EBOM-2009 WEc2: Additional Indoor Plumbing Fixture and Fitting Efficiency

  • EBOM_WEc2-Type3-PlumbingEfficiency diagram
  • Exceed WEp1 requirements

    This credit rewards project buildings that exceed the requirements specified in WEp1: Minimum Indoor Plumbing Fixture and Fitting Efficiency.  Additional points are earned if the performance calculations indicate that indoor potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. usage is at least 10% less than indicated in the credit baseline. Projects may be awarded an innovation point for exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. by achieving a potable water savings of 35% or greater.

    To earn this credit, start with the efficiency assessment completed for WEp1, then evaluate what changes, if any, are needed to meet the project’s water conservation goals.

    FAQs for LEED-EBOM WEp1/WEc2

    If manufacturer documentation is unavailable and the flow/fixture rate is unknown, how would one go about confirming the flow/flush rates of those fixtures?

    You can try to find the manufacturer and model stamped on the fixture itself. Sometimes the fixture stamps are hard to find, are not legible, or even are not there. The other option is to physically measure and time water consumption rates for at least a 20% of the fixtures of each fixture type in the project building that differs from UPCUniform Plumbing Code/IPCInternational Plumbing Code requirements.

    We are not able to locate the flow/flush rates of the plumbing fixtures in the project building, so we have decided to test 20% of the fixtures of each fixture type. How do we go about doing that?

    There is no official protocol for testing fixtures, but it can be done in the following ways. For a lavatory and kitchen sink faucets and showers, simply fill a bucket for 60 seconds. For wall-mounted urinals and water closets, ask the building engineerA qualified engineering professional with relevant and sufficient expertise who oversees and is responsible for the operation and maintenance of mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems in the project building. to assist you in disconnecting the plumbing from the flushometerA device that utilizes pressure from the water supply system, rather than the force of gravity, to discharge water into the bowl of a toilet or urinal. It is designed to use less water than conventional flush toilets. and measure a flush of water into a bucket. It is recommended that each fixture be tested at least three times, to get a weighted average flow/flush rate. This is quite a process, so consider it a last resort if the fixture documentation can absolutely not be found. Make sure to track all of your testing data in a well-organized spreadsheet and to upload that data to LEED Online, along with a detailed narrative describing your testing methodology.

    If pre-1993 plumbing fixtures are still in place (i.e. the water closets), but their flush valves have been replaced post-1993, does that count as 'plumbing renovation' or fixture replacement for the purposes of the prerequisite/credit?

    It is reasonable to count those fixtures as "plumbing renovation," so you could still list those fixtures as pre-1993. Per p. 85 of the Reference Guide, a flushometer change out is considered a minor retrofit, and doesn't trigger the more stringent baseline.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Before the Performance Period

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  • All Options


  • The following indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings are covered in all credit options: water closets, urinals, showerheads, and lavatory faucets.


  • Develop and implement a policy requiring an economic assessment of a conversion to high-performance plumbing fixtures and fittings as part of any future indoor plumbing renovation.


  • The assessment must account for potential cost savings on water supply, disposal, and expected maintenance. The economic assessment should, at minimum, determine the simple payback of any new fixture investment. Carefully consider the payback period required to justify your purchasing decision.


  • In-house staff may develop this policy and the ensuing economic assessment at minimal cost.


  • Option 1: LEED-Certified Building


  • Provide a copy of the official LEED scorecard confirming that the project building previously earned at least one point in water use reduction credits under another LEED rating system.


  • This compliance path carries no added costs.


  • Option 2: Building Constructed in 1993 or Later


  • Verify that the project building was initially built after January 1, 1993 and that the installed fixtures all meet the prevailing plumbing fixture efficiency standards in place at that time.


  • This compliance path carries no added cost.


  • Option 3: Plumbing Fixtures Replaced Since 1993


  • Verify that all relevant fixtures have been replaced since January 1, 1993 and that the installed fixtures all meet the prevailing plumbing fixture efficiency standards in place at the time they were installed.


  • Provide documentation that authenticates the date and scope of the fixture upgrade.


  • Formal authentication of the fixture upgrade can be met using copies of construction permits, substantial completion notices, contract excerpts, plumbing inspection reports, commissioning reports, or similar documentation.


  • If indoor plumbing systems were substantially completed at different times for different parts of the building, use Option 4 (see below) to complete performance calculations using a weighted average water-use baseline.


  • This compliance path carries minimal costs for documentation.


  • Option 4: Plumbing Fixtures Installed Before 1993


  • Inventory all plumbing fixtures to record manufacturer, model number, flush or flow rate and date of installation in project building.


  • Complete performance and baseline calculations in the LEED Online credit form using fixture data and occupancy and usage information. For plumbing systems substantially completed before 1993, the baseline is set at 160% of the IPC/UPC-compliant figure; however, for systems substantially completed in 1993 or later, the baseline is set at 120% of the water usage with code-compliant fixtures. If you have a pre-1993 building and have simply replaced bathroom fixtures without performing a more complete renovation of the bathroom structure and plumbing system, you’re allowed to use the 160% baseline for all of your fixtures.


  • If your building supports visitors or retail customers, you will need to calculate the average number of each of these occupant types that use your facilities on a daily basis.


  • The key to successful documentation of this credit is proper setup of your building fixture groups in the LEED Online credit form. This part of the form can be confusing and is often misinterpreted.  Carefully review the instructions on creating these fixture groups and make sure that the credit form is displaying the correct values for occupancy and number of fixtures in your building when you are finished. For additional guidance on setting up these fixture usage groups, please reference guidelines published by USGBC (see Resources).


  • If performance calculations indicate that water use exceeds the baseline case, find opportunities for water-use reduction through replacement of fixtures and fittings with high-efficiency options.


  • If retrofitting is required, begin with low-cost fixtures and fittings, such as 0.5 gpm faucet aerators, high performance or dual-flush flushometers, and low-flow showerheads.


  • When replacing flushometers, make sure that the existing water closet or urinal bowl is capable of providing the flush rate specified on the new hardware. This information should be available on product data sheets or by request from the manufacturer.


  • If you have a pre-1993 building, and are planning on performing a major bathroom renovation as part of the overall LEED project, be sure to register the project with the USGBC before starting any retrofitting, in order to claim the less stringent 160% baseline case.


  • Replacement of traditional fixtures with high-performance alternatives may require higher upfront costs. However, these fixtures will conserve water as well as energy (from hot water), and will generally offer a favorable payback.


  • Provide manufacturer data verifying the flush/flow rate of all installed fixtures and fittings that either exceed or do not meet UPC/IPC specifications.


  • In buildings with older or diverse fixtures, it may be difficult to find product documentation of flow and flush rates. Identify fixtures by brand and model information, and contact manufacturers for assistance.

During the Performance Period

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  • A good preventive maintenance program will not only identify leaks and obvious problems, but will also include a regular flow and flush rate test for at least 20% of fixtures to ensure continued performance.


  • If in-house staff perform preventative maintenance, costs will be minimal.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    WE Credit 2: Additional indoor plumbing fixture and fitting efficiency

    1–5 Points

    Intent

    To maximize indoor plumbing fixture and fitting efficiency within buildings to reduce the use of potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. and consequent burden on municipal water supply and wastewater systems.

    Requirements

    During the performance period, have in place strategies and systems that in aggregate produce a reduction in indoor plumbing fixture and fitting potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. use from the calculated baseline established in WE Prerequisite 1: Minimum Indoor Plumbing Fixture and Fitting Efficiency.

    The minimum water reduction percentage for each point threshold is as follows:

    Percentage Reduction Points
    10% 1
    15% 2
    20% 3
    25% 4
    30% 5



    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Reduce indoor plumbing fixture and fitting water usage through automatic controls and other actions. Specify water-conserving indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings that exceed the Uniform Plumbing Codes 2006 or International Plumbing Codes 2006 fixture and fitting requirements, in combination with ultrahigh-efficiency or dry fixture and fitting and control technologies.

Web Tools

U.S. DOE, Federal Energy Management Program

This site provides good information on basic water efficiency challenges, best practices and federal, state, and local resources.


EPA WaterSense

WaterSense, a partnership program sponsored by EPA, certifies products that meet its water conservation thresholds.


How to Conserve Water and Use it Effectively

Includes information on practices for conserving water and using water efficiently for residential users, system operators, agricultural users, and for industrial/commercial users. Both engineering and behavioral practices are described.


Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI)

This portion of RMI’s website is devoted to water conservation and efficiency. The site contains information on commercial, industrial and institutional water use, watershed management and articles on policy and implementation.


Terry Love’s Consumer Toilet Reports

This Web site offers a plumber’s perspective on many of the major low flow water efficient toilets used in commercial and residential applications.


Water Closet Performance Testing

This site provides two reports on independent test results for flush performance and reliability for a variety of different toilets.


WATERGY version 3.0

WATERGY is a spreadsheet model that uses water/energy relationship assumptions to analyze the potential of water savings and associated energy savings.


Alliance for Water Efficiency

The Alliance for Water Efficiency provides information and assistance on water conservation efforts.

Publications

Water: Doing More with Less

This article from Environmental Building News discusses building water efficiency.

Technical Guides

Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) 2006, Section 402.0: Water-Conserving Fixtures and Fittings

The Uniform Plumbing Code defines water-conserving fixtures and fittings for water closets, urinals and metered faucets. This ANSI-accredited code safeguards life, health, property and public welfare by regulating and controlling the design, construction, installation, quality of materials, location, operation and maintenance or use of plumbing systems.


International Plumbing Code (IPC) 2006, Section 604: Design of Building Water Distribution System

The International Plumbing Code defines maximum flow rates and consumption for plumbing fixtures and fittings, including private lavatories, public lavatories (metering and those other than metering), showerheads, sink faucets, urinals and water closets.


LEED 2009 Water Use Reduction: Additional Guidance

This document from USGBC offers guidelines to help you properly set up fixture usage groups in the LEED Online credit form, avoiding common mistakes associated with the water-efficiency prerequisite and credit.

LEED Gold Project Documentation

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of WEc2 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

Sample LEED Online Form

This LEED Online form with annotation demonstrates how to document WEp1 and WEc2.

LEED Online Forms: EBOM-2009 WE

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

54 Comments

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Kimberly Hosken LEED Fellow subcontractor
Apr 18 2016
LEEDuser Member
178 Thumbs Up

preventive maintenance program

Project Location: United States

I am certifying a project following the "streamlined path" as the building was certified LEED Gold NC 2.2. In the graphic shown here on LEEDuser you indicate a need for a preventive maintenance program to be implemented during the performance period to ensure ongoing performance of the fixtures. The "form" in LEED Online says there are No Performance requirements for the credit. Am I missing something? Is there a place to upload a maintenance plan?

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Tom Kennedy Enhanse
Feb 12 2015
LEEDuser Member
294 Thumbs Up

Changing out fixture trim after the performance period

We're in the middle of our response to the reviewer's comments on our initial submission (so our performance periods ended a few months ago).
Let's say we decide now that we should change out some shower heads and faucets in old fixtures, and do that. Further, let's say that when we enter those new flow values in the form on line, and it shows we reduce by a % that gets us the more points. If we describe this in a narrative, then re-submit, will GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). give us the extra points now eventhough we didn't have the new fixture trim until after the Performance Period? The lead in paragraph for WEc2 says "during the performance period", however, one could argue that the intent of a performance period is to know it works, and, perhaps, document it works. With new trim for lavatories and showers, there's nothing to prove, once it's in the flow will be what it is designed by the manufacturer to be, not otherwise (reduction is assured).
Thank you

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Apr 20 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5739 Thumbs Up

Hi Tom, I think this sounds fine. I'd be surprised if the reviewer didn't award you at the percent reduction you can demonstrate now (with calculations and manufacturer cut sheets), as long as you've sufficiently addressed the other prelim review comments.

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Chris Miller Chief Mechanical Engineer Design Alaska
Jun 20 2012
LEEDuser Member
1400 Thumbs Up

change in occupancy during performance period

How would you recommend handling changes to the number of FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
's during the performance period? Should I use a similar approach to what Portfolio Manager does with occupancy changes? In other words, adjust the baseline for the affected time period?

Does anyone have any experience doing this? How is this documented in LEED Online?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Jun 29 2012 LEEDuser Expert 10502 Thumbs Up

Changes in FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
only matter if they substantially change the distribution of occupants amongst fixtures of differing flow rates. So if your fixtures are constant throughout the building, changes in FTE really shouldnt affect your performance relative to the baseline.

But if the fixtures do differ, frankly I would just use the occupancy in effect at the beginning or end of the performance period. I don't think the Reference Guide specifies and I don't think it matters enormously. I would lean towards whatever occupancy setup you intend to submit for EAp2 and the PI forms.

Dan

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GreenShape Expert Employee Consulting Firm
Jun 19 2012
LEEDuser Member
1042 Thumbs Up

Water meters to show compliance?

In the earlier versions of this ratings system, you could show metered water usage, to prove reduction over the baseline. Is this no longer true? It seems like they only want the design case (aka the specs of the fixtures involved).

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Jun 19 2012 LEEDuser Member 8405 Thumbs Up

The current methodology compares a design baseline case (based on UPCUniform Plumbing Code/IPCInternational Plumbing Code 2006 flush and flow rates) to the actual flush and flow rates of the fixtures installed in the project building. There is no option for using metered data to verify compliance for either WEp1 or WEc2. However, if you are submeteringSubmetering is used to determine the proportion of energy use within a building attributable to specific end uses or subsystems (e.g., the heating subsystem of an HVAC system). the indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings, this would qualify you to attempt WEc1.2 for sub-metering.

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GreenShape Expert Employee, Consulting Firm Jun 19 2012 LEEDuser Member 1042 Thumbs Up

Thanks Jason. I'm working with a project that has currently installed non low flow fixtures but has "turned them down" to lower the actual flow rate. How could we capture that in the LEED calculations?

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Jun 19 2012 LEEDuser Member 8405 Thumbs Up

By "turned them down", do you mean that they retrofitted the fixtures with a different flow restrictor or is it something that is less tangible? The easiest way to document the installed case is to have cutsheets for installed fixtures, fittings, aerators, flow restrictors, etc. However, if there is some other process that this project is using to reduce the water flow in a different way, the alternate methodology to document installed water use is to actually measure the amount of water that comes out in a flush or comes out of the faucet in a certain amount of time. Basically, you disconnect the flushometerA device that utilizes pressure from the water supply system, rather than the force of gravity, to discharge water into the bowl of a toilet or urinal. It is designed to use less water than conventional flush toilets. from the water closet or urinal, stick a bucket under the open pipe, flush the fixture and see how much water comes out. For faucets/showers, you time the flow for 15 seconds and measure the result. To get a good sample, you should measure at least 20% of each fixture type in the building and test each fixture three times to calculate an average amount of water consumed. Be sure to start your measurements with ground floor fixtures to account for variations in water pressure as you move to the upper floors of a building. If you summarize all your results in a spreadsheet and include a written description of your testing methodolgy, you can use the measured flush/flow rates in your WEp1 calculations in lieu of the standard rates that would normally be verified through manufacturer cut sheets.

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Jun 19 2012 LEEDuser Expert 10502 Thumbs Up

I noted the phrase 'turned them down' myself and wondered if it might mean reducing the water pressure in the building? I have heard that strategy suggested in the past but my understanding is that it would not pass muster with GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).. Would be interested if other folks have experimented with that strategy and had different feedback.

Dan

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Jul 18 2012 Guest 2949 Thumbs Up

Thanks for that note Jason, we are working on a hospital project that will likely require a similar test like you outlined. I will share the results!

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
May 28 2012
LEEDuser Member
3526 Thumbs Up

secondary use of well water

Our project will use well water for HVAC/ ooling tower first then reuse it for flush of water closet. We assume it can be regarded as gray water even if it is derived from well first. Is our understanding correct?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 03 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Noriko, yes, the water being reused after it's been through the cooling tower is graywaterUntreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washers and laundry tubs. It must not include waste water from kitchen sinks or dishwashers (Uniform Plumbing Code, Appendix G, Gray Water Systems for Single-Family Dwellings); waste water discharged from lavatories, bathtubs, showers, clothes washers and laundry sinks (International Plumbing Code, Appendix C, Gray Water Recycling Systems). Some states and local authorities allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Other differences can likely be found in state and local codes. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area..

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Patrick Culhane Sustainability Officer Canderel
Jan 12 2012
Guest
297 Thumbs Up

Custodial Sinks and Faucets

I'd like to clarify whether this credit only applies to those domestic fixtures used by tenants or if faucets used by custodial staff also need to be included?

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Jan 13 2012 LEEDuser Member 8405 Thumbs Up

It's misleading that the janitorial sinks are included in the Fixture drop-down list on the LEED Credit Form. The "unofficial" guidance is that janitorial sinks may be excluded from calculations. The reason is that when you're using a slop sink, you're not necessarily concerned with a flow rate because it's not being run for a certain period of time repeatedly throughout the day, it's being used for a specific purpose like filling up a mop bucket. USGBC gives you the option to include those sinks, but you would have to use some creative accounting to figure out the appropriate way to include the usage in the calculations. Bottom line, I've worked on plenty of v2009 projects that excluded janitorial sinks and never had any problems.

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Jul 18 2012 Guest 2949 Thumbs Up

Jason, would that be true for commercial kitchen sinks for food preparation as well? I know that LEEDuser as some guidance above on kitchen sinks but wondering if they can be omitted?

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Prudence Ferreira Principal Integral Impact
May 31 2011
Guest
1081 Thumbs Up

Dual Flush Converters

Would the USGBC accept a dual flush converter as compliant vs installing new toilets?

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Sep 13 2011 LEEDuser Member 8405 Thumbs Up

Yes, you can replace/retrofit your existing hardware with a dual-flushA type of water-saving toilet that gives a choice of flushes depending on the type of waste — solid or liquid. flushometerA device that utilizes pressure from the water supply system, rather than the force of gravity, to discharge water into the bowl of a toilet or urinal. It is designed to use less water than conventional flush toilets.. There are two things to keep in mind:
1) Since you are replacing the flushometer for the purposes of your LEED project, and since the retrofit is not considered a major plumbing renovation (i.e. no pipes or tile replaced), you are still allowed to count these retrofitted fixture as pre-1993 fixtures in your calculations.
2) Make sure to do a little research to ensure that your existing toilet bowls will still be able to flush properly with a reduced volume of water. Some older toilets that are designed to use 3.5 gpf will not function properly when only 1.6 gpf or lower is used.

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Maria Unruh Electrical Engineer Antella Consulting Engineers
Apr 01 2011
Guest
671 Thumbs Up

How to account for telecommuters

This might not be the most appropriate credit category to ask this question but it does affect the calculations for this credit. Our project has 21 full time telecommuters. To account for this I put 21 part time employees that worked 0 hours a week in Plf3. This gave the appropriate FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
number, however the LEED reviewers did not like this solution. I didn't explain in the original submission that I was accounting for the telecommuters with my "0" and that may have been the problem.

It created a problem with this credit since now the FTE is considered wrong. Any ideas on how to go about calculating FTE to include telecommuters?

Thanks.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 01 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Ben, perhaps this question has an obvious answer that I am not thinking of (SSc4?), but why do you feel you need to include telecommuters in the occupant figures for the building? Are they ever there? If they only show up occasionally, would they be better represented as transients/guests?

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David Hubka Director of Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Apr 03 2011 LEEDuser Expert 5309 Thumbs Up

I agree with Tristan.
Telecommuters who don't go to the building should not be classified as part time employees.

Determine how many weekly hours each individual will plan to be in the building. A person in the building 10 hours per week counts as .25 FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
(10 hours / 40 hours). Add everyone up. If you don't get to a total of 1 FTE you are not allowed to achieve optional IEQ credits - per the LEED MPR Supplemental guidance.

Hope this helps.

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Maria Unruh Electrical Engineer, Antella Consulting Engineers Apr 05 2011 Guest 671 Thumbs Up

Ah, yes that is a rather painfully obvious answer. Thanks for the help!

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Avkash Patel
Dec 15 2010
Guest
581 Thumbs Up

LEED NC TO LEED OM

My building initially received one LEED point for Water Use reduction of 20% under LEED NC V2 however, after looking at the original documentation it shows that the actual reduction was 25.2% from the baseline case. My question is, in order to receive 4 points for this credit instead of 3 how should I file for this credit in LEED Online? I am not aloud to upload supporting documents and my scorecard says 20% reduction.

Thanks again,

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 11 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Avkash, the requirements and documentation for LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. are different from LEED-NC. You need to follow the EBOM requirements and see how it goes!

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Avkash Patel Jan 11 2011 Guest 581 Thumbs Up

Tristan, Thanks for the words; I figured this credit out a few weeks ago and I appreciate all of
your help. In order to achieve this credit, we collected all of the original cut sheets and compared them to each bathroom to see whether or not any upgrades were done. We then had a 3rd party come in to formally authenticate the reduction and create a narrative for LEEDonline. I am hopeful that this is
enough to be compliant for this credit.

Thank you again for all of your help.

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J Douglas Dietrich
Dec 06 2010
LEEDuser Member
470 Thumbs Up

Issues with LEED Online and WE p 1 and WE c 2 and PI form 3

The FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
numbers I enter in PI form 3 are not being reflected in the WE forms. Anyone else having this issue?
Also, on WE p 1 how can it be that the form is calculating the percent water use reduction in all figures to be higher than either of the figures for percent reduction of water use in flush fixtures and percent reduction of water use in flow fixtures?
Finally, should I expect any of the the percent water use reduction figures to change if the FTE numbers and/or gender percents change? Right now in LEED Online, the percents don't seem to change at all when I do change the FTE number and gender percents.
Your help is much appreciated. Thank you!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 07 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

With any LEED Online glitch like this I would always first check to make sure that you're not using a BETA form? (Marked on the bottom.) If so, ask GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). to update it via the "feedback" link.

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Yong Lee Low ESD Consultancy ZEB-Technology Pte Ltd
Jul 27 2010
LEEDuser Member
2488 Thumbs Up

100% WATER CONSUMPTION FROM TREATED HARVESTED RAIN WATER

The project I am working on is using 100% of its water demand by collecting rain water in a man made lake in its boundary and then treating it in a water treatment facility,also in its site.Does it contribute in saying that "100% potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. demand is replaced with treated water collected by rain water harvesting" and claim points for it??

Please advice.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 27 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, I don't see any reason this can't work. Is there any concern that you have about this strategy?

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Yong Lee Low ESD Consultancy, ZEB-Technology Pte Ltd Jul 29 2010 LEEDuser Member 2488 Thumbs Up

My concern is that though the water source is 'harvested rain water' which is 100% non-potable .However,when it has to be used 20% of it is still used in the same form for irrigation etc. but 80% of it is treated to be potable and then it is used.The credit requirement says that 'to maximize indoor plumbing fixture and fitting efficiency within buildings' .The reduction is not due to efficient fittings but 'rain water harvesting 'strategy.Can I claim exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. for this credit?Sorry about so may confusing questions.But I am really not sure how to approach it.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 05 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

The credit is focused on efficiency, but harvested rainwater is an allowable way of earning the credit. You should be able to earn an EP point if you meet the threshold.

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Anshul Chawla Green Building Analyst, Environmental Design Solutions Sep 17 2010 Guest 198 Thumbs Up

The concerned project building is a five star hotel. Table3 in WE p1 mentions the default fixture usage for FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE.

Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix.

All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.
and residents separately. In which category, shall we include hotel guests?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 29 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

I would put hotel guests in a resident category, but you'd want to make sure this is appropriate for the type of use you see in the hotel.

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Ashu Gupta Project Engineer
Jun 10 2010
Guest
800 Thumbs Up

Grey Water for Flushing

Can we claim the savings by using Grey water for flushing in this credit?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 10 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, according to page 83 of the LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. Reference Guide, graywaterUntreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washers and laundry tubs. It must not include waste water from kitchen sinks or dishwashers (Uniform Plumbing Code, Appendix G, Gray Water Systems for Single-Family Dwellings); waste water discharged from lavatories, bathtubs, showers, clothes washers and laundry sinks (International Plumbing Code, Appendix C, Gray Water Recycling Systems). Some states and local authorities allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Other differences can likely be found in state and local codes. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area. is an implementation option for this credit.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Jun 11 2010 LEEDuser Member 10961 Thumbs Up

Yes, but until the last time I checked, the submittal form on LEEDonline did not accommidate this, so you can expect to submit additional information to support your claim.

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Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal , ecocentric cc Aug 03 2010 LEEDuser Member 2054 Thumbs Up

we are looking at exactly the same issue and to account for this in the LEED online form, we are assigning a 0 value to the flush rate for the toilets and urinals, which use only graywaterUntreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washers and laundry tubs. It must not include waste water from kitchen sinks or dishwashers (Uniform Plumbing Code, Appendix G, Gray Water Systems for Single-Family Dwellings); waste water discharged from lavatories, bathtubs, showers, clothes washers and laundry sinks (International Plumbing Code, Appendix C, Gray Water Recycling Systems). Some states and local authorities allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Other differences can likely be found in state and local codes. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area.. I read somewhere that this is an acceptable way of approaching this, provided this claim is supplemented with additional information, which confirm this. Am I correct?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 03 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

In LEED-NC, you have to submit greywater or rainwater reuse as an alternative compliance path—the calculator won't accommodate them. I would guess that this is the same in EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems., and that jerry-rigging the calculator to make it do what you want will not be acceptable. But I am just guessing. Might be worth a note to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). via the "feedback" form.

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Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal , ecocentric cc Aug 04 2010 LEEDuser Member 2054 Thumbs Up

thank you, Tristan. Have sent a message to LEED online and will provide feedback to LEEDUser, once clarified.

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Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal , ecocentric cc Aug 11 2010 LEEDuser Member 2054 Thumbs Up

further to the discussion on accounting for graywaterUntreated household waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste. Graywater includes used water from bathtubs, showers, bathroom wash basins, and water from clothes-washers and laundry tubs. It must not include waste water from kitchen sinks or dishwashers (Uniform Plumbing Code, Appendix G, Gray Water Systems for Single-Family Dwellings); waste water discharged from lavatories, bathtubs, showers, clothes washers and laundry sinks (International Plumbing Code, Appendix C, Gray Water Recycling Systems). Some states and local authorities allow kitchen sink wastewater to be included in graywater. Other differences can likely be found in state and local codes. Project teams should comply with the graywater definition established by the authority having jurisdiction in the project area. in WEP1 and WE2 I sent a query to LEED online. For the benefit of others, i have included below our query and the response from LEED online, which clarifies the matter:

Inquiry: around 50% of the total flush fixtures installed in the building use only non-potable reclaimed cooling tower water. Can we account for this by assigning a 0 value in the column "installed flush rate" or do we have to use an alternative compliance path?

Response: The current WE Prerequisite 1 form does not take into account the use of nonpotable waterNonpotable water: does not meet EPA's drinking water quality standards and is not approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction. Water that is unsafe or unpalatable to drink because it contains pollutants, contaminants, minerals, or infective agents.. To account for nonpotable water use, in addition to completing the tables with the occupancy, fixture, and fitting data, please use the Alternative Compliance path section of the forms (WEp1 and WEc3 if applicable) to provide additional documentation/calculations to support the additional savings claimed from non-potable water use (including but not limited to system capacity to show that the nonpotable water is sufficient to meet demand and the final water use savings percentage). By using the Alternative Compliance path section, the points documented indicated on the form will update according to the number of attempted points.

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Rachael McClain
May 06 2010
Guest
1515 Thumbs Up

WEc2 Form

I'm having problems with the WEc2 form, I can't enter any numbers in to the form where it has zeros. Do you have to complete the WEp1 form before that form becomes active?

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional May 06 2010 LEEDuser Member 8405 Thumbs Up

Yep, that's exactly right. The USGBC will not accept any sort of custom calculations for WEp1 so they really want to ensure that everyone uses the calculators they provide in the credit form to show that the prerequisite is met before attempting WEc2.

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Paul C Sep 20 2010 Guest 2705 Thumbs Up

My building was completed after 1993 which in WEp1 I selected option 2, then when I go to WEc2, I cannot adjust the numbers that are set at zero, does this mean I would have to adjust WEp1 to use option 4 to then use WEc2?

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Rachael McClain
Mar 10 2010
Guest
1515 Thumbs Up

building complete 1993 or later

I am confused by the table above with the tab that says building completed 1993 or later its says the baseline is 160%, the table also has a tab that says fixtures installed after 1993 or later, and the baseline for that is 120%. If the building was completed after 93' then the fixtures would of had to be installed after 93' as well. So why are these percentages different? Could someone please explain because the above explanation does not answer my question.

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Mar 11 2010 LEEDuser Member 8405 Thumbs Up

Rachel, the diagram has been revised recently, so please take a look and see if it makes more sense now. The previous diagram did not accurately explain the distinction between the different baselines. You only need to think about this issue with the baseline if you're using the Option 4 compliance path and doing performance calculations and even then, the LEED credit form does all the work for you.

Buildings that were built before the Energy Policy Act of 1992 had different building codes to follow. It's assumed that they have fixtures that use more water, so LEED uses the higher baseline (160%) when performing calculations to allow them more breathing room. So, if your building is pre-1993, the higher baseline is used and if it is post-1993, the lower baseline is used. Another common scenario is a pre-1993 building that has some of the original fixtures and others that have been retrofitted in the last 15 years; in this case, the baseline is pro-rated to be somewhere between 160% and 120%, based on the relevant number of fixtures and when they were installed.

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April Ambrose Territory Manager Viridian
Jan 22 2010
LEEDuser Member
3209 Thumbs Up

"Building Completed 1993 or Later" Tab on Graph

The graph includes a tab for buildings completed in 1993 or later. For such buildings isn't the baseline 120%, as the plumbing system for such buildings was "substantially completed in 1993 or later?" (cited language is from p. 81 of LEED reference guide).

Shouldn't the tab say "Building Completed Before 1993" or something akin to that language?

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Jan 29 2010 LEEDuser Member 8405 Thumbs Up

The language for this credit is notoriously confusing, so thank you for helping us to fine-tune our explanation! There are several options to document compliance with this credit depending on the age of the project building and/or plumbing system.

If your building was completed after 1/1/1993, it is assumed that it meets all relevant UPCUniform Plumbing Code/IPCInternational Plumbing Code codes and you can earn one point without performing additional calculations.

The same situation applies if all relevant building fixtures/fittings were replaced after 1/1/1993.

If your building was completed before 1993, you need to use Option 4 to analyze all of your building fixtures and use the data to calculate the potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. consumption and compare it to the LEED baseline.

As you've pointed out, the baseline is calculated at 160% of UPC/IPC codes for pre-1993 fixtures and 120% for post-1993 fixtures; if your building has fixtures from before and after 1993, a weighted average is used to determine the LEED baseline.

So, the credit option is designed to help you account for older and newer fixtures and develop a comprehensive picture of potable water consumption, regardless of whether your building was completed prior to 1993.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Mar 11 2010 LEEDuser Member 10961 Thumbs Up

...mmm...different countries have different codes also at different times. just food for thought.

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Paul C Sep 20 2010 Guest 2705 Thumbs Up

Our project building was built in 2000, therefore if I can provide an inventory of all fixtures meeting or exceeding the UPCUniform Plumbing Code/IPCInternational Plumbing Code standards I achieve the WEp1. Above Jason stated in 2nd paragraph you can earn one point w/o performing additional calculations, does he mean you can earn the pre-req, not one point?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Sep 29 2010 LEEDuser Expert 10502 Thumbs Up

Prerequisite and one point as I understand it Paul. If your fixtures are UPCUniform Plumbing Code/IPCInternational Plumbing Code compliant, you will be able to document a reduction of greater than 10% of the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. baseline (which is UPC/IPC + 20%).

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Leah Neam Project Engineer, Hathaway Dinwiddie Construction Co. Feb 08 2011 LEEDuser Member 68 Thumbs Up

Are there any more recent understandings regarding this topic? We are experiencing the same questions as addressed above. In the WEp1 form we found the following note:

"Note: To earn WE Credit 2, complete either the LEED Design & Construction Streamlined Path option OR the Performance Calculation option. The other streamlined paths are not applicable to WE Credit 2."

Based on this note, it is our understanding that projects using options 2 and 3 are not eligible to earn points in WEc2. Is this your interpretation?

If so, the language within the checklists tab of WEp1 stating "Project buildings built in 1993 or later will automatically earn additional points under WEc2...." is misleading. Your input or feedback is appreciated!

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Mar 14 2011 LEEDuser Member 8405 Thumbs Up

Leah, the language is a bit confusing, but what we tried to express was that buildings that are built to current code will have water consumption performance levels that are good enough to earn at least one point under Option 4 without any type of retrofits required. If your building meets all current UPCUniform Plumbing Code/IPCInternational Plumbing Code standards, you technically qualify to use either Option 2, Option 3 or Option 4. However, if you pick one of the streamlined paths (Option 2 or Option 3), you give up the opportunity to try to earn additional points under WEc2.

So, in theory, a project building built in 2005 could demonstrate a reduction in potable waterWater that meets or exceeds U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality standards (or a local equivalent outside the U.S.) and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. consumption of 45% below the LEED baseline, but if the project team didn't feel like doing all the legwork to conduct the fixture inventory and perform the calculations, they could just use Option 2 to show that they meet the prerequisite. In doing so, they would leave a lot of points on the table, but even though it's a good idea, there's no requirement to show exactly how well your building is performing for WEp1 if you meet the criteria to use Option 2 or Option 3.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Dec 22 2009
LEEDuser Moderator

Process water for EP point

In the Reference Guide (page 84) under WEp1, it says that process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. appliances like dishwashers and washing machines don't count under WEp1, but may be counted under WEc2 -- but only in considering Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements.. And interestingly, this is not mentioned in the Reference Guide under WEc2.

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Dec 23 2009 LEEDuser Expert 10502 Thumbs Up

My understanding of that notation in the Reference Guide is that it allows for the consideration of exceptionally low-volume appliances in the context of an Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. credit.

However, it should not be read to *require* the inclusion of those appliances or similar in the calculations for WEp1, WEc2, or an Exemplary Performance credit. A building can certainly earn any of the above without addressing such appliances; the standard suite of fixtures are what dictate performance.

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