a copy of the MSDS with the exemption highlighted. The reviewer should be able to see that, scan the ingredients list, and be satisfied that it qualifies as least-toxic.

Thanks!
Trista

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Coordinator, Opsis Architecture Mar 10 2014 LEEDuser Member 446 Thumbs Up

That is very informative. Thanks so much Trista!

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager YR&G
Nov 22 2013
LEEDuser Expert
1384 Thumbs Up

Updated SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List

Heads up that an updated list came out in September 2013 and can be accessed here - www.sfenvironment.org/sites/default/files/fliers/files/sfe_th_pesticides...

We'll be updating the LEEDuser plan template shortly,
Trista

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

FYI for all LEEDuser members, our template has been updated with the new SF list.

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Jennifer de Mooy Climate Adaptation Project Manager, State of Delaware, Division of Energy & Climate Jan 23 2014 LEEDuser Member 53 Thumbs Up

We are currently in the performance period and have an IPM plan that was written with the previous version of the template and SF list. The plan and (older) SF list are part of the contract with the pest management service. Do we need to amend our pest management contract to refer to the new SF list? Are there other changes in the template that need to be addressed?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1384 Thumbs Up

Hi Jennifer, I recommend updating your vendor contract with the new list (I don't think this would be too onerous for them to follow), and also updating your plan. GBCI will allow a grace period if your plan references the old list but at some point they'll start asking projects to make the update.

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Helen Samuel Staff Ernst & Young
Oct 15 2013
LEEDuser Member
137 Thumbs Up

International project - no EPA registration #'s

I am working on an international project and none of the pesticides used are EPA-registered. In the Pesticide Application Log, can this column can be left blank? We don't want this to jeopardize our ability to achieve this credit by not listing any #'s.

We will be providing universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. for all chemicals used that are not least-toxic.

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Oct 16 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1384 Thumbs Up

Hi Helen, I recommend noting in that column that the pesticide is not registered with the EPA, just so the reviewer doesn't wonder why the spot is blank. You shouldn't run into a problem if all the other columns are filled out with the pesticide details.

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Elizabeth Floyd Senior Project Manager Sustainable Design Consulting LLC
Sep 13 2013
LEEDuser Member
78 Thumbs Up

Emergency Circumstances - Examples needed

I'm looking for an example from an IPM Plan that has earned the LEED credit where the emergency circumstances were defined.

What constitutes a typical 'emergency circumstance'? Rabid rodents rampaging through an occupied space?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Oct 16 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1384 Thumbs Up

Hi Elizabeth, here's a definition that has passed GBCI review:

An emergency is defined as a circumstance where the immediate use of a pesticide is necessary to protect the health or safety of building users; when no economically feasible alternative that provides adequate control is available; or when significant economic loss will occur unless action is taken.

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Magda Aghababyan CEO Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd.
Jul 30 2013
LEEDuser Member
438 Thumbs Up

Scheduled pest management not a good strategy?

Is scheduled pest management activities (for example once a month) not an appropriate strategy under this credit? Does the credit mean that you can only apply pesticides when you identify significant pest activity in the facility?

Thank you.

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Megan Meiklejohn Sustainability Operations Director, East Coast , Healthy Buildings Jul 30 2013 Guest 723 Thumbs Up

Hi Magda,

The intent of this credit is to apply integrated pest managementIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment. strategies and reduce pesticides usage. Scheduled pest management is not a strategy to earn this credit. Pesticide usage should only be done when an issue is identified and it should be your last resort. If you do need to apply pesticides, use the least toxic options first. And if a situation arises in which you need to use a non least toxic pesticide , universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. to the building occupants must be provided.

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Michelle Bracewell-Musson Owner, LEED AP Musson General Contracting & Green Expectations Sustainability Solutions
Jun 04 2013
LEEDuser Member
1081 Thumbs Up

San Francisco's Pesticide Criteria and LEED Ref G. Contradiction

Hello,

I am just trying to make sure I put the appropriate resources into the IPM Plan and found this information that may be helpful via this link: http://www.sfenvironment.org/article/pest-management/least-toxic-pestici...

San Francisco's pesticide criteria and LEED

Managers of LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. certified green buildings are required to notify all building residents when pesticide applications are made. However, this “universal notification” is not required if only least-toxic products are used. The USGBC uses San Francisco’s hazard tier system to define “least-toxic products.” The Tier system denotes the level of hazard: Tier I = greatest hazard and Tier III = least hazard.

To find out if your pesticide is a Tier III product, you will need to review your product using the SF Pesticide Hazard Screening Protocol. The Pesticide Action Network database is particularly useful for this purpose. Some products have already been reviewed by SF Environment; these are listed in the SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List.

Important note for LEED practitioners

The LEED-EBOM 2009 Reference Manual, and the addenda to the manual, list incorrect web links for San Francisco's hazard screening protocol and the list of tier rankings for pesticides. The manual directed readers to San Francisco's Reduced-Risk Pesticide List, which is not appropropriate for this purpose. LEED professionals or building managers seeking information on pesticide tier rankings should consult the Hazard Screening Protocol or the Hazard Screening List above instead.

I am still needing confirmation from anyone in LEEDUser. Can you verify if this is true?

Thanks,

Michelle

Additional Information for Least-Toxic Pesticides for Green Buildings

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Michelle Cottrell President, Design Management Services Jun 04 2013 LEEDuser Member 670 Thumbs Up

Hi Michelle-

I received our certification review comments back in March in which the reviewer had made notion of this error and asked that it be corrected in our policy.
I hope this helps you!

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jun 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1384 Thumbs Up

Hi Michelle,

The "SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List" is the correct resource to reference in your IPM Plan - http://www.sfenvironment.org/article/pest-management/least-toxic-pestici....

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Michelle Bracewell-Musson Owner, LEED AP Musson General Contracting & Green Expectations Sustainability Solutions
May 29 2013
LEEDuser Member
1081 Thumbs Up

Bi-weekly Inspections - must be done by??

The Plan requires biweekly inpections: 'Visual inspections shall be performed at least 2 times per month, with treatment if necessary. After each visit, the pest contractor shall provide a printed service report that includes written observations, recommendations and details of IPM activities.'

Question: Can the Landscaper do weekly visual inspections and notify the Pest Contractor if there are issues? We currently have the Pest Contractor completing his logs on a monthly basis and the Landscaper completing his on a biweekly basis. This is due to the extra costs associated with extra site visits by the Pest Contractor. Does it have to only be the Landcape Pest Contractor as well as the building insect/rodent Pest Contractor? The Lanscaper takes care of landscape pests and he is there every week, so we feel this would be enough -your thoughts?

Also, do we have to post Universal NotificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. for locked rat bat boxes (Tier II)? These are out all of the time due to the adjoining fields.

Thanks,

Michelle

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jul 10 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1384 Thumbs Up

Hi Michelle, there's no requirement for who conducts the inspections. The main goal is to ensure that potential pest problems are identified and remedied timely to avoid larger pest outbreaks.

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Michelle Bracewell-Musson Owner, LEED AP Musson General Contracting & Green Expectations Sustainability Solutions
May 23 2013
LEEDuser Member
1081 Thumbs Up

JT Eatons Bait Blocks Peanut Butter or Apple (Tier ll)

Hello,

Due to where the building is located (between fields), it seems we need to have these bait blocks (placed outside the buildings) used continuously or there is a problem. These are solid blocks that are secure (locked). Does that mean we have to have the 72 hour notice up all of the time? We have glue strips (compliant) inside, but they do not do anything for the rats so both are being used.

I think we will be fine for this credit, I just need to know if the 72 hour notice must be up for bait blocks?

Thanks,

Michelle

Any suggestions?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jun 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1384 Thumbs Up

Hi Michelle,

You raise some good questions, and I think there are a couple of things to consider here. First, rodent baits never qualify as least toxic and therefore always require universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do.. Additionally, baits that are toxic after one dose (aka single-feed or second generation baits) can't be used if your building is located next to spaces where other kinds of wildlife could be affected. The fields you mentioned may qualify as this type of open area, so you'll want to be sure the bait you use is compliant.

But probably most importantly, it sounds like there may be an opportunity here to implement non-chemical/non-lethal methods, especially since it sounds like rats are a chronic problem. Structural repairs and increased sanitation (especially for outdoor trash bins/loading docks areas) can make your building a lot less attractive to rodents and help reduce the need for chemical controls.

Hope this helps,
Trista

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Michelle Cottrell President Design Management Services
Mar 26 2013
LEEDuser Member
670 Thumbs Up

Latest review comments based on LEEDUser policy template

I just received these review comments for this credit (we used the LEEDUser suggested policy template):

The IPM plan includes pyrethrum as a suggested treatment for flies on page seven, but pyrethrins are considered a Tier I (high
hazard) pesticide per the SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List. Further, the plan includes diatomaceous earth (DE) as a suggested
treatment for ants on page six, but it is unclear if DE is considered a least toxic pesticide. Based on internet research, the chemical
name of DE is Silica and Silica gel is listed as a Tier II (high hazard) pesticide per the SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List.

Additionally, note that on page five of the plan in the chemical controls section, the SF Reduced-Risk Pesticide List is referenced rather than SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List. The SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List contains the official list of products and chemicals that meet the Tier III Hazard Criteria and can be located at http://www.sfenvironment.org/article/pest-management/least-toxic-pestici.... As the SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List is referenced on page two of the plan under the least-toxic pesticide section, credit compliance is not affected. For future submittals, please ensure that the plan only evaluates least toxic and non-least toxic pesticides according to the San Francisco Tier III hazard criteria and the list contained in the SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List.

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Michelle Cottrell President, Design Management Services Mar 26 2013 LEEDuser Member 670 Thumbs Up

I should also include this technical advice comment the review team provided:
Please provide a revised plan that clarifies the use of pyrethrum and DE on project sites and clarify if DE is a Tier I, II, or III pesticide. Note that because pyrethrins and silica gel are non-least toxic pesticides, they should only be used once alternative and least toxic pest control methods have been exhausted and only if universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. is exercised for each application of pyrethrins and silica gel.

I gather the provided template policy should state that pyrethrins and silica gel should only be used once alternative and least toxic pest control methods have been exhausted and only if universal notification is exercised for each application of pyrethrins and silica gel? OR do the products need to be replaced with Tier III products?

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Megan Meiklejohn Sustainability Operations Director, East Coast , Healthy Buildings Mar 27 2013 Guest 723 Thumbs Up

Hi Michelle,
I would use your first option: that application of pyrethrum and DE only be used once least toxic pest control methods have been exhausted and universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. is exercised.

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Michelle Cottrell President, Design Management Services Mar 27 2013 LEEDuser Member 670 Thumbs Up

Thank you Megan for the quick reply!

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RUMI ENGINEER
Jan 12 2013
LEEDuser Member
131 Thumbs Up

Compliance for SS CR 3 & IEQ CR 3.6

Our client uses pesticides/chemicals which are allowed to use in India as per local regulation. None of the pesticides or active ingredients from the SF list of Least toxic pesticide reflect in local regulation or are available in India. Our client is providing Universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. to building occupants for all pesticides usages as and when they occur. Will it be sufficient to achieve SS CR 3-IPM & IEQ cr 3.6 Green CleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices.- IPM? thanks in advance

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Feb 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4317 Thumbs Up

See the related comment below.

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Manasi Kulkarni
Jan 10 2013
Guest
54 Thumbs Up

SF least toxic pesticide list

Hi All,
Our client is using pesticides which are neither included in SF pesticide list nor active ingredients are found in that list. Our client is following local regulations for pesticide use in India as well as he is providing universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. to the building occupants. Will that be sufficient to achieve this credit?

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Feb 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 4317 Thumbs Up

Providing universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. will keep you compliant if you're not able to source a least toxic pesticide. But, you will also need to demonstrate that IPM strategies were attempted prior to applying the pesticides. Without evidence of the IPM strategies attempted, the credit could be in jeopardy.

Also, San Francisco has posted its hazard screening protocol, which you may be able to use to source preferable pesticides available in India. Even so, providing universal notification would still be prudent.

http://www.sfenvironment.org/article/pest-management/least-toxic-pestici...

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Jennifer de Mooy Climate Adaptation Project Manager State of Delaware, Division of Energy & Climate
Nov 26 2012
LEEDuser Member
53 Thumbs Up

SF Screened Pesticide List

To follow up on Mary Ann's question (11/6), the SF list of screened pesticides is dated November 2008. Is there an updated list available?

Also, the IPM Plan Template available from LEEDuser states (in Section 6):
"Least-toxic pesticide status also applies to any pesticide product, other than rodent bait, that is applied in a self-contained, enclosed bait station...." Does this mean that rodent bait in an enclosed bait station is NOT subject to the universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do.? Previous comments indicate otherwise.

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Megan Meiklejohn Sustainability Operations Director, East Coast , Healthy Buildings Nov 26 2012 Guest 723 Thumbs Up

Jennifer, The November 2008 is the most updated list available on SFenvironment.org’s website.

All rodent bait applications, even in an enclosed station, are never considered least-toxic and always require universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do.. All nonrodent pesticides in self-contained, enclosed bait stations and placed in inaccessible locations are considered least-toxic and do not require universal notification.

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Mary Ann Santos
Nov 06 2012
LEEDuser Member
2153 Thumbs Up

Active ingredient

Hi All,

Our client uses pesticides/chemicals in their facility, some are those that are commercially available or sold for household use, however the active ingredient is not present on the SF hazard screening list.
How can we determine the tier or level of toxicity of the pesticide if the active ingredient is not present in the list? Thanks in advance.

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Megan Meiklejohn Sustainability Operations Director, East Coast , Healthy Buildings Nov 12 2012 Guest 723 Thumbs Up

Hi Mary Ann,
If the active ingredients of your product are not listed in the SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List as a Tier 3 Product, then that product is not considered least toxic. In this case, you will need to provide universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. to the building occupants when using this product.

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Jennifer de Mooy Climate Adaptation Project Manager State of Delaware, Division of Energy & Climate
Sep 13 2012
LEEDuser Member
53 Thumbs Up

Does GreenPro (TM) meet LEED standard?

I am trying to determine if the GreenPro (TM) certification through NMPA meets the LEED requirements. Pest management is contracted out for the building we are seeking certification, and the contractor offers this option.

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Megan Meiklejohn Sustainability Operations Director, East Coast , Healthy Buildings Sep 28 2012 Guest 723 Thumbs Up

Hi Jennifer. In order to comply with this credit, you will need to ensure that the vendor is following IPM procedures and requirements per the building’s IPM plan (which meets all the LEED credit requirements). Even if you have a GreenPro certification, you need to submit your IPM plan and pesticide application log for IEQc3.6.

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Matthew Macko Principal Environmental Building Strategies
Jun 20 2012
LEEDuser Member
757 Thumbs Up

No pesticides used during performance period

We are currently working on a project that used no pesticides during the performance period. In order to obtain the credit, are we only supposed to mention that if there is ever a need for pesticides, we would use the San Francisco Pesticide Hazard Screening List products?

Thanks in advance for any advice

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 20 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Hi Matt, I don't have experience with a situation like this, but it's hard for me to imagine it would be sufficient to earn the credit.

The credit requires a plan with multiple components (see our guidance above). Your suggestion doesn't include all those components, such as univesal notification.

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Samantha Longshore Sustainability Advisor Transwestern
Oct 03 2011
LEEDuser Member
425 Thumbs Up

Rodent Glue Traps

Hello, I have a project building that would like to use glue traps for rodents. It's seems incredibly inhumane, but I know the credit and SF list is really guided by chemical toxicity. Could anyone tell me if LEED considers glue traps to be a compliant strategy for rodent control? And does this need to be on the pesticide log as it's not really a pesticide? It sounds like this building often has a rodent problem so I'd like to present them with a viable solution.

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Oct 10 2011 LEEDuser Expert 1184 Thumbs Up

Hi Samantha

Yes, while glue traps aren't the most desirable approach for pest management, they are a compliant strategy for rodent control. The ultimate goal is to avoid the use of pesticides that may harm the building occupants.

And in terms of the log, I would include all pest management activities, including cleaning/replacing traps and monitoring tools, or even just general pest inspections. A pest management vendor should be able to easily capture every pest management activity in a log - and this is a great strategy for building managers to monitor their vendor and make sure they aren't applying non least-toxic pesticides without their knowledge!

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei
Oct 18 2010
LEEDuser Member
4578 Thumbs Up

2010 SF Environment Pesticide List

i understand that the SF Pesticide list is for San Francisco city local code and the listed product is been monitor closely. but when IPM practice were adopted outside US, do we need to compare our pesticide against the list base on the products name or the active ingredient?
for example:
we might have a pesticide product name which is not registered at SF Pesticide List but does have an active ingredient listed at the SF Pesticide list. what should i do?

Q2: if i have a pesticide product fall at Tier 1, what should i do?
- Should i look for alternative and try our best close to Tier 1 (this might be the best option)
But if we unable to find an alternative
then every time a schedule pest maintenance, we need to sent a notice to all tenant (72 hrs prior) pest control activity, correct?

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Oct 22 2010 LEEDuser Expert 7145 Thumbs Up

Jason, the best thing to do is to compare the active ingredients of your products to those listed on the SF Reduced Risk list. Brand availability is going to vary around the world, so that isn't the most effective way to monitor these products. Check the active ingredient and concentration to determine which tier the product would fall under.

The solution you propose for your second question is exactly right. Try to find least-toxic alternatives that fall under the Tier 3 criteria for as many situations as you can. When Tier 3 product are unavailable or ineffective for a particular pest problem, use a Tier 1 or Tier 2 product after providing at least 72 hours notice to your building occupants via the universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. procedures outlined in your IPM Plan.

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei Oct 28 2010 LEEDuser Member 4578 Thumbs Up

thanks Jason, i have 2 more question.

i do agree with your statement that i should look at the active ingredient rather than the product listed on the SF env because there are different brand around the globe., but i encounter one problem , there aren;t any specific w/w (limit of use) of these active ingredient inside the SF checklist.

Q1 : if i'm currently using a smaller percentage of tier 1 active ingredient compare with those on SF checklist, can i still continue to use it?

Q2: i found out that, our pest controller is using permethrin, which listed as " Pesticide Banned in Habitat Area Full List" due to the effect onto California Red Legged Frog. But our project are not at California, can we still use this chemical?

thanks

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Oct 28 2010 LEEDuser Expert 7145 Thumbs Up

The key thing to remember is that IPM does not ban the use of Tier 1 or Tier 2 pesticides. The intent of IPM is to promote the use of least toxic methods, or Tier 3 pesticides, whenever possible. If those products aren't available or effective, you are allowed to use Tier 1 and Tier 2 products, but you MUST fulfill the requirements of universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do.. Building occupants must be notified at least 72 hours in advance of application or within 24 hours after an emergency application. Emergency conditions are usually defined as "immediate threat to health and/or safety of building occupants.", like a swarm of bees or something like that.

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Andy Rhoades Partner Leading Edge Consulting
Sep 14 2010
LEEDuser Member
516 Thumbs Up

2010 SF Reduced Risk Pesticde List

Our project is using a pesticide that is found on the 2010 SF Reduced Risk Pesticide List but not on the 2007. The reference guide states that the 2007 list should be used. Is it safe to assume that the review team will accept the updated 2010 list?

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Sep 14 2010 LEEDuser Expert 7645 Thumbs Up

Andy,

There's a Reference Guide addenda that directs project teams to the SF Pesticide Hazard Screening List: http://www.sfenvironment.org/our_programs/interests.html?ssi=2&ti=1&ii=117

It's my understanding that this is more comprehensive than the Reduced Risk Pesticide lists (regardless of issue date).

Also, the Pesticide Hazard Screening List includes Tier 1 and 2 products in addition to Tier 3, so make sure you are zeroing in on the right Tier.

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Pablo Fortunato Suarez Principal ESD Consultant/Architect, GreenArc Sustainable Building & Architecture May 11 2011 Guest 2981 Thumbs Up

My query is related to above.

Will the LEED Review team consider chemicals on the list if concentrations/dilutions are lower than those on the list?

Hoping to hear some advise.

thanks

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional May 16 2011 LEEDuser Expert 7145 Thumbs Up

The Hazard Screening List will indicate that the threshold for Tier 1/Tier2/Tier 3 is sometimes based on a minimum concentration of the active ingredient (i.e. 7.9% by volume). If the product you're using isn't listed on the Hazard Screening List, but the active ingredient is listed, you'll need to show that your product has a concentration equal to or lower than the concentration for a Tier 3 product. so if the ingredient shows up as a Tier 1 pesticide with a concentration of 5.0%, it isn't enough to show that your product has a concentration of 4.9% - you need to show that your product meets Tier 3 thresholds.

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Andy Rhoades Partner Leading Edge Consulting
Jul 27 2010
LEEDuser Member
516 Thumbs Up

Re-application of Toxic Pesticides

We have a project that needs to use toxic pesticides to control the rodents. We have taken the LEED compliant procedure and notified the tenants 72 hours prior to the pesticide application. The pest control vendor needs to refill the toxic pesticide. Do we need to use universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. for a refill?

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Stephanie Graham Sustainability Manager, Burns & McDonnell Jul 07 2011 LEEDuser Member 78 Thumbs Up

A comment on a recent project from a reviewer indicated that universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. must be given for the initial application and for refills of the pesticide.

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ZEB Tech singapore ESD Consultancy ZEB-Technology Pte Ltd
Jun 24 2010
LEEDuser Member
2222 Thumbs Up

Pesticides not listed in 2007 San Francisco List

Most of the chemicals being used for my project are not listed in the 2007 San Francisco Reduced-Risk Pesticide List.Does it mean that the credit cannot be achieved or if we are issuing the 72hour prior notification, we will still achieve the credit.Please Advise.Thank You.

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Shira Norman YRG sustainability Jun 25 2010 LEEDuser Member 636 Thumbs Up

It's always good to look into non-chemical and least toxic options prior to applying conventional pesticides; however, as long as you demonstrate that the building management issued universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. (alerting all occupants) at least 72 hour prior to pesticide applications or within 24 hours after emergency pesticide applications, you comply with the credit requirements.

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Drew Johnson LEED AP O+M
Jan 25 2010
Guest
931 Thumbs Up

Where does Interior Plant Maintenance fit into IPM?

Many property management groups and tenants purchase interior plants to be placed in building common areas and tenant spaces. Typically, in a multi-tenant situation, a third party contractor will be hired to provide interior plant maintenance services. I recently had a conversation with two such interior plant maintenance companies and discovered that they sometimes use insecticides that do not appear on the SF list of "least toxic" pesticides. Where does this service fit into IPM?

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Shira Norman YRG sustainability Jan 25 2010 LEEDuser Member 636 Thumbs Up

All pesticides, including insecticides and herbicides, that are not classified as Tier 3 products on San Francisco's list can be used in and around a project building so long as you issue universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. prior to applying the chemicals. However, it is always important to consider non-chemical pest management solutions prior to administering toxic pesticides.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 27 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Drew, just checking—is your question about whether the vendor's services are covered by the credit at all? (Since they are not directly under the control of building management.)

The answer to that question is YES, and hopefully you can get the companies to compete against each other to improve their practices!

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Drew Johnson LEED AP O+M Jan 27 2010 Guest 931 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your comment Shira.

Tristan, yes I was seeking clarification as to whether or not this service was addressed by the credit at all, and hoping someone in the LEEDUser community would have dealt with this on a project. Leaning heavily on the intent of EQc3.6, my assumption was, "yes" these services and the chemicals used are indeed covered. In the reference guide, it is clear that use of pesticides in exterior landscape maintenance is to be included in Outdoor IPM (SSc3), but the requirements for EQc3.6 do not make specific mention of interior plant maintenance as a part of Indoor IPM.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 27 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Drew, I see what you're saying—although indoor plants are a common realm for application of pesticides, so for that reason I think it's pretty clear that they're covered.

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John Forbes President and CEO, Leadership IPM Consultations LLC Jan 03 2012 Guest 30 Thumbs Up

Indoor plants can be a major source of Fungi's Flies (Gnats) They feed on the bacteria that forms on the soil. If the plant is overwatered this is very common. The IPM approach is to make sure that the soil is not over watered or go to a different substrate that won't let the bacteria form. In addition you can use products like DE mixed in the soil. This is a benign dust the will dissacate the flies but not harm the soil. I hope this helps.

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