EBOM-2009 IEQp2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control

  • Multi-rating system IEQp2 Credit Requirements Diagram
  • Prohibiting smoking is the simplest path

    Prohibiting smoking indoors is the most efficient and cost-effective way to achieve this prerequisite. The key to this approach is to establish a building-wide policy prohibiting smoking indoors and within 25 feet of the building’s entrances, outdoor air intakes, and operable windows. These policies can be enforced through strategic placement of cigarette receptacles, signage indicating where smoking is prohibited, and passive discouragement of smoking near the building openings. Building managers, housekeeping, and security personnel should address occupants who are smoking in or near restricted areas to ensure that they are aware of the policies and the reasons for enforcement.

    You can allow smoking, but it's more of a challenge

    This prerequisite can be challenging for projects that permit smoking in designated smoking rooms or residential units. If you choose to designate interior smoking areas in your project, you will need to ensure that tobacco smoke does not transfer into nonsmoking areas. Doing so usually requires both well-enforced policies and costly mechanical intervention. 

    Consider these questions before pursuing this credit

    • Where is smoking allowed? Can any of these areas be transitioned to non-smoking areas?
    • Has the building designated any outdoor areas for smoking, either formally in employee manuals and/or site plans, or informally by providing butt receptacles, seating, or similar amenities? Are any of these areas within 25 feet of doors, air intakes, or operable windows? If so, can they be moved at a reasonable expense?
    • Are designated outdoor smoking areas sufficiently sheltered from the elements to ensure that building occupants use them, instead of covered entrances or other locations closer to the building?
    • How is the smoking policy communicated? Is it effective?
    • In a multifamily residential building or a building with designated smoking rooms, what are the costs associated with the required testing?
    • In a multifamily residential building, are there enough units that require testing to make it cost-effective to purchase blower-door equipment and perform the testing in-house?

    FAQ's for LEED-EBOM IEQp2

    Municipal law requires that our building be completely smoke-free inside. It also bans smoking next to the building, but it’s not as stringent as the 25 foot LEED requirement. Do we have to make another policy that bans smoking within 25 feet?

    Yes, if local regulations are not as strict as LEED, you must create a policy that complies with LEED standards (and communicate this policy to building users) to achieve this prerequisite. Exterior signage which communicates the policy is required so that all occupants, visitors, and passersby are made aware of the exterior smoking policy.

    Our outside smoking area is located less than 25 feet from an emergency exit. Is this okay since that door is rarely (if ever) used?

    The Reference Guide doesn’t explicitly make a distinction between a regular door and an emergency exit, making this a bit of a gray area. The safest bet is to assume they’re treated the same way under this prerequisite, which would require relocation of the smoking area to a compliant distance. If you’d like a definitive answer to this question you can submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

Expand All

  • All Options


  • If smoking inside public buildings is prohibited by law in your state or locality, acquire a copy of the law or regulation to confirm its alignment with LEED requirements.


  • Measure the distance from designated outdoor smoking areas to all building openings and air intakes to ensure a distance of at least 25 feet.


  • Remove butt receptacles from entryways.


  • Communicate the policy to occupants through signage, email communications, and incorporating it into employee or occupant handbooks.


  • Smokers may object to the decision to relocate smoking areas. Collaborating with occupants who smoke at the outset of this effort to hear their concerns and meet their needs as best as possible may ease this resistance.


  • If smoking is prohibited across the entire building and grounds, there should be zero or minimal costs associated with developing the policy and subsequent communication plans.


  • Moving more elaborate smoking areas, such as shelters or benches, may come with some added costs.


  • Case 1–Option 2 and Case 2: Prohibit Smoking Except in Designated Areas


  • If smoking is currently allowed indoors, owners or facility managers should switch to a policy that prohibits smoking wherever possible.


  • If you choose to allow smoking in designated interior areas, determine areas where possible air leaks may need to be sealed in preparation for blower-door testing. Perform blower-door testing to measure air leakage rates throughout the building.


  • For buildings that allow smoking, common problem areas that may require sealing to prevent room-to-room transfer of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) include bathroom exhaust vents, doors and locks, shared drain risers, electrical and telecommunications receptacles, plumbing and heating chases, at the floorplate behind baseboards, under doors leading to shared hallways.


  • For multi-unit buildings, it may be most cost-effective for project teams to buy testing equipment, receive training, and perform the blower door testing in-house.


  • Blower-door testing can be expensive and time-consuming depending on the number of units that require measurement.

During the Performance Period

Expand All

  • All Options


  • Monitor common areas and grounds to verify that occupants are observing the smoking policies.


  • Address smokers who do not observe the smoking policy and confirm that they aware of the policy.


  • Changes to exterior smoking areas may lead to noncompliant behaviors and
    create custodial problems; for example, smokers may leave butts on the ground in areas where there are no longer butt receptacles. Anticipate this problem by asking custodial staff to check such areas regularly. Keeping these areas clean will discourage such littering.


  • If local regulations exist but are not as stringent as LEED, the building smoking policy must comply with LEED standards in order to achieve the prerequisite.


  • Ongoing monitoring and enforcement does not typically involve any added costs.


  • Case 1–Option 2 and Case 2: Prohibit Smoking Except in Designated Areas


  • Perform blower-door testing to measure air leakage rates throughout the building.


  • Blower-door testing can be expensive and time-consuming depending on the number of units that require measurement

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    IEQ Prerequisite 2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) control

    Required

    Intent

    To prevent or minimize exposure of building occupants, indoor surfaces and ventilation air distribution systems to environmental tobacco smoke (ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer.).

    Requirements

    OPTION 1
    • Prohibit smoking in the building.
    • Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet (8 meters) of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows.

    OR

    OPTION 2

    CASE 1. Non-Residential Projects
    • Prohibit smoking in the building except in designated smoking rooms and establish negative pressure in the rooms with smoking.
    • Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet (8 meters) of building entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows.
    • Locate designated smoking room(s) to effectively contain, capture and remove ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer. from the building. At a minimum, the smoking room must be directly exhausted to the outdoors, away from air intakes and building entry paths, away from air intakes and building entry paths, with no recirculation of ETS containing air to the nonsmoking area of the building; enclosed with impermeable deck-to-deck partitions. The smoking room must be operated at a negative pressure (compared with the surrounding spaces) of at least an average of 5 Pascals (Pa) (0.02 inch water gauge) and a minimum of 1 Pa (0.004 inch water gauge) when the doors to the rooms are closed.
    • Verify performance of the smoking room differential air pressures by conducting 15 minutes of measurement, with a minimum of 1 measurement every 10 seconds, of the differential pressure in the smoking room with respect to each adjacent area and in each adjacent vertical chase with the doors to the smoking room closed. Conduct the testing with each space configured for worst-case conditions for transport of air from the smoking room (with closed doors) to adjacent spaces.
    • CASE 2. Residential and Hospitality Projects
      • Reduce air leakage between smoking and nonsmoking areas.
      • Prohibit smoking in all common areas of the building.
      • Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet (8 meters) of building entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows opening to common areas.
      • Minimize uncontrolled pathways for ETS transfer between individual residential units by sealing penetrations in walls, ceilings and floors in the residential units and by sealing adjacent vertical chases adjacent to the units.
      • Weather-strip all doors in the residential units leading to common hallways to minimize air leakage into the

        hallway.1
      • Demonstrate acceptable sealing of residential units by a blower door testA blower door test gives an overall value for airtightness of a space, and can help identify air leaks. The testing unit consists of a calibrated fan that is sealed onto the unit entrance. The fan creates a continuous flow of pressure into the unit (or out of the unit when using theatrical fog to locate leaks). Devices detect the rate of pressure retention and loss due to possible air leaks in the construction. conducted in accordance with ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services-779-03, Standard Test Method for Determining Air Leakage RateThe speed at which an appliance loses refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges or over 12 months, whichever is shorter. The leakage rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the rate stabilized. (EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608). by Fan Pressurization. Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ANSI/ASTM-E779-03, Standard Test Method for Determining Air Leakage Rate By Fan Pressurization.
      • Use the progressive sampling methodology defined in Chapter 7 (Home Energy Rating Systems, HERS Required Verification and Diagnostic Testing) of the California Residential Alternative Calculation Method Approval Manual. Projects outside the U.S. may use a local sampling methodology, whichever is more stringent. Residential units must demonstrate less than 1.25 square inches of leakage area per 100 square feet (8 square centimeters of leakage area per 10 square meters) of enclosure area (i.e., the sum of all wall, ceiling and floor areas).

      1If the common hallways are pressurized with respect to the residential units then doors in the residential units leading to the common hallways need not be weatherstripped provided that the positive differential pressure is demonstrated as in Option 2, Case 1 above, considering the residential unit as the smoking room.

      Credit substitution available

      You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Prohibit smoking in the building or provide negative-pressure smoking rooms. For residential buildings, a third option is to provide very tight construction to minimize the transfer of ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer. among dwelling units.

    FOOTNOTE

    1 If the common hallways are pressurized with respect to the residential units then doors in the residential units leading to the common hallways need not be weather-stripped provided that the positive differential pressure is demonstrated as in Option 2, Case 1 above, considering the residential unit as the smoking room.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


ASTM Standard E 779-03: Measuring Air Leakage Rate by Fan Pressurization

This test method covers a technique for measuring the rate of air leakage through a building envelope under controlled pressurization and depressurization.


California Residential Alternative Calculation Method Approval Manual, Chapter 7

This document establishes requirements for certifying the energy efficiency of residential buildings in accordance with the California Home Energy Rating System Program (California Code of Regulations, Title 20, Chapter 4, Article 8, Sections 1670


Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Program

HERS determines the sampling rate for blower door testing for residential units.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.


U.S. Dept. of Energy - Air Sealing

Guidelines for proper air sealing techniques.


U.S. Dept. of Energy - Blower Door Tests

Provides general background on blower door tests.

Publications

The Smoke-Free Guide: How to Eliminate Tobacco Smoke from Your Environment

This guide condenses statistical information into lay language, provides a form to assess one's exposure to ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer., and suggests ways to eliminate it from one's world. Several examples of policies from a variety of governmental units in the United States and Canada are cited. Arlene Galloway, (Gordon Soules Book Publishers, 1988).


Smoking In The Workplace: Guidelines For Implementing A Smoke Free Policy

This publication from Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights details the legal basis for constructing a smoke-free workplace policy.


The Percentage of Gamblers Who Smoke: A Study of Nevada Casinos and other Gaming Venues (Chris A. Pritsos)

This study finds that the percentage of gamblers who smoke is not significantly different from the percentage of the general population who smoke, undermining claims that barring smoking in casinos would have a devastating economic impact.


Environmental Tobacco Smoke

This EPA document summarizes environmental tobacco smoke research and provides information on national laws targeting the issue.

LEED Gold Project Documentation

All Options

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of IEQp2 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

Communciation of Smoking Policy

All Options

Provide a narrative explaining how the smoking policy is communicated to occupants, and example communications.

Pressurization and Air Leakage Testing

Provide drawings, data, and a narrative explaining pressurization and leakage rate testing protocols.

ETS Policy

All Options

Establish a building smoking policy, enforcing the requirements of the chosen compliance path.

Smoking Area Plan

All Options

Provide a map showing that designated outdoor smoking areas are 25 feet or more from building openings.

Sample LEED Online Form

This annotated version of the IEQp2 LEED Online form demonstrates how to document this preqrequisite.

LEED Online Forms: LEED-EBOM IEQ

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

118 Comments

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Sep 02 2016
LEEDuser Member
3172 Thumbs Up

Exterior Signage - LEED Online IEQp2 v06

The LEED Online form v06 of this prerequisite asks the user to select either: "smoking is prohibited on the project site" or "smoking is prohibited within 25 feet of entries, outdoor air intakes, and operable windows".

Does this means a change in the requirements? Would it be acceptable to have a simpler sign saying "SMOKING IS PROHIBITED WITHIN THIS SITE" instead of the longer "Smoking is prohibited within 25 feet (8 meters) of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows"?

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. Sep 04 2016 LEEDuser Member 3172 Thumbs Up

From USGBC

Thank you for contacting us regarding signage requirements for LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. v2009 IEQp2 Environmental Tobacco Smoke control.

Yes, it is permissible for signage to state "Smoking is prohibited on this site." Signage is required to communicate a compliant exterior smoking policy. As such, it is acceptable for the signage to:
(a) allow smoking in designated areas (i.e., areas not within 25 feet/8 meters of entries, outdoor air intakes, and operable windows),
(b) prohibit smoking in designated areas (i.e., areas within 25 feet/8 meters of entries, outdoor air intakes, and operable windows), or
(c) prohibit smoking on the entire property.

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Vanessa W.
Aug 10 2016
Guest
10 Thumbs Up

EQ P2 Option A - Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control

Project Location: Canada

Hi,

We already have a Smoke & Vape-Free Environment Policy in place since last year which prohibits smoking in and on the grounds, way beyond the 25ft requirement for LEED. We want to make sure our policy meets the requirements of the LEED policy template. What I'm not sure about is if we have to list performance metrics for this credit? Is it enough that we have the policy in place as well as the appropriate signage on site. Also, does our signage have to specifically say no smoking within 25 feet when our current boundary and posted signs are way beyond this?

TIA

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Kimberly Schlaepfer Sustainability Coordinator LEED AP O+M, BD+C, YR&G Aug 12 2016 LEEDuser Expert 607 Thumbs Up

Hi Vanessa,
The no-smoking policy does not need to follow the typical template for LEED policies, so no performance metrics, goals, etc need to be included. There is a sample no-smoking policy that can be found in the documentation tool-kit above.
The signage does not need to note that there is no smoking within 25 feet, but the policy and other documentation must demonstrate that the 25 foot rule is clearly communicated to all building tenants.
I hope this helps!

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Vanessa W. Aug 15 2016 Guest 10 Thumbs Up

Thanks so much for the reply Kimberly! This definitely helps clear things up.

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Ranya Metwalli Shields LEED AP BD+C, CEM
Mar 09 2016
LEEDuser Member
42 Thumbs Up

Conflict with energy efficiency in extreme climate

Project Location: Kuwait

We are optimizing a 4 storey residential building for certification under LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. (it is currently under construction) . Most residential units will have to allow smoking . My understanding is that in addition to pressurization , weather stripping of apartment doors and blower tests, this also means the ducting will have to be redesigned st all air from smoking appartments must be completely exhausted outdoors and 100% fresh air only must be supplied to apartment spaces. Is my understanding correct ? The issues here are not only ducting redesign, but the energy efficiency issues of using 100% fresh air for cooling for all these spaces as this is an extremely hot climate which will completely undermine building performance in EAC1 optimize energy performance . Any other suggestions or alternatives to save the project energy efficiency performance and meet the ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer. prerequisite ?

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Mar 09 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5760 Thumbs Up

Hi Ranya,

How is the ventilation system currently designed? The smoking prerequisite doesn't prescribe a specific ventilation strategy and so you may have some options. But, since the prerequisite essentially prohibits air transfer from one unit to another, the ventilation system could not be designed in such a way that air from one residential unit would later end up in another.

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BREEAM Fellow, BuildingWise LLC Mar 09 2016 LEEDuser Expert 7901 Thumbs Up

Ranya. A brief question. If the building is being constructed from the ground up then EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. is the wrong rating system to be using....you should be in BD&C.

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Ranya Metwalli Shields LEED AP BD+C, CEM Mar 09 2016 LEEDuser Member 42 Thumbs Up

Barry, the building is currently under construction, a number of BD+C prerequisites incl construction activity pollution prevention already voided as owner request for LEED certification came halfway through construction. Hence we decided best option to plan ahead and "optimize" building for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.. If only they had called us a year ago !

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Ranya Metwalli Shields LEED AP BD+C, CEM Mar 09 2016 LEEDuser Member 42 Thumbs Up

Thanks Ben, at the moment there are a number of apartments sharing a common return. Each apartment receives a mixture of fresh and recirculated return air. Note that at this point in time we can make some changes to the HVAC design . Would it be okay to recirculate the return air from the non smoking appartments throughout the building including the supply of the non-smoking apartments this would help solve the problem. What additional measures, if any in this scenario should be included to prevent cross-contamination ? Is there any way you know of where we can treat or clean the smoke-laden air ? Any other suggestions to solve our dilemma ? Thanks !

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Mar 29 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5760 Thumbs Up

Hi Ranya,
I don't know the answer to your question 100%, but it doesn't seem like recirculating air back to a central AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. would work. Even if it was only recirculated air from non-smoking units, those units could change to smoking units at a later date. Treating the air somehow also wouldn't align with the prerequisite requirements. If you wanted to try that, it would require submitting a CIR.

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Ranya Metwalli Shields LEED AP BD+C, CEM Mar 29 2016 LEEDuser Member 42 Thumbs Up

Ben,
Thanks,

Another idea is to set up lease so smoking is on balconies only . Balcony doors would be weatherstripped and adjacent room positively pressurised (balcony would be treated as smoking room ) We would also have to conduct blower tests and ensure no intakes or operable windows within 25 ft of balconies, but the main thing is this implementation means we will not compromise on our energy efficiency targets which was the main concern.What do you think ?

Aso, non-smoking units would not change over time to smoking. Would this help ?

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Mar 29 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5760 Thumbs Up

That might be possible if you could show that ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer. transfer to other units would be minimized. Maybe you saw this related LEED interpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. http://www.usgbc.org/content/li-1957?

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Mercè Llorca DEERNS, S.L.
Feb 08 2016
LEEDuser Member
23 Thumbs Up

Prohibit Smoking Signage in entrance of Parking and loading docs

Project Location: Spain

Even though there is a post over this ítem I am not really sure about this two áreas and the need of signage.

In our builiding there are 4 entrances to the underground car park. In the whole building it is prohibited to smoke

If only the tobacco smoke can come from a person walking by in the parking entrance (it is forbidden by the Spanish law inside the buildings), and the Access ramp is longer than 25 meters, do we need to put a Prohibited Smoking signal in the Street?

And the other question a bit related it is about Loading docks. In the same building, there is asmall area of loading dock. If there is no permanent occupancy of workers (they load or discharge ocasionally) do we need to put the signal of non smoking in the entrance?

Thanks

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Kimberly Schlaepfer Sustainability Coordinator LEED AP O+M, BD+C, YR&G Feb 19 2016 LEEDuser Expert 607 Thumbs Up

Hi Mercé,
To answer your first question, that will depend on the entrance to the parking garage. If there is a operable window or any other opening in the building that will allow for smoke to enter the building within 25 feet of the parking garage entrances, then yes, you will need signage. Otherwise, you should be okay without posting signage at all of the parking garage entrances.

To answer your second question, I think that yes it would be a good idea to post signage at the loading dock entrance. Because it is a pedestrian entrance (even though it isn't regularly used) it should have signage, in case employees or drivers want to smoke in that area.

Hope that helps!

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Gabriela Crespo CxA, LEED AP BD+C, O+M Revitaliza Consultores
Dec 15 2015
Guest
292 Thumbs Up

Outdoor Seating for a Restaurant

Dear all, we have a multi-tenant project that includes restaurants, currently they have a smoking policy for outdoor seating, 1.is it possible to maintain the policy for outdoor smoking, if we comply with the 25 ft distance of the entrance to that area?
2.There is a space with large openings in the wall to provide ventilation but we are not sure if we can consider it as an outdoor space. Can we somehow get a parameter on how large should be the openings be to considered it as an outdoor space?
Thank you!

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Kimberly Schlaepfer Sustainability Coordinator LEED AP O+M, BD+C, YR&G Dec 15 2015 LEEDuser Expert 607 Thumbs Up

Hi Gabriela,

To demonstrate compliance you will need to prohibit smoking within 25 feet of all building entrances and windows as well as prohibit smoking within 25 feet of outdoor seating area for the restaurant. To answer your second question, the opening for ventilation is treated like any other building opening, like a door or a window, and you'll need to prohibit smoking within 25 feet of that opening as well.
Hope that helps!

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Dec 15 2015 Guest 1823 Thumbs Up

Hi Kimberly,
Can you refer on which document you base your requirement for "prohibit smoking within 25 feet of outdoor seating"? I have neither read it in the Reference Guide nor the rating system, but maybe you are based in a LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. that I am not aware of.

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Kimberly Schlaepfer Sustainability Coordinator LEED AP O+M, BD+C, YR&G Dec 15 2015 LEEDuser Expert 607 Thumbs Up

Hi Gustavo,

I apologize my initial comment was unclear. The v2009 requirements simply state that smoking is not allowed within 25 feet of any building openings, which in most cases would encompass the entire outdoor seating area. In the v4 Reference Guide on page 413 there is a nice graphic that demonstrates where smoking must be prohibited when there's outdoor seating.

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M; CxA: Green Rater in Training, Revitaliza Consultores Dec 15 2015 Guest 1823 Thumbs Up

Yes, we are considering v3 because we won't be able to pass this prerequisite in v4.

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Alexander Benning Project Manager ES EnviroSustain GmbH
Jun 24 2015
LEEDuser Member
348 Thumbs Up

indoor smoking room exhaust

Project Location: Germany

Hi, an occupant in our project building (office) insists on indoor smoking.
He agreed to installing a cabin in his kitchenette (they already smoke there). The cabin is able to comply with LEED requirements (deck-to-deck-partition, 5Pa negative pressure). Additionaly the cabin filters the air through 3 filters:
1. F7
2.HEPA-filter H14 which filters particles down to 0.01µm
3. adsorptionThe property of many solid surfaces, especially porous ones like carpet or ceiling tile, to attract and retain molecules from the air, for example, volatile organic compounds (VOCs). filter (activated carbon) removing smells and hazardous gases.
It has been shown that the exhaust air contains less VOCs and hazardous substances from tabaco smoke than required by WHO for indoor air.

Are we allowed to exhaust this thoroughly cleaned air to the outside within the 25ft?
Thank you.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Jul 07 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5760 Thumbs Up

Would the air be exhausted to a location within 25ft of a building opening or air intake? If so, I'm not sure that would be acceptable despite the filtration that you describe. But, it might be possible if you were able to demonstrate that the exhaust air were similar in quality to the ambient outdoor air. Otherwise, the best solution would be to exhaust further than 25ft from the openings/intakes.

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Haley Duncan Project Manager Silver Oak Cellars
Mar 25 2015
LEEDuser Member
264 Thumbs Up

Location(s) and Wording of Signs

Project Location: United States

I'd like a little more clarity on "posting information regarding the building's nonsmoking policy in prominent locations throughout the building."

We are a winery with a production facility, offices, and a tasting room. While we already have in place a no smoking policy, we do not have permanent "No Smoking" signs. For our main entrance, which is the entrance our customers use, is it acceptable to place a standing sign at the roads edge (near the main entrance) that reads "No Smoking Within 25ft of our Building"? The key parts that I'd like direction on are the location of the sign and the wording. An earlier post recommended adding the "25 feet" wording as it is one of the main requirements in this prerequisite, but not necessarily the "building entries, outdoor air intakes, etc."

This would be similar to our "Open for Tasting/Closed for Tasting" sign as it is free-standing and at the roads edge. The issue here is mostly aesthetic- we have very few permanent signs on our buildings, except where mandated by code.

We are more flexible for our other entries- the main production entry, main admin entry, etc. but I'd like to be very clear about how many signs really need to go up. Is it acceptable to place typical signage (not free standing) at one major entrance of each of our buildings instead of every single possible entrance?

We would also post the complete No Smoking Policy on our bulletin board in the employee break room and other high-traffic areas.

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Mar 25 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5760 Thumbs Up

Hi Haley,

In general, your strategy seems great. The free-standing sign near the main entrance should be fine and signage isn't required at all possible entries. I would try and meet the test of including "high visibility signage" as suggested by the Implementation section of the reference guide. Another idea would be to post signage in areas where operationally, there's the highest chance of people being tempted to break the rules.

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Mary Grace Wong Miss
Sep 24 2014
Guest
45 Thumbs Up

25ft of entrace located near corner of building

Project Location: Canada

Does the 25ft referring to a straight line measurement? Or, it's following the building footprintBuilding footprint is the area on a project site used by the building structure, defined by the perimeter of the building plan. Parking lots, parking garages, landscapes, and other nonbuilding facilities are not included in the building footprint.? Or, as a radius?

The reason of this question being an existing ashtray is located at the corner of our building, while the main entrance is located at ~10ft from the corner on the other side. Historically, the designated smoking area is vaguely located where the ashtray is.

As we are making the Entrance Area a smoke-free zone, would this very ashtray be exempt due to its location at the other side of the corner?

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Tam Kin Hung
Jun 24 2014
LEEDuser Member
179 Thumbs Up

Why 25 feet?

We need to explain to the tenant why on-property smoking must be prohibited within 25 feet of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows. Is there any techinical advice on it?

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BREEAM Fellow, BuildingWise LLC Jun 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 7901 Thumbs Up

Tam, There is VAST evidence that second hand smoke is a killer. The introduction of smoke into the buildings occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space. MUST be prevented at all costs (the litigation costs alone out-way the capital costs of smoking prevention within a building). The USGBC (in conjunction the ALL health advisers) have designated that smoking should be prevented closer than 25ft from the described areas. The only problem with this is that a city center building cannot control who smokes and where in a public street (unfortunately) but as attitudes changes, which they are...and legislation is further enhanced, this problem will go away. This rules INCLUDE the newest toy electric cigarettes.

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Jun 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 21249 Thumbs Up

As for 'why' I think it comes from separate ventilation in the codes and 25' was the strictest setting. We do healthcare work and the standards were to always separate an exhaust vent by 25' to an intake. It allows the pollutants to be dispersed. My assumption has been that this is where the standard was set. Notice the words assumption and were. Do I have an exact code citation? No, this is my interpretation. You might try digging around in the EPA website for air quality standardsThe level of pollutants prescribed by regulations that are not to be exceeded during a given time in a defined area. (EPA).

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Ryan Tinus Sustainability Manager Tishman Speyer
Apr 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
177 Thumbs Up

Signage Requirements

Hello. We have a building located downtown in Chicago, and have a question regarding required verbiage for the signage posted at building entrances. If we do not allow smoking anywhere in the building or on the site, are we allowed to post signage indicating "Smoke Free Environment," or must we use the 25' language?

Thanks.
Ryan

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Apr 10 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4744 Thumbs Up

Hi Ryan, I'd be sure that the signage indicates 25 feet, since that's the core part of the policy that's intended to be communicated through the signage.

Thanks!
Trista

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Feb 04 2014
LEEDuser Member
4014 Thumbs Up

Blower Door Testing in non-smoking rooms

In our hotel project, most rooms are non-smoking. Do they comply or do we have to test on all rooms even when they are designated as non smoking?

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Feb 17 2014 LEEDuser Member 2239 Thumbs Up

Hi Emmanuel

From my experience, you only have to test the rooms that are designated as smoking rooms. And in some instances sampling is permitted. For example, we had a ~100 room hotel where smoking was allowed in some rooms, and we were able to demonstrate compliance by testing 1 in 7 smoking rooms where the layout was identical (i.e. all queen suits).

Best,

Hannah

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Anna Dengler
Dec 18 2013
Guest
16 Thumbs Up

Smoking 25 feet from operable windows

Our building has a no smoking policy and will be posting no smoking signage at all entrances "No smoking within 25 feet of building entrance." However, the windows on the second floor are operable and within range of 25 feet from the sidewalk (some less than 25 feet some more than 25 feet from the ground). What are the best options for the building with this scenario? To prevent all second floor windows from opening would cost $5,000. To change the signage to read "no smoking anywhere" doesn't seem to make sense either. It is a NYC building with only a portion of the sidewalk on the property. How best to meet this prerequisite?

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BREEAM Fellow, BuildingWise LLC Dec 23 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7901 Thumbs Up

Anna

Basically you can't succeed....and GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). know this. While you can 'request' that there is no smoking within 25ft, if it's a public sidewalk you're stuck...if it was private ground then of course you could dictate. Create a narrative and site plan for GBCI explaining the layout...the prereq will pass.

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Elizabeth Felder
Nov 21 2013
Guest
490 Thumbs Up

Underground Parking Garage and Loading Dock

What is the consensus on entryways from an underground parking garage into the building? Would signage need to be posted at the doors into the building from the garage area? What about level 1 and level 2 entrances into an elevator lobby?

A second question regards loading docks. What if the overhead door is way, way beyond 25 from the public sidewalk? Contractors and vendors have to drive past automatic doors to get into the loading dock area, so technically there are two sets of automatic doors to get to the actual building entrance. Does signage need to specify no smoking within 25 feet anywhere in this circumstance?

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Jan 02 2014 LEEDuser Member 8281 Thumbs Up

Elizabeth, does the building and/or parking garage management company currently allow people to smoke in the underground parking garage? I'm a little surprised by that, but if it isn't a U.S. building, then I understand that it may be an issue. If smoking is allowed in the garage, then you'll need to post signage at all relevant locations to do your best to ensure that smoke will not get into the project building.

Regarding loading docks: yes, your signage is really geared more towards building occupants and vendors who have business at the property than the general public who just happen to be walking by. If your loading dock is part of your LEED Project Boundary, then it must meet the requirements of IEQp2.

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Julie Pollack Co-Founder/Principal e2e Sustainability Consultants, LLC
Oct 23 2013
LEEDuser Member
239 Thumbs Up

Smoking shelters

When researching this credit, I found info stating that when using Option 1, the building owner should provide a smoking shelter. Is this true? I've not found any other references to this requirement but want to be sure. The building has a bench with ash receptacles outside of the 25 foot boundary and the required signage.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 23 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Julie, where did you see that? Clearly this is not referenced in the credit language (see above) and would conflict with many building and campus smoke-free policies. I don't think it's good advice.

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Julie Pollack Co-Founder/Principal, e2e Sustainability Consultants, LLC Oct 23 2013 LEEDuser Member 239 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Tristan. It was on a website offering LEED tips - which, of course I can no longer locate to verify it. But since I couldn't find anything in the ref guide or LEEDUser, I thought I would ask. So, my understanding is that if smoking is allowed on the site- but not in the building -we only need to provide an outdoor designated smoking area outside of the 25 ft non-smoking boundary, and appropriate signage - but not a shelter from the weather?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 23 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

LEED does not dictate anything about the qualities of a designated exterior smoking area, except for the location.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory Colliers International
Aug 08 2013
LEEDuser Member
4095 Thumbs Up

Differential Pressure Test

We've conducted the differential pressure test and the average is around 7 pa.

We've had the contractor test the room and report the results on the LEEDUser form. The form has a space to report the d. pressure average, d. pressure average with the doors closed and the d. pressure average compared with adjacent rooms. As the pressure test was conducted with doors closed, we don't really understand the difference here. Also, the information on the form appears to be different from that required in the LEED Online form.

Our understanding is that we need to report the average (min 5 Pa) and minimum (min 1 Pa) pressure differential from the test report(s).

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, can you clarify what question you are asking or clarificaition you are looking for? Thanks.

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Andy Rhoades Partner Leading Edge Consulting
Jul 08 2013
LEEDuser Member
723 Thumbs Up

Zero Lot Line Buildings

For those of you working with zero lot line buildings: we have seen the reviews vary in the past pertaining to documentation submittals. We have decided to clarify this by using an "unofficial" ruling via email correspondence w/ GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)..

"For zero lot line buildings, smoking must be prohibited on the property that is under the building/management control, and the building should still have signage indicating that smoking is prohibited within 25 feet of entries. The rule is not required to be enforced on public sidewalks that are not under the building/management control, but appropriate signage needs to be in place."

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Robin Obaugh Vice President - Engineering Hines
Jun 19 2013
Guest
386 Thumbs Up

E Cigarettes

Has there been any commentary on whether how "e-cigarettes" align or do not align with the intent of this credit?

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, JLL Jun 19 2013 LEEDuser Member 6669 Thumbs Up

well...I think it is not the same as "tobacco smoke." I am not aware of this being covered in the scope of the prerequisite and we have not had any review comments asking about this but maybe if you were working on a bar or restaurant you might want to address this.

For the building management's benefit (after the building is occupied) you may want to prohibit these....since some people confuse them for traditional tobacco cigarettes. My friend at a bar was told he couldn't use his e-cigarette because the owner said others take this as a cue that smoking is allowed and light up their tobacco cigarettes.

The e-cigarette "juice" sometimes (not always) has nicotine. It might be good due-dilligence to see if this is harmful to people when exhaled. I don't know off the top of my head. If it is then it would be advisable to prohibit its use in a certified "green" building!

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Andy Rhoades Partner, Leading Edge Consulting Jul 08 2013 LEEDuser Member 723 Thumbs Up

I just spoke with a USGBC / GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). affiliate on this topic, and here is the response:

The prerequisite does not apply to e-cigarettes and only applies to tobacco smoke. It may still be beneficial for the building/management to discourage people from using e-cigarettes within 25 feet of building entries, since others may see them and may think that regular smoking is allowed within 25 feet of the building.

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Rachel Shepherd Project Engineer Eneractive Solutions
May 08 2013
LEEDuser Member
22 Thumbs Up

Blower Door Testing on 36 Story Multi-Family

I am working on a project where blower door testing is required for a multi-family facility. The building is 36 stories tall with a mechanical penthouse. The ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services standard states in section 8.4:

"Measure and record the indoor and outdoor temperatures at the beginning and the end of the test and average the values. If the product of the absolute value of the indoor/outdoor air temperature difference multiplied by the building height, gives a result greater than 200 m °C (1180 ft °F), the test shall not be performed, because the pressure difference induced by the stack effect is too large to allow accurate interpretation of the results."

If my building is too tall to perform blower door testing because the results will be inaccurate, what other alternatives does LEED accept to comply with the credit?

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International May 08 2013 LEEDuser Member 4095 Thumbs Up

If the internal and external temperatures are the same then the building height can be infinite and the test can still be performed.

Temp difference * height < 1180, so
height/1180 = maximum temperature difference

Good luck with the weather!

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Accounting Accounting Controller Light House
Dec 10 2012
LEEDuser Member
112 Thumbs Up

EQp2 Residential Buildings that Allow Smoking Testing

Wondering the testing requirements (blower door) for residential buildings that allow smoking in the suites. Do we have to test every suite or just 10% of the first x and 5% of the remaining x? Where can I find this information, thanks.

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Michelle Cottrell President, Design Management Services Jan 18 2013 LEEDuser Member 1016 Thumbs Up

Curtis - did you ever receive or find any guidance for the blower door testing requirements?

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Accounting Accounting Controller, Light House Jan 18 2013 LEEDuser Member 112 Thumbs Up

no I did not...

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Feb 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 5760 Thumbs Up

With respect to sampling, the v2009 rating system language references Chapter 4 of the Residential Manual for Compliance with California's 2001 Energy Efficiency Standards and includes a link to that standard.

LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 5170 summarizes the sampling methodology from that standard as follows.

... residential units will be grouped together based on unit type. Testing will be conducted on one (1) in seven (7) units in each group. Should any of the residential units fail the test, the construction contractor can resolve the issue prior to re-testing that unit. Should any of the remaining 1 in 7 units in that group fail the test, the entire group will be deemed to fail. The contractor will then correct every unit in that group prior to every unit being tested.

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Michelle Cottrell President, Design Management Services Feb 14 2013 LEEDuser Member 1016 Thumbs Up

Thank you Ben - wondering if you can also help with another related question:

I am working on a a large multifamily building for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. with over 500 units. The owner does not want to eliminate smoking in the apartments. The building is pressurized and each apartment is exhausted 100% of the time. We can easily prove the pressure differential between the hallways and apartment units. Is this sufficient to satisfy the tobacco smoke prerequisite or is blower door testing required for occupied units to prove that smoke does not transfer between apartments? The blower door testing will be very intrusive to tenants and costly. Have you completed a similar project with a large number of apartment units? Or Jason Franken - have you?
Interested to hear how others have approached this...

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Mar 22 2013 LEEDuser Expert 5760 Thumbs Up

Blower door testing is still required as far as I know. Are there any vacant units that could be tested? Maybe if you could at least conduct the testing for the vacant units and then adopt a policy to verify leakage for other units when they turnover, it might be plausible. But, this type of strategy would need to be confirmed through a project specific LEED interpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org..

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Michelle Cottrell President, Design Management Services May 29 2013 LEEDuser Member 1016 Thumbs Up

Thanks Ben - we are moving forward with the blower door testing following the sampling rate in the reference guide. For a building this size, it really is quite an effort!

Another question for you: Is it fair to assume we are to use the same sampling rate for the pressure differential testing as we are using for the blower door testing? The doors to the residential spaces are not weather-sealed requiring us to perform the pressure differential testing for the smoking rooms. With every apartment considered a smoking room, we can't be expected to test every apartment - right?

I look forward to your input! Thank you!

-MC

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Oliver Glahn
Oct 02 2012
Guest
25 Thumbs Up

Differential Pressure Measurement

Hello,
has anyone experience in conducting the differential air pressureThe difference in air pressure between two spaces, potentially leading, in the case of a pressure difference, to the migration of contaminants from one space to another. When using a designated smoking room ror environmental tobacco smoke control, you may need to test the differential air pressure in the smoking room with respect to each adjacent area and in each adjacent vertical chase with the doors to the smoking room closed. The testing will be conducted with each space configured for worst case conditions of transport of air from the smoking rooms to adjacent spaces with the smoking rooms' doors closed to the adjacent spaces. The test can be conducted by a mechanical engineer. The test should involve 15 minutes of measurement, with a minimum of one measurement every 10 seconds. With the doors to the smoking room closed, operate exhaust sufficient to create a negative pressure with respect to the adjacent spaces of at least an average of 5 Pa (0.02 inches of water gauge) and with a minimum of 1 Pa (0.004 inches of water gauge). measurement of a smoking room with respect to each adjacent vertial chase? This requirement seems very difficult to meet. Is it required to test each cabel or service duct that is adjacent? Or is it required to conduct additionally a blower door testA blower door test gives an overall value for airtightness of a space, and can help identify air leaks. The testing unit consists of a calibrated fan that is sealed onto the unit entrance. The fan creates a continuous flow of pressure into the unit (or out of the unit when using theatrical fog to locate leaks). Devices detect the rate of pressure retention and loss due to possible air leaks in the construction. to verify proper sealed chases?
Thank you very much

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Julia Thielke Project Manager Oct 16 2012 LEEDuser Member 219 Thumbs Up

Good question, we are dealing with the same problem. Does anyone know something about testing vertical chases and if cabel channels or service ducts can be excluded, if openings are not accessable?
Thanks

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Ben Stanley Sustainability Manager, YRG sustainability Feb 06 2013 LEEDuser Expert 5760 Thumbs Up

In our experience, it has been sufficient to conduct differential pressure testing for spaces that share an opening with the smoking room. It may help your cause to also provide a description of the conditions/construction of the room that ensures that smoke doesn't migrate to other spaces.

We have not been required to address cable channels or service ducts.

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carla cruz
Sep 03 2012
LEEDuser Member
2944 Thumbs Up

Proposed smoking area near guard house

The guard house is totally isolated and placed away from the whole building, but is located inside the project boundary. The proposed smoking area is within 25 feet from the guard house. Can this proposed location be considered compliant?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 03 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Mary Ann, I don't see an argument for that being  compliant—do you?

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carla cruz Sep 03 2012 LEEDuser Member 2944 Thumbs Up

My worry is that the guard house is regularly occupied and has an opening (a door and window).

To elaborate more on my situation, inside the project boundary is the main building and an isolated guard house. In between those areas are parking lots. So the client proposed to place the smoking area away from the main building, but not so close to the guard house. The problem is that the proposed smoking area is within 25 feet away from the guard house which is regulary occupied.

To verify, this is proposed area is compliant? Thanks.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 03 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Mary Ann, I don't see it being compliant. I agree with you that the fact that the guard house is occupied is problemtic for this proposed area.

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Wolfgang Gollner Dipl.-Ing. ZT - Dr. Pfeiler GmbH
May 14 2012
LEEDuser Member
63 Thumbs Up

Entries - Definition

"Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet of ENTRIES, outdoor air intakes and operable windows."

I didn't found a definition, which entries are meant? Perhaps main entries for building occupants?
Can some entries be excempted? Such as:
emergency exits (only used in the event of fire) or
entries for delivery (used once a week)
side entries...

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 14 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Wolfgang, I agree, it would be good for USGBC to define this. However, my understanding is that the definition would be very broad—encompassing pretty much any opening in the envelope, including the examples you gave.

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carla cruz Jul 17 2012 LEEDuser Member 2944 Thumbs Up

Hi All,

Is there already an official interpretation or definition from USGBC/GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). regarding the building entries and excemptions for some entries, if any?

This also concerns our project where the owner proposes a smoking area at roof deck but near a storage room. The storage room has an opening (a door) and nothing else; it will not introduce ETSEnvironmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, consists of airborne particles emitted from the burning end of cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, and is exhaled by smokers. These particles contain about 4,000 compounds, up to 50 of which are known to cause cancer. inside the building because the wall partitons are concreted from floor to ceiling, and it is also rarely used. While all other building opening that may introduce ETS inside the building is 25 feet away.

Would appreciate your thoughts.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 22 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Mary Ann, what is being stored there? Thirdhand smoke is a real problem.

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Kimberly Cullinane
Apr 24 2012
Guest
621 Thumbs Up

Apartment building - clarify air sealing and weatherstripping

I am working with an apartment building that does include some smoking residential units and some nonsmoking units. Can we weatherstrip and seal and conduct blower door tests (using appropriate sampling method) for the smoking units only? It doesn't seem necessary that we go through the expense of weatherstripping and sealing all of the nonsmoking units as well. It's just not clear in the Reference Guide, which does not draw this distinction.

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company May 08 2012 Guest 9586 Thumbs Up

Kimberly,

I believe the answer to your question is under the first section of the Checklists tab above, have you looked there?

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Elizabeth Crenshaw Hammitt Environmental Coordinator EPB
Apr 03 2012
Guest
1502 Thumbs Up

Door proximity

Is it an issue if the door to the smoking room is under 25 feet away from a door that leads to a porch area? Is it an issue if the smoking room has a door that leads to the outside that is fewer than 25 feet away from the other door that also leads outside? Thanks -

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 09 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Elizabeth, that sounds to me like it would not meet the credit requirements.

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