EBOM-2009 MRc4: Sustainable Purchasing—Reduced Mercury in Lamps

  • EBOM MRc4 Mercury Diagram with Tips
  • Fluorescent lamps are efficient, but contain mercury

    Fluorescent lamps are one of the most affordable, efficient, and common lighting technologies. Along with metal halide and other gas-discharge lamps, however, they contain mercury, a toxic element that contributes to water pollution and poses significant human health risks. Use of low-mercury fluorescent lamps, or other mercury-free lighting  technologies, reduce the risk of mercury exposure in buildings from broken lamps, and reduces overall mercury consumption. (Don’t let the reduced mercury lull you into complacency about safety in use and disposal, however.)

    Implement lamp purchasing guidelines

    The credit encourages project teams to develop and implement guidelines for lamp purchases, ultimately reducing the amount of mercury used for lighting below certain limits. When building management controls all lamp purchases, the credit is readily achievable, while multi-tenant buildings with decentralized purchasing may find it more challenging. The level of effort required may also vary depending on the type of lamps and fixtures currently installed in the building.

    Start with an inventory

    Begin by inventorying all interior and exterior lamps to document the manufacturer, model, and technical specifications, including mercury content. Once this inventory is completed, the project team can use the LEED Online credit form to determine the performance level of the current lamps and fixtures and the level of modifications required meet the credit target. You may need to simply substitute current lamps with lower-mercury alternatives, or you may need to replace fixtures and ballasts that can accommodate low-mercury, high-efficiency lamps. Mercury-free lamps, such as light-emitting diode (LED) lamps, which are particularly suitable for certain specialty applications such as exit signs, exterior architectural lighting, and display case lighting, will count towards reducing the overall average mercury content in your building.

    Typical Range of Mercury Content Levels in Lamps

    Costs will vary

    Project costs will vary according to the level of replacement required. In many cases, your lighting vendor can help by identifying low-mercury lamp options that fit the existing fixtures and ballasts; once this plan is in place, you’ll need to commit to purchasing these replacements as existing lamps reach the end of their useful life. There are numerous low-mercury lamp options available for typical lamp types; to help narrow down your options, refer to the table showing the range of mercury content you can expect to see.

    Start with these questions

    • Does the project building have an accurate inventory of all lamps installed on-site? What is the effort level required to generate such an inventory?
    • In multi-tenant facilities, does the project team control lamp purchasing throughout the building? If not, does the project building house any tenants who might be unwilling or unable to share lamp data?
    • Are lamp vendors or manufacturer representatives available to support development of a low-mercury lamp purchasing plan?
    • Who is responsible for placing purchase orders for lamps? Can they be responsible for tracking lamp purchases over the performance period?

    Complete submittals properly

    Project teams often confuse the two required data tables on the LEED Online credit form. Both of the following tables are required for earning this credit.

    • Table 1.1 represents the Lamp Purchasing Plan, which identifies a list of low-mercury, high-efficiency lamps approved by the project team to use as replacements as existing lamps burn out over time.
    • Table 1.2 is a record of all lamp purchases made during the performance period. Table 1.2 serves to confirm that, during the performance period, project teams purchased the proper lamps according to the Lamp Purchasing Plan, and that the average weighted mercury content of the purchased lamps met the mercury target specified in the plan.

    CFLs may be excluded

    Screw-based compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) that meet voluntary NEMA guidelines for maximum mercury content may be excluded from both the purchasing plan and the performance calculation. This exclusion option makes credit compliance easier, because CFLs may contain a relatively high amount of mercury compared to a common linear fluorescent lamp. However, CFLs that meet NEMA guidelines are still far more energy-efficient than an equivalent incandescent bulb, so the credit encourages project teams to continue using CFLs to retain the energy benefits without being penalized for the contribution to the overall building mercury levels.

    FAQs for LEED-EBOM MRc4

    There are no mercury-containing lamps installed in the project building. Can we upload a signed statement from our property manager instead of completing the credit form and documentation?

    It is rare for a building to have absolutely no mercury-containing lamps installed. However, if this is the case, submit a lamp inventory and manufacturer documentation confirming your claim. Don’t be surprised if your reviewer asks questions.

    A large multi-tenant project does not have a uniform lighting standard, therefore there are a number of different types of lamps are installed on the project. How should we go about documenting this credit?

    It is not necessary to inventory every lamp installed in the project building. However in order to accurately determine which types and how many lamps should be listed in the purchasing plan, it is necessary to take inventory of at least 90% of the fixture types in the building (including hard-wired, portable, and task lighting). You will also need to inventory the number of lamps associated with each fixture type. Taking an inventory of fixtures will be less time-consuming than an inventory of every installed lamp. You can then determine appropriate low- or no-mercury lamp options for the inventoried fixtures and include them in the purchasing plan.

    Do we need to provide a purchasing plan if the lamp inventory of currently installed lamps shows that the average mercury content is already below 90 picograms per lumen-hour?

    Yes, you still need to provide a purchasing plan to confirm that you have developed a plan for future lamp purchases that meet the credit requirements. If the project building’s currently installed lamps are already below 90 picograms per lumen-hour, you can just copy over the lamp inventory into the purchasing plan table in the credit form. You can adjust the purchasing plan further to get an even lower average mercury-content if desired.

    Do lamps for task lighting need to be included in the purchasing plan?

    Yes, lamps for task lighting should be included in the purchasing plan - unless they account for less than 10% of the total lamp building lamp inventory, then you can exclude them. Screw-based CFLs that meet NEMA guidelines may be excluded as well.

    Do mercury-free lamps need to be included in Table MRc4-1 Lamp Purchasing Plan and Table MRc4-2 Performance Period Lamp Purchasing?

    Mercury-free lamps (such as LEDs) do not need to be included in purchasing plan, and can only be included if they are more efficient than their mercury-containing counterparts If you would like to include mercury-free lamps in the purchasing plan, you must provide documentation confirming that those lamps are in fact more efficient than their mercury-containing counterparts. Therefore, if you are unable to obtain that documentation, it is best to not include mercury-free lamps in the purchasing plan. If you include mercury-free lamps in the purchasing plan, you must also include those mercury-free lamps listed in the purchasing plan that were purchased during the performance period in Table MRc4-2.

    All of the outdoor fixtures in the project building are mercury-free. Can we exclude all outdoor fixtures from the purchasing plan?

    Yes, all mercury-free lamps can be excluded from the purchasing plan. However, it might be a good idea to include a narrative explaining why all outdoor light fixtures have been excluded, so that the reviewer knows that you didn’t ignore or forget outdoor fixtures.

    The project building is a large multi-tenant building and tenants are responsible for their own lamp purchases. Can lamps in tenant spaces be excluded?

    No, 90% of all lamps types in the entire must be included. Tenant spaces may not be excluded. Achieving this credit in this situation can be challenging.

    How do you know if a lamp meets the NEMA guidelines, and can therefore be excluded?

    Screw-based, integral self-ballasted compact fluorescent lamps can be excluded if they meet the voluntary guidelines for maximum mercury content published by NEMA. The guidelines are such that:

    • Lamps with input wattage of 0 ≤ 25 watts must have 4mg total mercury or less
    • Lamps with input wattage of 25 ≤ 40 watts must have 5mg total mercury or less

    If the manufacturer documentation confirms the mercury content is below these maximum mercury content values, than the lamps may be excluded.

    Are there a minimum number of lamps that need to be purchased during the performance period in order to achieve this credit?

    You must purchase at least one lamp during the performance period to achieve this credit.

    The project building includes a significant amount of process lighting (i.e. sports arena lighting or studio lighting). Do these lamps need to be included?

    Yes, all lamps in the project building and site need to be included, unless they meet the exception criteria. This credit may be challenging to achieve on this type of project.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

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  • Inventory all lamps currently installed in the project building and associated grounds, providing the total number of lamps installed, and a mercury content baseline.


  • Staff can typically handle the inventory and purchasing plan at minimal cost. Upon request, and particularly for larger projects, some manufacturers or vendors will organize the inventory themselves and provide a ready-made purchasing plan that will meet your LEED goals.


  • Create a lamp purchasing plan that specifies a maximum average mercury content of no more than 90 picograms per lumen-hour for at least 90% of the lamps in the project building and associated grounds. Identify low-mercury lamps that will work with existing fixtures and ballasts when possible, and be sure to provide appropriate illumination levels and quality. Record the following manufacturer data for each lamp entered in the  purchasing plan:

    • Rated average life (hours)
    • Mean Light Output (lumens)
    • Mercury content (milligrams)

  • You can easily look up product data for a lamp by using the manufacturer website and the lamp’s NAED code—a five or six digit code that can be found on product packing, receipts, or shipping manifests.


  • If any mercury-free lamps are identified in the purchasing plan, provide manufacturer product information that the lamp is as energy-efficient as its mercury-containing counterpart.


  • Screw-base CFLs that meet voluntary NEMA guidelines may be excluded from the purchasing plan, because the credit encourages their use instead of less-efficient incandescent bulbs.


  • Swapping out all existing non-compliant lamps before the end of their useful lives is not the point of the purchasing plan and credit. Instead, the project team should replace lamps over time with credit-compliant options identified in the purchasing plan.  Although the lamp inventory needs to cover every lamp in the building and on the associated grounds, the purchasing plan only needs to cover 90% of the lamps, allowing you to exclude 10% of the lamps in order to accommodate unusual fixture or lamp types.


  • The LEED Submittal Template asks for lamp mercury content in milligrams, but in some instances, manufacturers may list the mercury content for a lamp in different units such as picograms. Be sure to verify the unit of measurement and convert the amount of mercury to milligrams if necessary before recording the data in the Submittal Template. See attached spreadsheet for help with this conversion.


  • Reducing the wattage of a lamp (for instance, going from a 32-watt T-8 fluorescent tube to a 28-watt T-8) will typically result in mercury reductions as well as improved energy efficiency. If it is economically feasible to retrofit a portion or all of the lamps and ballasts, those changes may make this credit more achievable. In many cases, such as this example, “relamping” can be done without “reballasting.”


  • In Multi-Tenant Buildings


  • Work with building tenants to obtain actual lamp data for each of their spaces. The project team may exempt up to 10% of the building floor area if the tenants that use that space are not willing or able to share information about currently installed lamps.


  • If you need to exclude 10% of the floor area in a multi-tenant building from your initial lamp inventory, you are still only required to cover 90% of the total number of inventoried lamps in your lamp purchasing plan.


  • If more than 10% of the building floor area is occupied by tenants who are unwilling or unable to share information about currently installed lamps, the project team is allowed to extrapolate existing data for the purchasing plan in order to complete a plan that covers at least 90% of the lamps in the building and associated grounds.


  • Don’t forget to include outdoor fixtures! If you want to exclude exterior lamps as part of the allowable 10% exclusion or if they do not contain mercury, include a note to the review team and let them know why the lamps are not included in the purchasing plan.


  • Lamps for task lighting should be included, but remember only 90% of the total lamp inventory needs to be included, so that 10% exclusion may come in handy here.

During the Performance Period

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  • Track all lamp purchases and verify that the weighted average mercury content of purchased lamps meets the target specified in the purchasing plan


  • Mercury-containing lamps (or their high-efficiency counterparts) must be purchased during the performance period to qualify for this credit. In other words, if no lamps are purchased during the performance period, you will not be able to achieve the credit, even if you’ve developed a good purchasing plan.


  • Provide manufacturer cut sheets for at least 20% of the total number of lamps purchased during the performance period, for the LEED submittal. Make sure that the cut sheets clearly indicate the specific lamp description or code and the rated picogram/lumen-hour, or the rated mercury content, mean lumen output, and rated life.


  • Cut sheets do not always clearly display the three pieces of data you need to complete the submittal tables. Here are some tips:

    • “Rated Average Life”: For fluorescent lamps, make sure to use the value for the three-hour instant start.
    • “Mean Lumens”: Make sure to use the value for “Design Mean Lumens.” Do not use the value for “Initial Lumens” unless the manufacturer does not provide a value for the mean lumens.
    • Sylvania Lighting provides a LEED-EBOM calculator on its commercial website that may be used as product documentation for mercury content.

  • Record lamp inventory and purchasing data in the LEED Online credit form to calculate the average mercury content.


  • A custom mercury content calculator will be denied by the LEED reviewer and should not be submitted as part of your LEED application. If a custom calculator or tool provided by a manufacturer was used during the performance period, all required data must be transferred to the built-in calculators in Table 1.1 and Table 1.2 of the LEED Submittal Template.


  • In-house staff can handle lamp inventory and purchasing data tracking and documentation at minimal added cost.


  • In multi-tenant buildings, collect lamp purchasing data from tenants and verify that each purchase complies with the purchasing plan.


  • Make sure that you provide documentation confirming the mercury content for at least 20% of the lamps purchased during the performance period, and for any lamps with no mercury-content that have been included in the purchasing plan, and be sure that the documentation easily aligns with the information provided in the credit form.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    MR Credit 4: Sustainable purchasing - reduced mercury in lamps

    1 Point

    Intent

    To establish and maintain a toxic material source reduction program to reduce the amount of mercury brought onto the building site through purchases of lamps.

    Requirements

    Develop a lighting purchasing plan that specifies maximum levels of mercury permitted in mercury-containing lamps purchased for the building and associated grounds, including lamps for both indoor and outdoor fixtures, as well as both hard-wired and portable fixtures. The purchasing plan must specify a target for the overall average of mercury content in lamps of 90 picograms per lumen-hourPicograms per lumen-hour is a measure of the amount of mercury in a lamp per unit of light delivered over its useful life. or less. The plan must include lamps for both indoor and outdoor fixtures, as well as both hard-wired and portable fixtures. The plan must require that at least 90% of purchased lamps comply with the target (as measured by the number of lamps). Lamps containing no mercury may be counted toward plan compliance only if they have energy efficiency at least as good as their mercury-containing counterparts.

    Implement the lighting purchasing plan during the performance period such that all purchased mercury-containing lamps comply with the plan. One point is awarded to projects for which at least 90% of all mercury-containing lamps purchased during the performance period (as measured by the number of lamps) comply with the purchasing plan and meet the following overall target for mercury content of 90 picograms per lumen-hour.

    Exception: Screw-based, integral compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) may be excluded from both the plan and the performance calculation if they comply with the voluntary industry guidelines for maximum mercury content published by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), as described in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. [Europe ACP: NEMA Equivalent]

    Screw-based, integral CFLs that do not comply with the NEMA guidelines [Europe ACP: NEMA Equivalent] must be included in the purchasing plan and the performance calculation.

    Performance metrics for lamps — including mercury content (mg/lamp), mean light output (lumens) and rated life (hours) — must be derived according to industry standards, as described in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Mercury values generated by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests do not provide the required mercury information for LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance and cannot be used in the calculation.

    LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance addresses only the lamps purchased during the performance period, not the lamps installed in the building. Similarly, LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance does not require that each purchased lamp comply with the specified mercury limit; only the overall average of purchased lamps must comply.

    Mercury-containing lamps (or their high-efficiency counterparts) must be purchased during the performance period to earn points in this credit.

    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    Europe ACP: NEMA Equivalent

    Projects in Europe may exclude CFLs if they comply with the criteria listed in Annex III of the Restriction of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances of the European Union Directive (EU RoHS.)

    Screw-based, integral CFLs that do not comply with the NEMA guidelines (or EU RoHS for projects in Europe) must be included in the purchasing plan and the performance calculation.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Establish and follow a lamp-purchasing program that sets a minimum level of mercury content and life for all mercury-containing lamp types. Work with suppliers to specify these requirements for all future purchases.

Web Tools

NEMA

Voluntary guidelines for maximum mercury content by NEMA.


LampRecycle.org

LampRecycle.org is an online resource from the National Electric Manufacturers Association (NEMA). It provides information on recycling spent mercury-containing lamps, including links to regulations and recycling service providers.


U.S. EPA Mercury Website

This comprehensive site offers information about mercury emissions, the use of mercury in manufactured products, human and environmental health effects, and laws and regulations.


Phillips LEED-EB Picogram/Lumen hour Calculator

Phillips-specific calculator to determine the picograms per lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour for individual lamp types or an inventory of lamps. The calculator also includes bulb data needed to complete the credit calculation.

LEED Gold Project Documentation

All Options

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of MRc4 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

Lamp Inventory

All Options

Use a lamp inventory worksheet to evaluate existing mercury content, to develop a lamp purchasing plan, and to track lamp purchases during the performance period.

Product Cut Sheets

All Options

Provide cut sheets for at least 20% of the lamps purchased during the performance period.

Compliance of CFLs

All Options

Screw-base compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) that meet voluntary National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) guidelines (see link below) may be excluded from the purchasing plan, because the credit encourages their use instead of less-efficient incandescent bulbs.

Mercury-Free Lamps

All Options

If using any mercury-free lamps such as LEDs, show manufacturer documentation that the lamps are at least as energy-efficient as mercury-containing counterparts.

Mercury Conversion Calculator

This calculator converts picograms per lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour to milligrams of mercury. Some manufacturers do not give their mercury data as directly as they could, for LEED purposes.

LEED Online Forms: EBOM-2009 MR

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.-2009 MR credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

v06 forms:

v04 forms:

v03 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Extrapolation for Non-Participating Tenants

Purchasing and data tracking must cover the entire building, including tenant spaces, with the exception that teams may exclude purchases for up to 10% of your building's floor area if that area is under separate management. This sample calculation shows the impact of non-participating tenants on purchasing credit calculations.

145 Comments

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Nov 02 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7594 Thumbs Up

Have you considered partnering with a big manufacturer like Philips or Sylvania to provide each student living in the dorms with one CFL1. Compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) – light source in which the tube is folded or twisted into a spiral to concentrate the light output; CFLs are typically 3 to 4 times as efficient as incandescent light bulbs, and they last 8 to 10 times as long. 2. Small fluorescent lamps used as more efficient alternatives to incandescent lighting. Also called PL, CFL, Twin-Tube, or BIAX lamps. (EPA) 3. A light bulb designed to replace screw-in incandescent light bulbs; they are often found in table lamps, wall sconces, and hall and ceiling fixtures of commercial buildings with residential type lights. They combine the efficiency of fluorescent lighting with the convenience of standard incandescent bulbs. Light is produced the same way as other fluorescent lamps. Compact fluorescent bulbs have either electronic or magnetic ballasts. at the start of each school year?

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American University Sustainability, American University Nov 02 2012 LEEDuser Member 1026 Thumbs Up

Hmm, that's a thought. I guess we could ask each person how many fixtures they have so we know the number of portable fixtures and the bulbs in them then. Do you think the review team would go for that?

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Elizabeth Crenshaw Hammitt Environmental Coordinator, EPB Nov 12 2012 Guest 1223 Thumbs Up

Emily,
This sounds like a really creative idea, and a great way to engage students…if you have the time within your project scope, you may want to send the question to GBCI - or if you feel the credit is worth it, submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide to know for sure...if they accept the approach, you could include the GBCI response/ ruling in your application, and in theory this would protect against a reviewer's opinion to the contrary....Good luck!

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Julio Sanchez Building Engineer Hines
Sep 25 2012
Guest
93 Thumbs Up

90% minimum purchase compliance during performance period

Guys, I have this problem, we have buildings that were recently retrofitted to T8 bulbs but also have several pin based CFL1. Compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) – light source in which the tube is folded or twisted into a spiral to concentrate the light output; CFLs are typically 3 to 4 times as efficient as incandescent light bulbs, and they last 8 to 10 times as long. 2. Small fluorescent lamps used as more efficient alternatives to incandescent lighting. Also called PL, CFL, Twin-Tube, or BIAX lamps. (EPA) 3. A light bulb designed to replace screw-in incandescent light bulbs; they are often found in table lamps, wall sconces, and hall and ceiling fixtures of commercial buildings with residential type lights. They combine the efficiency of fluorescent lighting with the convenience of standard incandescent bulbs. Light is produced the same way as other fluorescent lamps. Compact fluorescent bulbs have either electronic or magnetic ballasts. fixtures in our buildings, we are in our second performance period now and since we retrofitted not too long ago we do not purchase many T8 lights since we don't need to, but we are buying a few pin based CFL's (those go out quite more often and although we switched to the lowest pg/lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hr. available in the market, they are still at 91pg/lm hr.). Our total pg/lm hr is still well below 90 in average, but our purchases do not account for 90% of lights under 90pg/lm hr. during this period. Do this means that I have to replace the pin based fixtures to achieve this credit?

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Sep 25 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7594 Thumbs Up

I think you're going to be o.k. There are two requirements for this credit:
1) you must have a purchasing plan that addresses at least 90% of the lamps in the building AND has a weighted average mercury content of 90 pg/lm-hr or lower
2) you must purchase some lamps during your performance period

Technically if you bought one box of T8 lamps during your performance period (or a few pin-based CFLs), this would be enough to meet the purchasing requirement, as long as the lamps you buy are included in your purchasing plan.

So, to be clear, you don't have to buy enough different types of lamps to account for 90% of the lamps in your purchasing plan. You just need to buy any lamps that are included in your purchasing plan. Make sense?

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Julio Sanchez Building Engineer, Hines Sep 25 2012 Guest 93 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the quick response, I might be wrong but here's the way we are looking at this requirement. This is an example:
During this performance period we bought 100 T8 lamps with a total of 29 pg/lm hr. and we bought 20 pin based CFL1. Compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) – light source in which the tube is folded or twisted into a spiral to concentrate the light output; CFLs are typically 3 to 4 times as efficient as incandescent light bulbs, and they last 8 to 10 times as long. 2. Small fluorescent lamps used as more efficient alternatives to incandescent lighting. Also called PL, CFL, Twin-Tube, or BIAX lamps. (EPA) 3. A light bulb designed to replace screw-in incandescent light bulbs; they are often found in table lamps, wall sconces, and hall and ceiling fixtures of commercial buildings with residential type lights. They combine the efficiency of fluorescent lighting with the convenience of standard incandescent bulbs. Light is produced the same way as other fluorescent lamps. Compact fluorescent bulbs have either electronic or magnetic ballasts.'s with a total of 100 pg/lm hr.
When we record this in our performance period purchases table, the overall pg/lm hr for our total purchases is below 70 pg/lm hr. but, from the total lights purchased (120) 17% (20 CFL's) were not in compliance with the minimum of 90 pg/lm hr. (90%) for each lamp.
We are assuming this based on the following requirement:
"The plan must require that at least 90% of purchased lamps comply with the target (as measured by the number of lamps).
Please let me know if our assumption is not accurate.

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Sep 25 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7594 Thumbs Up

You're mixing up the specifics of the two different requirements.

Yes, it is true that the Purchasing Plan must address at least 90% of the lamps. This is the information that gets entered into Table MRc4-1 in the Credit Form.

However, the list of purchased lamps that gets entered into Table MRc4-2 has a different set of criteria. You need to ensure that:
1) at least 1 lamp is purchased during the performance period,
2) that the weighted average mercury content is less than 90 pg/lm-hr, and
3) that the purchased lamp(s) are listed in the aforementioned Purchasing Plan

That's it. It doesn't matter how many lamps or lamp types are entered into Table MRc4-2, as long as those three criteria are met. Hope this helps.

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Julio Sanchez Building Engineer, Hines Sep 25 2012 Guest 93 Thumbs Up

Right on the spot, thanks for the clarification, that just saved us a lot of work.

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Shevaun Barrie Inland Technical Services
Sep 19 2012
LEEDuser Member
1078 Thumbs Up

RoHS

Does anyone know if LEED counts being RoHS compliant as being equal to NEMA compliance?
Thank you,
Shevaun

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 23 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Shevaun, LEED does not have a ruling on this one way or the other. You could potentially make a case for it in your narrative, or through a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide or LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org..

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Luis Leal Luis Leal CTE
Aug 07 2012
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

CCFL- Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps

CCFL- Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps could be excluded from the calculations? The manufacture just inform this:"Low content of mercury, 20% less than that of CFL.
How should I proceed?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 03 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Luis, I don't see how you could exclude CCFLs. Among mercury-containing lamps, only screw-base CFLs are allowed to be ignored.

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matthew strong
May 04 2012
Guest
365 Thumbs Up

MRc4 Exemplary Performance Threshold

Can anyone tell me where the 50 pg/l-h threshold for exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. came from? This is what LEED reviewers are using, I just am having trouble figuring out where this originated from since the reference guide says 70 pg/l-h and there are no addenda that I can find saying otherwise. Thanks!

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional May 04 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7594 Thumbs Up

Is your project registered under v2008 or v2009? The EP threshold was 50 pg/lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output.-hour in the v2008 rating system, but that was also when there were 2 points available under MRc4. When they revised the credit in the v2009 rating system, they made the credit worth one point (with the minimum threshold at 90 pg/lumen-hour) and set the EP threshold at 70 pg/lumen-hour. If you're working on a v2009 project and the reviewer is trying to claim that the EP threshold is 50, it's definitely within your purview to point out that they are not observing the current credit language (politely, of course).

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matthew strong May 07 2012 Guest 365 Thumbs Up

The project is registered under the 2009 rating system and we were under the 50 threshold anyway. I just wanted to make sure that for future 2009 projects I am communicating the correct thresholds to clients. Thanks!

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Michelle Bracewell-Musson Owner, LEED AP, Musson General Contracting & Green Expectations Sustainability Solutions Jun 06 2012 LEEDuser Member 1188 Thumbs Up

A Little Confused...
EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. v2009 The reference guide states: 'one point is awarded to projects for which at least 90% of all mercury-containing lamps comply with plan and target of 90 picograms per lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour.' p283. Then on p288, it states: ' Project teams can earn an additional point if 90% of lamps purchased over the performance period have an average mercury content of 70 picograms per lumen hour or less.'
Please clarify if there is a typo or if I am confused.
Thanks!

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Jun 07 2012 LEEDuser Member 2806 Thumbs Up

The extra exceptional performance point is for purchasing lamps which exceed the credit requirement of 90 picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram./lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour and average of 70 picogram/lumen hour or less.

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Patrick Culhane Sustainability Officer Canderel
Apr 27 2012
Guest
243 Thumbs Up

Sylvania Ecologic Lights

Our project team considering purchasing ECOLOGIC lamps from Sylvania to fulfill this credit, however we aren’t certain if these are accepted under LEED. The literature claims that they "are engineered to pass the Federal TCLP test for hazardous waste determination," however, the LEED EB Canada guide states that TCLP tests are not adequate indicators of mercury content for the purposes of LEED (our project is located in Montreal). Has anyone used this line of lights to meet the low-mercury lighting standard for a project in Canada?

Thank you.

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Apr 30 2012 LEEDuser Expert 17310 Thumbs Up

You'll need the actualy mg of mercury per lamp.

Sylvania doesn't publish this information as easily as some other companies. I found on their website a LEED-EB calculator. It's an excel file that you download from their Tools & Resources section. It will give you the mercury content of each lamp.
http://www.sylvania.com/en-us/tools-and-resources/Pages/default.aspx#

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Apr 30 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7594 Thumbs Up

Patrick, one thing to keep in mind is that there isn't a distinction between "accepted" or "non-accepted" lamps for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. MRc4. The final documentation will be a purchasing plan that shows a total weighted average mercury content less than 90 picograms/lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output.-hour and a list that documents the total weighted average mercury content of lamps purchased during the performance period.

So, your purchasing plan can be a combination of different types of lamps, with both high and low mercury levels, that would be installed in a perfect world in your project building. The LEED credit form uses all the technical lamp data (mg of mercury, rated lamp life and mean lumens) to calculate the weighed average mercury content of this collection of lamps. Using manufacturer data, including the Sylvania tool that Bill mentions above, you can gather all this technical data and come up with a purchasing plan that will meet the LEED requirements.

Then, you just need to purchase some lamps during the performance period. Ideally, you would be purchasing one of the lamp types listed in your purchasing plan to replace one or more burned out lamps at the end of their useful life. Remember that all of your purchased lamps must also have a total weighted average mercury content of 90 picograms/lumen-hour or less in order to earn this credit.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory Colliers International
Mar 06 2012
LEEDuser Member
2806 Thumbs Up

How do I find replacement lights?

I've been provided with a light inventory for our building and so know what type of light I'm looking for (e.g. 18W F840). I've also found the Philips, GE and Sylvania LEED-EB calculators. What I can't find is any link between the two. All of them require specific product codes or product names and linking the product I'm looking for the product name is proving very frustrating.

Is there any efficient way to identify the optimal replacement products?

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Mar 07 2012 LEEDuser Expert 8571 Thumbs Up

Michael,

Good question...I don't think the manufacturer's have necessarily optimized their calculators to show alternative, lower mercury options for the lamps you currently have. We usually figure out which of the current lamps are raising the overall picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram. per lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour amount, and then contact the manufacturer or vendor and ask them to suggest alternatives for piloting. You can also zero in on the low-mercury line offered by a given manufacturer (e.g., the Philips Alto line). And, of course, if you have any T-12s, switching those to T-8s or T-5s will help with energy efficiency and dramatically lower the picogram per lumen hour value.

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Blas Beristain
Jan 09 2012
Guest
201 Thumbs Up

NEMA compliance

Hi. I am kind of new to this. I was checking if a Spanish building might earn some credits from MRc4. Since I am Spanish and it´s my first experience with LEED, I had not heard before of NEMA or NEMA standards. I just wanted to check that any CFL1. Compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) – light source in which the tube is folded or twisted into a spiral to concentrate the light output; CFLs are typically 3 to 4 times as efficient as incandescent light bulbs, and they last 8 to 10 times as long. 2. Small fluorescent lamps used as more efficient alternatives to incandescent lighting. Also called PL, CFL, Twin-Tube, or BIAX lamps. (EPA) 3. A light bulb designed to replace screw-in incandescent light bulbs; they are often found in table lamps, wall sconces, and hall and ceiling fixtures of commercial buildings with residential type lights. They combine the efficiency of fluorescent lighting with the convenience of standard incandescent bulbs. Light is produced the same way as other fluorescent lamps. Compact fluorescent bulbs have either electronic or magnetic ballasts. under 5 mg of mercury content (with less than 25 W) or under 6 mg (between 24 and 40 W) comply with NEMA (and, thus, it can be excluded). I mean that meeting the standard does not need some sort of NEMA label or something similar (like in the case of "energy star" label for electronics), that it is enough wtih being under the thresolds. I hope I made myself clear. Thanks a lot.

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Jan 10 2012 LEEDuser Expert 8571 Thumbs Up

I think you've got it - there's not a NEMA label or certification or anything that lamps must have, just that they fall under the mercury thresholds established by NEMA.

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Jan 10 2012 LEEDuser Expert 17310 Thumbs Up

Blas, Only CFL1. Compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) – light source in which the tube is folded or twisted into a spiral to concentrate the light output; CFLs are typically 3 to 4 times as efficient as incandescent light bulbs, and they last 8 to 10 times as long. 2. Small fluorescent lamps used as more efficient alternatives to incandescent lighting. Also called PL, CFL, Twin-Tube, or BIAX lamps. (EPA) 3. A light bulb designed to replace screw-in incandescent light bulbs; they are often found in table lamps, wall sconces, and hall and ceiling fixtures of commercial buildings with residential type lights. They combine the efficiency of fluorescent lighting with the convenience of standard incandescent bulbs. Light is produced the same way as other fluorescent lamps. Compact fluorescent bulbs have either electronic or magnetic ballasts.'s with screw bases and integral ballasts that meet NEMA standards are exempt. These are the kind that replace traditional incandescent lamps in the old fixtures.

A newer CFL fixture where the ballast is separate from the lamp and the lamp has pins will require you to meet the listed 90 picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram. level average.

Expect the mg limits in LEED 2012 to be lowered to the NEMA 2010 level of 4mg and 5mg.
http://www.nema.org/gov/env_conscious_design/lamps/cfl-mercury.cfm

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Molly ODONNELL design consultant
Oct 05 2011
Guest
41 Thumbs Up

Count LED conversion for EBOM MRc4?

Can MRc4 be used on EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. project purchasing LED troffers instead of any CFLs? (Building is in the process of converting all fixtures to LED, thereby eliminating the mercury.)

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Oct 29 2011 LEEDuser Member 2569 Thumbs Up

Hi Molly, of course you can! That's one of the non-direct intents of the credit. Take a look at page 285 in the reference guide.

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E H Sustainability Architect
Sep 06 2011
Guest
3568 Thumbs Up

LED lamp documentation

I am working on a project whose majority of fixtures are LED. I am wondering what the LED equivalent to a lamp/blub is when documenting this credit. In this project, each fixture uses a number of LED strips (the number of "strips" varies per fixture). Would one LED "strip" count as one blub for documentation purposes?

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Oct 29 2011 LEEDuser Member 2569 Thumbs Up

I am not sure as to why this is relevant. You don't have to include LEDs in the inventory and LEDs don't contain mercury, so the calculation of picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram. per lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour per bulb wouldn't apply. Instead you would count them as zero picograms if you are purchasing during the performance period. Does anybody else see this differently?

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E H Sustainability Architect Nov 02 2011 Guest 3568 Thumbs Up

The building is actually a major renovation project going for Low Mercury Lighting as an ID credit for a LEED NC certification. So there is no performance period. We are documenting all the new lights purchased, which includes the LED fixtures and the existing fixtures (that are mostly exterior pole lamps). We actually just got a response to an inquiry from GBCI stating the each LED "strip" would be considered one bulb.

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Sheela I
Aug 29 2011
Guest
1035 Thumbs Up

Low Mercury Lamps - ID Credit

Do all the lamps have to be Low mercury? in order to achieve this credit?

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Aug 30 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17310 Thumbs Up

"The plan must require that at least 90% of purchased lamps comply with the target (as measured by the number of lamps)."

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Sheela I Aug 30 2011 Guest 1035 Thumbs Up

Is it true that The only lamps this credit is applicable are the fluorescent lamps ? The project that i am working on is LEED CI. We are trying to get an ID credit for Low Mercury lamps. As of now we only have two types of lamps that are Low mercury and they are fluorescent lamps. Does low mercury apply to other lamps as well?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Sep 01 2011 LEEDuser Expert 9277 Thumbs Up

Hi Sheela - Just a quick note on your original question. Bill's response is accurate but I'm not sure it leads to the right conclusion. The 'target' under discussion is the overall picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram./lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output.-hour average for all the bulbs - it is not a per-bulb limit on mercury content. You must indeed include 90% of your bulbs in this calculation, but in many instances a large number of bulbs which are conventional mercury content are offset by a similar number of bulbs which are low-mercury. For example, a building with only 2 bulbs can be compliant by having both bulbs under 90 pg/l-h or by having one bulb at 100 pg/l-h and the other bulb at 79 pg/l-h (which averages to less than 90). In the latter example, you are analyzing 100% of your bulbs, but obviously half your bulbs are not low-mercury. Hope that helps a bit.

Dan

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Sonrisa Lucero Owner / Energy Engineer / Sustainability Consultant, Sustainnovations, LLC Sep 18 2012 LEEDuser Member 1645 Thumbs Up

Sheela, to answer your second question: no, this credit does not only apply to fluorescent lamps. While it is true that LED and incandescent lamps have no mercury, most HID (High Intensity Discharge) lamps contain a high level of mercury. In my experience, most HIDs in use do not have less than 90 pg Hg/lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output.-hr.

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist Wight and Company
Jul 27 2011
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8476 Thumbs Up

Applying to LEED 2009 for NC

I'm working on a project that would like to apply this credit to a new construction building. The new building is part of a college campus, but the LEED boundary only includes the new building. To earn this credit as an ID point under LEED NC is it sufficient to apply this method to just the new building and any lamps within the exterior LEED boundary? OR Do we need to include this provision as a campus-wide program?

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BuildingWise LLC Jul 27 2011 LEEDuser Expert 5260 Thumbs Up

Great question. As you are conducting a LEED NC in the one single building in theory you should only need to cover the EB portion with compliant purchasing of all the light bulbs in that one single building. (I'm leaving aside the fact that the reviewers may or may not pass this as an ID credit). However in practice this may not feasible as you will have compliant and non compliant light bulbs in operations storage and making certain that ONLY compliant bulbs are used in your building may be un-enforceable. Better to encourage a full campus wide MR credit compliance to overcome this possibility, even though it will be a tremendous task.

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Jamie Brady Project Manager, EMO Energy Solutions Aug 17 2011 Guest 152 Thumbs Up

Emily I would include any fixtures within the LEED Project Boundary, including exterior lights. We've earned this as an Innovation credit many times, including on campuses and military bases that have existing purchasing contracts that limit the selection of replacement bulbs. You can develop a suggested purchasing plan for replacement lamps for all of the lighting fixtures, and have the campus facilities department review/approve the plan. Obviously, you might want to check with them first to see what typical manufacturer(s) they use currently.

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Austin Evans Temporary Worker Scroll Compressors LLC
Jun 03 2011
Guest
439 Thumbs Up

The light fixtures currently

The light fixtures currently installed meet the specified criteria however what do you do if the bulbs were replaced not too long ago and their lifetime will outlast a 2 year window. The plant has approzimately 4,000 T5 bulbs and a good lifetime for them is about three years. Some of the other bulbs will need to be replaced but they are T12, T8 (normal and U -shaped, and a few other odd bulbs. Most of the bulbs being replaced will be T12 bulbs which have a mercury content of 109pg/lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour so 90% of bulbs purchased wouldn't be under 90pg/lumen hour. The plant has a total of just over 6,000 lamps (so looking at possibly up to 2,000 lamp replacements during performance period). Is there anyway to work around this or would we potentially have to replace T5 lamps about 6 months earlier than necessary to achieve this credit?

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BuildingWise LLC Jun 17 2011 LEEDuser Expert 5260 Thumbs Up

Unless I'm missing something here the point of this credit is what you PURCHASE not what you REPLACE. There is absolutely no way the USGBC wants you to remove any bulbs or fittings (ie, unlike other credits they really don't want you spending any money here!) just commit to purchasing compliant bulbs

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Eamon Geary Sustainability Director - Facilities Michael Baker Jr, Inc.
Apr 04 2011
LEEDuser Member
749 Thumbs Up

Applicable to LEED NC 2009?

Our staff has utilized this credit in multiple 2.2 projects successfully. However, with the change to CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide's in 2009, does that eliminate our ability to use this ID credit for a LEED NC 2009 project? Thanks!

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Kimberly Frith Sustainability Consultant, Alto Sustainability, LLC Apr 04 2011 LEEDuser Expert 4101 Thumbs Up

I would recommend looking at the documentation required for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. MRp1 and MRc4 including the sample credit forms and any required uploads in LEED Online version 3. The way we pursue the Green Housekeeping credit for LEED NC 2009 projects is by documenting that the project is complying with the EBOM IEQp3 requirements, so I think following that same path for reduced mercury would be acceptable.

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Sarah Corbitt Assoc AIA, LEED AP BD+C LS3P
Mar 22 2011
Guest
243 Thumbs Up

Using as ID credit in New Construction, indoor & outdoor

I'm working on a project which is using this credit as an ID credit for LEED-NC. Must outdoor lights be included? Does that mean all exterior lighting of the building, as well as areas such as the parking lot? The project is the athletic fieldhouse (coaches offices) for an athletic campus of a public university, but we are using NC rather than Schools.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 28 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Sarah, the credit is intended to apply to the building as well as grounds. I would include all of the grounds in your LEED boundary, which most likely does include the parking lot, from what you say.

If you're adapting this to be an ID credit for NC, you may have more leeway in defining it as you wish, but I would see that as an uphill battle.

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Terry Gorski Building Scientist Chelsea Group, Ltd.
Jan 14 2011
LEEDuser Member
560 Thumbs Up

If we want to borrow this

If we want to borrow this credit for use as an Innovation Credit in a NC project, how would we fill in the LEED Online form with data since the form for this credit does not show up in a LEED Online NC project? Would we be able to just submit the inventory tracking Excel sheet? Also, since it applies to purchases during the Performance Period, what timeframe would be required for an NC project? Thanks for any help you can provide!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 20 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Terry, you can grab the MRc4 form from LEED Online—see the  link near the top of the page labeled "Download Sample Forms."

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Jan 20 2011 LEEDuser Expert 7594 Thumbs Up

You might also be able to request an official version of the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. Credit Form through the GBCI Feedback Form in LEED Online.

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Jamie Brady Project Manager, EMO Energy Solutions Aug 17 2011 Guest 152 Thumbs Up

Also, keep in mind that for some reason GBCI is using a limit of 80 picograms/lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output.-hour for the threshold when using this as an Innovation point.

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Sara Curlee BWBR Mar 26 2012 LEEDuser Member 618 Thumbs Up

I am working through the same question. I just emailed my GBCI review group for guidance on what MRc4 template to use. I'll let you know what they say.

Also, I have the same question about the performance period. Since my project is NC 2009, it doesn't have one designated. What might be a logical time period to use? The submission date and include three months prior?

Thanks for any guidance.

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company Apr 10 2012 Guest 8476 Thumbs Up

I am currently in the process of submitting this credit as an Innovation credit on an NC project. I have included in the Special Circumstances that there is no performance period since this is an NC project. 

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Sara Curlee BWBR Apr 11 2012 LEEDuser Member 618 Thumbs Up

Hello again,

Emily - including an explanation in the special circumstances makes a lot of sense.

I did get a responses back from my review team about these issues too. They are listed below.

As far as filling out the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.-MRc4 template - To access sample forms, log into LEED Online v3 with a site user account, and proceed to the “Sample Forms Download” link. A completed copy of the Active or Static MRc4 form will be acceptable.

Then about including a performance period - Yes, you are correct to not address the performance period requirements listed in the form, since your project is not EBOM. All other requirements outlined in the form should be followed.

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei
Dec 28 2010
LEEDuser Member
4815 Thumbs Up

Mercury Free Lamp Brochure Upload

I get to know that we need to upload brochure or lamp specification if we declare in our existing building has Mercury Free lamp. we need to prove to USGBC that these lamp is more luminous efficacyIn lighting, the ratio of light output (in lumens) to input power (in watts). Higher efficacy indicates higher efficiency. than mercury contain lamps. in the case that we unable to collect ALL Mercury Free lamp brochure for uploading purposes, we will decline to get this credit?
in our project, Mercury Free lamp only has 1541 pcs ,about 1% of our total lamp installed in our building, while the rest is Low Mercury contain lamps. please advice.

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Dec 29 2010 LEEDuser Expert 7594 Thumbs Up

If you want to claim the mercury-free lamps in your credit calculations, then you have to provide manufacturer documentation showing that they are just as energy efficient as their conventional counterparts. However, you are allowed to exempt up to 10% of the total number of lamps in your project building from the credit calculations. So, it may affect your overall weighted average mercury content, but you can exempt those 1541 mercury free lamps if you're unable to find all of the manufacturer documentation.

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei Dec 29 2010 LEEDuser Member 4815 Thumbs Up

Hi Jason, Thank you for your advice, 2/3 of these mercury-free lamps does have the manufacturing spec, and ready for submission. only 1/3 of it doesn't able to collect from local manufacturer.

again, Thank you.

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David Grosdeck Property Manager Cassidy Turley
Dec 13 2010
Guest
363 Thumbs Up

Multi-tenant light bulb tracking

The property managment office is responsible for all lighting replacements in the building with the exception of the task lighting. Our inventory includes over 18,000 light bulbs.

The tenants purchase their own bulbs and do not have an inventory of their task lighting fixtures. Can the tenant task lighting fixtures be excluded?

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Dec 19 2010 LEEDuser Expert 7594 Thumbs Up

Yes, it is completely acceptable to limit the reach of your policies and programs to those areas of the building that are under the building management's direct control. Make sure that you note in your Sustainable Purchasing Policy for MRp1 that lighting purchase policy applies only for lamps under management's direct control.

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Michael Miller Project Architect Jun 25 2011 Guest 2367 Thumbs Up

Perhaps the LO template has changed since this Q&A, but v3.0 of the form clearly indicates that the credit applies to all lamp purchases in the entire building and associated grounds, including all tenant purchases, with the exception of the 10% area exemption.

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Paul C
Oct 29 2010
Guest
2523 Thumbs Up

Lamp Purchasing Plan

On page 288 of the reference guide, it provides an example of a lighting purchasing plan. I do not see where we can upload a text purchasing plan on LEED ONLINE. I only see the initial spreadsheet and the performance period spreadsheet.

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Oct 29 2010 LEEDuser Expert 7594 Thumbs Up

The example in the reference guide is intended to be an excerpt of the required information that you must provide on the Submittal Template or Credit Form. Do not submit a custom spreadsheet for your purchasing plan because the reviewers will not accept it. Make sure you put all the data from your purchasing plan into the appropriate table on the required credit documentation in LEED Online.

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Chris Munn Director, National Operations Chelsea Group, Ltd.
Sep 30 2010
LEEDuser Member
1603 Thumbs Up

NEMA Compliant CFLs?

I have found letters of commitment from both GE and Phillips stating "all of its self ballasted compact fluorescent lamps which are sold or made available for sale in the United States meet the mercury dosing limits contained in the Voluntary Commitment Requirements document (or NEMA standard) posted on the NEMA web site. Does that mean that all screw-based CFLs from GE and Phillips can be excluded from the purchasing plan and performance calculation?

If not, then how do you determine which ones are compliant on an individual basis?

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Natalie Bodenhamer Associate, Altura Associates, Inc. Sep 30 2010 Guest 870 Thumbs Up

Hi Chris,

If the manufacturer states that all screw-based, integral compact fluorescent lamps meet the NEMA guidelines, then all such lamps from that manufacturer may be excluded from the purchasing plan and performance period purchasing data. As MRc4 documentation support, I suggest uploading the manufacturer letter for each lamp excluded.

To determine which lamps meet the voluntary guidelines on an individual basis, follow the NEMA guidelines below:
• Lamps rated with input wattages of 0 ≤ 25 watts: 5 mg total mercury
• Lamps rated with input wattages of 25 ≤ 40 watts: 6 mg total mercury

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John Ida President Urban Works, Inc.
Aug 04 2010
Guest
1023 Thumbs Up

Default Values for Lamps with Unknown Hg Content?

Can we use the default (highest values) for older lamps that do not have Mercury Content listed per bulb? For instance, if the company no longer supplies the model/make of a T8, can we assume the typical highest value for Mercury content? It is TCLP compliant, but the leed online form states that TCLP compliance is insufficient information. Similarly, what if there is no lamp life (hours) available? We have contacted the manufacturer but are having trouble digging up data from the 1990s. Thanks.

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Aug 05 2010 LEEDuser Expert 9277 Thumbs Up

John - If the lamps are no longer supplied, then you can no longer purchase them, therefore - problem solved! Remember that your mercury calculation is based on the purchasing plan, not the mercury content of your current bulbs. The presence of old lamps with unknown mercury content in the building is really not relevant - the question is, when one of those lamps burns out, what lamp will you replace it with - and what is the mercury content/lumens/life of that replacement. This credit is entirely focused on future purchases, so map out your purchasing/replacement plan to ensure a 90 picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram./lumen-hour weighted average when full replacement is complete and, as always, don't toss out perfectly good bulbs until the end of their useful lives. . .

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Richard Navarro
Jul 07 2010
LEEDuser Member
845 Thumbs Up

Mercury Content

Hi I was wondering what you are supposed to do if the manufacturer spec sheet has the number for picograms of mercury per mean lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour, but not the number for the amount of mercury content.

I ask this mainly in relation to what is required to input for LEEDonline.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 12 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Richard the mercury content per bulb is a required input for LEED Online. The way the form is set up, it calculates the building average picograms/lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output.-hr within the form, so this can't be an input.

I would try to get this information from the manufacturer.

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Bill Swanson PE, LEED AP, Integrated Architecture Nov 11 2010 LEEDuser Expert 17310 Thumbs Up

Look at the mean lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. output and the average lamp life in hours (based on 3-hour starts). As an example:

32W T8 lamp
Mercury: 83 picograms Hg per mean lumen hour
Mean Lumen: 2,385 lumen
Lamp life @ 3h: 20,000 hours

Total mercury = (0.000000000083) * (2,385) * (20,000)
Total mercury = 0.00396 g of mercury, Or 4.0 mg if you short hand it.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert
Feb 26 2010
LEEDuser Member
9799 Thumbs Up

Sports Arena - Flood Lighting for HD Television

Usually I treat flood lighting for sports arenas as a process. Is there an exception for process lights?

A good expensive flood light is as follows:

OSRAM HQI®-TS metal halide lamp
Average life: 4,000 h
Luminous efficacyIn lighting, the ratio of light output (in lumens) to input power (in watts). Higher efficacy indicates higher efficiency. of lamp to 103 lm/W used for
for 2000 W per lamp
206000 lm per lamp
Lumens per life of lamp = 206 000 x 4 000 = 824 000 000 lumens
at 250 mg Hg per lamp --> 250 milligram = 250 000 000 000 picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram.

i.e. 250 000 000 000 / (206 000 * 4 000) = 303 390 picograms / (lumen-hour)
Requirement = < 90 picograms / (lumen-hour)

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 26 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

The credit language seems pretty clear that there are no exceptions for process loads. The only exception is for screw-based CFLs.

You also have the option of not complying with the credit for 10% of your purchases.

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Drew Johnson LEED AP O+M
Dec 28 2009
Guest
940 Thumbs Up

Pin-based CFL's

I understand why self-ballasted CFL1. Compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) – light source in which the tube is folded or twisted into a spiral to concentrate the light output; CFLs are typically 3 to 4 times as efficient as incandescent light bulbs, and they last 8 to 10 times as long. 2. Small fluorescent lamps used as more efficient alternatives to incandescent lighting. Also called PL, CFL, Twin-Tube, or BIAX lamps. (EPA) 3. A light bulb designed to replace screw-in incandescent light bulbs; they are often found in table lamps, wall sconces, and hall and ceiling fixtures of commercial buildings with residential type lights. They combine the efficiency of fluorescent lighting with the convenience of standard incandescent bulbs. Light is produced the same way as other fluorescent lamps. Compact fluorescent bulbs have either electronic or magnetic ballasts.'s are allowed to be excluded from MRc4 calculations if they are NEMA compliant. However, why are pin-based CFL's not given similar allowances for exclusion?

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Dec 29 2009 LEEDuser Expert 8571 Thumbs Up

I'm not sure if there's been any consideration of offering a similar approach to pin-based CFLs, but I think the main motivation for the screw-based allowance is to make sure this credit doesn't discourage a switch from incandescents to screw-based CFLs. Since that possibility doesn't exist for the pin-based lamps, there's no special allowance.

If you do happen to have a lot of pin-based CFLs that are pushing your picogramA picogram is 1 trillionth of a gram./lumen1. A lumen is a unit of luminous flux equal to the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source of 1 candle intensity. 2. A measurement of light output. hour value up, you can always exclude up to 10% of lamps from the calculations (the credit only requires that you show compliance based on 90% of the lamps, based on the number of lamps).

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May 04 2015
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