EBOM-2009 IEQp1: Minimum IAQ Performance

  • EBOM IEQp1 Diagram
  • Upgrades? No. Changes? Probably

    Meeting the LEED ventilation prerequisite is not likely to require substantial building upgrades, although it is likely to require some adjustments, such as altering minimum damper settings on existing equipment.

    An in-house engineer or a third-party vendor can help you measure outdoor air flow in each air-handling unit and compare their performance against ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 requirements. ASHRAE and USGBC provide calculators for determining the required rates of outdoor air flow for your building based on floor area, actual occupancy, and other characteristics of the space and ventilation distribution system. Buildings that employ older ventilation equipment or unique ventilation solutions may have one or more air handling units that are unable to meet the ASHRAE 62.1-2007 requirements. In this scenario, you can still achieve this prerequisite by showing that these air handling units provide at least 10 cubic feet per minute per person of outside air under normal operating conditions.

    Well-ventilated officeWell-ventilated space will improve occupant comfort and productivity. Photo – YRG Sustainability

    Achievable for naturally ventilated buildings

    Naturally ventilated buildings must document compliance with a special section of the ASHRAE 62.1-2007 standard, and complete some specific measurements, but this should still be highly achievable for buildings with lots of windows or a well-designed engineered natural ventilation system.

    Maintain good air quality along with energy performance

    Reducing mechanical ventilation and outdoor air intake are easy ways to reduce energy consumption, but can compromise indoor air quality if not thoughtfully executed. This prerequisite and EAp2: Minimum Energy Efficiency Performance are often seen as being in conflict with each other, but IEQp1 is designed, in part, to ensure that energy efficiency in LEED-certified buildings does not come at the expense of good indoor air quality.

    Management in actionRegular inspection and preventive maintenance on mechanical equipment will help ensure optimal airflow in your building. Photo – YRG Sustainability

    Consider these questions before pursuing this credit

    • Is the building mechanically ventilated, naturally ventilated, or mixed-mode? ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 addresses natural and mechanical ventilation systems using different guidelines and criteria.  Mixed-mode systems must demonstrate compliance while operating in mechanical mode only.
    • Do you have a building automation system (BAS)A building automation system (BAS) uses computer-based monitoring to coordinate, organize, and optimize building control subsystems, including lighting, equipment scheduling, and alarm reporting. that measures outdoor air? If your building does not use a BAS to monitor the rate of outside air flow through the ventilation system, manual measurements of outside air flow must be taken at each air handling unit.
    • Have the ventilation systems been tested or balanced in the last 2 years? If yes, do you have documentation on the measurements of outdoor air flow? Recent testing reports, which include ventilation rate procedure (VRP) calculations, may be used to compare measured outside air flow to the ASHRAE 62.1-2007 requirements.
    • Do occupants and building maintenance staff feel that the building is well-ventilated? Does the air seem fresh? Stuffy? Odorous? Occupant feedback is a valuable early-detection tool to know if your ventilation system is operating properly and complying with ASHRAE 62.1-2007 standards.
    • Do you have mechanical drawings that are helpful for managing ventilation systems and maintaining outdoor air flow calculations as required by ASHRAE? Do you have an HVAC preventative maintenance program? A set of accurate mechanical drawings will help you to determine where outside air flow measurements should be taken and provide manufacturer product information that can be useful in developing an ongoing preventive maintenance program to ensure proper system performance.
    • Are your engineers trained and equipped to take outdoor air flow measurements? If not, is there an engineering firm that you can use to help with these tests?

    LEED-EBOM IEQp1 FAQs

    What if after our Preliminary Review we have to re-work the ventilation rate procedure calculations and find that we need to make corrections to the system in order to meet the prerequisite? Can we redo the outside air testing after making corrections? Would we need to update the performance period for all credits accordingly?

    If for some reason you needed to make corrections to the ventilation system in order to meet the ventilation prerequisite during the review process, you could do so without having to reset the performance period for all of the performance based credits like EAp2. Outside air measurements can and must be redone to confirm that the systems meet the prerequisite after the corrections were made.

    What if our systems do not meet the required outside air when systems are tested at worst-case conditions?

    If the systems do not meet the required outside air during the initial testing the following actions should be taken:

    • If the system (damper) set points for the worst case condition can be modified to supply sufficient outside air to meet the ASHRAE 62.1-2007 requirements, the team must do so.
    • If the system is incapable of providing enough outside air to meet the ASHRAE 62.1-2007 requirements, the project can then pursue Case 2 and provide at least 10 cfm/person for those systems. Note that the team needs to supply evidence that the systems aren’t capable of meeting the ASHRAE 62.1-2007 requirements.

    Our building has a single fan that supplies outside air to multiple AHU’s. Do we need to perform outside air testing at the supply fan or at all AHUs?

    Outside air measurements need to be tested at the system level and so measurements would need to be taken at each AHU, not just the single supply fan.

    We have a VAV system where single AHUs serve multiple zones. Do we need to take outside air measurements at each VAV box?

    If a single AHU is supplying outside air to multiple zones through VAV boxes, outside air measurements need to be tested at the AHU level but not a the VAV boxes.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

Expand All

  • For naturally ventilated buildings, follow the guidelines specified in ASHRAE 62.1-2007, Section 5.1 to assess compliance with the requirements. If your building has the proper ratio of operable windows or roof openings to floor area as described in the ASHRAE standard, you are likely to be able to show compliance. You may also show compliance by meeting the requirements of EQc1.3: IAQ Best Practices—Increased Ventilation.


  • For mechanical and mixed-mode ventilation systems, follow the guidelines specified in ASHRAE 62.1-2007, Section 6 (detailed below) and use the provided 62MZCalcs calculator to determine ASHRAE-compliant ventilation rates for each air-handling unit and zone in the building.


  • The building's original system design specifications and airflow rates are not relevant to this prerequisite. Designing a system to achieve ASHRAE compliance does not mean that the system is delivering airflow at those rates under current operating conditions.


  • Develop a ventilation maintenance program including periodic checks and system repairs.

During the Performance Period

Expand All

  • For All Options


  • Conduct a visual inspection of outside air vents, dampers, and louvers and remove any obstructions that restrict outdoor air flow.


  • Conduct airflow monitoring using manual instrumentation or a building automation system to document outdoor airflow rates. Gather data or take measurements for each air handling unit or ventilation zone; sampling is not permitted. For all VAV boxes, you’ll need to set up the ventilation system to simulate the worst-case system conditions expected during normal operations, such as minimum outside air flow due to damper position.


  • If your building automation system does not continuously measure outdoor airflow, you should still be able to measure airflow accurately by performing a duct traverse with a pitot tube. If the system’s configuration does not allow for a duct traverse (such as with curved ductwork or limited access), anemometer measures can be taken at each air handling unit.


  • Compare measured flow with required levels of outdoor air for each ventilation zone. Calculate the required outdoor air levels by completing ventilation rate procedure (VRP) calculations using the provided ASHRAE 62MZCalcs spreadsheet for each air handling unit.


  • Perform VRP calculations for all air handling units and applicable floor areas. Make sure that the floor area covered by VRP calculations matches up with the total gross floor area that is reported in your LEED application.


  • In the ASHRAE 62MZcalc spreadsheet, be sure to override the default occupancy with actual building occupancy.


  • Test all building exhaust systems to confirm that they are functioning as intended. Be sure to confirm proper function, including fan speed, voltage, control sequences, and set points.


  • Costs for testing will depend on how many air handling units and ventilation zones need testing, whether staff are qualified to do testing in-house, and whether the building has a BAS that gathers data.


  • Adjust ventilation set points if testing shows that the building is over-ventilated to save energy and reduce operational costs.


  • Increased mechanical ventilation rates may increase energy costs for heating and cooling. Some strategies for mitigating these costs include energy recovery ventilation, economizers and controls, CO2 monitors, and demand-controlled ventilation.


  • Good indoor air quality can lower operational costs while increasing occupant health and productivity as well as the value and marketability of the building.


  • Case 1: Projects Able to Meet ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007


  • Demonstrate that each air handling unit supplies the minimum outdoor air flow specified by ASHRAE 62.1-2007. If one or more air handling units do not meet the ASHRAE requirements, you can still earn the prerequisite by using the EQp1 Option B Calculator to show that those units supply at least 10 cfm per person.


  • Case 2: Projects Unable to Meet ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 Due to Physical Constraints


  • Demonstrate that it is not feasible to meet ASHRAE 62.1-2007 because of building design and construction. Also, demonstrate that at least 10 cfm per person of outdoor air is supplied under normal operating conditions. Projects able to demonstrate both of these items can earn the prerequisite, even though they don’t provide optimal indoor air quality.


  • Use the EQp1 Option B calculator for all air handling units that are unable to provide the minimum outdoor air flows required by ASHRAE 62.1-2007.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    IEQ Prerequisite 1: Minimum indoor air quality performance

    Required

    Intent

    To establish minimum indoor air quality (IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors.) performance to enhance indoor air quality in buildings, thus contributing to the health and well-being of the occupants.

    Requirements

    Case 1. Projects able to meet the standard
    OPTION 1. ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 or Non-U.S. Equivalent

    Modify or maintain each outside air intake, supply air fan and/or ventilation distribution system to supply at least the outdoor air ventilation rate required by ASHRAE Standard 62.1–2007 ventilation rate procedure (with errata but without addenda ) under all normal operating conditions. Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 for breathing zoneThe breathing zone is the region within an occupied space between 3 and 6 feet above the floor and more than 2 feet from walls or fixed air-conditioning equipment. (AHSRAE 62.1–2007) minimum ventilation rates.

    OPTION 2. CEN Standard EN 15251: 2007

    Projects outside the U.S. may modify or maintain each outside air intake, supply air fan and/or ventilation distribution system to supply at least the outdoor air ventilation rate required by Annex B of Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN) Standard EN 15251: 2007, Indoor environmental input parameters for design and assessment of energy performance of buildings addressing indoor air quality, thermal environment, lighting and acoustics.

    Case 2. Projects unable to meet the standard

    If meeting the ventilation rates required of the above standards is infeasible because of the physical constraints of the existing ventilation system, modify or maintain the system to supply at least 10 cubic feet per minute (cfm) (5 liters per second) of outdoor air per person under all normal operating conditions. Demonstrate through design documentation, measurements or other evidence that the current system cannot provide the flow rates required by the above standards under any operating condition even when functioning properly.

    Each air-handling unit in the building must comply with either Case 1 or Case 2. If some airhandling units can provide the outside air flow required by the above standards and others cannot, those that can must do so. Buildings must provide at least 10 cfm (5 liters per second) per person of outside air at each air-handling unit under all normal operating conditions to earn this prerequisite.

    • Show compliance with the applicable requirement above (Case 1 or Case 2) through measurements taken at the system level (i.e., the air-handling unit). For variable air volume systems, the dampers, fan speeds, etc. must be set during the test to the worstcase system conditions (minimum outside air flow) expected during normal ventilation operations. Each air-handler must be measured; sampling or grouping of air-handlers is prohibited.
    • Implement and maintain an HVAC system maintenance program to ensure the proper operations and maintenance of HVAC components as they relate to outdoor air

      introduction and exhaust.
    • Test and maintain the operation of all building exhaust systems, including bathroom, shower, kitchen and parking exhaust systems.

    Naturally ventilated buildings must comply with ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, paragraph 5.1(with errata but without addenda1). [Europe ACP: Arbeitsstaettenrichtlinie ASR 5]

    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    Europe ACP: Arbeitsstaettenrichtlinie ASR 5

    Projects in Europe may use Arbeitsstaettenrichtlinie ASR 5 as a local equivalent to ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, paragraph 5.1.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Pilot Alternative Compliance Path Available

    This credit has a pilot ACP available in the LEED Pilot Credit Library. See Indoor air quality procedure - alternative compliance path for more information

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Conduct a visual inspection of outside air vents and dampers and remove any outside air vent or louver obstructions that restrict full outside air capacity from entering the distribution system. Conduct airflow monitoring to document outside air cubic feet per minute (cfm). Compare measured flow with designed flow for each unit. Test the operation of each exhaust fan and verify that exhaust airflow meets design requirements or intentions. EPA’s “Guidelines for HVAC System Maintenance” provides guidance on developing, implementing and maintaining an HVAC system maintenance program to ensure the proper operations and maintenance of HVAC components as they relate to IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors..

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) Applications Manual 10: 2005, Natural Ventilation in Non-Domestic Buildings

This is a best-practice design guide to natural ventilation.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

LEED Gold Project Documentation

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of IEQp1 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

Non-Compliant AHU Form

Case 2: Projects Unable to Meet ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007 Due to Physical Constraints

A form like this will be needed for all AHUs that are not capable of meeting the outdoor airflow required by ASHRAE 62.1-2007; these AHUs must provide a minimum of 10 cfm in order to meet the prerequisite.

Ventilation System Maintenance

All Options

Use logs or status reports to document preventive maintenance of ventilation systems.

Exhaust Systems Testing

You can use the form provided as a checklist for testing exhaust systems, and for recording results.

IEQp1 LEED Online Form

Use these LEED Online screen captures with annotated tips from LEEDuser to help you fill out this form.

LEED Online Forms: LEED-EBOM IEQ

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

366 Comments

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Patrick Murisset Eng Sustentech
Jul 14 2016
Guest
4 Thumbs Up

AHUs unable to meet case 1 or case 2

Project Location: Brazil

Hello.

I coordinated a project in which the IEQp1 was audited. There were a few AHUs that did not comply with the ASHRAE 62.1-2007 neither the 10 cfm/person, others do; this situation was described and justified on the prerequisite template. However, I received the technical advice on the standard preliminary review that I quote below:

"The form states in option 1 that all AHUs must be able to meet the minimum air flow requirements.However, It appears that some of the building’s AHUs do not meet the minimum requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality. If that is the case, Option 2 must be selected on the form. Additionally, sufficient documentation must be provided to demonstrate the building AHUs that are incapable of supplying the outdoor air flow required by 62.1-2007. Provide a narrative that clearly indicates why building AHUs are incapable of supplying the outdoor air flow required by ASHRAE 62.1-2007 and provide technical evidence that demonstrates that these limitations are true for all system operating conditions, even when functioning properly. If the project team is able to make minor adjustments, such as setpoint adjustments, damper positioning, etc., to meet the requirements of Case 1 they are required to do so for prerequisite achievement. It is not necessary make adjustments if it involves any amount of capital investment or equipment purchase."

The problem was solved as the building owner did want to anticipate a significant investment as the building needed to be adjusted to comply with the Brazilian national law. So, only by this matter, the ventilation system was able to meet case 1 and be in accordance with prerequisite.

I would like a feedback from the colleagues of this forum, mainly the last sentence of the quoting.
In my opinion: if any investment is necessary to adjust and/or to correct the ventilation system(s), then the building is not obligated to make any investment in equipment and/or corrections to the system(s).
I am going to adopt this path in future cases like this.

Can I get some opinions, please?

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training Revitaliza Consultores
May 17 2016
Guest
1601 Thumbs Up

10% exemption

Project Location: Mexico

Is it allowed to exclude up to 10% of spaces from this prerequisite?

Our project is a 20-story building that complies with the ventilation rates but there is an office in the core that doesn't have any ventilation and it is very difficult to get there without spending much money and bothering the tenants.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability May 23 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5608 Thumbs Up

It is acceptable to apply the 10% exclusion to this prerequisite. The only prerequisite/credit that cannot apply the 10% exclusion is IEQp2 (smoking).

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Christopher Davis Program Manager, Global Energy & Sustainability, CBRE May 24 2016 Guest 134 Thumbs Up

Yes, the 10% separate-management exclusion applies to this prerequisite, but keep in mind that the 10% threshold applies to the entire tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. in which a non-compliant room might exist. Based on how this has been enforced in the past, it would not be acceptable to exclude one room in a separately-managed tenant that comprises 15% of the building.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Apr 25 2016
LEEDuser Member
3852 Thumbs Up

Parking exhaust

Do parking spaces or restrooms need to comply with Ashare exhaust rates of table 'TABLE 6-4 Minimum Exhaust Rates'?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Apr 26 2016 LEEDuser Expert 2927 Thumbs Up

Exhaust fan testing is required. The tests must confirm proper function such as fan speed, voltage, control sequence and setpointsSetpoints are normal operating ranges for building systems and indoor environmental quality. When the building systems are outside of their normal operating range, action is taken by the building operator or automation system..

The reference guide nor the credit template require the project team to confirm that the exhaust rates comply with TABLE 6-4.

I have never been asked by a reviewer to confirm exhaust fan rates. This includes 100+ LEED EB projects and 2 LEED Volume Programs.

If you do receive a request from a review team to confirm exhaust rates please post.

thank you!

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training Revitaliza Consultores
Feb 21 2016
Guest
1601 Thumbs Up

Physical constraints

Hallo,

I am wondering what is the Reference Guide referring to when it says "physical constraints of the existing ventilation system".

For instance, should I consider a "physical constraint" a space that wasn't designed with ventilation and additional ductwork is needed from the AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. to provide outdoor air?

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Mar 03 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5608 Thumbs Up

Hi Gustavo, you've been working through some tricky situations!

I guess the first thing is that the project would be required to make some adjustment or installation to provide ventilation to the previously unventilated space in order to meet the prerequisite.

Then, in my experience, GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). may require the project to supply ventilation to that space to meet ASHRAE 62.1 levels, rather than Case 2, despite the fact that the space was previously unventilated.

But there's a caveat to that. If there are physical constraints associated with the building that made it impossible to supply the ASHRAE 62.1 airflow, like something that would restrict the size of the ductwork, I believe that GBCI would allow the space to just meet Case 2 (10 cfm/person). This may be a good situation to submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide to confirm with GBCI.

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Saul Pichardo, AIA Principal/Director AOB
Jan 26 2016
Guest
65 Thumbs Up

Airflow testing service

Project Location: United States

Hi All,

We are looking for a company in the San Francisco BayA bay is a component of a standard, rectilinear building design. It is the open area defined by a building element such as columns or a window. Typically, there are multiple identical bays in succession. Area who can conduct the airflow tests in our commercial building (in the office area). We are working on a LEED O&M project. Can anybody recommend companies?

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satheesh M
Dec 16 2015
Guest
50 Thumbs Up

Case 1 - Grouping the space types

Hi,

we are working for the project with multiple tenants. we could not collect all the floors HVAC layouts. but we have the AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. details. we are grouping all the spaces as a office space.

In calculation, we will enter only one office space for each AHU. Is it right way?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Dec 16 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2927 Thumbs Up

Entering only "office" into the calculator most likely won't be accepted by the LEED reviewer.

When we do not have tenant build out plans we physically walk the space and measure potentially critical zones to enter into the 62MZ.

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Hugo Teixeira Grupo Orion Feb 15 2016 Guest 9 Thumbs Up

Hi David ,
I Understood your answer , but I would like to know if I must carry out the mesuruments for each zone in order to prove que each zone outdoor air flow is right , or it is ok if the redbourn the total amount of outdoor air flow That Is entering in the room where the AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. is Placed ? Is this procedure right ?
PS.: Just to be clear, all the air of my zones are supplied by one AHU.

Thanks.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 16 2016 LEEDuser Expert 2927 Thumbs Up

Hello Hugo, I do not entirely understand you question but will do my best to answer.

Project teams do not need to measure airflow at the zone level (e.g. airflow from supply diffusersIn an HVAC context, diffusers disperse heating, cooling, or ventilation air as it enters a room, ideally preventing uncomfortable direct currents and in many cases, reducing energy costs and improving indoor air quality (IAQ). In light fixtures, diffusers filter and disperse light. serving the room) rather they need to measure the airflow at the system level (e.g. supply/return/outdoor air at the air handling unit).

I hope this helps.

Dave

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Hugo Teixeira Grupo Orion Feb 16 2016 Guest 9 Thumbs Up

Precisely David. It is exactly what I was looking for .
Thanks very much .

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Dustin Campbell Sustainability Analyst ETC Group
Nov 24 2015
Guest
136 Thumbs Up

Guidance for IDEC Systems?

Project Location: United States

Does anyone have experience applying the “USGBC LEED 62MZCalc” spreadsheet for Indirect Evaporative Cooling (IDEC) systems?

Or, is there an alternate compliance path elected due to the significant differences as compared to ordinary air handling systems that return a large percentage of return (re-circulated) air?

We are challenged with how to correctly apply this spreadsheet for an IDEC system that runs, for most of the year, at 100% outside air. It would seem that there would be a special steps provided within this spreadsheet to consider IDEC systems since, looking from a broader perspective, it would seem intuitive that an IDEC system will much more than satisfy the ventilation requirements for 95% of the year.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Nov 30 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5608 Thumbs Up

Hi Dustin,

How does the system run at the worst case condition or how is it running when it's not providing 100% outside air? In general, the calculations and measurement conditions should reflect that worst case condition (minimum outdoor air provided relative to required outdoor air) of the system. Check this newish calculator from USGBC to facilitate the calculations http://www.usgbc.org/resources/minimum-indoor-air-quality-performance-ca....

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Dec 09 2015 LEEDuser Expert 8958 Thumbs Up

I second what Ben said regarding this being a worst case calculator. You take credit for the energy savings from the IDEC but this LEED doesn't credit you for better air quality for more of the year because you have 100% outside air more of the year.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K
Oct 28 2015
LEEDuser Member
716 Thumbs Up

Exhaust system tests

Project Location: Poland

I have two questions regarding exhaust system tests:
1. Do the tests have to be conducted only for local exhaust fans (like e.g. toilets and kitchens) or do we have to conduct tests also for the exhaust fans in air handling units?
2. The reference guid says that the fan speed should be tested. Could you tell me what kind of measurements are required for this prerequisite? Do we have to measure rotations per minute or is it enough to measure exhaust fan air flow?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Oct 28 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2927 Thumbs Up

All exhaust fans are required to be tested.
Actual RPM, Volts, Amps must be recorded.

OR

Substitute v4 EQp1 on the project since the v4 version of the prereq does not require the exhaust fans to be tested.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K Nov 13 2015 LEEDuser Member 716 Thumbs Up

Can I substitute only IEQp1 with v4 and stick to v 2009 for the other prerequisites and credits? If yes, how should it be done? Should we fill in the LEEDonline form v 2009 and mark that "the project is using an alternative compliance approach in lieu of standard submittal paths" and upload the new version of the form?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Dec 16 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2927 Thumbs Up

Hello Agata, just saw you post now -apologies for the delay.

You are allowed to substitute only v4 EQp1 and pursue v2009 requirements on all other prereqs/credits.

Simply select "alt compliance" and upload completed v4 credit template + supporting documentation.

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Kimberly Hosken LEED Fellow, subcontractor May 24 2016 LEEDuser Member 72 Thumbs Up

Our project is about 3 years old and achieved the IEQp1 and IEQc1.3 in LEED NCv2.2. The guidance above suggests "If your building does not use a BAS to monitor the rate of outside air flow through the ventilation system, manual measurements of outside air flow must be taken at each air handling unit." I had previously believed that we always had to test no matter what, but now I'm not sure.
My question is if the building BAS does read and record OA cfm on all of our AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. and demonstrates compliance do we need to test AHU at all? What proof do we need to demonstrate this?
Also if we use V4 for prerequisite can we still pursue IEQ1.3 v2009?
I looked in CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide database but gave up after 2 hours of searching.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services May 24 2016 LEEDuser Expert 2927 Thumbs Up

Hello Kimberly,

This post addresses exhaust fan testing. EQp1 of v3 requires exhaust fan testing, EQp1 of v4 does not.

As for OA measurements, it can be read via the BAS, they do not need to be tested.The GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). may require maintenance or calibration reports of the OA measuring device(s) to ensure their continued/current accuracy. They may also ask for screen shots of the BAS as well as a narrative documenting that the readings/screen shots were taken when the AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. was at the worst-case condition.

You can still pursue the v3 increased ventilation credit if you substitute the EQp1 v4 prerequisite.

Good Questions!

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Christopher Davis Program Manager, Global Energy & Sustainability, CBRE May 24 2016 Guest 134 Thumbs Up

I don't believe it's accurate to say that exhaust fan testing isn't required in v4. It may not be a stand-alone documentation requirement in the form, but the prerequisite language states: "Implement and maintain an HVAC system maintenance program, based on ASHRAE 62.1–2010, Section 8 ... to ensure the proper operations and maintenance of HVAC components as they relate to outdoor air introduction and exhaust." If I'm not mistaken, Section 8 recommends testing OA rates and exhaust fans every 5 years.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services May 24 2016 LEEDuser Expert 2927 Thumbs Up

Hello Christopher,

You are correct, Section 8 recommends OA testing once every 5 years however it does not list specific requirements with respect to exhaust fans serving the project building.

EQp1 requirements, as they relate to the building's exhaust fans, was a concern of ours when we wrote our v4 O+M Volume prototype. Hence we discussed with the technical folks at USGBC/GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).. They did not require us to include exhaust fan testing in the prototype. Our non-volume v4 projects are also not required to perform exhaust fan testing to demonstrate EQp1 compliance.

All our projects do include an exhaust fan maintenance plan in which the exhaust fans are maintained per the manufacturer's O+M manual. Logs are kept by the building engineers or mechanical service contractors.

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Haley Duncan Project Manager Silver Oak Cellars
Sep 16 2015
LEEDuser Member
230 Thumbs Up

Option B Calculator

Where can I find the Option B Calculator that is used to calculate compliance with 10 CFM per person for AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork.'s unable to meet ASHRAE 62.1-2007?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jan 25 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4285 Thumbs Up

Hi Haley, there's no official calculator for this option. You can create your own spreadsheet listing out the following for each AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. complying via Case 2:

- the number of occupants (system level)
- the required outside air per Case 2 (e.g. occupants x 10 cfm)
- the measured outside airflow

This will let GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). easily compare the required OA per Case 2 against the measured OA.

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Jennifer Turchin Principal Coda Group
Aug 19 2015
LEEDuser Member
268 Thumbs Up

IEQp1 and Performance Period Timeline

I am working on a number of facilities owned by the same entity and they want to have the outdoor air testing done at all the facilities as one scope of work for a contractor, however, the performance period for each project will not start at the same time - will be in the next few years. The EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. Reference Guide states: “outdoor air testing generally occurs during the performance period (Max 2 years). Exception can be made if….pursuing EAc2.3 ongoing commissioning…and can be done up to 5 years before the end of the performance period.”

The project we are doing are not able to achieve EAc2.3 so does that mean we can’t do the testing unless we are starting the performance period? I interpret this to mean that if one unit isn’t working and we can’t get it fixed quickly and the performance period is started, then we have to retest all units once the performance period is restarted, which doesn't seem to make sense just because the projects don't pursue EAc2.3.

Does anyone have any experience with this or can anyone provide an insight?

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Aug 19 2015 LEEDuser Member 3915 Thumbs Up

The performance period for each credit can be different and can (in general) last for any period between 3 and 24 months. LEED requires that the performance periods END at essentially the same time, but they can start at different times. This means that you can perform the indoor air quality testing up to 24 months before the end of the performance period for each building.

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Jennifer Turchin Principal, Coda Group Aug 19 2015 LEEDuser Member 268 Thumbs Up

Correct - but what if it is longer than 24 months until the start of the Performance Period (this is likely with a quasi-governmental client). Then is the testing going to have to happen again? This is onerous.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Aug 21 2015 LEEDuser Member 3915 Thumbs Up

The rules say the testing will have to happen again,and you can never count on wiggle room with LEED review teams. I would wait as long as possible to bring as many of the projects within the 24 month performance period as possible. For the later projects I would refer to the owner's "portfolio approach" to testing and then reference the previous projects. No guarantee it will be accepted, but there is a reasonable chance.

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Zonda E. Team Zonda Engineering
Jul 29 2015
Guest
127 Thumbs Up

VRF with DOAS inyecting air into common return plenum

Hi there, I'm working on a project with VRF + DOAS, where outside air is injected into a common return plenum for all VRF indoor units. This means we can't measure outside air flow at each indoor unit. Would measuring outdoor air flow for each branch/plenum be enough in this case? If it isn't, then should we be pushing for major changes into OA distribution in order to guarantee the right amount of OA reaching each indoor unit? This option might not even be feasible.

Thanks
Regards,
Santiago.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Aug 21 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5608 Thumbs Up

Hi Santiago,

We had a similar issue recently and it may be possible to conduct the outdoor air measurements at each branch/plenum. But I'd recommend issuing a credit interpretation request to get a project specific ruling from GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).. They'll need to know a bit about the system configuration and your proposed solution for measuring outdoor air at the "system" level, which would be each branch/plenum in this case. Also, given your description, they'll want to know how your team plans to demonstrate that the outdoor air is distributed in the plenum in such a way that it reaches all of the VRF systems. The ASHRAE 62.1-2007 Users Manual has some information about Plenum Systems that may be helpful as well as your thinking through the right solution.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Aug 21 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2927 Thumbs Up

We've also encountered similar type applications. We were successful in measuring the outside air at the air handling unit rather than the terminal units since the terminal units (heat pumps) were constant volume.

No guarantees, just thought I'd offer some of our team's past experience.

I'm interested in hearing the results from what GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). requires your project to do.

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Marilia Silva Sustainability Consultancy Services Cushman & Wakefield
Dec 08 2014
LEEDuser Member
1330 Thumbs Up

EBOM Project Occupancy Doubt

Project Location: Brazil

Hi everyone,

I’m working on a project and I have a doubt about occupancy in the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems..

After the measurements, we found that the air conditioning system does not meet the external ventilation levels, according to the ASHRAE 62.1-2007.

On this assumption, a new project will be studied.

The point is, the building has floors that have very different occupation, for example:

1st Floor: 50 occupants
2nd Floor: 200 occupants (tenant is an English language school)
3rd Floor: 14 occupants
and other ...

When the project is developed, the premise can not consider this wide range of occupants.

My question is, assuming that the project will meet the IEQp1, the project can be considered a standard occupation? For example, using the occupation of 50 people on all floors.

What should I do in this case?

Thank you very much!

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Dec 08 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2927 Thumbs Up

you are required to enter the actual occupancy levels into the ventilation calculator.

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Diego Pietzsch Mechanical Engineer
Sep 04 2014
Guest
83 Thumbs Up

Natural Ventilation in a Warehouse

How can a large Warehouse that uses natural ventilation system, but does not meet the requirements of ASHRAE 62.1-2007 section 5.1 be able to pass under the LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. IEQp1? Is it possible to use simulation as an alternative for proving ventilation levels compliance?

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Marilia Silva Sustainability Consultancy Services, Cushman & Wakefield Sep 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 1330 Thumbs Up

Hi Diego,

you can prove through the sizing calculation of natural ventilation warehouse system.

In a warehouse the idea is to remove heat through the chimney effect.

Take a look at the ASHRAE 62.1 User Manual, which talks about Enginnered Ventilation System.

Regards

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Julia Weatherby President, Weatherby Design & Co. Engineers Sep 05 2014 Guest 2434 Thumbs Up

Diego-
You could use any of the natural ventilation analysis techniques discussed under the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. IEQ credit 1.3 Increased Ventilation to document adequate ventilation, even if you are not going for the Increased Ventilation credit.

Refer to the IEQ Credit 1.3 section of the EBOM 2009 reference guide or to that credit on LEED User.

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Marilia Silva Sustainability Consultancy Services Cushman & Wakefield
Sep 03 2014
LEEDuser Member
1330 Thumbs Up

Occupancy Doubt

Hi everyone,

i'm working in a office building that will be certified. I've a doubt about the occupancy to consider.

One of the floors will have a new tenant, which has much higher than projected occupancy, making the equipment impossible to meet the standard, and impacting on the heat load.

The new tenant will have classrooms.

How can I consider the amount of occupants in a classroom? Consider that is unable to determine how many students have for each class.

Can i consider it the peak of occupation?

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Julia Weatherby President, Weatherby Design & Co. Engineers Sep 03 2014 Guest 2434 Thumbs Up

For the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. rating system, you are supposed to use "the maximum number of people expected to occupy the zone during typical usage."

Here's what the LEED Tips for EBOM 2009 says: "Remember that all values of occupancy used to define minimum outside airflow requirements must be based on the maximum occupancy expected during normal facility operation and not on design occupancy, minimum occupancy, or unusual or emergency conditions. According to the Reduced Occupancy Guidance for LEED for Existing Buildings, the default values for occupancy listed in ASHRAE standard 62.1-2007 should be used only for completely vacant spaces."

This means that you should consider "normal" building usage and use an occupancy value that would be considered maximum during actual "normal" or "typical" conditions. That's not an average, but it's also not the absolute peak that might occur during an extraordinary circumstance.

If this occupancy level causes an issue for you, you could look at averaging techniques from Section 6.2.6.2 of ASHRAE 62.1-2007. The reference guide does say you can use those averaging techniques if the expected number of occupants fluctuates. That probably wouldn't help much though, as that kind of averaging makes more difference for spaces like lobbies with high ceilings and peak occupancies that may last only 15 minutes, than for a classroom with a normal height ceiling where the peak occupancy is closer to an hour or so. The time "T" over which you can average the occupancy is obtained from the equation, T=3v/Vbz, where
T=averaging time in minutes
v=volume of the zone in cubic feet
Vbz=the breathing zoneThe breathing zone is the region within an occupied space between 3 and 6 feet above the floor and more than 2 feet from walls or fixed air-conditioning equipment. (AHSRAE 62.1–2007) outdoor airflow calculated for the typical maximum people OA rate plus the area OA rate

For example, for a 900 square foot classroom with a 9 foot high ceiling and a typical maximum of 30 occupants:
v = 900 sf x 9 ft = 8,100 cubic feet
Vbz = (10 cfm/person x 30 people) + (0.12 cfm/sf x 900 sf) = 408

T = 3v/Vbz = 60 minutes
(which does you no good if typical classes are 1 hour or longer)

For EBOM, you should be basing your calculations on a performance period that occurs over a time period during which the building is occupied. This means that you or the building owner or tenant should be able to observe the classrooms during actual usage to determine what the "typical" maximum occupancies are.

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Janna Nash
Aug 06 2014
Guest
619 Thumbs Up

Exhaust Fans in Production area

For LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009, IEQp1, are exhaust fan test reports required for every fan or just one per type. We have 4 restrooms with an exhaust fan in each and then 4 industrial size exhaust fans in the production area that move air from inside the building to outside to help with air circ in summer. This production area is not air conditioned. Could you also tell me the best type of equipment to use for measuring outdoor airflow at the HVAC units. This project has six HVAC units to cool the office areas and computer rooms - just simple residential-size 4-5 ton split units, so I need to describe to contractor what tool to use and where to take the measurement. Readings are not required at diffusersIn an HVAC context, diffusers disperse heating, cooling, or ventilation air as it enters a room, ideally preventing uncomfortable direct currents and in many cases, reducing energy costs and improving indoor air quality (IAQ). In light fixtures, diffusers filter and disperse light./vents, correct? Thanks for any help you can pass on quickly as we wrap up this project!

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Janna Nash Aug 11 2014 Guest 619 Thumbs Up

Clarification: Contractor came to take Outdoor Air measurements and we found the small HVAC units for our project building do not have fresh air intake. Can I comply with this IEQ prerequisite? And how?

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James Doyle Owner ConServe
Jul 31 2014
Guest
197 Thumbs Up

EBOM IEQp1-A1 Statement "Would need over 100% OA Intake"

Our EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 project credit data has to be completed by 8-5 and I am getting a message "Would need over 100% OA Intake" at the end of the IEQp1-A1 VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas. data input form. All values look good with the measured OA intake to the AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. exceeding the required minimum amount. What does the over 100% OA statement mean? We are using the V4 form.

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Ilona Johnson, PE, CEM, LEED AP Associate, Lilker EMO Energy Solutions Jul 30 2014 Guest 525 Thumbs Up

Look for the zone in purple italics in the calculator. Is it getting enough ventilation? Your "critical zone" may be under ventilated.

Also, which cell is this message showing up in? If it's showing up in row 43 of the USGBC version of the ASHRAE calculator, it may mean that you meet the prerequisite minimum OA, but not the 30% increased OA for IEQc2.

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James Doyle Owner, ConServe Jul 30 2014 Guest 197 Thumbs Up

Ilona,
I am referring to the LEEDonline "VRP Compliance Calculator" found in Appendix 1 of the V4 data entry form. We are not using the ASHRAE calculator "62MZCalc". The critical zone had a Zp of 0.99 so I changed some values an now the highest Zp is 0.93. The note is removed when I hit recalculate but comes back when I reload the saved form!! :-(

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Jun 13 2016 Guest 1601 Thumbs Up

Hi James! I have the same issue filling out the IEQp1 form. How did you solve it?

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James Doyle Owner ConServe
Jul 17 2014
Guest
197 Thumbs Up

Can ebom 2009 use IEQp1 v3 forms?

Our EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 project (registered in late 2011 or early 2012) Score Card indicates that for IEQp1 we are to use the v4 form. I thought we could use the v3 form which may not require us to display the VRP Compliance Calculator. I realize we have to comply with the calculator and have it available if LEED wants to see the calculations. 85% of the systems are constant volume and there are 2 VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas. systems (with non recirculating boxes) that are being tested for total OA flow at worst case winter conditions. Is it not easier to document IEQp1 with the v3 form than the v4 form? If we can use the v3 forms how do we get LEED to change the Score Card from v4 to v3?

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Jay Murray LEED Administrator Commercial Construction Consulting
Jul 16 2014
LEEDuser Member
230 Thumbs Up

10 cfm per person rule

I have a small tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. in a large high rise commercial building. 100% outdoor air is supplied down a shaft, each floor has a main heat pumpA type of heating and/or cooling equipment that draws heat into a building from outside and, during the cooling season, ejects heat from the building to the outside. Heat pumps are vapor-compression refrigeration systems whose indoor/outdoor coils are used reversibly as condensers or evaporators, depending on the need for heating or cooling. In the 2003 CBECS, specific information was collected on whether the heat pump system was a packaged unit, residential-type split system, or individual room heat pump, and whether the heat pump was air source, ground source, or water source. which mixes that outdoor air with return air from the floor (40% OA, 60% RA). That mixed air is conditioned by the main floor heat pump and supplied to our space (the sensor for the main heat pump is located within our open office space). The interior of this space (mostly open office) has diffusersIn an HVAC context, diffusers disperse heating, cooling, or ventilation air as it enters a room, ideally preventing uncomfortable direct currents and in many cases, reducing energy costs and improving indoor air quality (IAQ). In light fixtures, diffusers filter and disperse light. serving it directly from that supply duct, while the perimeter spaces (2 conference rooms and some perimeter offices are fed from smaller heat pumps located above the ceiling with the 40/60 main heat pump supplying air into the back of the individual heat pumps. My question is this: the space as a whole is supplied 2,730 cfm from main floor heat pump, of that amount 40% is equal to 1,100 cfm of outdoor air. This office employs 35 people max, but when you add up the conference rooms and consider all of the offices occupied, the occupancy goes as high as 55 people (taking zero diversity). 55 times 10 cfm per person is 550 cfm, exactly 1/2 of what we are supplying. I noticed that one conference room only has 120 cfm going to the back of it's local heat pump which is NOT enough outdoor air per ASHRAE 62 for a room with 8 people. Will USGBC allow me to look at the space as a whole, or do I need to prove that every space within it meets the 10 cfm threshold even though we are supplying twice the required amount of outdoor air into the entire space?

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Ilona Johnson, PE, CEM, LEED AP Associate, Lilker EMO Energy Solutions Jul 16 2014 Guest 525 Thumbs Up

I started to respond based on Case A, but then I realized you are mentioning the 10 cfm because you are pursuing Case B. But I'm curious about the context. If you are providing two times the required 10 cfm per person, then you are providing 20 cfm per person. What is the area of your space? With 20 cfm per person, I'm curious if Case B is appropriate. You may be close to meeting ASHRAE 62.1 requirements in other spaces excluding this one conference room.

I once tried submitting Case B on a project, but then the reviewer came back and said we should make minor modifications to meet Case A. This might mean rebalancing air supply in certain spaces such as your conference room that receive insufficient ventilation...

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Jerry Scott
Apr 09 2014
Guest
83 Thumbs Up

Design Condition

I assume both Vpsd and Vdzd should both be taken at a set design condition (cooling or heating). I received the following GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). comment:

"The Vdzd values should be the maximum design values and the other variables noted shall be modified to appropriately represent the worst-case condition. It is not clear whether the design cooling, or design heating condition (primary plus local recirculated air) represents the maximum supply to the zone."

This seems to imply the Vdzd values should be for the greatest of heating or cooling, and the condition might not be the same for every zone.

Is my original thought correct that Vpsd and Vpzd should always be evaluated under the same design condition?

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Ali Stricks
Apr 08 2014
Guest
57 Thumbs Up

Public Corridors Lack Ventilation

I’m dealing with a building that generally meets ASHRAE 62.1, however several public corridors are unconditioned and unventilated. The corridors do not have the minimum 0.06 cm/sf required per ASHRAE 62.1. I want to ensure the building meets prereq requirements, but I also want to avoid suggesting unnecessary and costly changes in the air distribution system. I have the following questions:
1) All AHUS could comply through Case B by providing at least 10 cfm per person. However, I’m unclear on the circumstances in which a reviewer will accept Case B in place of Case A. Would the reviewers come back and say we need to add supply registers in the corridor?
2) Several corridors are flanked on both sides by offices with outdoor air flow rates that exceed ASHRAE 62.1. Could I claim “credit” for air mixing from adjacent rooms?

Thanks in advance!

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Julia Weatherby President, Weatherby Design & Co. Engineers Apr 11 2014 Guest 2434 Thumbs Up

1) I don't think the reviewer would require that you add ductwork or diffusersIn an HVAC context, diffusers disperse heating, cooling, or ventilation air as it enters a room, ideally preventing uncomfortable direct currents and in many cases, reducing energy costs and improving indoor air quality (IAQ). In light fixtures, diffusers filter and disperse light. to a system to comply with Case A.
2) If there are no closed doors between the offices and the corridors, it might be reasonable to divide the corridors into parts to be included in the same ventilation zone with an adjacent office. In this case the square footage area of the office zone would be increased but the population would not be increased; the entire area would be defined as "office" for purposes of the ventilation calculations. This would model the air supplied to the office as being shared between the office and its adjacent circulation corridor.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Feb 21 2016 Guest 1601 Thumbs Up

1)We have a similar case in a 20-story building in Mexico. Lift lobbies lack ventilation but the UMAs serving each floor provide more than 10cf per person. Will this be accepted by the LEED reviewer to comply with case B?

Thank you

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Mar 03 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5608 Thumbs Up

Somehow, you'll need to show that those lift lobbies receive ventilation air. One possibility would be if there's a pressure differential between the lift lobby and adjacent ventilated spaces, and there's a path for mixed/ventilated air to travel between the two spaces, you could show that it's reasonable to expect that ventilated air would reach those spaces.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Apr 02 2014
LEEDuser Member
3020 Thumbs Up

Measurement at DOAS before fixed dampers

From the reference guide: "Show compliance with the applicable requirement above through measurements taken at the system level (i.e., the air-handling unit). For variable air volume systems, the dampers, fan speeds, etc. must be set during the test to the worst-case system conditions (minimum outside air flow) expected during normal ventilation operations. Each air-handler must be measured; sampling or grouping of air-handlers is prohibited."

The building we are working with has a DOAS - dedicated outdoor air system, that supplies OA to three meeting rooms, the pipes that go to each room have fixed dampers that were regulated during the HVAC test and balance. Is our understanding correct to say that the measurements must be made at the system level even when there are fixed dampers are set near the diffusersIn an HVAC context, diffusers disperse heating, cooling, or ventilation air as it enters a room, ideally preventing uncomfortable direct currents and in many cases, reducing energy costs and improving indoor air quality (IAQ). In light fixtures, diffusers filter and disperse light.?

Thanks in advance,

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Julia Weatherby President, Weatherby Design & Co. Engineers Apr 11 2014 Guest 2434 Thumbs Up

Because your system is 100% outdoor air (no recirculation), I imagine it would be acceptable to add together the air flows at each supply air register. I assume it is easier for you to make the measurements at the air outlets than at the air handling unit outdoor air inlet. You can include a narrative in the Special Circumstances section or the Alternative Compliance section noting that the ductwork routing was confirmed and that airflow was measured at all outlets of the 100% outdoor air system. Theoretically, the sum of the air outlets should be equal to the outdoor air inlet at the AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork.. Even considering duct leakage, the sum of the outlets would be expected to be less than or equal to the OA inlet at the AHU, so demonstrating compliance by measuring the sum of the air outlets should be a valid method in a 100% outdoor air system.

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Andrew Tse LEED Project Engineer Lilker EMO Energy Solutions
Mar 31 2014
LEEDuser Member
340 Thumbs Up

Local code more stringent than ASHRAE 62.1

I noticed that the LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. form does not have the same compliance path as LEED-NC, which allows you to document that your building complies with local code that is more stringent than ASHRAE 62.1. Has anyone ever tried the "local code" compliance path for an EBOM project?

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Hernando Miranda Owner, Soltierra LLC Apr 01 2014 Guest 11754 Thumbs Up

Hello Tom,

I have not done an EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. project, but proving local code is more stringent than ASHRAE 62.1 is quite a pain.

If you are challenged, the reviewers will ask you have to analyze your project using both methods and identify the most stringent conditions. This might appear to mean doing a side-by-side analysis on a space-by-space and a system-by-system basis. But, on the single occasion where a reviewer challenged me about local code for ventilation, I did not provide a side-by-side analysis. I provided two separate analyses which each showed compliance.

A side-by-side analysis doesn't really prove anything because the calculation methodologies and assumptions used are often very different--apples and oranges.

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tiantian zhou
Mar 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
277 Thumbs Up

VRP calculations for fan-powered boxes using 62MZ calc

Our system has fan-powered VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas. boxes. The first review comments required us to use 62MZ calc to account for local recirculation. But we have 120 AHUs and hundreds of zones. One 62MZ calc excel file only can calculate one system which means we have to fill and upload 120 excel file. is it right and terrible?
what should I do?
The 62MZ calc sheet is not so smart and convenient. we are looking forward to more smart calculation sheet.

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Julia Weatherby President, Weatherby Design & Co. Engineers Apr 11 2014 Guest 2434 Thumbs Up

You probably have to submit 120 Excel files. However, you do not have to fill out every zone for every AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork.. You can make a judgement as to which zones are likely to be critical zones and include only those zones if that is helpful. However, when you have only a few zones served by an AHU, it is probably easiest to include all the zones for that AHU so you do not have to override any of the system variables.
If some of your AHU's are similar to each other, you could at least copy a completed Excel file and edit for any differences rather than starting from scratch with each AHU.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Mar 20 2014
LEEDuser Member
3020 Thumbs Up

Ez for projects unable to meet ASHARE 62.1-2007?

Hello.

Is it necessary to consider the zone air distribution effectiveness (Ez) for projects unable to meet ASHARE 62.1-2007 when calculating 10cfm/person minimum ventilation?

Thanks in advance,

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Julia Weatherby President, Weatherby Design & Co. Engineers Mar 21 2014 Guest 2434 Thumbs Up

No, you do not need to consider Ez for air handling units unable to meet ASHRAE 62.1-2007. The 10 cfm/person is as measured at the AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. outdoor intake.
However, you do need to evaluate each AHU separately to determine whether it can meet ASHRAE 62.1-2007, prior to using the 10 cfm/person alternative. You may need to submit some AHU's through the ASHRAE 62.1-2007 path while others in the same building use the 10 cfm/person route.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. Mar 23 2014 LEEDuser Member 3020 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much, Julia!

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Mar 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
3020 Thumbs Up

Pz - Zone Population real vs default occupant density

Hello.

On 6.2.2.1 Breathing ZoneThe breathing zone is the region within an occupied space between 3 and 6 feet above the floor and more than 2 feet from walls or fixed air-conditioning equipment. (AHSRAE 62.1–2007) Outdoor Airflow, I read "Note: If Pz cannot be accurately predicted during design, it shall be an estimated value based on the zone floor area and the default occupant density listed in Table 6-1."

For existing buildings as well, Pz shall be calculated using actual occupancy, instead of calculated using the default density?

Thanks in advance,

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Ilona Johnson, PE, CEM, LEED AP Associate, Lilker EMO Energy Solutions Mar 17 2014 Guest 525 Thumbs Up

Hi Noriko,
Your calculations are supposed to be based on actual occupancy for this credit.

From a code perspective for new construction projects, you should use the actual number of occupants if known, and use the ASHRAE default occupants if the number is unknown. However, if you are documenting this credit for the LEED EB rating system, then you can always take a count of the occupants in the building. LEED reviewers expect you to use the actual number of people in the building to estimate outdoor air requirements. Ensure your occupant count is consistent with the occupants reported for all other credits.

I hope that helps!

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. Mar 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 3020 Thumbs Up

Thank you Ilona!

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Katie Raymond Senior Sustainability Engineer Epsilon
Mar 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
75 Thumbs Up

CO2 sensors located in the return duct

I noticed Ben's comment below from February 10th,

"Also, if the CO2Carbon dioxide sensors are located in the return duct, the review team will likely request justification for how those sensors are accurately accounting for the CO2 in the breathing space of the occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space.."

Funny, I just got that exact comment back last week. I'm wondering, Ben, what type of justification could a team provide in this scenario? If we've already set up the calculations and testing to reflect the scenario where the potentially critical zones are fully occupied and the fans and outside air dampers are set to the lowest point, haven't we already demonstrated that the AHUs can push enough outside air to satisfy ASHRAE 62.1?

It seems this comment relates to IEQc1.2, which we are not pursuing.

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Mar 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 2162 Thumbs Up

Hi Katie

I think the review team is just asking you to confirm that you are aware that the CO2Carbon dioxide sensors are in place and that you understand the implications that the sensors have on your system and the associated OA flow rates. But more so, they are testing you to see if you have adequately accounted for the sensors during testing.

So I think all you need to do is provide a narrative confirming that your approach took into account the above considerations and then include the narrative you began regarding your specific "calculations and testing to reflect the scenario where the potentially critical zones are fully occupied and the fans and outside air dampers are set to the lowest point." Use enough detail so that the review team is aware of your understanding of the implications.

Good luck!

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Ilona Johnson, PE, CEM, LEED AP Associate, Lilker EMO Energy Solutions Mar 29 2014 Guest 525 Thumbs Up

I saw a similar comment on a LEED CI project, and the reviewer stated that CO2Carbon dioxide sensors in the return duct do not meet ASHRAE 62.1. They were concerned that CO2 sensors in the return duct report an average CO2 level, but do not report the CO2 concentration in worst case zones. The problem is that a return CO2 sensor could report a CO2 concentration that is lower than the space concentration in a densely packed conference room. If the building automation system reduces the outdoor air supply based on the return CO2 sensor, it could be starving the conference room of required outdoor air.

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