EBOM-2009 MRc4: Sustainable Purchasing—Reduced Mercury in Lamps

  • EBOM MRc4 Mercury Diagram with Tips
  • Fluorescent lamps are efficient, but contain mercury

    Fluorescent lamps are one of the most affordable, efficient, and common lighting technologies. Along with metal halide and other gas-discharge lamps, however, they contain mercury, a toxic element that contributes to water pollution and poses significant human health risks. Use of low-mercury fluorescent lamps, or other mercury-free lighting  technologies, reduce the risk of mercury exposure in buildings from broken lamps, and reduces overall mercury consumption. (Don’t let the reduced mercury lull you into complacency about safety in use and disposal, however.)

    Implement lamp purchasing guidelines

    The credit encourages project teams to develop and implement guidelines for lamp purchases, ultimately reducing the amount of mercury used for lighting below certain limits. When building management controls all lamp purchases, the credit is readily achievable, while multi-tenant buildings with decentralized purchasing may find it more challenging. The level of effort required may also vary depending on the type of lamps and fixtures currently installed in the building.

    Start with an inventory

    Begin by inventorying all interior and exterior lamps to document the manufacturer, model, and technical specifications, including mercury content. Once this inventory is completed, the project team can use the LEED Online credit form to determine the performance level of the current lamps and fixtures and the level of modifications required meet the credit target. You may need to simply substitute current lamps with lower-mercury alternatives, or you may need to replace fixtures and ballasts that can accommodate low-mercury, high-efficiency lamps. Mercury-free lamps, such as light-emitting diode (LED) lamps, which are particularly suitable for certain specialty applications such as exit signs, exterior architectural lighting, and display case lighting, will count towards reducing the overall average mercury content in your building.

    Typical Range of Mercury Content Levels in Lamps

    Costs will vary

    Project costs will vary according to the level of replacement required. In many cases, your lighting vendor can help by identifying low-mercury lamp options that fit the existing fixtures and ballasts; once this plan is in place, you’ll need to commit to purchasing these replacements as existing lamps reach the end of their useful life. There are numerous low-mercury lamp options available for typical lamp types; to help narrow down your options, refer to the table showing the range of mercury content you can expect to see.

    Start with these questions

    • Does the project building have an accurate inventory of all lamps installed on-site? What is the effort level required to generate such an inventory?
    • In multi-tenant facilities, does the project team control lamp purchasing throughout the building? If not, does the project building house any tenants who might be unwilling or unable to share lamp data?
    • Are lamp vendors or manufacturer representatives available to support development of a low-mercury lamp purchasing plan?
    • Who is responsible for placing purchase orders for lamps? Can they be responsible for tracking lamp purchases over the performance period?

    Complete submittals properly

    Project teams often confuse the two required data tables on the LEED Online credit form. Both of the following tables are required for earning this credit.

    • Table 1.1 represents the Lamp Purchasing Plan, which identifies a list of low-mercury, high-efficiency lamps approved by the project team to use as replacements as existing lamps burn out over time.
    • Table 1.2 is a record of all lamp purchases made during the performance period. Table 1.2 serves to confirm that, during the performance period, project teams purchased the proper lamps according to the Lamp Purchasing Plan, and that the average weighted mercury content of the purchased lamps met the mercury target specified in the plan.

    CFLs may be excluded

    Screw-based compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) that meet voluntary NEMA guidelines for maximum mercury content may be excluded from both the purchasing plan and the performance calculation. This exclusion option makes credit compliance easier, because CFLs may contain a relatively high amount of mercury compared to a common linear fluorescent lamp. However, CFLs that meet NEMA guidelines are still far more energy-efficient than an equivalent incandescent bulb, so the credit encourages project teams to continue using CFLs to retain the energy benefits without being penalized for the contribution to the overall building mercury levels.

    FAQs for LEED-EBOM MRc4

    There are no mercury-containing lamps installed in the project building. Can we upload a signed statement from our property manager instead of completing the credit form and documentation?

    It is rare for a building to have absolutely no mercury-containing lamps installed. However, if this is the case, submit a lamp inventory and manufacturer documentation confirming your claim. Don’t be surprised if your reviewer asks questions.

    A large multi-tenant project does not have a uniform lighting standard, therefore there are a number of different types of lamps are installed on the project. How should we go about documenting this credit?

    It is not necessary to inventory every lamp installed in the project building. However in order to accurately determine which types and how many lamps should be listed in the purchasing plan, it is necessary to take inventory of at least 90% of the fixture types in the building (including hard-wired, portable, and task lighting). You will also need to inventory the number of lamps associated with each fixture type. Taking an inventory of fixtures will be less time-consuming than an inventory of every installed lamp. You can then determine appropriate low- or no-mercury lamp options for the inventoried fixtures and include them in the purchasing plan.

    Do we need to provide a purchasing plan if the lamp inventory of currently installed lamps shows that the average mercury content is already below 90 picograms per lumen-hour?

    Yes, you still need to provide a purchasing plan to confirm that you have developed a plan for future lamp purchases that meet the credit requirements. If the project building’s currently installed lamps are already below 90 picograms per lumen-hour, you can just copy over the lamp inventory into the purchasing plan table in the credit form. You can adjust the purchasing plan further to get an even lower average mercury-content if desired.

    Do lamps for task lighting need to be included in the purchasing plan?

    Yes, lamps for task lighting should be included in the purchasing plan - unless they account for less than 10% of the total lamp building lamp inventory, then you can exclude them. Screw-based CFLs that meet NEMA guidelines may be excluded as well.

    Do mercury-free lamps need to be included in Table MRc4-1 Lamp Purchasing Plan and Table MRc4-2 Performance Period Lamp Purchasing?

    Mercury-free lamps (such as LEDs) do not need to be included in purchasing plan, and can only be included if they are more efficient than their mercury-containing counterparts If you would like to include mercury-free lamps in the purchasing plan, you must provide documentation confirming that those lamps are in fact more efficient than their mercury-containing counterparts. Therefore, if you are unable to obtain that documentation, it is best to not include mercury-free lamps in the purchasing plan. If you include mercury-free lamps in the purchasing plan, you must also include those mercury-free lamps listed in the purchasing plan that were purchased during the performance period in Table MRc4-2.

    All of the outdoor fixtures in the project building are mercury-free. Can we exclude all outdoor fixtures from the purchasing plan?

    Yes, all mercury-free lamps can be excluded from the purchasing plan. However, it might be a good idea to include a narrative explaining why all outdoor light fixtures have been excluded, so that the reviewer knows that you didn’t ignore or forget outdoor fixtures.

    The project building is a large multi-tenant building and tenants are responsible for their own lamp purchases. Can lamps in tenant spaces be excluded?

    No, 90% of all lamps types in the entire must be included. Tenant spaces may not be excluded. Achieving this credit in this situation can be challenging.

    How do you know if a lamp meets the NEMA guidelines, and can therefore be excluded?

    Screw-based, integral self-ballasted compact fluorescent lamps can be excluded if they meet the voluntary guidelines for maximum mercury content published by NEMA. The guidelines are such that:

    • Lamps with input wattage of 0 ≤ 25 watts must have 4mg total mercury or less
    • Lamps with input wattage of 25 ≤ 40 watts must have 5mg total mercury or less

    If the manufacturer documentation confirms the mercury content is below these maximum mercury content values, than the lamps may be excluded.

    Are there a minimum number of lamps that need to be purchased during the performance period in order to achieve this credit?

    You must purchase at least one lamp during the performance period to achieve this credit.

    The project building includes a significant amount of process lighting (i.e. sports arena lighting or studio lighting). Do these lamps need to be included?

    Yes, all lamps in the project building and site need to be included, unless they meet the exception criteria. This credit may be challenging to achieve on this type of project.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

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  • Inventory all lamps currently installed in the project building and associated grounds, providing the total number of lamps installed, and a mercury content baseline.


  • Staff can typically handle the inventory and purchasing plan at minimal cost. Upon request, and particularly for larger projects, some manufacturers or vendors will organize the inventory themselves and provide a ready-made purchasing plan that will meet your LEED goals.


  • Create a lamp purchasing plan that specifies a maximum average mercury content of no more than 90 picograms per lumen-hour for at least 90% of the lamps in the project building and associated grounds. Identify low-mercury lamps that will work with existing fixtures and ballasts when possible, and be sure to provide appropriate illumination levels and quality. Record the following manufacturer data for each lamp entered in the  purchasing plan:

    • Rated average life (hours)
    • Mean Light Output (lumens)
    • Mercury content (milligrams)

  • You can easily look up product data for a lamp by using the manufacturer website and the lamp’s NAED code—a five or six digit code that can be found on product packing, receipts, or shipping manifests.


  • If any mercury-free lamps are identified in the purchasing plan, provide manufacturer product information that the lamp is as energy-efficient as its mercury-containing counterpart.


  • Screw-base CFLs that meet voluntary NEMA guidelines may be excluded from the purchasing plan, because the credit encourages their use instead of less-efficient incandescent bulbs.


  • Swapping out all existing non-compliant lamps before the end of their useful lives is not the point of the purchasing plan and credit. Instead, the project team should replace lamps over time with credit-compliant options identified in the purchasing plan.  Although the lamp inventory needs to cover every lamp in the building and on the associated grounds, the purchasing plan only needs to cover 90% of the lamps, allowing you to exclude 10% of the lamps in order to accommodate unusual fixture or lamp types.


  • The LEED Submittal Template asks for lamp mercury content in milligrams, but in some instances, manufacturers may list the mercury content for a lamp in different units such as picograms. Be sure to verify the unit of measurement and convert the amount of mercury to milligrams if necessary before recording the data in the Submittal Template. See attached spreadsheet for help with this conversion.


  • Reducing the wattage of a lamp (for instance, going from a 32-watt T-8 fluorescent tube to a 28-watt T-8) will typically result in mercury reductions as well as improved energy efficiency. If it is economically feasible to retrofit a portion or all of the lamps and ballasts, those changes may make this credit more achievable. In many cases, such as this example, “relamping” can be done without “reballasting.”


  • In Multi-Tenant Buildings


  • Work with building tenants to obtain actual lamp data for each of their spaces. The project team may exempt up to 10% of the building floor area if the tenants that use that space are not willing or able to share information about currently installed lamps.


  • If you need to exclude 10% of the floor area in a multi-tenant building from your initial lamp inventory, you are still only required to cover 90% of the total number of inventoried lamps in your lamp purchasing plan.


  • If more than 10% of the building floor area is occupied by tenants who are unwilling or unable to share information about currently installed lamps, the project team is allowed to extrapolate existing data for the purchasing plan in order to complete a plan that covers at least 90% of the lamps in the building and associated grounds.


  • Don’t forget to include outdoor fixtures! If you want to exclude exterior lamps as part of the allowable 10% exclusion or if they do not contain mercury, include a note to the review team and let them know why the lamps are not included in the purchasing plan.


  • Lamps for task lighting should be included, but remember only 90% of the total lamp inventory needs to be included, so that 10% exclusion may come in handy here.

During the Performance Period

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  • Track all lamp purchases and verify that the weighted average mercury content of purchased lamps meets the target specified in the purchasing plan


  • Mercury-containing lamps (or their high-efficiency counterparts) must be purchased during the performance period to qualify for this credit. In other words, if no lamps are purchased during the performance period, you will not be able to achieve the credit, even if you’ve developed a good purchasing plan.


  • Provide manufacturer cut sheets for at least 20% of the total number of lamps purchased during the performance period, for the LEED submittal. Make sure that the cut sheets clearly indicate the specific lamp description or code and the rated picogram/lumen-hour, or the rated mercury content, mean lumen output, and rated life.


  • Cut sheets do not always clearly display the three pieces of data you need to complete the submittal tables. Here are some tips:

    • “Rated Average Life”: For fluorescent lamps, make sure to use the value for the three-hour instant start.
    • “Mean Lumens”: Make sure to use the value for “Design Mean Lumens.” Do not use the value for “Initial Lumens” unless the manufacturer does not provide a value for the mean lumens.
    • Sylvania Lighting provides a LEED-EBOM calculator on its commercial website that may be used as product documentation for mercury content.

  • Record lamp inventory and purchasing data in the LEED Online credit form to calculate the average mercury content.


  • A custom mercury content calculator will be denied by the LEED reviewer and should not be submitted as part of your LEED application. If a custom calculator or tool provided by a manufacturer was used during the performance period, all required data must be transferred to the built-in calculators in Table 1.1 and Table 1.2 of the LEED Submittal Template.


  • In-house staff can handle lamp inventory and purchasing data tracking and documentation at minimal added cost.


  • In multi-tenant buildings, collect lamp purchasing data from tenants and verify that each purchase complies with the purchasing plan.


  • Make sure that you provide documentation confirming the mercury content for at least 20% of the lamps purchased during the performance period, and for any lamps with no mercury-content that have been included in the purchasing plan, and be sure that the documentation easily aligns with the information provided in the credit form.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    MR Credit 4: Sustainable purchasing - reduced mercury in lamps

    1 Point

    Intent

    To establish and maintain a toxic material source reduction program to reduce the amount of mercury brought onto the building site through purchases of lamps.

    Requirements

    Develop a lighting purchasing plan that specifies maximum levels of mercury permitted in mercury-containing lamps purchased for the building and associated grounds, including lamps for both indoor and outdoor fixtures, as well as both hard-wired and portable fixtures. The purchasing plan must specify a target for the overall average of mercury content in lamps of 90 picograms per lumen-hourPicograms per lumen-hour is a measure of the amount of mercury in a lamp per unit of light delivered over its useful life. or less. The plan must include lamps for both indoor and outdoor fixtures, as well as both hard-wired and portable fixtures. The plan must require that at least 90% of purchased lamps comply with the target (as measured by the number of lamps). Lamps containing no mercury may be counted toward plan compliance only if they have energy efficiency at least as good as their mercury-containing counterparts.

    Implement the lighting purchasing plan during the performance period such that all purchased mercury-containing lamps comply with the plan. One point is awarded to projects for which at least 90% of all mercury-containing lamps purchased during the performance period (as measured by the number of lamps) comply with the purchasing plan and meet the following overall target for mercury content of 90 picograms per lumen-hour.

    Exception: Screw-based, integral compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) may be excluded from both the plan and the performance calculation if they comply with the voluntary industry guidelines for maximum mercury content published by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), as described in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. [Europe ACP: NEMA Equivalent]

    Screw-based, integral CFLs that do not comply with the NEMA guidelines [Europe ACP: NEMA Equivalent] must be included in the purchasing plan and the performance calculation.

    Performance metrics for lamps — including mercury content (mg/lamp), mean light output (lumens) and rated life (hours) — must be derived according to industry standards, as described in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Mercury values generated by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests do not provide the required mercury information for LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance and cannot be used in the calculation.

    LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance addresses only the lamps purchased during the performance period, not the lamps installed in the building. Similarly, LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance does not require that each purchased lamp comply with the specified mercury limit; only the overall average of purchased lamps must comply.

    Mercury-containing lamps (or their high-efficiency counterparts) must be purchased during the performance period to earn points in this credit.

    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    Europe ACP: NEMA Equivalent

    Projects in Europe may exclude CFLs if they comply with the criteria listed in Annex III of the Restriction of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances of the European Union Directive (EU RoHS.)

    Screw-based, integral CFLs that do not comply with the NEMA guidelines (or EU RoHS for projects in Europe) must be included in the purchasing plan and the performance calculation.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Establish and follow a lamp-purchasing program that sets a minimum level of mercury content and life for all mercury-containing lamp types. Work with suppliers to specify these requirements for all future purchases.

Web Tools

NEMA

Voluntary guidelines for maximum mercury content by NEMA.


LampRecycle.org

LampRecycle.org is an online resource from the National Electric Manufacturers Association (NEMA). It provides information on recycling spent mercury-containing lamps, including links to regulations and recycling service providers.


U.S. EPA Mercury Website

This comprehensive site offers information about mercury emissions, the use of mercury in manufactured products, human and environmental health effects, and laws and regulations.


Phillips LEED-EB Picogram/Lumen hour Calculator

Phillips-specific calculator to determine the picograms per lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour for individual lamp types or an inventory of lamps. The calculator also includes bulb data needed to complete the credit calculation.

LEED Gold Project Documentation

All Options

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of MRc4 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

Lamp Inventory

All Options

Use a lamp inventory worksheet to evaluate existing mercury content, to develop a lamp purchasing plan, and to track lamp purchases during the performance period.

Product Cut Sheets

All Options

Provide cut sheets for at least 20% of the lamps purchased during the performance period.

Compliance of CFLs

All Options

Screw-base compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) that meet voluntary National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) guidelines (see link below) may be excluded from the purchasing plan, because the credit encourages their use instead of less-efficient incandescent bulbs.

Mercury-Free Lamps

All Options

If using any mercury-free lamps such as LEDs, show manufacturer documentation that the lamps are at least as energy-efficient as mercury-containing counterparts.

Mercury Conversion Calculator

This calculator converts picograms per lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour to milligrams of mercury. Some manufacturers do not give their mercury data as directly as they could, for LEED purposes.

LEED Online Forms: EBOM-2009 MR

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

Extrapolation for Non-Participating Tenants

Purchasing and data tracking must cover the entire building, including tenant spaces, with the exception that teams may exclude purchases for up to 10% of your building's floor area if that area is under separate management. This sample calculation shows the impact of non-participating tenants on purchasing credit calculations.

154 Comments

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José Solis Big and Bright Strategies
Mar 22 2016
LEEDuser Member
136 Thumbs Up

Innovation Credit for Core and Shell v2009

Project Location: United States

I have a Core and Shell v2009 project. I've seen that a number of people have been using this credit as an ID credit for NC projects. Is it safe to assume that we can use it for CS also? Do we need to write any language into the lease language that the tenants have to meet the criteria? Or would we pretty much be covered by the Core and Shell lighting which will all be LED?

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Brian Salazar President, LEED AP, WELL AP, Entegra Development & Investment, LLC Mar 22 2016 LEEDuser Member 1520 Thumbs Up

Hi Jose

You do need to incorporate a low mercury purchasing policy in the lease agreement and make it binding for the credit to count toward a CS project.

Good luck!
Brian

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José Solis Big and Bright Strategies Mar 23 2016 LEEDuser Member 136 Thumbs Up

What does the maximum target picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram. level need to be? I've seen 90 in the credit language; 80 in the ID#5500 ruling for NC projects (though that ruling also states that it does not apply to CS projects); and 70 in some of the responses here on LEEDuser. Which is it? I need to get the language inserted in the lease by Friday before it's finalized.

Also, is there any place I can find lease language for the credit? Do I just need to reinterpret the performance requirements for the plan? Or does there also have to be a specific performance period included?

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Sara Zoumbaris Sustainable Design Consulting
Dec 29 2015
LEEDuser Member
1210 Thumbs Up

Low Mercury Credit - Cafeteria Kitchen Equipment

Project Location: United States

Hello, Although I am pursuing this credit as ID for LEED-CI, I am posting this question here. We are working on a LEED-CI Retail cafeteria which includes several micro-restaurant options in it with food serving stations and display cases. Are we required to include the lighting in these cases and serving stations within this credit when performing the calculation etc?
Thank You!

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Jan 04 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6042 Thumbs Up

Hi Sara, you're allowed to exclude up to 10% of lamps in the building. It sounds like these are good candidates for exclusion.

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Saju Varghese SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Oct 12 2015
LEEDuser Member
5066 Thumbs Up

addition on an area

when I have an addition project do I have to demonstrate compliance for the new addition and renovated areas or does it have to be applied to all areas? (existing to remain, renovated and new)

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Kimberly Schlaepfer Sustainability Coordinator LEED AP O+M, BD+C, YR&G Nov 03 2015 LEEDuser Expert 927 Thumbs Up

Hi Catalina,
The requirements state that 90% of all lamps purchased during the performance period must have an average of 90 picograms of mercury or less per lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour. This credit does not address lamps that were already installed in the building, only lamps purchased during the performance period. If your addition happened during the performance period, then yes, you would have to demonstrate compliance with all lamps purchased for the addition, but only if those purchases were during the performance period. If no lamps were purchased during the performance period, you can't earn this credit.
Hope that helps!

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner ArchEcology, LLC
Jul 07 2015
LEEDuser Member
9221 Thumbs Up

Inventory vs Plan

This credit talks about a purchasing plan but uses an inventory in lieu in the documentation. If we are pursuing MR4, does that mean we have to include MR4 in our MRpr1 purchasing plan document, or can we use a different credit in addition to Credit 1 for that plan?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Nov 30 2015 LEEDuser Expert 6042 Thumbs Up

Hi Michelle, you don’t have to include MRc4 in your MRp1 sustainable purchasing policy, even if you attempt MRc4. It might make sense to though if you're already invested in pursuing MRc4, since the policy can reinforce those efforts. You could also cover MRc1 + MRc4 + a different credit in the policy, if you like.

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Susan Coy LEED Administrator GMB Architecture + Engineering
Jan 30 2015
LEEDuser Member
152 Thumbs Up

No mercury Lights

Project Location: United States

I am working a NC project that has only LED lights, can I pursue an Innovation in Design credit as there are no mercury containing lights?

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Melissa Kelly Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 03 2015 LEEDuser Expert 756 Thumbs Up

Hi Susan,

The purchasing plan portion of this credit is a great framework for an ID credit in BD+C projects. In your situation, when you submit the plan, you'll also need to show via product cut sheets that the efficacyIn lighting, the ratio of light output (in lumens) to input power (in watts). Higher efficacy indicates higher efficiency. (measured in lumens/watt) of the mercury-free LED lamps in your plan are equivalent to their mercury-containing counterparts. I would start by comparing them with the efficacies listed in the ENERGY STAR lamp specifications for similar applications.
(http://www.energystar.gov/products/certified-products/detail/light-bulbs and http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=lamps.pr_crit_lamps)

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant, DCarbon Jul 20 2015 Guest 1975 Thumbs Up

Hi Susan and Melissa. We are making use of LEED BD+C: New Construction (v4) Innovation credit: Purchasing – lamps. We only have LED lamps in the building, thus with no mercury content. Since it is required to enter only mercury
content per bulb, mean light output per bulb type (lumens) and rated life per bulb (hrs) why do we still need to show that efficacyIn lighting, the ratio of light output (in lumens) to input power (in watts). Higher efficacy indicates higher efficiency. is equivalent to mercury-containing counterparts? And in that case how can the mercury-containing counterparts be defined?

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Melissa Kelly Sustainability Manager, YR&G Nov 30 2015 LEEDuser Expert 756 Thumbs Up

Hi Charalampos,

I've always understood the requirement to show equivalent efficacyIn lighting, the ratio of light output (in lumens) to input power (in watts). Higher efficacy indicates higher efficiency. as a quality-control measure, to prevent incentivizing the use of mercury-free bulbs that are overly energy-intensive or produce poor light quality compared to mercury-containing bulbs.

Some LED lamps have direct counterparts (such as a screw-in LED downlight and a screw-in CFL1. Compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) – light source in which the tube is folded or twisted into a spiral to concentrate the light output; CFLs are typically 3 to 4 times as efficient as incandescent light bulbs, and they last 8 to 10 times as long. 2. Small fluorescent lamps used as more efficient alternatives to incandescent lighting. Also called PL, CFL, Twin-Tube, or BIAX lamps. (EPA) 3. A light bulb designed to replace screw-in incandescent light bulbs; they are often found in table lamps, wall sconces, and hall and ceiling fixtures of commercial buildings with residential type lights. They combine the efficiency of fluorescent lighting with the convenience of standard incandescent bulbs. Light is produced the same way as other fluorescent lamps. Compact fluorescent bulbs have either electronic or magnetic ballasts.), while for others you may need to judge based on use. Helen and Maria's posts further down this page may help you out.

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Dec 01 2015 LEEDuser Expert 10597 Thumbs Up

Just to follow up on Melissa's comment, which I agree with completely - The requirement for proving efficiency is to ensure that buildings dont earn this credit by using mercury-free lamps that are LESS efficient than fluorescents - namely, incandescent lamps. That is, the credit isn't solely about mercury-free lighting, its about lowering the mercury content of your energy efficient lighting. In your case, Charalampos, I suspect that standard manufacturer cut sheets for your lamps stating that they are LED will be enough to make most reviewers happy.

Hope that helps,

Dan

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Vivek Singla
Jun 12 2014
LEEDuser Member
62 Thumbs Up

Which Rated Life per bulb is to be used in calculations?

I found the following life values in the Bulb specifications. Which rated life is to be used in the LEEDOnline form for this credit?

Life to 10% failures EM = 6500 hr
Life to 10% fail Preheat EL, 3h = 8000 hr
Life to 10% fail Nonpreh EL, 3h = 4500 hr
Avg. Life = 10000 hr
Rated Avg. Life = 12000 hr
Life to 50% fail Nonpreh EL, 3h = 7000 hr

(The use of Avg. Life of 10000 hrs by the Philips calculator in the toolkit is a bit confusing)

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Jun 12 2014 LEEDuser Expert 24443 Thumbs Up

Life to 50% fail Nonpreh EL, 3h = 7000 hr
This is the value that should be used.

I have no idea what they mean by "Ave. Life" and "Rated Avg. Life". I'd guess The first three lines (measured to 10% failures) are likely similar to the last 3 lines (measured to 50% failures). Line 1 & 4 are the same test method, 2 & 5 are the same, and then 3 & 6 are the same.

I'll bet "Ave. Life" was never turned off. The lights were always on and they measured them until 50% failed.

"Rated Avg. Life" would then be the 3 hours on at a time using the programmed ballast.

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Vivek Singla Jun 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 62 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the help Bill. The Philips calculator doesn't match the values that appear in the LEEDOnline form if I use the 7000 hr value, hence the confusion. I will use the 7000 hr value and upload the manufacturer's specifications.

We need to upload the cutsheets or similar documentation only for 20% of the bulbs we purchased during the performance period or for all those which are included in the performance purchasing plan?

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AtSite Inc AtSite
Jun 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
161 Thumbs Up

Worst Case Scenario

I have scoured the internet for HG content of a few of the CFLs we have in our building with no luck. Let's say I can't find HG content and thus cannot know whether the CFLs meet NEMA guidelines. Can I include them and assume the worst-case scenario for their mercury content of 6 mg (according to the table above)? We are still well above the 90 picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram. target (38 as a building)

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Jun 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 22899 Thumbs Up

That is likely what I would and write a narrative. I have no idea if this would be accepted by a reviewer but it seems the conservative path. Have you tried calling the company? Ask to speak to a VP of technical sales. That person won't know but they will get the message that they aren't servicing the marketplace. You may even get a real answer.

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AtSite Inc AtSite Jun 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 161 Thumbs Up

Thanks I'll give it a try and see what happens. Will post back with the outcome of the review.

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei
May 01 2014
LEEDuser Member
5551 Thumbs Up

Life and Light Output

This credit requires not only the mercury content of the bulbs, but specific life and light output using specified testing methods:
· Life of bulb: 3 hours on/20 minutes off for fluorescent bulbs; 11 hours on for HID lamps.
· Light output of bulb: fluorescent bulbs measured with an instant-start ballast having a ballast factor of 1.0
(exception: T-5 bulbs are measured using program-start ballasts), as measured at 40% of bulb life

The reviewers do not accept life and light output values on manufacturer's cut sheets without the testing methods justified.

The problem is that even the largest leading global manufacturers do not provide or do not have such information available on all of their products, e.g., Philips.

Chances are, projects do not have trouble meeting the criteria, but struggle to document per the credit requirement. A lot of buildings use products with very low mercury level and reasonable rated life and lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. values. However, without manufacturer's information using the specific testing methods, they simply cannot document the credit.

While LEED calls it "industry standard criteria," which is questionable, is there any industry-wise accepted factors that can be applied to "Life to 50% failures EM" or "Rated Luminous Flux EM" to get the values specified?

Any guidance would be very much appreciated.

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture May 01 2014 LEEDuser Expert 24443 Thumbs Up

The 3 hours on / 20 minutes off is a standard testing practice in the industry to determine lamp life. If no details are provided then it should be assumed that this was the test used. The "off" period is less important.

Some manufacturers have enjoyed inflating their life expectancy numbers by reducing the number of times a lamp has to start. They'll show a 12 hour "on" cycle. But anytime I've seen this they'll also show the 3 hour cycle to comply with industry standards.

I would try to tell the reviewer that the 3 hour life expectancy test is the industry standard and any published claims for a lamp's life expectancy comply with this standard unless noted otherwise.

The 50% value is how lamp life is calculated. A lab will run 1000 lamps and when the 500th lamp fails you have your average (median) life expectancy. I'm not familiar with "Life to 50% failures EM" or "Rated Luminous Flux EM". I tried googling the terms and only got something from a Philips lamp. I'm not sure what "EM" stands for here. Maybe 'estimated median'? The way it is written on the Philips data sheets I would read it as.
Life of lamp = "Life to 50% failures EM"
Light output of lamp = "Rated Luminous Flux EM".

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei May 04 2014 LEEDuser Member 5551 Thumbs Up

Thanks very much for your insight, Bill.

Life of lamp and light output of lamp are clear on the cutsheets, just not the testing methods.
The reviewers have basically stopped accepting values without specified testing methods.
For example, some products would have the following all listed out, and would be easier to justify:
- Life to 50% failures EM
- Life to 50% fail Preheat EL,3h
- Life to 50% fail Nonpreh EL,3h
while others only have one life of lamp listed:
- Life to 50% failures EM
so it is hard to tell if it actually followed the 3 hours on / 20 minutes off standard.

Light output is of the same issue. There is always a rated lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. value on the cut sheet, but you'd never find the wording "measured with an instant-start ballast having a ballast factor of 1.0, as measured at 40% of bulb life" from a manufacturer.

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture May 05 2014 LEEDuser Expert 24443 Thumbs Up

Preheat = a programmed start ballast.
Nonpreheat = an instant start ballast.

Lumens are listed in one of two ways. Either an initial value or a maintained (mean) value.

Here's a sample cut sheet. Information overload. But this should have everything a reviewer wants to see. http://download.p4c.philips.com/l4b/9/927869785102_na/927869785102_na_ps...

Mercury Content = 1.7 mg
Design Mean Lumens = 2,935 Lm
Rated Avg Live [3-Hr Inst St] = 24,000 hr

1.7mg = 1,700,000,000 pg
1,700,000,000 pg / (2,935 Lm * 24,000 hr) = 24 pg/LmHr

GE's website many years ago only had a picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram. value for the mercury content. I had to bug them to list the total lamp content. Even big companies can be responsive if you ask a question. But it may take 2 or 3 responses back and forth before they understand what you want.

Do you have a link to the cutsheet that you submitted and what the exact words were that the reviewer said? Someone seems to be overthinking what is needed.

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei May 09 2014 LEEDuser Member 5551 Thumbs Up

Hi Bill,

Thanks for your input again.

If only every cut sheet looks like the one you showed.
Most cut sheets we run into look like this:
http://download.p4c.philips.com/l4b/9/927983286536_eu/927983286536_eu_ps...

They would have 10% failure life, 50% failure life, and rated lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output.. And that's it. No 3-hr and no mean lumen, or lacking one or the other. And the manufacturers don't usually respond to the requests of additional information or additional testing results. In such cases, reviewers would comment like below:

1. Please provide manufacturer documentation that verifies the rated life values listed on the form based on 3-hour instant start values,
as outlined above.
2. Provide manufacturer documentation that verifies the light outputs listed on the form based on mean lumen values, as outlined
above.

I know it's simply two line items on the manufacturer's cut sheet, but they're not usually available.

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Helen Samuel Senior Tax Accountant Ernst & Young LLP
Nov 25 2013
LEEDuser Member
334 Thumbs Up

LED Lamps - efficiency of mercury containing counterparts?

"Mercury-free lamps, such as LEDs, can be included in the picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram. per lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output.-hour calculations only if they have efficiency levels that are equal to or greater than those of comparable mercury-containing counterparts."

What documentation is required to prove this? We are including some halogen lamps that have no mercury in our purchasing plan. We have the MSDS1. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) are detailed, written instructions documenting a method to achieve uniformity of performance. 2. A report that manufacturers of most products are required to make available to installers and purchasers, informing them of product information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures, the existence of potentially hazardous ingredients, and providing instructions for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of products for each lamp. Do we then also need to get MSDS for some other lamps that we are not using, just to show that our lamp has higher lumen/watt than a mercury lamp? I guess my question is: how do we decide which lamp is comparable? It seems sort of random, like I could search out any mercury containing lamp and just find one that is less efficient than mine so I can include mine in the plan.

We also purchased LED lights during our performance period. Can we include those in Table 4-2 in order to drive down our overall picogram per lumen-hour number? Will those require additional comparison information as well?

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Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 15 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Hi Helen,

Halogen lamps are not as efficient as mercury-containing fluorescents and metal halides, so you can't include those in your purchasing plan. (Halogens are a type of incandescent.)

The LEDs may or may not be as efficient. You need to check on the performance specs for those. For documentation you'd provide spec sheets showing the efficacyIn lighting, the ratio of light output (in lumens) to input power (in watts). Higher efficacy indicates higher efficiency.. There are examples of all the different types of documentation needed in the Resources area of this LEEDuser credit page--that's available to paying LEEDuser members.

Nadav

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Deepthy KB Sustainability Consultant, LEED AP, EY Feb 16 2014 Guest 36 Thumbs Up

Hi,

For our project in Dubai, the total number of Lamps in the building is 8905. We included 8852 lamps in the purchasing plan with an overall Mercury content of 71.2 pg/lm hr. During the Performance Period, the total number of lamps purchased was 920 with overall Mercury content of 52.5 pg/lm hr. After the preliminary review, the USGBC review team has asked us to verify the energy efficiency of 2 of our Halogen lamps in comparison to their mercury containing counterparts with documentation.

I would appreciate if any of you could provide input on the exclusion principle of MR C4 which says 90% of "mercury containing lamps". In the Purchasing plan, even if I exclude these 2 Halogen lamps, it does not affect the total, and 90% of 8905 would still be accounted for. But, since these Halogen lamps were purchased during the performance period, excluding them would only account for 85% of the total Performance Period Purchases. If we can be confident that the calculations (for both Purchasing plan and Performance Purchases) are applicable only to mercury containing lamps, we could respond to the USGBC excluding these from both calculations irrespective of their effect on the total numbers. Could someone verify?

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Brian Salazar President, LEED AP, WELL AP, Entegra Development & Investment, LLC Jul 24 2014 LEEDuser Member 1520 Thumbs Up

I am a bit confused by this for the simple fact that there is no fluorescent equivalent to most Halogen MR16 bulb. Functionally, only LED replacements can be used to substitute for Halogen in most applications.

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Saju Varghese SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Nov 13 2013
LEEDuser Member
5066 Thumbs Up

mercury in specialty lamps (animal care)

We are having an issue because some animal care lamps of our project do not really disclose the mercury content of the lamps since they consider it as some part of their copyright of some sort. They did provide us with product safety data sheets but not really sure if these have to be documented. Thanks

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Saju Varghese SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Nov 04 2013
LEEDuser Member
5066 Thumbs Up

Low mercury lamps as innovation and design for NCv2009

I'm guessing since we are submitting this for innovation and design we do not need to comply for the performance period requirement?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Right.

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Sheryl Swartzle Sustainability Specialist TLC Engineering for Architecture
Oct 17 2013
LEEDuser Member
1227 Thumbs Up

ID credit for low-mercury lamps

To use this for an ID credit does the average of 90 picograms per lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour change to an average of 80 picograms per lumen hour to achieve the point?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Oct 17 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6042 Thumbs Up

Hi Sheryl, lamps purchased during the performance period must have an average mercury content of 70 picograms per lumen-hourPicograms per lumen-hour is a measure of the amount of mercury in a lamp per unit of light delivered over its useful life. (or less) to earn exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. credit.

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Sheryl Swartzle Sustainability Specialist, TLC Engineering for Architecture Oct 17 2013 LEEDuser Member 1227 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your response. Do you know when it changed to 70 picograms?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Oct 17 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6042 Thumbs Up

Looks like it was 80 picograms in EB v2.0 and then changed to 70 picograms in EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. v2008.

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Saju Varghese SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR, JALRW Eng. Group Inc. Nov 13 2013 LEEDuser Member 5066 Thumbs Up

Under the birdeye's view this comment confuses the concept of 70 picograms/lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output.:

"Do we need to provide a purchasing plan if the lamp inventory of currently installed lamps shows that the average mercury content is already below 90 picograms per lumen-hourPicograms per lumen-hour is a measure of the amount of mercury in a lamp per unit of light delivered over its useful life.?

Yes, you still need to provide a purchasing plan to confirm that you have developed a plan for future lamp purchases that meet the credit requirements. If the project building’s currently installed lamps are already below 90 picograms per lumen-hour, you can just copy over the lamp inventory into the purchasing plan table in the credit form. You can adjust the purchasing plan further to get an even lower average mercury-content if desired"

Please clarify.

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Robin Dukelow, LEED AP BD+C Sustainability Consultant; Project Manager, Henderson Engineers, Inc.; Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC Aug 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 177 Thumbs Up

Hello, I am going through a review on this as an ID credit on an NC project now. The Reviewer referenced LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 5500, which "requires that projects comply with an average mercury content limit of 80 pictograms in order to achieve an ID point."

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Tam Kin Hung
Sep 27 2013
LEEDuser Member
191 Thumbs Up

Life of lamp

Refer to the reference guide, the test condition of life of lamp is 3 hours on for every 20 minutes off for fluorescents, 11 hours on for high-intensity discharge lamps.
Does it mean the high-intensity discharge lamps must meet the reuqirements of 11 hours on for every 20 min off?According to IEC 61167;1998, the lamps are tested 11 hours on every 1 hour off. Wondering if the requirement in LEED is more strict than IEC?

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Sep 27 2013 LEEDuser Expert 24443 Thumbs Up

The reference guide never said 20 minutes off for HID. If the standard test practice is 11-hours on and 1-hour off then use that.

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Saju Varghese SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Sep 24 2013
LEEDuser Member
5066 Thumbs Up

Multifamily residence (LEEDv2)

I'm wondering if the lighting fixtures in each particular residence have to be accounted in this calculation. Not really sure since the residents own their place, they are not under a leasing program or anything, and only corridors and common areas are under management's control.

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Sep 27 2013 LEEDuser Expert 24443 Thumbs Up

The reference guide says, "For buildings occupied by multiple tenants, tenant purchasing data should be aggregated to ensure that compliance is evaluated for the entire project building, If individual tenants do not provide purchasing data, tenant purchasing must be estimated by the project team and assumed to be 0% compliant with sustanability critereia. Estimated data for nonparticipating tenants should be integrated with the purchasing data provided by cooperating tenants to generatre building-wide purchasing values. The estimate of purchases made by tenants that do not provide data may be extrapolated from purchasing rates elsewhere in the buildings on a per square foot or per occupant basis, ... The calculation must be defensible, robust, and appropriate,..."

If all of the residential tenants have screw-based integral CFLs then they are exempt.

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Saju Varghese SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Sep 10 2013
LEEDuser Member
5066 Thumbs Up

Emergency lights

Do emergency lights need to be included in this list?

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Sep 10 2013 LEEDuser Expert 24443 Thumbs Up

There is nothing in the Credit to exempt emergency lights. I can't think of a reason why emergency lights would need an exemption. All of my emergency fixtures are either LED, fluorescent, and a occasional incandescent. The only one with mercury is fluorescent and it is typical of what the building uses. There's no reason why emergency fixtures need more mercury.

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American University Sustainability American University
Aug 09 2013
Guest
1587 Thumbs Up

Initial Inventory

Can someone explain the building inventory? I see here it says to inventory for manufacturer, etc but the LEED online form just asks for a number of mercury-containing bulbs in the building. I'm just still not quite grasping what is meant by the purchasing plan and what needs to actually be tracked. Here's my assumption: number of mercury containing lamps; the types of lamps that would need to be purchased to achieve 90 picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram. target; the actual lamps purchased during the performance period. Yes?

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Aug 09 2013 LEEDuser Expert 9550 Thumbs Up

Hi Emily,

Most project teams start by inventorying the current lamps in use. You use the same type of format as is shown in the Lamp Purchasing Plan table within the Form. Then, depending on where your current picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram. per lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hr level is, your plan can be to simply continue purchasing identical replacements from your current inventory if you already comply, or you must find lower mercury alternatives for your going forward plan, which is what you report in the LEED Form.

I'd recommend using the Lamp Inventory Worksheet that is housed under the LEEDuser Documentation Toolkit for this work.

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Elena Grau
Aug 01 2013
Guest
79 Thumbs Up

Exit Signs

Hi,
I'd like to know which kind of luminaire means "exit signs". Does it means the constant light of the emergency lights?
Thanks,

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Aug 01 2013 LEEDuser Expert 24443 Thumbs Up

It's an American phrase refering to a light that has the word "EXIT" on it to show the safe way out of the building. You are probably used to the green running man symbol. That is the same for practical purposes.
http://www.cooperindustries.com/content/public/en/lighting/brands/sure-l...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exit_sign

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Elena Grau Aug 02 2013 Guest 79 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much for the explanation!

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Saju Varghese SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Apr 26 2013
LEEDuser Member
5066 Thumbs Up

v2.2 project with v3 ID credit

Can a v2.2 project get this credit even if its a v2009 credit?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 26 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

THere are no hard and fast rules about this. I couldn't say for certain, but I don't foresee any issues.

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Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist, HGA Architects and Engineers Apr 26 2013 LEEDuser Member 2737 Thumbs Up

I believe you are limited to using credits within the same version of your rating system - i.e. v2 projects can use credits from other v2 rating systems (NCv2.2 can use EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. v2; NCv2009 can use EBOM v2009). My understanding was that it was not possible to use later version (i.e. NCv2.2 using EBOM v2009). I'd recommend contacting GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). for confirmation before moving too farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). down down attempting that pathway.

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John Albrecht AIA, LEED Fellow, ChicagoGreen LLC Jun 10 2013 LEEDuser Member 109 Thumbs Up

I thought the same, but I asked and was told vety clearly by GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). pesentors at Greenbuild last Nov that yes you could in fact 'opt' into a later version of a particular credit.

To be sure, use the Feedback tab on LEED Online and ask them yourself. If true, then upload the GBCI respsonse with your credit form and check the the 'Alternative Complaince' path.

Please share your Feedback and any GBCI response here.

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Saju Varghese SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Apr 08 2013
LEEDuser Member
5066 Thumbs Up

ID Credit

When you submit this credit as Innovation in Design for New Construction v2.2 is it required to follow up on the purchasing plan or can it be just the initial purchase since we are submitting under NEW construction rating?

Thanks.

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April Rice Sustainability Director, RDG Planning & Design May 15 2013 Guest 271 Thumbs Up

We have never followed up with the client about the purchasing after we created the purchasing plan.

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Janki Vyas Sustainability Consultant + Architect Re:Vision Architecture
Mar 08 2013
Guest
49 Thumbs Up

Purchasing fluorescent UV lamps for HVAC system

Our office has to purchase replacement UV lamps for our air filtration system. The manufacturer recommended lamps are fluorescent and contain a low level of Hg (3 Mg). So my question is, would we have to include these lamps in our purchasing plan? They are not being used to light a space, the main purpose of these lamps is to disinfect air filters. If the UV lamps need to be included, I was able to get the Hg content from the manufacturer and the lamp life The useful span of operation of a source of artificial light, such as bulbs. Lamp life for fluorescent lights is determined by testing three hours on for every 20 minutes off. For high-density discharge lamps, the test is based on 11 hours on for every 20 minutes off. Lamp life depends on whether the start ballast is program or instant. This information is published in manufacturer's information. Also known as rated average life.(it's recommended to replace the lamps every 2 years) but I can't find anything on lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. output. How would one go about calculating the picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram. per lumen if there is no lumen value available?

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Mar 08 2013 LEEDuser Expert 24443 Thumbs Up

I can see the arguement both ways for this. It's a grey area. UV light is still light and can fit the intent of this Credit's scope. But it's also integral to a piece of equipment that serves a function other than lighting. No one is asking for mercury content in other lighting integral to equipment like the light in your refrigerator or microwave.

I'd say use your own opinion and you can find justification either way if challenged.

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Saju Varghese SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Mar 04 2013
LEEDuser Member
5066 Thumbs Up

LEDs compared to their counterpart flourescent

In order to compare apples to apples (efficiency) lets assume the unit as lumens/Watt. However, LEDs should be compared to their "most" efficient counterpart, and to their "initial" efficiency since they decay with time? or to the regular counterpart and an average efficiency?

Thanks.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 31 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Victor, "efficiacy" is the term for lumens/watt. There are rules about the rated efficacyIn lighting, the ratio of light output (in lumens) to input power (in watts). Higher efficacy indicates higher efficiency. of LEDs and I would go with that, and not overthink the decay issue.

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Manager BGIS
Feb 25 2013
LEEDuser Expert
4489 Thumbs Up

ID Credit?

Has anyone successfully utilized this EB:OM credit as an ID credit for NC or CI?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 25 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

John-David, have you been through this forum and the NC IDc1 forum? There are several conversations on MRc4, as I recall. It is commonly used, often with success, I believe.

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Saju Varghese SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Feb 07 2013
LEEDuser Member
5066 Thumbs Up

Task Lighting Lamps

Do task lighting lamps need to be included in this credit?

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American University Sustainability, American University Feb 08 2013 Guest 1587 Thumbs Up

Yes - all hardwired and portable fixtures must be included.

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Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer Skanska Sweden
Jan 09 2013
LEEDuser Member
3446 Thumbs Up

LED-lights always more efficient? Why not include them?

I am pursuing this credit for a CI project as an ID credit. I am wondering, in order to comply with the overall value of 90 pg Hg/(lm*h), I need to include all my LED lamps. They naturally have no Mercury. I need them to weigh down the result of the fluorescent lamps so that the overall value complies. The text says that I may exclude non-mercury lights. But I don’t want to. I may include them, right? I know they have to be at least as efficient, but LEDs are always more efficient aren’t they? So I don’t see why people don’t include them…

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Jan 09 2013 LEEDuser Expert 24443 Thumbs Up

You may include the LED lamps to weigh down the results like you want. But 90% (quantity) of purchased lamps must comply with the 90 pg Hg/(lm*h) limit. There's only so much you can skew the average.

Some LED lamps are garbage. But most will be better than a cheap CFL1. Compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) – light source in which the tube is folded or twisted into a spiral to concentrate the light output; CFLs are typically 3 to 4 times as efficient as incandescent light bulbs, and they last 8 to 10 times as long. 2. Small fluorescent lamps used as more efficient alternatives to incandescent lighting. Also called PL, CFL, Twin-Tube, or BIAX lamps. (EPA) 3. A light bulb designed to replace screw-in incandescent light bulbs; they are often found in table lamps, wall sconces, and hall and ceiling fixtures of commercial buildings with residential type lights. They combine the efficiency of fluorescent lighting with the convenience of standard incandescent bulbs. Light is produced the same way as other fluorescent lamps. Compact fluorescent bulbs have either electronic or magnetic ballasts. so you can count them in your calculation. I wouldn't say LED's are always more efficient. It depends. The energy star website has an excel file list of thousands of CFL and LED replacement lamps that carry the Energy Star label. There are some really efficient CFL's (some over 80 lm/W). There are also many more LED lamps that never made it on this list that can be assumed to perform poorly (less than 40 lumens / Watt).

http://downloads.energystar.gov/bi/qplist/Lamps_Qualified_Product_List.x...

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Maria Porter Environmental Certification Engineer, Skanska Sweden Jan 11 2013 LEEDuser Member 3446 Thumbs Up

Bill, thank you for your superfast reply!

I will include 100 % of all lights. It just seems as the right thing to do since I’m using this credit as an ID credit under CI. Even if my result would be a lot better by excluding 10 %. We have only made a quick calculation to see if the credit is worth pursuing and it looks ok, so we will now go into detail.

I have to ask my lighting guy how many watts the chosen LEDs were, he only mentioned that they were more efficient than CFLs.
My only experiences have been when I tried to buy LED lamps for my home. All lights I checked there were more efficient than CFLs. But I guess it could be different for commercial use.

/Maria

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Laura Charlier LEED Services Director Group14 Engineering
Dec 21 2012
LEEDuser Member
725 Thumbs Up

Manufacturer bulb information availability is lacking!

Hello all. I have spent most of this week trying to complete research from the review comments. I have some questions, but also feedback for all of you.

1. Philips is no longer publishing their LEED data for any lamps. The best I've been able to do is establish contact with ONE person at corporate who knows where to find the information per the LEED specified requirements (for lumens and hours). The catalogues are incorrect, the spec sheets don't have the information, and the other customer service people provide the wrong numbers. Three other reviewers have accepted this completed spreadsheet, but LEED Review Team C doesn't like the copy of the e-mail and the spreadsheet as sufficient documentation.

2. GE does not have 11-hour testing procedures for their metal halide lamps, and therefore, they do not meet the documentation requirement. What is to be done there? This also means that their picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram. per lumen/hour spreadsheet on their website is inaccurate (and only provides the picogram information, not the full mg, lumens, and hours we need).

3. Sylvania's online calculator doesn't work for metal halide lamps either. A request has to be sent for the data, and again will come in the form of an e-mail.

Any advice here?

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Dec 27 2012 Guest 2982 Thumbs Up

I found the Philips specs sheet which contains mercury picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram. info for T8s (let me know if you need it), but having trouble finding same from GE. The mercury number they provided made no sense as compared to the number provided by Philips which brings me to your number 2 above, perhaps GE is providng the picogram info not the mg per lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour we need. Hmmm. We can we assume GE is unaware of this need. I am going to try to find a contact at GE and will let you know. Please do the same.

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John Casana Senior Lead Engineer, Booz Allen Hamilton Mar 05 2013 Guest 181 Thumbs Up

I am also having difficulty locating the following MRc4 data for Phillips bulbs: mean lumens; and, three-hour instant start rated life for: pl-t[2] and PLT 32W 835 4P 1CT. The product data sheet for pl-t[2] lists the initial lumens value for the bulb but not the mean lumens value. The product data sheets for pl-t[2] and PLT 32W 835 4P 1CT indicate various rated life values, but not “3-hour instant start rated life value”. I submitted a request to Phillips technical support and am awaiting a reply. Can you offer any guidance?

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous May 15 2013 LEEDuser Expert 22899 Thumbs Up

I documented this as an ID credit for a NCv3 project recently (first time for me to use this EB+OM credit), the GE website now has information specifically for this credit. It made things very, very easy. We did not have HID lamps like the OP did and I can not speak to that experience.

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Jul 27 2017
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