EBOM-2009 MRpc102: Legal Wood

  • Getting illegal wood out of our buildings

    This alternative compliance path (ACP) is being piloted throughout the LEED rating systems. The stated goal is to use this pilot phase to develop and refine a future prerequisite. This pilot credit could provide feedback on a possible future LEED prerequisite to require projects to document that all forestry products come from legal sources. This is important for a variety of reasons. Deforestation and illegal logging cause environmental, social, and economic devastation throughout the world. Additionally, some believe that project teams could potentially be held accountable for purchasing illegal wood products from manufacturers if they have not done due diligence to ensure the supply chain is clean.

    This ACP has some potentially controversial elements as well. In addition to requiring that all wood used in a project have verification of legality, it expands the definition of "certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System." to include programs endorsed by the ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services D7612−10 standard. Previously excluded certification schemes,  including systems owned by the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI), are now included in this pilot compliance path.

    For more background on the policy debates around this pilot credit, see the BuildingGreen article, LEED Pilots Legal Wood, Expansion of Certified Wood.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    MR Pilot Credit 102: Legal Wood

    Intent

    To reduce the environmental and air quality impacts of the materials acquired for use in the upgrade of buildings.

    Requirements

    This pilot credit is an alternative compliance path to:

    ACP language is in bold.

    Sustainable purchasing – facility alterations and additions

    Maintain a sustainable purchasing program covering materials for facility renovations, demolitions, refits and new construction additions. This applies only to base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). elements1 permanently or semipermanently attached to the building itself. Materials considered furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) are not considered base building elements and are excluded from this credit. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators are also excluded from this credit.

    A sample calculaton for this credit is available in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Achieve sustainable purchases of 50% of total purchases (by cost) during the performance period. Sustainable purchases shall meet 1 or more of the following criteria:

    • Purchases contain at least 10% postconsumer and/or 20% postindustrial material.
    • Purchases contain at least 70% material salvaged from off-site or outside the organization.
    • Purchases contain at least 70% material salvaged from on-site, through an internal organization materials and equipment reuse program.
    • Purchases contain at least 50% rapidly renewableTerm describing a natural material that is grown and harvested on a relatively short-rotation cycle (defined by the LEED rating system to be ten years or less). material.
    • Purchases contain at least 50% Forest Stewardship Council certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System..
    • Purchases contain at least 50% material harvested and processed or extracted and processed within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) radius of the project. Building materials or products shipped by rail or water have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) total travel distance of the project site using a weighted average determined through the following formula:

      (Distance by rail/3) + (Distance by inland waterway/2) + (Distance by sea/15) + (Distance by all other means) ≤ 500 miles [800 kilometers]

    • Adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. have a VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content less than the current VOC content limits of South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.) Rule #1168, or sealants used as fillers meet or exceed the requirements of the BayA bay is a component of a standard, rectilinear building design. It is the open area defined by a building element such as columns or a window. Typically, there are multiple identical bays in succession. Area Air Quality Management District Regulation 8, Rule 51.
    • Paints and coating have VOC emissions not exceeding the VOC and chemical component limits of Green Seal’s Standard GS-11 requirements.
    • Noncarpet finished flooring meets one of the following requirements and constitutes a minimum of 25% of the finished floor area:
      • Is FloorScore certified
      • Maximum VOC concentrations are less than or equal to those specified in the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, using the office scenario as defined in Table 7.5 within the practice.
      • Maximum VOC concentrations meet the California requirements specified above based on the following:
        • California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using test results obtained at the 14 day time point
        • Projects outside the U.S. may use the German AgBB/DIBt testing method and all testing methods based on AgBB/DIBt method (GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) using test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day or 14 day time point. For caprolactam, if test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day time point is used, the emission concentration must be less than ½ of the concentration limit specified above because the emission may not have peaked at the measured time points.

          If a European testing method (AgBB/DIBt GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) had used parameters for calculating test results different from those specified in the referenced California method, then the European test results for carpets or floorings need to be converted into California air concentrations by multiplication with 0.7.
    • Carpet meets one of the following requirements:
      • Meets CRI Green Label Plus Carpet Testing Program
      • Maximum VOC concentrations are less than or equal to those specified in the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, using the office scenario as defined in Table 7.5 within the practice. The additional VOC concentration limits listed in Section 9.1a must also be met
      • Maximum VOC concentrations meet the California requirements specified above based on the following:
        • California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using test results obtained at the 14 day time point
        • Projects outside the U.S. may use the German AgBB/DIBt testing method and all testing methods based on AgBB/DIBt method (GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) using test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day or 14 day time point. For caprolactam, if test result obtained at the 3 day or 7 day time point is used, the emission concentration must be less than ½ of the concentration limit specified above because the emission may not have peaked at the measured time points.

          If a European testing method (AgBB/DIBt GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) had used parameters for calculating test results different from those specified in the referenced California method, then the European test results for carpets or floorings need to be converted into California air concentrations by multiplication with 0.7.
    • Carpet cushion meets the requirements of the CRI Green Label Testing Program.
    • Composite panels and agrifiber2 products contain no added urea-formaldehyde1. Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring VOC found in small amounts in animals and plants but is carcinogenic and an irritant to most people when present in high concentrations, causing headaches, dizziness, mental impairment, and other symptoms. When present in the air at levels above 0.1 ppm, it can cause watery eyes; burning sensations in the eyes, nose, and throat; nausea; coughing; chest tightness; wheezing; skin rashes; and asthmatic and allergic reactions. 2. A known carcinogen with no known safe exposure level. Formaldehyde occurs naturally, but appears in unnaturally high concentra­tions in many buildings because it is an ingredient in binders used in many building materials and furnishings. resins.
    • Pilot Alternative Compliance Path – Legal Wood

      Purchases consist of at least 50% Certified Sources as defined by ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services D7612-10. Wood products sourced from Certified Sources are credited at 100% of their value provided:

      • All wood products are verified to be from Legal (non-controversial) Sources as defined by ASTM D7612-10.
      • And

      • At least 70% (based on cost) of all wood products on the project are from Responsible Sources as defined by ASTM D7612-10.

    Each purchase can receive credit for each sustainable criterion met (i.e., a $100 purchase that contains both 10% postconsumer recycled content and 50% of content harvested within 500 miles of the project counts twice in the calculation, for a total of $200 of sustainable purchasing).

    Materials for alterations or additions must be purchased during the performance period to earn points in this credit.

    Sustainable Purchasing: Ongoing Consumables

    This is an alternative compliance path to LEED v2009 O+M: Sustainable purchasing - ongoing consumables

    ACP language is in bold.

    Maintain a sustainable purchasing program covering materials with a low cost per unit that are regularly used and replaced through the course of business. These materials include at a minimum, paper (printing or copy paper, notebooks, notepads, envelopes), toner cartridges, binders, batteries and desk accessories. Food and beverages are excluded from this credit but are covered under MR Credit 5. Sustainable Purchasing - Food. For materials that may be considered either ongoing consumables or durable goodsProducts with a useful life of approximately two or more years and that are replaced infrequently. Examples include furniture, office equipment, appliances, external power adapters, televisions, and audiovisual equipment. (see MR Credits 2.1 and 2.2), the project team is free to decide which category to put them in as long as consistency is maintained with MR Credits 2.1 and 2.2, with no contradictions, exclusions or double-counting. Consistency must also be maintained with MR Credit 7.

    A template calculator for MR c1 is available in LEED Online 3 as a credit submittal. One point is awarded to projects that achieve sustainable purchases of at least 60%, of total purchases (by cost) during the performance period. Sustainable purchases are those that meet one or more of the following criteria:

    • Purchases contain at least 10% postconsumer and/or 20% postindustrial material.
    • Purchases contain at least 50% rapidly renewable materials.
    • Purchases contain at least 50% materials harvested and processed or extracted and processed within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) radius of the project. Building materials or products shipped by rail or water have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) total travel distance of the project site using a weighted average determined through the following formula:

      (Distance by rail/3) + (Distance by inland waterway/2) + (Distance by sea/15) + (Distance by all other means) ≤ 500 miles [800 kilometers]

    • Purchases consist of at least 50% Forest Stewardship Council (FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts.)–certified paper products.
    • Batteries are rechargeable.

    Each purchase can receive credit for each sustainable criterion met (i.e., a $100 purchase that contains both 10% postconsumer recycled content and 50% of content harvested within 500 miles of the project counts twice in the calculation, for a total of $200 of sustainable purchasing).

    Legal Wood Pilot Alternative Compliance Path



    Purchases consist of at least 50% Certified Sources as defined by ASTM D7612-10. Paper and wood products sourced from Certified Sources are credited at 100% of their value provided:

    • All paper and wood products are verified to be from Legal (non-controversial) Sources as defined by ASTM D7612-10.
    • And

    • At least 70% (based on cost) of all paper and wood products on the project are from Responsible Sources as defined by ASTM D7612-10.

    Ongoing consumables must be purchased during the performance period to earn points in this credit.

    Documentation Requirements

    General

    Register for the pilot credit

    Pilot Credit Survey

    Credit Specific

    Complete the Legal Wood Calculator, found on the resources tab of this credit.

    Survey Questions

    • where is this project located (city, state/province, country)
    • does the country/region the project is located in have existing laws/regulations regarding legal wood? are they effectively enforced?
    • how much wood, relative to other materials, was used on this project (by cost)?
    • prior to attempting this credit, what was your understanding of illegal wood in the buildings industry supply chain in your region?
    • prior to the work the project team did on this credit, was verified legal wood something that was required in any standard project spec used by the project team?
      • if yes, what specific language was used?
      • if no, did the project team develop standard specification language for future use?
    • What specific piece of this ACP was the most difficult:
      • 100% legality verification?
      • 70% responsibly sourced verification?
      • procurement of certified wood?
    • was legality documentation readily available from your upstream wood suppliers?
      • what documentation were they able to provide?
      • was this the first time that a project team asked the supplier for documentation to verify legality for wood?
    • who, on the project team, was responsible for documentation? did the project team need to hire an outside expert to facilitate achievement?
    • Did this credit influence or change the wood that was ultimately used on the project?
    • One of the goals of this ACP is to assess the feasibility of the creation of a prerequisite around legal sourcing of building materials.
      • How transformational do you think a prerequisite requiring legality verification for forest products would be?
      • How feasible do you think a prerequisite requiring legality verification of forest products would be?
      • How feasible do you think legality verification of all materials would be?

    Not pursuing this pilot but have a comment you'd like to share with USGBC?

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Feb 26 2017
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