EBOM-2009 SSpc82: Local food production

  • Bringing food production onsite

    In greenhouses atop the Vinegar Factory market and adjoining bakery on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, Eli Zabar (inset) grows fresh tomatoes, a wide variety of greens, strawberries, and even figs. | Photo – Jacqueline MirellIn greenhouses atop the Vinegar Factory market and adjoining bakery on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, Eli Zabar (inset) grows fresh tomatoes, a wide variety of greens, strawberries, and even figs. Photo – Jacqueline MirellThe intent of this pilot credit is to improve human health and well-being, community involvement, and education on food production by designing and maintaining the site for food production.

    Requirements focus on providing for onsite food production: vegetable gardens and/or edible nut- and fruit-bearing plants appropriate to the site. Projects  can meet the requirements by dedicating a certain percentage of their site's vegetated area or rooftop space to food production. There is even a provision for vertical farming: to provide at least 3,000 cubic feet of vertically stacked agriculture.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    SS Pilot Credit 82: Local food production

    Intent

    To improve human health and well-being and increase community involvement in, and education about, food production.

    Requirements

    Provide a dedicated portion of the site for onsite food production: gardens or planters with vegetables and/or edible nut- and fruit-bearing plants appropriate to the site.

    The area calculated shall be the actual growing area used for the production of food bearing plants. Size the area using one of the following metrics:

    BD+C and ID+C projects (except Schools, Homes, and Midrise)

    • At least 5% of the site’s vegetated area (excluding preserved or restored habitat area) but no less than 250 square feet.
    • At least one square foot per Full Time Equivalent (excluding visitors) but no less than 200 square feet.
    • For urban projects with a minimum density of 1.5 FARFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters)., at least 15% of useable roof top surface area (excluding mechanical equipment, skylights, roof drains, window washing staging, emergency egress routes, etc. and private balconies or decks) but no less than 200 square feet.

    O+M projects (except Schools)

    • At least 5% of the site’s vegetated area (excluding preserved or restored habitat area) but no less than 250 square feet.
    • At least one square foot per Full Time Equivalent (excluding visitors) but no less than 200 square feet.
    • For urban projects with a minimum density of 1.5 FAR, at least 10% of useable roof top surface area (excluding mechanical equipment, skylights, roof drains, window washing staging, emergency egress routes, etc. and private balconies or decks) but no less than 200 s.f.

    LEED for Schools projects

    • 0.5 square feet per student with a minimum requirement of 75 square feet and a maximum requirement of 1,500 square feet.
    • The provision of food production space must be complemented by programmatic areas nearby and designed for students to congregate. Programmatic areas could include, but are not limited to, classrooms and cafeterias.

    LEED for Homes and Midrise projects

    • 50 square feet per single family home
    • 15 square feet per unit for multifamily
    • For urban housing projects with a minimum density of 1.5 FAR, at least 15% of useable roof top surface area (excluding mechanical equipment, skylights, roof drains, window washing staging, emergency egress routes, etc. and private balconies or decks) but no less than 200 square feet.
    AND

    All projects

    • Prepare and distribute required Integrated Pest ManagementIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment. (IPM) practices for project-specific use to all users and home owners.
    • Herbs used for food preparation shall not exceed 25% of the area requirement. All projects shall include at least three differing production crops.

    All projects except Homes

    • Maintain a record log of means and methods of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) or necessary alternatives to address site specific issues. Provide universal advance notification of chemical applications.
    • Permanent infrastructure must be provided. As applicable, provide and document solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), sufficient growing medium, secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces. A three-year commitment to the program must be documented. In the event that users are not utilizing and managing the food production area, the owner, property manager or HOA shall be responsible for annually implementing and maintaining the program.

    See the Resources tab of this pilot credit for recommendations on soil testing, fertilizer and herbicide use.

    General Pilot Documentation Requirements

    Register for the pilot credit

    Credits 1-14

    Credits 15-27

    Credits 28-42

    Credits 43-56

    Credits 57-67

    Credits 68-82

    Credits 83-103

    Credit specific
    • Plan(s) highlighting food production locations and plant species on the site, in a greenhouse, and/or on the roof with dimensions demonstrating the amount of area reserved for food production
    • Calculations showing that the food production area(s) meets the required thresholds (including number of students, if applicable).
    • For urban projects: documentation confirming the minimum 1.5 FAR
    • Documentation showing or describing how the food production space is complemented by nearby programmatic areas and designed for students to congregate (Schools only)
    • The project-specific IPM plan, including a narrative describing how it will be distributed to all users or home owners
    • Site-specific IPM record log, including a narrative describing universal advance notification of chemical applications (not required for Homes)
    • Supplemental documentation confirming permanent infrastructure (not required for Homes)
    • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. owner (not required for Homes)
    Changes
    • 11/01/2013:

      Revised to allow options from EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. to be used by all project types. Added LEED for Homes requirements.
    • 04/04/2014:

      Removed "urban" from "urban farm" in option 3
    • 12/04/2015:

      Restructured the credit, revised the area requirements, and added a path for urban projects. Removed CSA and existing farm support. Modified the IPM plan requirements and applicability, and capped herb growing area.
    SITES-LEED Equivalency

    This LEED credit (or a component of this credit) has been established as equivalent to a SITES v2 credit or component. For more information on using the equivalency as a substitution in your LEED or SITES project, see this article and guidance document.

34 Comments

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LEED Team DC Gensler
Dec 06 2016
LEEDuser Member
2 Thumbs Up

Nutrients for Plants

We are exploring this pilot credit for a back of house hotel building and would like to use hydroponics. However, we have initial concern about additional nutrients that may be needed in the system and the subsequent waste it may generate. Does anybody have experience with this and is it a concern? (Can containers that the nutrients would be shipped in be recycled, for example.)

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Kristi Ennis Boulder Associates Architects
Jun 22 2016
Guest
100 Thumbs Up

Medicinal plants

Our project has incorporated over 1000 square feet of garden area for medicinal plants, and will use them to teach visitors about their use. Has anyone ever incorporated area for medicinal plants into their application for this credit or as an innovation? Seems like they are equally valuable, as is the honey production that Elodie Dumas proposed on this forum.

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Lourdes Salinas THREE Consultoría Medioambiental
Jun 15 2016
LEEDuser Member
525 Thumbs Up

Local food production

Project Location: Mexico

What is the best option of water irrigation systems for a small on site food production?

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Elodie DUMAS ALTO Ingénierie
May 13 2016
LEEDuser Member
1033 Thumbs Up

Onsite honey production

Hello ,

We attempted to submit onsite honey production as innovation. The reviewer oriented us to that credit. As anyone as managed to get onsite honey production recognized as an innovation and could provide feedback ?

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Apr 08 2015
LEEDuser Member
3526 Thumbs Up

Area requirements

The requirements on the credit (BD+C) on the top of the page show:

1. At least 10% of the site’s vegetated area
2. At least 1,500 square feet of hydroponic area
3. At least 50% of usable roof top space (excluding mechanical equipment, etc.)
4. At least 3,000 cubic feet of vertical farming or vertically stacked agriculture (length x width x height)
5. At least one square foot per Full Time Equivalent (excluding visitors)

"General Pilot Documentation Requirements" at the bottom of the page show:

1. Area calculations (in square feet), showing that the food production areas make up at least 10 percent of the site’s vegetated area

Am I correct to assume that the requirements under "General Pilot Documentation Requirements" should read the same as the ones on the top of the page?

We’re planning to calculate the area based on one square foot per FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
, which would be lower than 10% of the total landscaped area of the site.

5. At least one square foot per Full Time Equivalent (excluding visitors)

"General Pilot Documentation Requirements" at the bottom of the page show:

1. Area calculations (in square feet), showing that the food production areas make up at least 10 percent of the site’s vegetated area

Am I correct to assume that the requirements under "General Pilot Documentation Requirements" should read the same as the ones on the top of the page?

We’re planning to calculate the area based on one square foot per FTE, which would be lower than 10% of the total landscaped area of the site.

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LEED Pro Consultant Bioconstruccion & Energia Alternativa Apr 29 2015 LEEDuser Member 2718 Thumbs Up

Hi Noriko,
We also applied this pilot credit for our project and we used the option of "at least one square foot per Full Time Equivalent" which is lower than 10% of our total landscape areaThe landscape area is the total site area less the building footprint, paved surfaces, water bodies, and patios. as you said.
Instead of showing area calculations for 10 percent, we explained calculations based on FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
and showed the different requirements of the credit in a drawing of the site including some images for evidence.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. May 01 2015 LEEDuser Member 3526 Thumbs Up

Hi!

Did you get any review comments?

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Jessica Garcia Oct 19 2015 LEEDuser Member 260 Thumbs Up

We also used the "at least one square foot per Full Time Equivalent" route and showed that our calculation was based on our employee-count (1sf per person, for over 150 people), which made this a feasible credit for a commercial office space using balcony planters. The great part of this credit was that it blossomed into part of an Office Wellness initiative, citing the therapeutic effects of (voluntary) gardening, as well as a hugely popular 'take home' program for office-raised produce. We have so farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). been able to seed, grow and harvest radishes, cilantro, basil, beets, parsley, tomatoes and chives. Our documentation uploads included PDF copies of office-wide communications inviting persons to participate in planting, caring and harvesting events, initial rollout of the Wellness program centered around 'homegrowing' our own healthy food and photos of employees participating in planting events as well as the progress of several species.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Apr 08 2015
LEEDuser Member
3526 Thumbs Up

How to calculate area of edible nut- and fruit-bearing plants?

Is there any guidance on how to calculate the area of edible nut and fruit bearing trees? I assume we could calculate the area based on the position of the tree trunks or the tree crown. Also, are we supposed to exclude the are of paths inside the food production vegetated area (gross area or net area)?

Thanks in advance.

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Matthew VanSweden Community and Environmental Advocate Integrated Architecture
Mar 05 2015
Guest
956 Thumbs Up

farmers

Out of curiosity, has anyone in pursuit of this credit or in its development talked to an actual farmer [or grower]?

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Kimberlee Dobbins Sustainability Coordinator, City of Virginia Beach Mar 31 2015 LEEDuser Member 294 Thumbs Up

Yes. Did you have any particular questions or concerns? We installed 400 sq. ft. of raised garden beds at our convention center in Virginia Beach. It's been a great success!

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Matthew VanSweden Community and Environmental Advocate, Integrated Architecture Mar 31 2015 Guest 956 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the reply, Kimberlee, and kudos to your team for talking to actual growers about how to best grow food. I had no agenda for asking the question other than maybe to demonstrate the gap within the design community between designer and grower. People often scoff at the idea of inviting a farmer to the design table, even when talking about growing food.

Out of curiosity, did the grower you reached out give any feedback on the pilot credit language or the experience?

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Kimberlee Dobbins Sustainability Coordinator, City of Virginia Beach Mar 31 2015 LEEDuser Member 294 Thumbs Up

Matthew, I wish I could say I personally spoke to the grower, but I did not. While I do not have any feedback specific to the pilot credit, I can tell you the garden itself has been very successful. The Chef here at the convention center worked with the contractor/grower to design the raised beds, select the topsoil and the organic seedlings and to see that the seedlings are established and growing. After that, our Chef and his staff have done the hand weeding and maintenance and harvesting. We have had tour groups and writers feature the garden. The tour groups pick their own herbs and vegetables and then go into the kitchen to make fresh salads and dressings! It's been a great success!

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OSLEIDE WALKER Associate IBI Group
Feb 17 2015
Guest
16 Thumbs Up

Local Food Production

Project Location: United States

Does anyone have any experience developing a successful Integrated Pest ManagementIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment. (IPMIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment.) Plan for this pilot credit. Do you know exactly what measures or components are required?

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader Opsis Architecture
Apr 07 2014
LEEDuser Member
1894 Thumbs Up

How can we get feedback on the pilot credit?

I am wondering if anyone who has posted has been able to get feedback any other way? I tried submitting my same question via LEEDonline and have received no response.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Heathering I have pinged the experts at USGBC again about feedback on your questions.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Apr 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 1894 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader Opsis Architecture
Mar 13 2014
LEEDuser Member
1894 Thumbs Up

Hydroponic based on FTE counts and IPM questions

I have two separate questions:
1. If we have a hydroponic green house, can we size it based on FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
counts and not the 1,500 sf minimum that is specific to hydroponics?
2. For the requirement of having IPMIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment. processes in place, does that mean the project must meet the full requirements of IPM per LEED? Or is this a "softer" requirement, where IPM processes must be in place but not necessarily to the exact requirements of the LEED IPM credits?

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Batya Metalitz Technical Director, LEED, USGBC Apr 08 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3864 Thumbs Up

Hi Heather - Sorry for the delay. I'm checking on your first question, but on the 2nd one, the IPMIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment. requirement is not the full EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. credit. There are some recommendations on the resources tab of the pilot credit, but no specific requirements for what the IPM plan should include beyond what's in the requirements.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Apr 08 2014 LEEDuser Member 1894 Thumbs Up

Thanks Batya.

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Theresa Backhus Sites Technical Specialist, LEED, USGBC Apr 10 2014 Guest 1011 Thumbs Up

Hi Heather,
The hydroponic growing area can be sized according to any metric in the bulleted list (1500 sf, FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
, etc).

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Andy Rhoades Partner, Leading Edge Consulting Feb 18 2015 LEEDuser Member 757 Thumbs Up

Does anyone know if Recordkeeping and Universal NotificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. systems must be included in the IPMIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment. Plan for this pilot credit?

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Danielle Ostafinski LEED Project Coordinator, Catalyst Partners Feb 18 2015 Guest 78 Thumbs Up

I did not include those two items in my IPMIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment. plan and it was accepted.

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Heather DeGrella Sustainability Design Leader, Opsis Architecture Feb 18 2015 LEEDuser Member 1894 Thumbs Up

Hi Andy,
I has a similar experience to Danielle. Three of our projects have now had the credit approved and the IPMIntegrated pest management (IPM) is the coordinated use of knowledge about pests, the environment, and pest prevention and control methods to minimize pest infestation and damage by the most economical means while minimizing hazards to people, property, and the environment. plan did not include record keeping or the Universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. requirements.

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Batya Metalitz Technical Director, LEED, USGBC Feb 23 2015 LEEDuser Expert 3864 Thumbs Up

Hi Andy

Heather and Danielle are correct, record keeping and universal notificationUniversal notification means notifying building occupants not less than 72 hours before a pesticide is applied in a building or on surrounding grounds under normal conditions, and within 24 hours after application of a pesticide in emergency conditions. Use of a least toxic pesticide or self-contained nonrodent bait does not require universal notification; all other pesticide applications do. are not required for the pilot credit documentation, but are good practice.

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Pamela Mendez WSP
Mar 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
158 Thumbs Up

Supplemental Documentation

Does anyone have sample supplemental documentation to show the following:
Confirming the permanent infrastructure has solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.

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Danielle Ostafinski LEED Project Coordinator, Catalyst Partners Apr 11 2014 Guest 78 Thumbs Up

I edited a drawing of the space (in my case a rooftop greenhouse) and drew the different requirements on the document. I also included a table for the calculations and images of the space.

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Kendal Neitzke LEED Administrator, LEED AP O&M, Senior Designer, Assoc. AIA, MSI General Corporation Jun 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 786 Thumbs Up

Our project building is for a natural foods retailer who is very focused on local food production. Edible planting areas were used as part of the overall site landscaping. I used the project landscape plan and added the appropriate notes for the documentation of this credit such as the area of each planting bed, walkways, etc. I also highlighted all of the edible plants on the overall landscape planting schedule.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Apr 12 2016 LEEDuser Member 3583 Thumbs Up

We provided plans that seemed clear to us for round 1, and after reviewers comments requesting clarification, we've annotated clearly exactly where paths, access, fences, etc, are. There will need to be a benchmark for the requested features--it would be helpful to know how the reviewers want us to identify them, and which if any might be optional.

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Tess Doeffinger
Mar 03 2014
Guest
19 Thumbs Up

Support an Existing Farm

In order for a school to meet Option 3: Supporting a local Farm, does there have to be both a financial contribution and volunteering involved or can it just be one of them?

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Batya Metalitz Technical Director, LEED, USGBC Apr 08 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3864 Thumbs Up

Hi Tess - As currently written, it is both financial contribution and full time equivalent volunteering time.

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Danielle Ostafinski LEED Project Coordinator Catalyst Partners
Dec 17 2013
Guest
78 Thumbs Up

Production area calculation

To demonstrate that at least one square foot per FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
is available for food production in a project with a greenhouse, should I use the square footage of the greenhouse space, or only the square footage of the raised beds in the greenhouse?

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Batya Metalitz Technical Director, LEED, USGBC Apr 08 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3864 Thumbs Up

Hi Danielle - Sorry for the delay. Just the growing area (raised beds in this case) should be included in the square footage measurements.

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Danielle Ostafinski LEED Project Coordinator, Catalyst Partners Apr 11 2014 Guest 78 Thumbs Up

Great, thanks.

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