EBOM-2009 WEc1: Water Performance Measurement

  • EBOM_WEc1_Type3_Metering Diagram
  • It’s about measurement, not efficiency

    Earning this credit doesn’t depend on using water efficiently. It simply requires you to install meters to measure overall water use and subsystem water use. As the saying goes, “If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it.”

    In addition to installing meters, you’ll have to collect meter data at least on weekly intervals, and establish processes for using that information to optimize water performance. Meters that you own must also be calibrated according to manufacturer’s recommendations.

    Option 1 is easy

    Option 1 gives you one point for installing permanent meters to measure all water use consumed for the entire building and associated grounds. The meters can be owned by a utility or another third party.

    Water meterTo meet Option 1, buildings must have a permanently installed meter to measure all potable water use on the building and grounds.

    Achieving Option 1 is usually easy, except in campus or multi-building situations, where water metering at the building-level isn’t in place or isn’t easily installed.

    Option 2 can also be worth it

    You can earn an additional point through Option 2, which requires that you meet Option 1 and install a submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system. on at least one water subsystem:

    • Landscape irrigation
    • Indoor plumbing and fixtures
    • Cooling tower makeup water
    • Domestic hot water
    • Process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making..

    Cooling towerBuildings can pursue Option 2 by metering subsytems like all replacement water for the building's cooling towers.The most common metering choices for Option 2 are landscape irrigation and cooling towers. One reason is that utilities will often provide a discount on sewer charges for water consumption from these uses, which can mean significant financial savings.

    Consider these questions when approaching this credit

    • Is metering currently in place to determine the total water consumption of the project building and grounds, either in the form of a single overall meter or multiple submeters? If meters exist, obtaining Option 1 is quite easy, and Option 2 may also be easy. 
    • How frequently is water consumption data currently recorded and by whom? The credit requires a weekly reading, at a minimum. Should automatic loggers or manual readings be used to satisfy the credit requirements?

    FAQs for LEED-EBOM WEc1

    We can't get weekly readings from the main building water meter. However we can take daily readings from a water subsystem (e.g. irrigation or cooling tower makeup). Can we pursue Option 2 (water subsystem metering) without pursing Option 1 (whole building water metering)?

    Unfortunately, no. The rating system language explicitly states that in order to meet he requirements of Option 2, the project building must first meet the requirements of Option 1. Also remember, if you want to install a whole-building water meter at the project building, do it before the beginning of the performance period.

    What kind of meter reading documentation is required to meet the items requested on the credit form? The LEED Online credit form requests both weekly readings, and then also monthly and annual summaries.

    There are two kinds of documentation related to meter readings that need to be provided in order to comply with the requirements of WEc1: one is to provide a record that water meter readings were read at least on a weekly basis and the other is to compile those weekly readings into monthly and annual summaries. This documentation must cover the entire performance period for this credit.

    What is the best way to track the monthly and annual water consumption summaries for the whole-building and subsystem water meters?

    If the project building’s water consumption is being tracked in Energy Star Portfolio Manager, you can export the data to use for the monthly and annual summaries. If not, you can log monthly and annual summaries in a spreadsheet.

    If a building’s meter or submeter was installed less than a year ago, how can we provide monthly and annual summaries?

    In this case, you can extrapolate to project the monthly (and then annual) summaries for the months that you don’t already have data for. Make sure you use a method to extrapolate that seems appropriate for your project.

    The water utility for the project building supplies electronic readings of whole building water consumption at least weekly that the project team can access. Will the electronic readings suffice for the required documentation for WEc1?

    Yes. If you can set up automatic electronic meter readings, it is probably more preferable than having to take weekly manual readings, so it’s not a problem for documenting this credt.

    We own our water meters and the manufacturer of the submeter does not provide documentation recommending a calibration interval. How can we document that we’ve met the calibration requirements?

    Unfortunately, there is no specific guidance on how to go about this. Some recommended approaches that may be accepted are as follows:

    1. Figure out if the manufacturer guarantees meter performance up to a certain age or volume of water that has passed through. Then demonstrate that the meters are under that age or water volume.
    2. Have the meter or submeter calibrated by a third-party or the project team to verify the accuracy. But remember, if you’re going to perform the calibration in-house, it is recommended that the project team submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide to get approval on the specific approach to calibration.

    For meters not owned by a third-party, when should the meter calibration take place in order to comply with WEc1?

    You should calibrate (or replace broken) meters before the performance period starts to ensure that the readings that are taken during the performance period are as accurate as possible.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

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  • Both Options


  • Consider both Option 1 and Option 2 for your project building. Option 1 involves a single water meter for the whole building and grounds, and is easier than Option 2, which requires metering at least one subsystem such as irrigation or the cooling tower. See information on both options below.


  • Metering of reclaimed water or graywater is encouraged and helpful for monitoring water reuse systems—but is not required for the credit.


  • Identify all meters in the building and associated grounds, and record their location, date of installation, and ownership. This will help you complete the LEED Online credit form and determine whether any of the meters owned by the project building are due for calibration based on the manufacturer’s recommended interval.


  • For both credit options (see below), ensure that any meters owned by the building are functioning properly by following the calibration recommendations from the manufacturer. Meters owned by utilities or other entities are exempt from this requirement.


  • If meters are located in difficult-to-access locations, determine if an automatic data logger is feasible, ideally one that transmits data wirelessly. 


  • While electronically logged data is more efficient, all data readings should be reviewed by facilities staff on a regular basis. Manual readings may be preferable in order to guarantee that the project team reviews and considers all data.


  • Option 1: Whole Building Metering


  • To meet Option 1 and earn one point, install permanent water meter(s) for the entire building and associated grounds.


  • Achieving Option 1 is usually easy, except in campus or multi-building situations, where metering at the building-level may not be in place or easily installed.


  • In most cases achieving Option 1 is cost-neutral if the building already has a whole building meter. Some staff time will be needed, however, to manage weekly meter readings.  


  • Implement a tracking process to collect water usage data on at least weekly intervals from water meters. You can record data automatically with data logging equipment or by manual meter readings.


  • Project buildings usually meet the Option 1 requirement by adding the required weekly meter readings to the operations personnel’s standard maintenance rounds.


  • Simply relying on utility bills that provide monthly consumption data does not meet the credit requirements, because the measurement interval is too long.


  • In some buildings, performing readings on a daily basis may be desirable. For example, many hotels do this because use of domestic hot water is a large load, in terms of both water and energy consumption, and it’s worth catching leaks or other issues right away.


  • Option 2: Submetering


  • You can earn an additional point by pursuing Option 2. You’ll need to meet the requirements for Option 1, and install submeters for at least one water subsystem, such as the following:

    • Landscape irrigation
    • Indoor plumbing and fixtures
    • Cooling tower makeup water
    • Domestic hot water
    • Process water.

  • The most common metering choices for Option 2 are landscape irrigation and cooling towers. One reason is that utilities will often provide a discount on sewer charges for water consumption from these uses, which can mean significant financial savings.


  • SubmeteringSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy use within a building attributable to specific end uses or subsystems (e.g., the heating subsystem of an HVAC system). at the space level will not help a project building achieve WEc1 Option 2 for submetering. Qualifying types of submeters for this credit include irrigation, indoor plumbing fixtures/fittings, cooling tower water, domestic hot water, or process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. use. You also need to demonstrate that the submeter(s) chosen are metering at least 80% of the total water consumption for that subsystem for the whole building (and 100% for cooling tower water subsystems).


  • Track the total metered water use for each subsystem in your building in the same manner that total building consumption is tracked in Option 1. 


  • For metered water subsystems, calculate the percentage of the subsystem covered by the meter. To earn the point, the meter should cover more than 80% of one or more of the qualifying subsystems. For cooling towers, 100% of the subsystem must be metered.


  • The installation of submetering equipment, if none previously existed, can lead to added costs for Option 2. Additional time will also be needed to record and analyze data from water subsystems, but this added effort is generally marginal and not a barrier to credit achievement.


  • In exchange for these investments, the credit allows you to keep close tabs on your water use and quickly fix problems or drive toward greater efficiency. Especially in areas with higher water and sewer costs, the payback can be very favorable.


  • Simply relying on utility bills that provide monthly consumption data does not meet the credit requirements, because the interval is too long and subsystems are not typically metered.

During the Performance Period

Expand All

  • Both Options


  • Provide a summary report of calibration performed within the recommended interval for all meters not owned by a third party.


  • In some cases, simply replacing the meter(s) rather than calibrating may be more cost effective.


  • Don’t forget to provide calibration documentation for any meters or submeters being claimed for credit towards achieving WEc1.


  • Consider using the Energy Star Portfolio Manager to record total monthly water utility data. Using Energy Star is an easy way to compile monthly data for credit documentation. 


  • Use trend graphs to assess weekly meter data for irregularities that could indicate a leak in the system, equipment problems, or other system-related issues that are contributing to excessive consumption.


  • Keep good records of your data, and analyze them. The required monthly and annual consumption summaries are intended to facilitate trend analyses that account for seasonal variations by identifying and analyzing unexpected levels of use based on comparisons to the same time period in prior years. 


  • Option 1: Metering for Building and Grounds


  • Implement a tracking process to collect weekly water use data, perform regular trend analysis of the data, and compile it into monthly and annual summaries. 


  • Option 2: Metering for Subsystems


  • Implement a tracking process to collect weekly water use data for each subsystem, perform regular trend analysis of the data, and compile it into monthly and annual summaries. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    WE Credit 1: Water performance measurement

    1-2 points

    Intent

    To measure building and subsystem water performance over time to understand consumption patterns and identify opportunities for additional water savings.

    Requirements

    Option 1. whole building metering (1 point)

    Have in place permanently installed water metering that measures the total potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems.1 use for the entire building and associated grounds. Meter data must be recorded on a regular basis and compiled into monthly and annual summaries. Applicants are also encouraged to meter gray or reclaimed water supplied to the building.

    OR

    Option 2. submetering (2 points)

    Meet the requirements for Option 1 and have in place permanently installed metering for 1 or more of the following water subsystems:

    • Irrigation. Meter water systems serving at least 80% of the irrigated landscape areaThe landscape area is the total site area less the building footprint, paved surfaces, water bodies, and patios. on the grounds. The percentage of irrigated landscape area served must be calculated as the total metered irrigated landscape area divided by the total irrigated landscape area. All landscaping areas fully covered with xeriscapingXeriscaping is a landscaping method that makes routine irrigation unnecessary. It uses drought-adaptable and low-water plants as well as soil amendments such as compost and mulches to reduce evaporation. or native vegetationPlants indigenous to a locality (native) and adapted to the local climate; they require limited irrigation following planting, do not require active maintenance such as mowing, and provide habitat value. that requires no routine irrigation must be excluded from the calculation entirely.
    • Indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings. Meter water systems serving at least 80% of the indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings described in WE Prerequisite 1, either directly or by deducting all other measured water use from the measured total water consumption of the building and grounds.
    • Cooling towers. Meter replacement water use of all cooling towers serving the facility.
    • Domestic hot water. Meter water use of at least 80% of the installed domestic hot water heating capacity (including both tanks and on-demand heaters).
    • Other process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making.. Meter at least 80% of expected daily water consumption for process- type end uses, such as humidification systems, dishwashers, clothes washers, pools and other systems using process water.

    Meters must measure potable water use, but gray or reclaimed water use may also be measured to meet the requirements of this credit. Metering must be continuous and data-logged to allow for an analysis of time trends. The project must compile monthly and annual summaries of results for each subsystem metered.

    Meters must be calibrated within the manufacturer’s recommended interval if the building owner, management organization or tenant owns the meter. Meters owned by third parties (e.g., utilities or governments) are exempt.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Install a building-level water meter to measure and track total potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. consumption in the facility. Install subsystem-level water metering to measure and track potable water consumption by specific building systems; prioritize metering for those systems that use the most potable water.

Web Tools

Energy Star Portfolio Manager

Energy Star’s Portfolio Manager is an interactive tool that allows building managers to track and assess energy and water consumption across a portfolio of buildings. 

 

Technical Guides

U.S. Department of the Interior, Water Measurement Manual: A Water Resources Technical Publication

This publication is a guide to effective water measurement practices. 

Publications

National Multiple Family Submetering and Allocation Billing Program Study

Includes a link to a study outlining the benefits of direct billing for individual units in multifamily buildings.

LEED Gold Project Documentation

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of WEc1 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

Weekly Meter Readings

Weekly meter readings must be manually recorded during the performance period unless an automatic data logging system records in weekly (or more frequent) intervals.

Water Meter Readings and Summaries Template

Use this template to record readings from the whole building water meter and any sub-system meters that are being claimed towards achieving WEc1.

Trend Analysis

Trend analysis like this example will point out suspicious data that would warrant an investigation for leaks or other problems.

LEED Online Forms: EBOM-2009 WE

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.-2009 WE credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

v06 forms:

v05 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions on these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

75 Comments

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Vincent Maglio Cheif Engineer Jones Lang LaSalle
Mar 07 2014
LEEDuser Member

Meter Calibration

Finding very difficult to get manufacturer recommended calibration intervals.
Is there a code or governing body that can be used as a guide such as NSF or AWWA

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Mar 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 889 Thumbs Up

Hi Vincent

We've encountered the same problem on our projects but haven't found a guide on the recommended interval. And if there is no interval indicated on the manufacturer's documentation, we get a little nervous about not earning the credit.

To that end, we often have building teams replace their water meter immediately prior to their performance period, so that we can justifiably say that the meter has been calibrated. There is a relatively small cost associated with this approach, but it seems to do the trick.

Thanks,

Hannah

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Tom Kennedy Thomas E Kennedy, PE
Mar 04 2014
LEEDuser Member
81 Thumbs Up

Metering domestic hot water for kitchen - exemplary point in WEc

Our project is a large office building with commercial kitchen (in house breakfast/lunch, etc). The building has hot water heaters for the kitchen, and a hot water heaters for everything else (basically restrooms). The systems are separate. The credit language suggests domestic hot water as a submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system. category, it does not, though, list kitchen domestic hot water as a submeter category. Do you believe we would be able to submit just he kitchen domestic hot water as a sub-meter category? Do you believe GBCI would only accept that if we stated that kitchen domestic hot water is 80% or more of all building domestic hot water (i.e., kitchen plus other systems total)? Since the commercial kitchen has a combination of sinks, sprayers, dishwashers, etc. might GBCI suggest that sub-metered kitchen domestic hot water would have to be counted as "process". If we end up having to state that our kitchen domestic hot water is 80% or more of total - do you have any suggestions on how we demonstrate that (keeping in mind, there are, obviously, no meters on those other users to show they are 20% or less).
Thank you

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Mar 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 1735 Thumbs Up

Everything that I've seen so far indicates that the kitchen water would be considered process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making.. Domestic hot water appears to be the hot water which you are not sub-metering. If you have a sub-meter on all the water for the restaurant kitchen then perhaps you can document the process water. Do you have other process wate uses such as feature pools or car wash facilities?

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Tom Kennedy Thomas E Kennedy, PE Mar 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 81 Thumbs Up

There is a water feature outside the main building public entry. It is only used in summer. It is on the north side and the sun does not hit it. It is a "reflecting pool" style (so water is still). I did some calcs and figured evaporation is only about 1% of total building water usage for the year. Irrigation and cooling towers are "process", but those have their own sub-meters. That's all the "process" use I know of - unless janitor mop sinks would be considered "process". While I expect the annual water use for these would be really small, I have wondered if USGBC views mop sinks as "process". I don't find mop sinks in the WEp1/WEc2 template, so I assume theses would, thus, be seen as "process". Do you and others agree?
The WEp1/WEc2 templates do include "kitchen sinks". So, now, when I send in sub-metered dom hot water and sub-metered dom cold water for this commercial kitchen, and submit both as "process", will USGBC come back and say "aren't there kitchen sinks in your kitchen?" and try to make me break those out? Most of the sinks in this commercial kitchen are scullery sinks and rinse off sinks, but, as with any commercial kitchen, there are two hand-wash lavatories. Do you feel USGBC would question this idea of sub-metering and submitting all of this commercial kitchen water as "process"?

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Jaida Holbrook Enivronmental Engineer Skanska Sverige AB
Aug 10 2013
LEEDuser Member
571 Thumbs Up

kitchen sub-meter

Our project if a large office building with approximately 1200 employees.

We have a whole building water meter and a domestic hot water meter. If we add a meter into the commercial kitchen. Would that qualify for Option 2?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 08 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Jaida, reading the credit language, I don't think that a submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system. for the kitchen fits it exactly. However, the two meters you already have should be enough to earn both credit options here.

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Patricia Fuertes
Apr 10 2013
Guest
203 Thumbs Up

Calibration report

We are pursuing this credit but meters in Spain are not calibrated nevermore once they are installed. When they are revised they are substituted if needed or every 4 years for example. So we can obtain the "accreditation certificate" by an external company verifying the calibration of the meter when it was installed, could it be enough to verify the correct operation of meters? if there is a meter that was changed before the performance period and it only was in operation for four years, do we have to substitute it?

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Apr 10 2013 LEEDuser Member 1735 Thumbs Up

On a recent project in Budapest we successfully cited local regulations which require installation of new, calibrated meters every 5 years. As our building is less than 5 years old the existing meters were accepted without any additional calibration records.

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Apr 10 2013 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

Yes, that works. Replacement meters are a sure way to get the credit and, in many cases, save considerable money.

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Edward Malesevich Sustainability Analyst Transwestern Sustainability Services
Mar 29 2013
LEEDuser Member
52 Thumbs Up

Malfunctioning Water Meters

Our project team is attempting the whole building metering along with the submeteringSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy use within a building attributable to specific end uses or subsystems (e.g., the heating subsystem of an HVAC system). option. Everything was going smoothly up until the start of the performance period, when it became evident that the main building water meter had stopped working. Since the meter is owned by the utility company, the site team had them come out and verify that the meter was in fact malfunctioning. However, since we're working with the local utility company, they don't seem to share the same urgency in getting the meter replaced.

We're now entering our third and final month of the performance period, and there seems to be no guarantee that a new meter will be installed before we reach the end of the performance period. Is it still possible to earn this credit if it's obvious that the meter is malfunctioning, and that we've done everything possible to have the issue corrected?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Aug 02 2013 LEEDuser Expert 905 Thumbs Up

Hi Edward,

I think it's worth a shot to provide water use data for the time you could collect it along with an explanation of what happened. It would help your case if you could demonstrate that a new meter was installed before you submit your application; this would give the reviewer more confidence that there are working meters and that normal readings will resume. But I understand that there's not much you can do when the utility is responsible for replacement. Unfortunately I'm not too hopeful that you'll be awarded these points since the requirement for weekly readings is strictly enforced, but you have nothing to lose by trying to make your case. Good luck!

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Aug 02 2013 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

Edward. In this case a clear and concise narrative...with any supporting documentation, should be provided to GBCI. While Trista is quite right that the weekly readings are required, in this case you are not in control of the utility meter and 'despite your best efforts' replacement has been slow in arriving. I'm sure that your submeters are being read weekly, and those details will help support the process.

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Michelle Bracewell-Musson Owner, LEED AP Musson General Contracting & Green Expectations Sustainability Solutions
Feb 23 2013
LEEDuser Member
1028 Thumbs Up

Weekly Reading Requirement for Option 1 AND Option 2?

Hi All,

It looks like our team missed something and I want to be sure.

We had always planned to pursue Option 1 (Whole Building metering), however, it seems like the weekly meter reading requirement comes into play for the whole building when Option 2 (submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system.) is persued. Is this true? We just added irrigation meters and the weekly irrigation was read but not the whole building. Have we lost the whole credit (both Option 1 and 2), or can we still save Option 1, by dropping out of the submeter point (Option 2)? We are submitting soon, so starting whole building might not work at this point.

To make it short: Are weekly readings always expected for Option 1 (whole building)? The Reference Guide really speaks to the weekly when the Option 2 guidance is explained, however, not as explicit in Option 1 guidance.

Thanks,
Michelle

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Mar 23 2013 LEEDuser Expert 889 Thumbs Up

Hi Michelle

Weekly readings are required for both options, regardless of if one or both are pursued. The readings need to be taken weekly over the performance period in order to qualify.

Thanks

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Ryan Nelson
Jan 28 2013
LEEDuser Member
27 Thumbs Up

Interpolation of bimonthly water bills for monthly summaries

Similar to how extrapolation of data for a submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system. that was recently installed is appropriate, can I interpolate between bimonthly water bills in order to produce the monthly consumption summary? If so, does anyone have an acceptable interpolation method to share?

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Jan 30 2013 LEEDuser Expert 889 Thumbs Up

Hi Ryan

The key thing about this credit is that you have to provide weekly meter readings, at a minimum. These readings are not required to be automated, and therefore could be taken manually. The manual allowance is there for instances where bills come in monthly, bi-monthly, or quarterly intervals.

Thanks

Hannah

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Ryan Nelson Jan 30 2013 LEEDuser Member 27 Thumbs Up

That makes sense, but perhaps my question was unclear. Since weekly readings weren't taken until the performance period, I cannot be expected to use weekly readings to satisfy the "monthly and annual consumption summaries" requirement of this credit's documentation, correct? Exporting Energy Star data is an acceptable method, and that is often tracked by using monthly bills. But if a property receives bills less frequently (e.g., bimonthly, quarterly), what is an appropriate interpolation method to produce a summary with monthly granularity as part of the tracker that must accompany the credit form? Or could I just do a bimonthly trend analysis instead of a monthly analysis for the 2 years that are required for the summary?

Thanks!

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Jan 31 2013 LEEDuser Expert 889 Thumbs Up

Hi

Thanks for the clarification. Yes, you can take the data collected during the performance period and extrapolate monthly and annual summaries. But again, this credit requires that meters are also read and recorded weekly (at a minimum) during the performance period.

Hope this helps!

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Ryan Nelson
Jan 16 2013
LEEDuser Member
27 Thumbs Up

Water deduct meters acceptable as submeter?

Could a water deduct meter be used as a working submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system. assuming it properly segregates systems such as the cooling tower or irrigation?

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Jan 30 2013 LEEDuser Expert 889 Thumbs Up

Hi Ryan

In order for a deduct meter to qualify, it would have to measure BOTH the total water use (by subsystem) AND the amount of water not discharging into the sewer. This credit requires that you provide weekly water meter readings of consumption and not absorption to landscaping or evaporation in the cooling tower process. So I'd double check the meter's data logging process and see if that meets the credit requirements.

Hope this helps!

Hannah

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Kimberley Riley
Dec 01 2012
Guest
36 Thumbs Up

WEc1 Water Performance Measurement

Our meter is owned by a 3rd party, the local utility company, it is an electronic meter, however, they only take the reading monthly. On the bill it breaks out average daily usage, how many days, etc. If I transfer this information to a spreadsheet can it be used for this credit?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Dec 01 2012 LEEDuser Expert 8261 Thumbs Up

Sorry Kimberley, that won't work. The intent of the credit is to ensure that meters are read regularly enough to catch leaks and unexpected consumption quickly, and with enough granularity to identify unusual patterns. USGBC has decided that a weekly reading is the right level; breaking monthly numbers into weekly averages isn't sufficient.

Hope that helps,

Dan

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Dec 01 2012 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

Yes for submeters, and in fact all meters (energy, water et al) weekly direct reading (real time or written) is by far the better method. However a small wrinkle has just be printed in the new Recertification guidelines (dated November 1, 2012) This states that for water performance metering-whole buildings (WE c1.1):

“Maintain continuous manual or data–logged meter readings. In the application, provide at least monthly meter readings from the most recent 25% of the recertification performance period.”

This is then changed for Water Performance measurement-sub metering (WEc 1.2)to:

“Maintain continuous manual or data–logged meter readings. In the application, provide at least bi–weekly meter readings from the most recent 25% of the recertification performance period.”

Neither of these ask for weekly readings which confuses the situation no end, but I support Dan’s position that ‘granularity is the key” and weekly does have one’s finger on the pulse of water usage.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory Colliers International
Oct 12 2012
LEEDuser Member
1735 Thumbs Up

Process Water Definition

Part of the definition of process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. states that it can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. On a recent project we achieved this point by sub-metering the car wash facility (and decorative pool) in our office building.

Has anyone had success (or failure) treating the water used in the building restaurant as process water (used in the process of food preparation)?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 23 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, I haven't done this but I don't see any obstacles to what you're suggesting.

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Jiri Dobias
Aug 06 2012
LEEDuser Member
1050 Thumbs Up

Irrigation sub-metering - water tank

Our project will build a water tank which will provide enough water to irrigate 100 % of our greenery. My question is if it is possible to sub-meter water going from the tank and by doing this, achieve OPTION 2 for sub-metering.
Thank you in advance.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 03 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Jiri, this seems like a good way to meet the Option 2 requirements.

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Heather Holdridge Sustainability Coordinator Lake/Flato Architects
Jun 27 2012
LEEDuser Member
1180 Thumbs Up

ID Credit for New Construction Projects

Has anyone had any success using this as an ID credit for a new construction project?

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Jessica Hawley Sustainability Consultant EBI Consulting
May 10 2012
LEEDuser Member
809 Thumbs Up

Greenhouse submeter part of landscape irrigation?

Our project has an irrigation submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system. that covers approximately 75-80% of the irrigated landscape. It also has a submeter (separate from the main irrigation submeter) on a greenhouse that is part of the site. Could this greenhouse submetered area be counted as part of the metered irrigated landscape for the calculations on this credit?

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Jun 19 2012 LEEDuser Expert 6882 Thumbs Up

If the water in the greenhouse is used exclusively for irrigation purposes, then yes, I believe you could make a case to include them in the metered totals for irrigation.

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Jenny Carney Principal YR&G
Jul 19 2011
LEEDuser Expert
7148 Thumbs Up

Recommendations for Wireless Automatic Readings

Hi All,

For those who have meters in hard to reach vaults, I'm wondering if you've found equipment you like for taking remote readings on water meters?

Thanks,
Jenny

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Jul 19 2011 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

Yes, try Cypress Envirosystems and Bronway. (If you email me direct Jenny I can send number)

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Austin Evans Temporary Worker Scroll Compressors LLC
Jun 23 2011
Guest
377 Thumbs Up

Option 2: Process Water

My manufacturing facilty has more than one kind of process type water user, and they are very distinct. LEED says "Meter at least 80% of expected daily water consumption for process type end uses," (pg 93 LEED Reference Guide EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. 2009). I'm wondering if this means if I have to meter 80% of all of my process waters or just 80% of one type of process water? For example: One process use is for cleaning parts and another is for coolant. Do I have to do 80% of both combined, or could I just do 80% of the coolant system?

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Jun 23 2011 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

It's 80% of ALL the water that is going to process...not each process...HOWEVER I would suggest that you do sub-submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system. each individual process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. use as well. There is a long list of options for re-use of process water that can significantly reduce potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. use. (Potable water initial use for cleaning parts, re-used a second time for cooling, reused a third time for flushing or irrigation) By sub-submeteringSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy use within a building attributable to specific end uses or subsystems (e.g., the heating subsystem of an HVAC system). the ROI can be clearly explained to the 'boss' .

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Blair Seibert Principal, Architect Verde Concepts, Inc.
Jun 21 2011
LEEDuser Member
422 Thumbs Up

Must submeters not within Option 2 list be read weekly?

We have a main, fire water and irrigation meter. If read weekly and calibrated properly we have what is needed to obtain 2 points in this credit. We have listed other submeters in the template because it asks for ALL submeters. These meters are installed in two restaurant/tenant spaces. The water used by these tenants does not account for a large portion of the building's potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. demand. My engineer thinks that because these submeters are not within the list of Option 2 meters they do not need to be read weekly. They are in the template (and the reviewer has seen the documentation once) so I'm thinking that as long as they are listed in the template they must be read weekly.

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Jun 22 2011 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

I might not be reading you question correctly but I'll answer then you come back if needed. All meters and submeters must be read weekly. The sum of all the meter readings must cover ALL the potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. used for that building. If you have submeters behind submeters behind the main meter then no those don't need to be read weekly. However in reality you would be reading these sub-sub meters in an attempt to drill down the potable water usage to a particular segment/tenant/process use within your building, maybe to back charge or pinpoint who is the gross user in the building.
Does that help?

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Blair Seibert Principal, Architect, Verde Concepts, Inc. Jun 22 2011 LEEDuser Member 422 Thumbs Up

Yes it does thanks. I guess any meter you have should be read weekly. It's just really time consuming. The meters are all over the place; two are above cars in the parking lot, one is under a heavy concrete cover, don't know about the last two. I'll let the client know.

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Jun 22 2011 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

Sharon
Check out Cypress Envirosystems. They seem to be adept at clip on converters to change manual meter readings in wireless digital signals.
Harry Sim is the head guy there

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Wendy Gibson
Jun 17 2011
Guest
1265 Thumbs Up

Weekly Meter Readings

I am wondering if the weekly meter readings need to be done on the same day every week? Can we read the meter on a wednesday and then on a thursday of the next week or read the meter on a thursday and then on a wednesday of the next week? Does it matter?

Thanks for the clarification.

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Jun 17 2011 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

No not really... First, thank you for actually reading them...your problem, should there really be one, is when you post the readings to whatever excel spread sheet you are using. If the meter readings are coming from a manufacturing process (using millions of gallons a day) then the variation between the missing day or the extra day between readings will show up. If you're in a 10,000 sq ft office with 3 occupants then the discrepancy is minimal. I'm sure that you're not considering doing this EVERY 2 weeks, i.e jumping the days about so the whole focus of this credit apart from the act of actually doing the meter readings is to show up any leaks that there may be in the system. (you could overcome this by constructing the math in the excel spread sheet to show actual daily use). From the GBCI's point of view these discrepancies can be answerable however the real point of the credit is to track water usage over a period of time, understand any changes and use the data derived from the readings to make changes to the operations, equipment and occupant training to reduce water consumption

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Wendy Gibson Jun 21 2011 Guest 1265 Thumbs Up

That makes sense. Perhaps we'll just make sure to read it within the first two or three days of each week...and then average out daily usage and we can see any changes pretty quickly.

Thanks for your help!

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Andrea Marzullo LEED Specialist OSC/CFEEA
Apr 28 2011
Guest
308 Thumbs Up

Condensate meters

1. Is anyone using condensate for make-up to their cooling tower?
2. If so, what size and type of meter is being used?
3. Is it allowable to calculate condensate for the cooling tower without a meter and where would you record that in this template?

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Apr 28 2011 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

Andrea. It depends! Ok, here's a question...where is the condensate coming from. If it's out of a 'de-humidification plant (AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork., cooler, etc) then there is a possibility of using it. (I'd check weather the AHU you're pulling from is using any chemical suppresents for Legionella, etc, will that chemical be compatible with the standard cooling tower chemicals?), but to all intents as the reference guide quotes "...Condensate water" (page 22, option 2). Obviously you must have a lot of condensate to be considering this option as the threshold is 50% of total makeup water.
To successfully meter the condensate you'd have to put a meter in-line and show over the performance period that the condensate was equal to 50% of the total water going to the cooling tower makeup. (compare the two meter reads and subtract)
The problem with NOT metering it is that over the course of a season the amount of top up water used by the cooling tower will vary depending on the cooling demand, therefore it would be a guess as to how much condensate was actually being used.
Lastly, the direct connection of cooling tower makeup water with a condensate water line will probably be illegal without air gaps and backflow preventers in the system.

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David Eldridge Project Manager, Grumman/Butkus Associates Apr 29 2011 LEEDuser Member 420 Thumbs Up

The wording for non-potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. reclamation is "encouraged" metering -- I think you should be allowed to recover the condensate (I'm assuming from AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. cooling coils) and use it to displace potable water used in the cooling tower make-up which would be metered separately.

If you did decide to meter it, you probably would have to use a strategy as Barry alludes to where:

1) The potable and recovered water are combined in a separate tank, and then metered as it is supplied to the tower. But that sounds like a dispropotionate effort to the quantity of water recovered unless you are in a really humid location.

2) The potable water is metered at the collection location and then added to the cooling tower as it is generated through a separate filling process -- after all the tower must be running while the AHUs are dehumidifying -- and then the potable make-up would be used to supplement. (Metered separately.)

You may want to perform some psychrometric calculations before investing in the extra metering, to see what the expected quantity of recovered water will be.

To make a long story short, my answer to Q #2 is that I don't know anyone doing this that meters it.

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability
Apr 10 2011
LEEDuser Member
2016 Thumbs Up

District Energy Systems-Chilled Water

How does DES and purchasing of chilled water from utility fall into this credit? The guidance from the LEED DES document does not cover WE credits. Thank you!

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Apr 11 2011 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

Jeff. This is actually a little difficult because it is easy to look at this two different ways. First you comment that you are purchasing 'chilled water from a utility'. Well that should already be submetered in some fashion otherwise they would not be able to bill you. (Unless you really are getting it for free!). This would fall under the EA credits as would steam or hotwater supplied from a utility where these 'energy supplies' are metered and used to create your Energy Star number.
Consequently I think that you are talking about a 'private' DES which is onsite of a campus style setup. If this is so then you may have a couple of options. 1. submeter each building and gain the numbers that you need for E* (and therefore fulfill the submeteringSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy use within a building attributable to specific end uses or subsystems (e.g., the heating subsystem of an HVAC system). requirement in the WE credit) or, 2. talk with the USGBC/GBCI about E* for the whole campus using the DES numbers only. (This would mean that you wouldn't get the WE credits but would shorten the whole process.

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Apr 11 2011 LEEDuser Member 2016 Thumbs Up

Thanks Barry.... it does serve a campus of buildings, yes we do purchase/meter both buildings separately, and we have included in our Energy Star.
That said, is this scenario considered as an energy source or water source when it comes to measurement and reduction in the WE section? Can we take credit for the submeteringSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy use within a building attributable to specific end uses or subsystems (e.g., the heating subsystem of an HVAC system). of the chilled water for this credit? and if we have irrigation and whole building can we take the EP on it too? Thank you

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Apr 11 2011 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

Jeff, Yes take it in Energy (You're supply an 'energy source' to the building just as you would have with steam). In WE c1 take it in Option 2, Other Process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making.. Why?, because the intent we wrote says, " To measure building and subsystem water performance over time to understand consumption...." The whole point of this is reduce potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems.. I would class this as a synergistic process where the chilled water, (the costs of cooling that are energy related) and metering the potable water content of that chilled water.
As to the EP...well if you're satisfying 2 or more in Option 2, then you stand to get it. (Note as with any EP always check the EP box in EVERY credit that EP complies..regardless of weather you use it or not...that helps that if one credits is denied later it's very simple to slip in another EP in the IO credits halfway through or even at the end)

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Cynthia Fowler Senior Engineer B.D. Abel Inc.
Mar 31 2011
Guest
183 Thumbs Up

Error Message when trying to select Complete

I get the following message when I try to click "Complete" for the credit:
"...Form shows that documentation requirements have not been met..."
I checked and rechecked and verified that all the documentation that was asked for was there, but the form's SUMMARY does not update to say that WE Credit 1: Water Performance Measurement Points Documented: is 1.
Is this a program glitch I can ask someone about?

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Kimberly Frith Sustainability Consultant, Alto Sustainability, LLC Mar 31 2011 LEEDuser Expert 3372 Thumbs Up

You can submit a Feedback request through LEED Online and explain the glitch. The helpdesk staff is usually quick to fix bugs in the templates.

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei Mar 31 2011 LEEDuser Member 4429 Thumbs Up

Our MR and IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. credits face the same issues. spend almost 1 months with GBCI Technical team to solve it but at the end we need to check on "alternative compliance" path as our 60 days period coming to the end. Even checked on " Special Circumstances" route also doesn't help.

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Mar 31 2011 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

Cynthia, This is one of our most loved credits (ha Ha) and to answer your question is going to take some space....and at times may ask you questions that may be a little rude...like this one:
-Are you sure than you have the right numbers in 'flush and flow summary statistics". This has to be a positive number...that would be 5%...not a -5%. (Yes I told you this might be rude)
-Next check EVERY SINGLE box has a number in it..even if that is a zero. (Example: in Fixture Group Definition table, every box MUST contain some thing..even a '0'). This goes for EVERY table
-In both Fixture Group tables, make certain that column 1 (Select) is the same verbiage as column 3 (Fixture ID)
-And YES, don't forget to press 'calculate' button

NOTE to GBCI...wouldn't it be nice that when you closed a form that was incomplete that it highlighted those areas that needed attention...like a lot on online forms out there in the 'internet ether?

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei
Mar 07 2011
LEEDuser Member
4429 Thumbs Up

Energy Star - Statement Energy Performance

Please help:
I generate Energy Star Statement of energy performance (SEP) and realize that the whole statement does not have any water usage summary.
but in LEED online template., it said " Upload WEc1-2. Provide water use summary report(s) from the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager tool."

am i missing something here? how to generate SEP with water usage performance summary?

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Natalie Bodenhamer Associate, Altura Associates, Inc. Mar 11 2011 Guest 832 Thumbs Up

Hi Jason,
In Portfolio Manager, you can choose to "view" a summary for performance in specific areas. It is a drop down menu that lists a variety of summaries to view. Once you select "Performance - Water Use", you can download that data and upload to LEED Online. Please note that this would take care of your "monthly summaries", but not weekly readings.
I hope that helps!
Natalie

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei Mar 12 2011 LEEDuser Member 4429 Thumbs Up

Hi Natalie,

do you mean, all i need to do is to download the excel data from Energy Star for the category of "water use performance " and upload to LEED online?
Yes, thanks for the note, the download is only for monthly summaries.

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Paul C
Dec 01 2010
Guest
2201 Thumbs Up

Meter Reading Device

Has anyone had any luck with a electronic device that allows for an easy, cost effective method to collect meter readings?

I have contacted our utility provider who uses a hand held unit which they stated may cost 3-4K, which will prove tough to justify purchasing such a device.

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Dec 08 2010 LEEDuser Expert 8261 Thumbs Up

Paul - I'd touch base with a couple commercial plumbing contractors. I can't recommend any specific meters or tools, but to be honest I'm not confident that there will be much out there for less than the cost you've suggested. To me, thats a fairly reasonable number - metering water use could easily be the difference between discovering a leak that represents thousands in wasted water or not discovering it until the utility bill arrives. . .

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Paul C Dec 09 2010 Guest 2201 Thumbs Up

Dan - In looking ahead to newer LEED standards, it sounds like remote metering with alerts will be required. We have a BAS system in place for many of our buildings, but would like to find a system that could tie directly into our BAS system allowing us to set set-points/alarms and have real time readings. Have you or anyone seen such a system or have any recommendations?

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, USGBC LEED Faculty, LEED AP O+M, BuildingWise LLC Jan 24 2011 LEEDuser Expert 3134 Thumbs Up

Paul, Check with Cypress (http://www.cypress.com/). They are starting to build 'clip on' meter reading technology that will convert existing numerical meters into wireless units. These can be connected into existing BMS units without having to run all that awful wiring

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David Grosdeck Property Manager Cassidy Turley
Nov 05 2010
Guest
343 Thumbs Up

Reading water meters

We have seperate water meters for our building, irrigation, and cooling tower. The meters are owned by the water department and are read by them electronically. The water meter reading data is collected by them at different times approximately twice per day. The usage for each meter is available to view on-line on a daily basis.

Is it acceptable to view and analize our on-line usage information from the water department on a weekly basis and print it out for documentation? Monthly summaries will be printed out as well.

I feel this is an effective use of our time. It will be very difficult and potentially dangerous to have our building staff attempt to access the water meter pits in the wintertime to view the meters on a weekly basis. I would like to submit the electronic on-line printouts as documentation for these credits.

Please advise.

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Nov 15 2010 LEEDuser Expert 8261 Thumbs Up

That is absolutely acceptable David, in fact its preferred. Electronic meter reading makes it infinitely easier to collect, store and analyze the information - no question that that is the preferred method. Great that the water department provides this to you!

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Paul C
Sep 13 2010
Guest
2201 Thumbs Up

Metering

Just want to clarify, if we irrigate using water only from ponds and any run-off goes back into the ponds, I would not need to meter irrigation water correct and only building consumption for option 1.

For option 2: our cooling towers have a make-up and bleed meter to submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system. water usage from the main building meter would that suffice?

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Paul C Sep 14 2010 Guest 2201 Thumbs Up

The water from irrigation comes from retention ponds which contain water from runoff or from wells, in achieving option 1 whole building metering, would just building metering be adquate as no potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. is used for the grounds? For option 2, as I said we have submeteringSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy use within a building attributable to specific end uses or subsystems (e.g., the heating subsystem of an HVAC system). on the cooling tower but I would also like to obtain the IO credit for having another submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system.. If I submeter my irrigation supply (non-potable water) would that count? On page 93 of the Ref. Guide 2nd last paragraph it states "meters must measure potable water use, but gray or reclaimed water use may also be measured to meet the requirements of this credit." If someone could shed some light on this I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks in advance.

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Natalie Bodenhamer Associate, Altura Associates, Inc. Sep 16 2010 Guest 832 Thumbs Up

Hi Paul,
To achieve option 1, your whole building water meter will suffice. You do not need to include the water used for irrigation (as it is non-potable and is supplied via retention pond). To achieve option 2, metering the replacement water to all cooling towers onsite will satisfy the requirement. Regarding exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements., metering at least 80% of the irrigation water supply will qualify. Sounds like the retention pond will help you out in SSc6 and WEc3 too! Good deal!

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Paul C Oct 18 2010 Guest 2201 Thumbs Up

I just want to verify as the wording is not extremely clear within the reference guide.

I will read/record the building's city potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. supply meter and record our consumption one day per week. This credit at first seems to only be concerned with potable water consumption.

I will also view the building cooler tower submeterSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy or water use within a building attributable to specific end uses such as tenant spaces, or subsystems such as the heating component of an HVAC system. and record the number one day per week.

We are currently in the stages of installing submeters on our irrigation water which is non-potable but will still give us the one IO point for this credit? For the WHOLE BUILDING metering I will only worry about the potable water consumption and ignore the irrigation water meter, thus the whole building water consumption will exclude irrigation consumption.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 22 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Paul, this reads correctly to me.

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ZEB Tech singapore ESD Consultancy ZEB-Technology Pte Ltd
Aug 19 2010
Guest
2158 Thumbs Up

hot water consumption sub-metering

oUR project is taking 'cooling tower' consumption as one of the sub-metering areas.For exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements.,we would want to go in for Domestic hot water subsystem metering data.The project is a resort which supplies hot water through a boiler for all the hot water demands in the resort.It is metered as well on a daily basis.Would this be enough to go in for the exemplary performance.Please advice.

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Natalie Bodenhamer Associate, Altura Associates, Inc. Aug 20 2010 Guest 832 Thumbs Up

As long as 80% of the installed domestic hot water heating capacity is metered, you can include the meter. Having a meter on your boiler (that heats 100% of the water demand) meets the requirement for Option 2 of the credit. As long as Option 1 is fulfilled (whole building water meter) and your cooling tower meter meets the Option 2 requirements, the domestic hot water meter will satisfy Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements..

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Shoko Yasuda Lend Lease Japan Feb 28 2011 LEEDuser Member 228 Thumbs Up

We are thinking to install meter for hot water. However we can only put meter for kitchens of two restraunts. There are other places where people use hot water, like small pantry for offices and toilets. We are thinking to calculate the amount they use in kitchen and compare it to the other usage to demonstrate kitchen usage is more than 80 % of all hot water.
Do you think it works all right for the point?
Thank you.

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