EBOM-2009 MRp1: Sustainable Purchasing Policy

  • MRp1 Action Steps Diagram
  • Your policy can be flexible

    This prerequisite requires you to write a sustainable purchasing policy to establish guiding principles for the purchase of environmentally preferable products and materials when economically feasible.  Switching to environmentally preferable purchasingA United States federal-wide program (Executive Order 13101) that encourages and assists Executive agencies in the purchasing of Environmentally Preferable Products and services. (EPPEnvironmentall preferable products (EPP) are those identified as having a lesser or reduced effect on health and the environment when compared with competing products that serve the same purpose.) may ultimately add costs for some purchases, but project teams can determine on a product-by-product basis whether the environmentally-preferable option is cost-effective. This EPP policy can be created by in-house staff without any capital investment.

    To meet the prerequisite, your EPP policy must adhere to the specifications of the USGBC’s Policy Model for LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.. You can download these guidelines from the Resources tab. The EPP policy must cover the products and materials addressed in MRc1: Sustainable Purchasing—Ongoing Consumables, and at least one of the other purchasing credits: MRc2: Sustainable Purchasing—Durable GoodsMRc3: Sustainable Purchasing—Facility Alterations and Additions, or MRc4: Sustainable Purchasing—Reduced Mercury in Lamps.

    The most common mistake with this prerequisite is to write a policy that does not adhere to all of the criteria in the Policy Model. Non-compliant EPP policies often fail to indicate the policy’s time period, establish a quantifiable performance metric, or assign key tasks to the responsible parties.

    You don't have to attempt or earn any credits

    However, you do not have to document compliance with the policy established for any of those credits. Additionally, in multi-tenant buildings, project teams are not expected to address purchases that are outside of the building and site management’s direct control, although they must identify those areas of the building that are outside the scope of the EPP.

    Enviromentally preferable purchasing includes products like these

    • Contains at least 10% post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product. and/or 20% post-industrialRefers to material diverted from the waste stream during a manufacturing process. Excluded from this category is reutilization of materials such as scrap that are generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process. Generally synonymous with "pre-consumer." material
    • Contains at least 50% rapidly renewableTerm describing a natural material that is grown and harvested on a relatively short-rotation cycle (defined by the LEED rating system to be ten years or less). material (e.g., bamboo, cotton, cork, wool)
    • Contains at least 50% materials harvested and extracted and processed within 500 miles of the facility
    • Consists of at least 50% Forest Stewardship Council (FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts.)-certified paper products
    • Rechargeable batteries

    These questions will help orient your team to this prerequisite

    • What types of purchases are within the building and site management’s control?
    • Which of these purchases will your team address in the EPP policy?
    • Who will be responsible for managing and enforcing the EPP policy?
    • What actions are necessary for the EPP policy to take effect prior to the start of the performance period?
    • How will the responsible parties track, measure and evaluate sustainable purchasing?
    • What are the goals for sustainable purchasing in the project building? How will targets be assessed?
    • What procedures and strategies will your team implement to meet the goals and intent of the policy?
    • How can you involve your vendors in supporting your sustainable purchasing goals?

    FAQ's for LEED-EBOM MRp1

    We already have a purchasing policy that covers most of the required elements of the prerequisite and the LEED-EBOM Policy Model, but not all of them. Do we have to write an entirely new policy?

    You can submit an existing policy with an amendment or attachment that addresses the missing requirements, as long as all new sections are officially adopted along with your existing policy. You may want to consider highlighting the required elements that are covered in your existing policy so that the LEED review team can easily confirm that you’ve addressed everything.

    Do we have to attempt all of the credits that we include in our policy? What if we attempt them and we don’t earn them?

    You do not need to attempt or achieve any purchasing credits to earn the prerequisite. Achievement of this prerequisite is based only on whether you create a compliant policy; no purchasing activity or documentation of compliance with the credits is required.

    We have a multi-tenant building. Do all of our tenants have to adopt the purchasing policy?

    No, the policy only has to cover purchasing performed by the building and site management. You don’t need to impose purchasing requirements on your tenants. Be sure to state the scope of your policy clearly to avoid confusion (in this case, purchases under the building management’s control).
    Remember that you do have to account for tenant purchases if you attempt any of the credits (with the exception that you can exempt up to 10% of the building’s floor area). Giving a copy of the purchasing policy to tenants and explaining its purpose and benefits can help you achieve the purchasing credits.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

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  • Create an EPP policy that guides sustainable purchasing for those products purchases that are within the building and site management’s control. Make sure that the EPP policy specifically covers each aspect of the USGBC Policy Model.


  • The EPP Policy may be part of a larger building sustainability policy or a document that pre-dates the LEED project time period. If the EPP policy is part of a larger document, highlight the sections relevant to this prerequisite (and which address each core element of the USGBC Policy Model) to help the reviewer easily locate this language.


  • In-house staff can develop the EPP policy, thus avoiding additional costs.


  • The EPP policy must cover purchases of ongoing consumables—the requirements for these purchases are described in MRc1: Sustainable Purchasing—Ongoing Consumables. Use the same policy to cover the requirements for at least one of the following credits: MRc2: Durable Goods, MRc3: Facility Alterations and Additions, or MRc4: Mercury-Containing Lamps.


  • The EPP policy must cover those product purchases that are within the building and site management’s control. Tenant purchases do not need to be covered, but the project team must identify in documentation the portions of the building that are not governed by this policy.


  • Furniture purchases, as well as electronics and office equipment, is part of sustainable purchasing of durable goods. Project teams often make the mistake of focusing only on electronic equipment and ignore the importance of selecting environmentally preferable furniture.


  • Issue copies of the EPP policy to all relevant personnel. Ensure that requirements are communicated to product vendors, and collaborate with vendors and contractors to identify preferred products that are competitive with conventional choices on both cost and performance standards. Engage vendors as early as possible to smooth transitions and identify opportunities.


  • Go beyond the requirements of the USGBC Policy Model to create an actual list of preferred products. Identify the most commonly purchased ongoing consumable items for the building and attach them to the EPP as “approved items for purchase.” This will help ensure that the policy is practical for those using it.


  • Vendor contracts from product suppliers often discuss how their products comply with LEED criteria, but these documents will not be accepted by LEED reviewers as credit documentation. The EPP policy must still be completed.


  • Cost premiums for environmentally preferable products will vary depending on the nature of the product and available manufacturers; however, the prerequisite allows the project building to determine whether or not an alternative purchase is economically feasible. The prerequisite defers to the judgment of the project team to define an econmic feasibility standard.


  • The purchasing goals in your policy do not need to match the required thresholds in the corresponding credit. For example, to earn MRc3: Sustainable Purchasing—Facility Alterations and Additions you must achieve sustainable purchases for 50% of total purchases by cost. You can set your policy goal at any level (above or below 50%) that makes sense for your particular project.

During the Performance Period

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  • Ensure that the EPP policy is in place and that responsible parties are using it as a guideline for any purchases made during the performance period. However, the project team is not required to document compliance for any of the purchasing credits for the purposes of this prerequisite.


  • Actively engage purchasing agents or other individuals overseeing significant spending to ensure that the EPP policy will be successful and that compliance will be realistic and sustainable.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    MR Prerequisite 1: Sustainable purchasing policy

    Required

    Intent

    To reduce the environmental harm from materials purchased, used, and disposed of in the operations within buildings.

    Requirements

    Have in place an Environmentally Preferable PurchasingA United States federal-wide program (Executive Order 13101) that encourages and assists Executive agencies in the purchasing of Environmentally Preferable Products and services. (EPPEnvironmentall preferable products (EPP) are those identified as having a lesser or reduced effect on health and the environment when compared with competing products that serve the same purpose.) policy that includes, at a minimum, product purchasing policies for the building and site addressing the requirements of MR Credit 1: Sustainable Purchasing—Ongoing Consumables. This policy must adhere to the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance policy model (see Introduction). At a minimum, the policy must cover those product purchases that are within the building and site management’s control.

    Additionally, extend the EPP policy to include product purchasing policies for the building and site addressing the requirements of at least 1 of the credits listed below. This extended policy must also adhere to the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance policy model and specifically address the goal, scope and performance metric for the respective credit:

    • MR Credit 2.1: Sustainable Purchasing—Electric-Powered Equipment
    • MR Credit 2.2: Sustainable Purchasing—Furniture
    • MR Credit 3: Sustainable Purchasing—Facility Alterations and Additions
    • MR Credit 4: Sustainable Purchasing—Reduced Mercury in Lamps

    This prerequisite requires only policies, not ongoing actual sustainable performance.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Evaluate the items that are purchased for the building, identify more environmentally friendly alternatives and establish a policy to purchase these alternatives when economically feasible. Work with suppliers to identify environmentally preferable products that meet the needs of the building.

Web Tools

U.S. EPA Environmentally Preferable Purchasing

Developed to help federal purchasers, this site can help green vendors, businesses large and small, and consumers. An index makes it easy to find and evaluate information about green products and services, calculate the costs and benefits of purchasing choices, and manage green purchasing processes.


USGBC Program, Plan and Policy Model for LEED-EB: O&M

USGBC provides a description of the definitions, requirements, and structure of a policy, program or plan as they relate to EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. submittals.


Energy Star Business Improvement: Purchasing and Procurement

The Energy Star website provides resources designed to assist procurement officials in making smart purchasing decisions.


Sustainability Purchasing Network

The Sustainability Purchasing Network is a learning resource for corporate, nonprofit, academic, public, and private organizations. It offers presentations on reducing purchasing-related carbon emissions, integrating sustainability into purchasing, and the business case for a sustainable procurement policy.


U.S. EPA Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines

This program is part of EPA’s effort to promote the use of materials recovered from solid waste. It provides comprehensive procurement guidelines and recovered-materials advisory notices, which recommend recycled-content levels for construction products, landscaping products, non-paper and paper products, and other items. It includes a searchable database of suppliers.


U.S. EPA Mercury

This comprehensive site offers information about mercury emissions, the use of mercury in manufactured products, human and environmental health effects, and applicable laws and regulations.

LEED Gold Project Documentation

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of MRp1 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

Sustainable Purchasing Policy

Create an EPPEnvironmentall preferable products (EPP) are those identified as having a lesser or reduced effect on health and the environment when compared with competing products that serve the same purpose. policy that guides sustainable purchasing for those products purchases that are within the building and site management’s control.

LEED-EBOM Policy, Program and Plan Models

Your LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. plans must include all required elements of the Program & Plan Model, which is described in this USGBC document.

LEED Online Forms: EBOM-2009 MR

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.-2009 MR credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

v06 forms:

v04 forms:

v03 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

29 Comments

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Sara Zoumbaris
Jun 13 2014
LEEDuser Member
181 Thumbs Up

Verbiage for Policies and Plans

Hello,

We are working with a city government to certify several buildings under LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.. The client has suggested that if we actually use the word "Policy" in the title of our documents, this will elongate the process of approval simply thus elongating the performance period and certification process. What other terms does LEED accept for these documents. I assume "Plan" and "Program" are both appropriate for all plans and policies being adopted and implemented? Guideline also seems appropriate but might be too vague...

Thanks!

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Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Jun 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 941 Thumbs Up

I wouldn't see an issue if you wanted to title your policy "Sustainable Purchasing Program". The bigger thing would be to make sure it still complies with the LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. Plan and Policy Model requirements. You can always include a supplemental narrative with the submission to the review team which clarifies that, while it's titled "Program" for client-purchases, it follows the standard "Policy" requirements per LEED.

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Jun 13 2014 LEEDuser Expert 4109 Thumbs Up

Sara, it's the content not necessarily the title that is the main driver here. However once you agree the 'policy' in these few buildings they could be rolling that out in all the other buildings at a later date...so I don't see the problem going away.

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David Wood Property Coordinator Jones Lang Lasalle/ BNY Mellon
Jun 26 2013
LEEDuser Member
140 Thumbs Up

Corporate Policy Question

We have a corporate Sustainable purchasing policy. With the policy came this note:

"LEED-EB version 3 requires Green Purchasing to include office supplies, stationary and other products as part of the Green Purchasing Policy which are not under the control of Global Facilities Services. As such, for purposes of this manual, Our Facility will remain under the version 2 Green Purchasing Policy adopted in December 2009 revised to include all facilities that control procurement of building maintenance supplies. While this existing policy does not conform to the version 3 requirements it is felt that the version 2 policy better reflects the products that Global Facilities Services has procurement authority over. For the purposes of the Global Facilities Services Sustainability Program, only products and materials purchased directly by building management shall be considered to determine compliance with this policy. Purchasing of general office supplies and computer equipment, etc. not purchased directly by building management staff are covered by policies within Corporate Sourcing and Technology Services. These other entities must be contacted for input whenever a PUCC listed property applies for LEED-EB certification. Cleaning supplies and paper products used in the housekeeping operation are excluded, since they are accounted for in the Green CleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. Policy and Procedures."

My question is that since we do not have control over some aspects of the requirement do we still have to state this in our policy eventhough we have no control? If yes would a new policy have to be made?

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Ryan L
Feb 22 2013
Guest
96 Thumbs Up

PDF Forms

Any chance we could downgrade the Version 4 PDF forms above? I don't want to upgrade Adobe Reader to 11 for fear it will not be compatible with LEED Online and I can't open these with 10. I love how nothing is easy!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 22 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Ryan, you could probaby arrange this by contacting GBCI.

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Heather Holdridge Sustainability Coordinator Lake/Flato Architects
Feb 24 2012
LEEDuser Member
1314 Thumbs Up

MRc5 question:

Does MRc5 count as an alternative to MRc2-4 or not? It seems like it does, however in the MRp1 policy document template it says it doesn't.

Could someone please clarify?

Thanks!

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Feb 24 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7219 Thumbs Up

It's funny, but I don't think it does. Your policy must cover MRc1, and then you have to choose at least to address at least one of the following: MRc2, MRc3, or MRc4. For some reason, the rating system language leaves MRc5 out of the mix when outlining your options for the Purchasing Policy and there have not been any addenda to adjust this. To be safe, I would still address at least one of the three specified credits in your policy, in addition to MRc5. Remember that the high-level language outlined in your policy does not require you to actually earn (or even attempt) the credit itself as part of your LEED application, so feel free to set goals and strategies for as many categories as possible in your policy.

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Lee Ann Walling, LEED AP ND Principal , Cedar Creek Sustainable Planning Services Feb 18 2013 Guest 84 Thumbs Up

Along the same lines . . . We are pursuing MRc5 but the reference guide apparently does not require a specific policy for this credit and it seems to exclude MRc5 from the prereq. Can we mention Sustainable Food in the prereq and start documenting our purchases? As a state agency we are rarely allowed to pay for food services, but we do have a couple of opportunities a year - including one in March. Thanks.

p.s. The sustainable food credit also doesn't mention appropriate packaging, utensils, plates, etc., which we would like to tack on to the credit. No use serving Fair Trade coffee in a Styrofoam cup.

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1587 Thumbs Up

Hi Lee Ann,

You're free to include or exclude food from your MRp1 policy at your discretion. I recommend including it though if you're even a little bit interested in selecting sustainable food options or are thinking of attempting MRc5. It's nice to have all your sustainable purchasing criteria laid out clearly in one place.

You're right about MRc5 not being concerned with packaging. However, those kitchen supplies you mention, like disposable cutlery and dinnerware, can be tracked in MRc1 as ongoing consumablesOngoing consumables have a low cost per unit and are regularly used and replaced in the course of business. Examples include paper, toner cartridges, binders, batteries, and desk accessories.. You can find a little more information about that under MRc1.

Trista

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Dennis Palmer Associate Building Solutions
May 31 2011
LEEDuser Member
30 Thumbs Up

Policy, "Measurement and Records"

The example provided for each policy specifically states measured values, for example Durable GoodsDurable goods have a useful life of 2 years or more and are replaced infrequently or may require capital program outlays. Examples include furniture, office equipment, appliances, external power adapters, televisions, and audiovisual equipment. Procurement measured value is within a given year at least 40% of the purchase shall be energy star qualified. Could we remove the measured value from the policy? Our approach would be to meet the client request, rather than a qualitative approach a quanatative approach, We would then apply the necessary measured values within our tracking/audit documentation.

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Brittany Bliffen Sustainability Manager, YR&G Aug 28 2011 LEEDuser Expert 454 Thumbs Up

Per the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. Policy Model, you must include an appropriate goal and performance metric in the Sustainable Purchasing policy. However, those goals do not need to match the thresholds required by MRc1-4. Does that answer your question?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Sep 01 2011 LEEDuser Expert 8803 Thumbs Up

I think Brittany is right to observe that the goals don't need to match EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. thresholds, but I also do think that the point behind requiring a goal and metric is to establish clear, quantitative goals that are easily understood and evaluated. A goal of meeting client needs may be the functional reality, but its a lot harder to define success or failure around. Given that the goals in these policies are essentially non-binding, I think your path of least resistance is to establish a quantitative goal, even if its one that seems easily reachable, and include more qualitative supplemental goals. Hope that helps.

Dan

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Robin Obaugh Vice President - Engineering Hines
Oct 18 2010
LEEDuser Member
324 Thumbs Up

Documentation Toolkit

Silly question I know, but when utilizing the "template" for the Sustainable Purchasing Policy, should we delete the header and footers related to LEED User?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Oct 19 2010 LEEDuser Expert 8803 Thumbs Up

As a reviewer, I am always looking for signs that a project has legitimately adopted and implemented the policies and programs that they claim to have put in place. One sure way to cast doubt on that issue is to submit a policy that is boilerplate from another source. So in addition to the changes, revisions, additions and subtractions you make to the content of the policy to ensure that is it accurate and useful for your facility, I would definitely recommend making cosmetic changes that reflect the document's integration with your other management tools and guiding policies.

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Robin Obaugh Vice President - Engineering, Hines Oct 19 2010 LEEDuser Member 324 Thumbs Up

Nice reply Dan, thanks for the input. The template certainly helps the process and I agree 100% with avoiding the boilerplate mentality.

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Paul C
Sep 30 2010
Guest
2338 Thumbs Up

Property Manager of Office Building

If we are the property management team of an office building, we only address purchases made by the building. The only purchases are made for janitorial, maintance, facility alterations etc.. which are described in other credits. My question relates to the first 'questions to consider' comment above, "What types of purchases are within the building and site management’s control?" I understand this must talk to MRc1 ongoing consumablesOngoing consumables have a low cost per unit and are regularly used and replaced in the course of business. Examples include paper, toner cartridges, binders, batteries, and desk accessories. but do not know if we have any ongoing purchases as the property manager outside what is talked about in other credits already and are not sure as to what possible purchases to include? Thanks in advance.

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Sep 30 2010 LEEDuser Expert 8803 Thumbs Up

I would suggest writing your MRp1 policy so as to encompass all ongoing or possible future purchases within the scope of purchasing described by the credit. That is, even if you don't currently purchase any ongoing consumablesOngoing consumables have a low cost per unit and are regularly used and replaced in the course of business. Examples include paper, toner cartridges, binders, batteries, and desk accessories. as the property management, ensure that the policy covers any purchases that might occur in the future if circumstances change. The same applies to durable goodsDurable goods have a useful life of 2 years or more and are replaced infrequently or may require capital program outlays. Examples include furniture, office equipment, appliances, external power adapters, televisions, and audiovisual equipment. and the rest - your policy will be the formal document that guides your performance; that performance will then be documented within the specific credit. Hope that helps.

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Jay Vorel
Jul 12 2010
Guest
30 Thumbs Up

Does a product count as an ongoing consumable?

My questions are for MRc1 Sustainable purchasing, in a machining facility our highest volume purchases are in raw material and tooling. The bulk of our solid waste comes from the metal chips produced from the process, which is recycled back through the foundry.
1. Does raw product that is purchased to make a finished good qualify as an ongoing consumable? My initial thoughts are that it is no different than paper documents that are produced in an office environment.
2. Would the recycled waste (metal chips) qualify as a post industrial material?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Jul 13 2010 LEEDuser Expert 8803 Thumbs Up

Jay, this is a really good question that I don't believe has a definite answer. I think there's a reasonable argument to be made that a manufacturing process is outside the scope of the MR prerequisites and credits and should be viewed as distinct from the existing category structure, which is clearly designed with a certain subset of items in mind. On the other hand, I have heard that in the past, reviews for hotels (for example) have required the inclusion of what I would think of as similar 'process' type items like sheets/towels/etc... in purchasing analyses. My advice to you would be to make the case you find most logical and compelling, and make it consistently (all purchasing and waste credits). But be prepared to respond to a review comment that requests data on that road not taken. . . Or, if its critical to your strategy, fire off a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide.

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Nell Boyle
Jun 08 2010
Guest
536 Thumbs Up

Performance Evaluation

I would like to amend or delete the performance evaluation provided on the template. Will this jepordize meeting the requirements of the prerequisite?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Jun 10 2010 LEEDuser Expert 8803 Thumbs Up

An amendment is certainly acceptable; deleting that section is also feasible as long as your 'Performance Metric' section articulates your processes for using the data you collect relative to purchasing to inform behavior. Having a program and a performance metric is, of course, not terribly helpful if noone is collecting data and reviewing it on a regular basis. So folding the portion of your policy that describes what you do with the data into the Performance Metric section makes a lot of sense (and you'll note that the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. Policy Model links both metric and evaluation in that section as well).

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Ryan Schwabenbauer
Apr 28 2010
Guest
102 Thumbs Up

LEED EBOM 2008: MRc1-8 Purchasing period, timing

Purchasing Period Question: Should purchases be tracked in the period ordered, received or paid for? Or is it OK as long as it is consistent across all credits where purchases are involved?

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional May 03 2010 LEEDuser Expert 7219 Thumbs Up

Ryan, the reference guide language isn't explicitly clear on this point, but to be safe, we suggest that you consistently track purchases in terms of when they are paid for. Additionally, make sure that you use a consistent approach to either include or exclude the amounts for sales tax and shipping & handling - again, it doesn't matter which way you do it as long as you're consistent.

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Wendy Gibson
Sep 09 2009
Guest
1434 Thumbs Up

Sustainable Purchasing clarification

I am currently working with vendors trying to get information showing compliance with MRc2. According option 2. Furniture., products are considered sustainable if they contain a certain percentage of recycled material or rapidely renewable material...Is this by total product or by specific material. For instance, for a chair seating is a composite product. For the portion of the product that has foam, are you looking for the percentage of all foam used in the product that is rapidly renewableTerm describing a natural material that is grown and harvested on a relatively short-rotation cycle (defined by the LEED rating system to be ten years or less)., or the percentage of foam that is rapidly renewable in relationship to the accumulated amount of materilas in the entire product? The question can also be applied to FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts. certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. and recycled plastic. If only a portion of the product is wood, are you looking for the total percentage of wood that is FSC certified or overall product?

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Jenny Carney Principal, YR&G Oct 06 2009 LEEDuser Expert 7871 Thumbs Up

Good question, and the calculations get a little sticky when only components of a product comply. The LEED for Operations & Maintenance Reference Guide does not address this as directly as LEED for New Construction Reference Guide, which states that the recycled content (or rapidly renewableTerm describing a natural material that is grown and harvested on a relatively short-rotation cycle (defined by the LEED rating system to be ten years or less)., regional, etc.) value of a material assembly is determined by weight. The recycled fraction of the assembly is then multiplied by the cost of the assembly to determine the recycled content value of the entire product.

For example, if a $10 product weights 10 pounds, 5 pounds each of plastic and wood, and the plastic portion contains 50% post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product. recycled content, the overall recycled content value is $2.50 (the recycled fraction is 50% of 50% = 25%, multiplied by $10 = $2.50).

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Nena Elise Jun 13 2011 LEEDuser Member 3424 Thumbs Up

Yes, but is this the case for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.? The credit does not seem to suggest this as it does in LEED NC.

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Donald Burns Electrical Supervisor / Green Associate colorado dept.of labor
Aug 14 2009
Guest
26 Thumbs Up

regional priority credits

I have the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. reference guide first edition. My situation is I cannot find a particular on regional priority credits. Is there an addenda or how can I get more information on these credits? Does any one Know? Help please. Thanks Don

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Joshua Radoff Principal, LEEDuser Primary Author, YRG sustainability Aug 14 2009 LEEDuser Expert 1008 Thumbs Up

You have to go to the USGBC website and find the regional priority page, which is hidden away here: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=1984

This lets you download a spreadsheet, by state, that lists the regional priority credits for each zip code in that state. There are tabs for the different rating systems: NC, CS, CI, S, EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems..

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Oct 01 2014
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