EBOM-2009 WEp1: Minimum Indoor Plumbing Fixture and Fitting Efficiency

  • EBOM WEp1 Action Steps Diagram
  • Start by assessing efficiency

    To meet this prerequisite, you will need to assess the efficiency of your basic indoor plumbing fixtures, such as faucets, water closets, urinals, and showerheads, and determine how much potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. is consumed relative to a LEED baseline case. If your current bathroom, kitchen and janitorial closet fixtures are already highly efficient, you will probably meet the prerequisite. If your installed fixtures are older and exceed the baseline, you’ll need to modify them.

    Baseline depends on when fixtures were installed

    The baseline for the prerequisite is established by calculating how much water the project building fixtures would use, based on actual occupancy figures and usage patterns, if it were fully compliant with IPCInternational Plumbing Code/UPCUniform Plumbing Code 2006 plumbing codes displayed in Table 1. This baseline also takes into consideration the installation date of the relevant fixtures. For plumbing systems substantially completed before 1994, the baseline is set at 160% of the IPC/UPC-compliant figure; however, for systems substantially completed in 1994 or later, the baseline is set at 120% of the water usage with code-compliant fixtures. Buildings with a mixture of fixture installation dates will use a weighted average to determine the final baseline.

    Inventory installed fixtures

    To determine compliance, you will need to inventory all installed fixtures, and document their flow and flush rates and date of installation. It is very important to determine the correct baseline setting, so carefully consider whether you have completed any major renovations to your bathrooms and associated plumbing systems in 1994 or later. If you have a pre-1994 building and have simply replaced bathroom fixtures without performing a more complete renovation of the bathroom structure and plumbing system, you’re allowed to use the 160% baseline for all of your fixtures.

    Installing flow or flush restrictors, such as faucet aerators or dual-flushA type of water-saving toilet that gives a choice of flushes depending on the type of waste — solid or liquid. flushometers, will carry relatively low costs. Expect significantly higher costs if you must replace the existing toilets to accommodate more efficient flushometers. Depending on water and sewer rates, plumbing retrofits like these can pay off relatively fast, however.

    Pay careful attention to the credit form

    The key to successful documentation of this credit is proper setup of your building fixture groups in the LEED Online credit form. This part of the form can be confusing and is often misinterpreted. Carefully review the instructions on creating these fixture groups and make sure that the credit form is displaying the correct values for occupancy and number of fixtures in your building when you are finished. USGBC has provided a guide that helps clarify many common issues—be sure to review this (see Resources).

    If you have a pre-1994 building, and are planning on performing a major bathroom renovation as part of the overall LEED project, be sure to register the project through LEED Online before starting any retrofitting in order to claim the less stringent 160% baseline.

     UPC and IPC Standards for Plumbing Fixture Water Usage

    Gather this information

    • How many different types of each fixture are installed in the building? Are fixture specs or product data sheets available for the installed fixtures?
    • What is the date of substantial completion for plumbing? Was the project initially built before 1994? If so, have there been renovations since 1994 that affected plumbing fixtures?
    • What opportunities exist for low-cost upgrades?
    • What upgrades will have the greatest effect on reducing water consumption?
    • Are there any high-intensity water uses, for example, a fitness center with showers?
    • Are rebates or incentives available to offset upgrade costs?

    FAQs for LEED-EBOM WEp1/WEc2

    If manufacturer documentation is unavailable and the flow/fixture rate is unknown, how would one go about confirming the flow/flush rates of those fixtures?

    You can try to find the manufacturer and model stamped on the fixture itself. Sometimes the fixture stamps are hard to find, are not legible, or even are not there. The other option is to physically measure and time water consumption rates for at least a 20% of the fixtures of each fixture type in the project building that differs from UPC/IPC requirements.

    We are not able to locate the flow/flush rates of the plumbing fixtures in the project building, so we have decided to test 20% of the fixtures of each fixture type. How do we go about doing that?

    There is no official protocol for testing fixtures, but it can be done in the following ways. For a lavatory and kitchen sink faucets and showers, simply fill a bucket for 60 seconds. For wall-mounted urinals and water closets, ask the building engineerA qualified engineering professional with relevant and sufficient expertise who oversees and is responsible for the operation and maintenance of mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems in the project building. to assist you in disconnecting the plumbing from the flushometer and measure a flush of water into a bucket. It is recommended that each fixture be tested at least three times, to get a weighted average flow/flush rate. This is quite a process, so consider it a last resort if the fixture documentation can absolutely not be found. Make sure to track all of your testing data in a well-organized spreadsheet and to upload that data to LEED Online, along with a detailed narrative describing your testing methodology.

    If pre-1993 plumbing fixtures are still in place (i.e. the water closets), but their flush valves have been replaced post-1993, does that count as 'plumbing renovation' or fixture replacement for the purposes of the prerequisite/credit?

    It is reasonable to count those fixtures as "plumbing renovation," so you could still list those fixtures as pre-1993. Per p. 85 of the Reference Guide, a flushometer change out is considered a minor retrofit, and doesn't trigger the more stringent baseline.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Schematic Design

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  • This prerequisite only includes core water uses—bathroom lavatories, water closets, urinals, showers, kitchen faucets and pre-rinse sprays. Janitors’ sinks, pot fillers, and tub faucets can be left out as they are used to fill containers with a fixed water volume regardless of the flow rate. "Kitchen sinks" includes all sinks in public or private buildings that are used with patterns and purposes similar to a sink in a residential kitchen. Break room sinks would be included; commercial kitchen sinks are not included. Lavatory faucets refer to hand-washing sinks, regardless of location, but lab or healthcare sinks with regulated flow rates are excluded. Pot-filling sinks can be excluded.

Before the Performance Period

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  • This prerequisite only includes core water uses—bathroom lavatories, water closets, urinals, showers, kitchen faucets and pre-rinse sprays. Janitors’ sinks, pot fillers, and tub faucets can be left out as they are used to fill containers with a fixed water volume regardless of the flow rate. "Kitchen sinks" includes all sinks in public or private buildings that are used with patterns and purposes similar to a sink in a residential kitchen. Break room sinks would be included; commercial kitchen sinks are not included. Lavatory faucets refer to hand-washing sinks, regardless of location, but lab or healthcare sinks with regulated flow rates are excluded. Pot-filling sinks can be excluded.


  • All Options


  • The following indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings are covered in all credit options: water closets, urinals, showerheads, and lavatory faucets.


  • Develop and implement a policy requiring an economic assessment of a conversion to high-performance plumbing fixtures and fittings as part of any future indoor plumbing renovation.


  • The assessment must account for potential cost savings on water supply, disposal, and expected maintenance. The economic assessment should, at minimum, determine the simple payback of any new fixture investment. Carefully consider the payback period required to justify your purchasing decision.


  • In-house staff may develop this policy and the ensuing economic assessment at minimal cost.


  • If your building has high-efficiency fixtures, consider using Option 4 (some or all fixtures installed before 1993) even if your building was completed or plumbing system renovated after 1993. This is an effective way to determine whether you’re eligible to earn additional points under WEc2.


  • Option 1: LEED-Certified Building


  • Provide a copy of the official LEED scorecard confirming that the project building previously earned at least one point in water use reduction credits under another LEED rating system.


  • This compliance path carries no added cost.


  • Option 2: Building Constructed in 1993 or Later


  • Verify that the project building was initially built after January 1, 1993 and that the installed fixtures all meet the prevailing plumbing fixture efficiency standards in place at that time.


  • Project buildings built in 1993 or later will automatically earn additional points under WEc2 based on use of code-compliant fixtures and fittings.


  • This compliance path carries no added costs.


  • Option 3: Plumbing Fixtures Replaced Since 1993


  • Verify that all relevant fixtures have been replaced since January 1, 1993 and that the installed fixtures all meet the prevailing plumbing fixture efficiency standards in place at the time they were installed.


  • Provide documentation that authenticates the date and scope of the fixture upgrade.


  • Formal authentication of the fixture upgrade can be met using copies of construction permits, substantial completion notices, contract excerpts, plumbing inspection reports, commissioning reports, or similar documentation.


  • If indoor plumbing systems were substantially completed at different times for different parts of the building, use Option 4 (see below) to complete performance calculations using a weighted average water-use baseline.


  • This compliance path carries minimal costs for documentation.


  • Option 4: Plumbing Fixtures Installed Before 1993


  • Inventory all plumbing fixtures to record manufacturer, model number, flush or flow rate and date of installation in project building.


  • Complete performance and baseline calculations in the LEED Online credit form using fixture data and occupancy and usage information. For plumbing systems substantially completed before 1993, the baseline is set at 160% of the IPC/UPC-compliant figure; however, for systems substantially completed in 1993 or later, the baseline is set at 120% of the water usage with code-compliant fixtures. If you have a pre-1993 building and have simply replaced bathroom fixtures without performing a more complete renovation of the bathroom structure and plumbing system, you’re allowed to use the 160% baseline for all of your fixtures.


  • If your building supports visitors or retail customers, you will need to calculate the average number of each of these occupant types that use your facilities on a daily basis.


  • The key to successful documentation of this credit is proper setup of your building fixture groups in the LEED Online credit form. This part of the form can be confusing and is often misinterpreted.  Carefully review the instructions on creating these fixture groups and make sure that the credit form is displaying the correct values for occupancy and number of fixtures in your building when you are finished. For additional guidance on setting up these fixture usage groups, please reference guidelines published by USGBC (see Resources).


  • If performance calculations indicate that water use exceeds the baseline case, find opportunities for water-use reduction through replacement of fixtures and fittings with high-efficiency options.


  • If retrofitting is required, begin with low-cost fixtures and fittings, such as 0.5 gpm faucet aerators, high performance or dual-flush flushometers, and low-flow showerheads.


  • When replacing flushometers, make sure that the existing water closet or urinal bowl is capable of providing the flush rate specified on the new hardware. This information should be available on product data sheets or by request from the manufacturer.


  • If you have a pre-1993 building, and are planning on performing a major bathroom renovation as part of the overall LEED project, be sure to register the project with the USGBC before starting any retrofitting, in order to claim the less stringent 160% baseline case.


  • Replacement of traditional fixtures with high-performance alternatives may require higher upfront costs. However, these fixtures will conserve water as well as energy (from hot water), and will generally offer a favorable payback.


  • Provide manufacturer data verifying the flush/flow rate of all installed fixtures and fittings that either exceed or do not meet UPC/IPC specifications.


  • In buildings with older or diverse fixtures, it may be difficult to find product documentation of flow and flush rates. Identify fixtures by brand and model information, and contact manufacturers for assistance.

During the Performance Period

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  • A good preventive maintenance program will not only identify leaks and obvious problems, but will also include a regular flow and flush rate test for at least 20% of fixtures to ensure continued performance.


  • If in-house staff perform preventative maintenance, costs will be minimal.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

    WE Prerequisite 1: Minimum indoor plumbing fixture and fitting efficiency

    Required

    Intent

    To reduce indoor fixture and fitting water use within buildings to reduce the burdens on potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. supply and wastewater systems.

    Requirements

    Reduce potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. use of indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings to a level equal to or below the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance baseline, calculated assuming 100% of the building’s indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings meet the plumbing code requirements as stated in the 2006 editions of the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPCUniform Plumbing Code) or International Plumbing Code (IPCInternational Plumbing Code) pertaining to fixture and fitting performance [Europe ACP: UPC-IPC Equivalent] [India ACP: UPC-IPC Equivalent]. Fixtures and fittings included in the calculations for this credit are water closets, urinals, showerheads, faucets, faucet replacement aerators and metering faucets.

    The LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance water use baseline is set depending on the year of substantial completion of the building’s indoor plumbing system. Substantial completion is defined as either initial building construction or the last plumbing renovation of all or part of the building that included 100% retrofit of all plumbing fixtures and fittings as part of the renovation. Set the baseline as follows:

    • For a plumbing system substantially completed in 1994 or later throughout the building, the baseline is 120% of the water use that would result if all fixtures met the codes cited above.
    • For a plumbing system substantially completed before 1994 throughout the building, the baseline is 160% of the water use that would result if all fixtures met the codes cited above.

    If indoor plumbing systems were substantially completed at different times (because the plumbing renovations occurred at different times in different parts of the building), Set a whole-building average baseline by prorating between the above limits. Prorate based on the proportion of plumbing fixtures installed during the plumbing renovations in each date period, as explained in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Pre-1994 buildings that have had only minor fixture retrofits (e.g., aerators, showerheads, flushing valves) but no plumbing renovations in or after 1994 may use the 160% baseline for the whole building.

    Demonstrate fixture and fitting performance through calculations to compare the water use of the as installed fixtures and fittings with the use of UPC- or IPC-compliant fixtures and fittings, or alternatives for Europe and India as explained in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition [Europe ACP: UPC-IPC Equivalent].

    Develop and implement a policy requiring economic assessment of conversion to high-performance plumbing fixtures and fittings as part of any future indoor plumbing renovation. The assessment must account for potential water supply and disposal cost savings and maintenance cost savings [Europe ACP: UPC-IPC Equivalent].

    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    Europe ACP: UPC-IPC Equivalent

    Projects in Europe may use the values defined by European Standards.

    India ACP: UPC-IPC Equivalent

    Projects in India may use values defined by the 2011 UPC - India and the 2013 Green Plumbing Code Supplement – India.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Reduce indoor plumbing fixture and fitting potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. usage through automatic water control systems. Install, where possible, water-conserving indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings that meet or exceed the UPCUniform Plumbing Code 2006 or IPCInternational Plumbing Code 2006 fixture and fitting requirements in combination with high-efficiency or dry fixture and control technologies.

Technical Guides

Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) 2006, Section 402.0: Water-Conserving Fixtures and Fittings

The Uniform Plumbing Code defines water-conserving fixtures and fittings for water closets, urinals and metered faucets. This ANSI-accredited code safeguards life, health, property and public welfare by regulating and controlling the design, construction, installation, quality of materials, location, operation and maintenance or use of plumbing systems.


International Plumbing Code (IPC) 2006, Section 604: Design of Building Water Distribution System

The International Plumbing Code defines maximum flow rates and consumption for plumbing fixtures and fittings, including private lavatories, public lavatories (metering and those other than metering), showerheads, sink faucets, urinals and water closets.


LEED 2009 Water Use Reduction: Additional Guidance

This document from USGBC offers guidelines to help you properly set up fixture usage groups in the LEED Online credit form, avoiding common mistakes associated with the water-efficiency prerequisite and credit.

Web Tools

EPA WaterSense

WaterSense, a partnership program sponsored by EPA, certifies products that meet its water conservation thresholds.


How to Conserve Water and Use it Effectively

Includes information on practices for conserving water and using water efficiently for residential users, system operators, agricultural users, and for industrial/commercial users. Both engineering and behavioral practices are described.


Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI)

This portion of RMI’s website is devoted to water conservation and efficiency. The site contains information on commercial, industrial and institutional water use, watershed management and articles on policy and implementation.


Terry Love’s Consumer Toilet Reports

This Web site offers a plumber’s perspective on many of the major low flow water efficient toilets used in commercial and residential applications.


Water Closet Performance Testing

This site provides two reports on independent test results for flush performance and reliability for a variety of different toilets.


U.S. DOE, Federal Energy Management Program

This site provides good information on basic water efficiency challenges, best practices and federal, state, and local resources.


WATERGY version 3.0

WATERGY is a spreadsheet model that uses water/energy relationship assumptions to analyze the potential of water savings and associated energy savings.


Alliance for Water Efficiency

The Alliance for Water Efficiency provides information and assistance on water conservation efforts.

Publications

Water: Doing More with Less

This article from Environmental Building News discusses building water efficiency.

Plumbing Renovation Economic Assessment Policy

Conduct an economic assessment policy like this one for WEp1 compliance.

LEED Gold Project Documentation

Complete LEED Online documentation for achievement of WEp1 on a certified Gold LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. 2009 project in Denver, Colorado.

Manufacturer Data

Option 4: Plumbing Fixtures Installed Before 1993

Provide and highlight, as in this example, manufacturer data that are not UPCUniform Plumbing Code/IPCInternational Plumbing Code code-compliant.

Water Fixture Inventory

Option 4: Plumbing Fixtures Installed Before 1993

A plumbing fixture inventory needs to include manufacturer, model number, flush or flow rate and date of installation in project building.

Sample LEED Online Form

This LEED Online form with annotation demonstrates how to document WEp1 and WEc2.

LEED-EBOM Policy, Program and Plan Models

Your LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. plans must include all required elements of the Program & Plan Model, which is described in this USGBC document.

LEED Online Forms: EBOM-2009 WE

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.-2009 WE credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

v06 forms:

v05 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions on these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

252 Comments

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Omar Delgado Mechanical Engineer EnerMech
Jun 20 2014
LEEDuser Member
117 Thumbs Up

Fixture replacement authentication

If the fixture upgrade will be done in house and will only consist of diaphragm replacement for installed flush valves, how can we authenticate the fixtures if there will be no copies of construction permits, substantial completion notices, contract excerpts, plumbing inspection reports, or commissioning reports? Can we use the purchase order for the parts as evidence?

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Magda Aghababyan CEO Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd.
Apr 09 2014
LEEDuser Member
456 Thumbs Up

Polluted well water use

Dear all,

We have a project that uses water from a polluted well for toilet flushing. The water is of low quality and is not drinkable. Do you think it is possible for us to consider this in WEp1 compliance?

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Lili Pan LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Managing Director , L GEES 智利捷达 Apr 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 170 Thumbs Up

Dear Magda,
1) If the treated grey water you use is not on-site, I think you cannot make it for WEp1. As I have similar project, and GBCI deny the compliance and emphasize the project intent is to evaluate fixture efficiency.
2) If the treated grey water you use is on-site, you perhaps have the chance. But still, I suggest you contact GBCI.

Regards,
Lili

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Magda Aghababyan CEO, Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd. Apr 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 456 Thumbs Up

Thanks Lili. Let me add some clarification in to it.

The wells are located on the same site owned by the project owner. These well water is of low quality and therefore not used for drinking. They are used for toilet flushing. I know in most cases well water is considered potable. But in this case since we can provide water test reports to say that they are well below quality, do you think we can claim potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. use reduction?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Apr 16 2014 LEEDuser Expert 8666 Thumbs Up

That's a really interesting question. On the one hand, I agree with Lili that the intent of the prerequisite is to evaluate fixture efficiency, and that using even greywater or non-potable well water efficiently should be the goal. On the other hand, elsewhere in the rating system (Irrigation Water Use) the use of reclaimed (nonpotable) water is considered equivalent to efficiency. I think that a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide may be the only way to resolve this with confidence.

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Mohamed Hesham LEED green associate
Mar 28 2014
Guest
3 Thumbs Up

Baseline confussion

i want to know what is the differences between the ipcInternational Plumbing Code baseline calculations ,the LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. baseline and the performance calculation, in the case i'm dealing with the building fixtures already comply with ipc rates, so what makes the difference between the ipc baseline and performance baseline in this case

Thank You

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Mar 31 2014 LEEDuser Member 2013 Thumbs Up

The LEED baseline for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. is 120% of IPCInternational Plumbing Code for fixtures installed in 1994 or later. For pre-1994 fixtures the baseline is 160%. See "Baselines depend on when fixtures were installed" above.

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Batya Metalitz Manager, LEED Technical Development USGBC
Feb 27 2014
LEEDuser Expert
2422 Thumbs Up

Project Teams: Offline Calculator Errors

PROJECT TEAMS, PLEASE NOTE: The LEED 2009 EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. WEp1 offline calculator is currently being revised because of functionality issues. A new version is expected to be posted in mid-2014. In the meantime we recommend that project teams use the v05 version of the WEp1 form, which can be downloaded on the right sidebar of the WEp1 page.

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Wendy Parker, LEED AP Manager of Safety & Environmental, MetroNational Mar 10 2014 LEEDuser Member 10 Thumbs Up

There isn't a v05 for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. - so which version should I use?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Mar 10 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

Hi Wendy, there's a v05 form available for download on the right side of this page http://www.usgbc.org/credits/existing-buildings/v2009/wep1?view=language under Sample forms.

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James Keohane, PE LEED BD+C CxA CPMP Sustainability and Commissioning Consultant, Sustainable Engineering Concepts, LLC Mar 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 626 Thumbs Up

A process question:I understand using the sample v5 "active form" and where to get it. When completing form for submission: Will it be acceptable when submitting to provide a narrative in "Special Circumstances" explaining use of v5 form and upload it separately?

Separate question: Why not take down the v6 form since it is not functional and give teams a working credit form?

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Wendy Parker, LEED AP Manager of Safety & Environmental, MetroNational Mar 21 2014 LEEDuser Member 10 Thumbs Up

I found the v5 you mentioned but I've noticed one difference which is tripping us up. The footnote "4" on the v6 for the Flow Fixture Data calcs says ...please convert all flow rates in GPM to GPC based on duration from the product specs" whereas v5 says "..using a default 12 second duration of flow". So which do I use while using the v5 calculator??

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Kevin Sullivan Director Leap Sustainability Design Consulting
Feb 25 2014
Guest
216 Thumbs Up

Multiple forms reqt. for AGMBC approach-LEED EBOM 2009 WEp1, C1

Hi

We are using the group approach under AGMBC ( Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects) guide for six buildings under the project's scope. We are using the New LEED Online platform. The credit asks us to fill a separate form for each building. However, only one form has been provided under each credit. If we try downloading the form and enter details for another building, the filled in form does not get saved. Hope to receive some help on this soon. Thanks!

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

Hi Kevin, that's odd, you should be able to complete the form and have it save all the information. There could be an issue with downloading it from LEED Online - try downloading it from the Documentation Tab here, or from USGBC.org. Just be sure to use the same version of the form that you have in LEED Online.

Best,
Trista

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Kevin Sullivan Director, Leap Sustainability Design Consulting Feb 26 2014 Guest 216 Thumbs Up

Hi Trista, thanks for your response. However, in the documentation tab I could not find the credit template there is only a sample form. I had downloading it from USGBC's website under the new LEED Online and saved it in on my system but if I fill it and save it, it does not gets saved. Please suggest something else. Thanks!

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Kevin Sullivan Director, Leap Sustainability Design Consulting Feb 26 2014 Guest 216 Thumbs Up

Also, there are only single forms where we have to fill them for different buildings for eg. criteria WEp1, WEc1. How should we go about for each building. Request someone to revert with a solution. Thanks!

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American University Sustainability American University
Nov 04 2013
LEEDuser Member
853 Thumbs Up

Laboratory sinks

I'm guessing lab sinks would be considered process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. because you don't necessarily want low flow rates where chemicals may be involved, but please advise. Thank you.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Expert 13738 Thumbs Up

Handwashing sinks in labs would fall under WEp1. Sinks in labs for washing items other than your hands are process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. and aren't included. Confirm with your users if they have any dedicated handwashing sinks in their labs.

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American University Sustainability American University
Nov 04 2013
LEEDuser Member
853 Thumbs Up

Check my math

Could someone check my math in terms of usage for a fixture group that has FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. as well as transient students using the fixtures? The fixture group in question also has urinals, so the male/female ratio comes into play. There are 19 FTE and 323 transient students.

For water closets I am using this formula: ((19 FTE*50% male*1 use/day)+(19 FTE*50% female*3 uses/day)+(332 transient*50% male*0.1 use/day)+(332 transient*50% female*0.5 uses/day))/351 total people using fixture group = 0.45 uses/day/person.

For urinals: ((19 FTE*50% male*2 use/day)+(19 FTE*50% female*0 uses/day)+(332 transient*50% male*0.4 use/day)+(332 transient*50% female*0 uses/day))/351 total people using fixture group = 0.45 uses/day/person.

Also, for total daily uses, do I enter the fixture uses/person (as calculated above) or the total fixture uses per day. Thanks!

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Lucy Williams Principal Lucy C. Williams, Architect
Oct 29 2013
LEEDuser Member
408 Thumbs Up

Dual Flush Toilets

We have a project registered with LEED-EB O&M 2009. There are dual flush toilets in the facility. In the flush rate table on the template (WEp 1-3), how do I determine what the installed flush rate is as there are 2 flush rates associated with this fixture; 1.6 gpf and 1.1 gpf?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Oct 29 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

Hi Lucy,

This guidance document explains how to calculate the rate for dual flush toilets: http://www.usgbc.org/Docs/Archive/General/Docs6493.pdf

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Amanda Johnson Penicaud Green Building
Oct 03 2013
Guest
100 Thumbs Up

Kitchen Sinks

Hi, we are working on an office tower EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. project and one standard review remark concerned the absence of kitchen sinks. There are no kitchen sinks associated with the office (coffee corner) but there is a staff canteen which we did not count (because it isn't related to the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. and is more process).
It seems that the review remark is really about coffee corner type kitchen sinks but I just want to make sure.
Should we have created a new group and used a completely different use calculation for the restaurant sink?

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Oct 03 2013 LEEDuser Member 2013 Thumbs Up

As the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. will not use the kitchen sink in the canteen, you should not need to include it. I would provide photo documentation (and plans if applicable) indicating that there are no sinks installed in the coffee corners.

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Simon S. SL+A International, Taipei
Sep 27 2013
LEEDuser Member
4591 Thumbs Up

Blow-Out Fixture Guidance

We work in SE Asia where many buildings have installed already or still install squat toilets (floor toilets) which are blow-out fixtures.

In a recent review comment, we have been advised:
"The form calculations include 3.5 GPF blow-out fixtures in the baseline, which is incorrect. Blow-out fixtures may only be used in
certain circumstances, such as institutional use (e.g., prisons) or where there are existing piping limitations that require the use of
toilets that consume greater than 1.6 gallons per flush. For more information, refer to the Water Use Reduction Additional Guidance
(Updated April 1, 2013)"

When we refer to the Water Use Reduction Additional Guidance (Updated April 1, 2013), we find this further information: "Blow-out Fixtures: Certain circumstances, such as institutional use or where there are existing piping limitations, may require the use of toilets that consume greater than 1.6 gallons per flush. In such circumstances, the “Blow-out fixture” option may be selected from the “Fixture Family” category of the Flush Fixture Data table. When selecting this option, be mindful that the 3.5 gpf baseline should also be used for the installed case; no water saving credit may be taken for reducing consumption from a blow-out fixture baseline. Additionally, projects may be asked to provide justification for using fixtures that consume greater than 1.6 gpf. This option is only available to rating systems that include blow-out fixtures in the prerequisite requirements (not EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems.)."

Just to be sure we understand the directions here...

Is this saying that blow-out fixtures may be included in the baseline calculation only for non-EBOM projects?

And these blow-out fixtures may only be included in the design case for EBOM projects?

FURTHERMORE, When you select the "Blow-Out Fixture" Fixture Family in the WEp1 LEED Online Form, the form automatically calculates the baseline as 3.5gpf - this is not editable by the form user.

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Lili Pan LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Managing Director , L GEES 智利捷达 Oct 12 2013 LEEDuser Member 170 Thumbs Up

To me, it is not logical to allow BD+C projects use 3.5GPF baseline for blow-out fixture while asking EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. projects use 1.6GPF baseline regardless the type (blow out or normal water closet).
I am not sure the definition of 'blow-out' fixture. I consider that blow-out fixture is using water pressure (without water tank) and water closet using water gravity (with water tank). So is it possible that squat toilet in your project is still a water closet? Perhaps worthwhile asking the manufacture to make a clear definition of their products.
Very appreciate if you can keep posting the follow ups. Very interesting topic indeed. As in China, squat toilet is very common for commercial buildings.

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Joyce Ganthavorn Recent college graduate
Jul 08 2013
Guest
19 Thumbs Up

WEp1 credit for student apartments

Hello!

I am currently working on the WEp1 credit for a student apartment. I am pretty new to the project and I was hoping someone could help me out by answering a few questions.

1. Would the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. and student default fixture values for residential buildings would be the same since both group lives in the building? Also, over the summer we host conferences at our school and the conference attendees would stay in the apartments for a few nights....would they be considered visitors and would the default fixture values be any different than the FTE and student ones?

2. Would I need to do two set of calculations because we have the academic year where students stay in the apartments, and then summer in which students move out and the apartments are free to host conferences? (If so, we also have a some students stay in the apartments for summer school...would they be in the academic year calculation or the summer one)

Please also note that the summer conference attendees varies in number and lengths of nights staying.

Sorry if I sound confusing. Feel free to ask me to clarify anything. I appreciate any help given. Thank you!

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Lili Pan LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Managing Director , L GEES 智利捷达 Oct 12 2013 LEEDuser Member 170 Thumbs Up

The group types depends on:
a, how many working days annually
b, which fixtures for each group's use
c, sex ratio
To you question
1, if the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories. and students has same working days, use same fixtures,and have same sex ratio, then you can combine them together. The people coming to the conference are visitors. But for this prerequisite calculation. They share the same usage pattern as FTE, only with much more less working days.
2, You need three. One using acadamic year. One using summer one. One using the entire year (acadamic year + summar one)
Hope I answer your questions.

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Blythe Jopling
Jun 14 2013
Guest
13 Thumbs Up

LEED CI for Retail WEp1

Our store is located in a shopping mall where customers have no access to WCs in the shop, but use the WCs provided within the main shopping mall. Do we need to include these shared WCs for the LEED assessment when calculating transient water use?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 31 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Blythe, you would not need to do this, no.

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María Fernanda Aguirre Architect LEED AP BD + C - LEED AP ID + C, Renato Miranda and Associates Jul 31 2013 Guest 262 Thumbs Up

Blythe: When you certify a project under CI (or CI Retail) rating System, one of the principles is to select wisely the building where the project is located. In fact for prerrequisite WE p1, in the Leedonline template you must select between 4 options, and you can choose to exclude fixtures outside the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. (last option) . That means, it is not neccessary to include them but you have to be careful if you are pursuing Credit SS c1, through option 2, path 10 because in that case both options are not compatible.

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Stefanie Hoffmann HAAGA HELIA OY Ab
Jun 03 2013
Guest
220 Thumbs Up

Projects outside the U.S.

Dear all,
Having worked on a LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. project in Helsinki, Finland, where we were unfortunately not able to fulfill one of the prerequisites (EAp2), motivated me to dedicate my bachelor's thesis to this particular topic. It is my intention now to create a "guidebook" on how to successfully implement those prerequisites, which are the most challenging in projects outside the US.
Is there anyone who would be willing to share his/her experiences with me over Skype or telephone interview? I am particularly interested in experiences regarding the implementation of prerequisites in projects outside the US.
I would very much appreciate any help and I will of course share my findings with you, too!
Best wishes,
Stefanie

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María Fernanda Aguirre Architect LEED AP BD + C - LEED AP ID + C, Renato Miranda and Associates Jun 20 2013 Guest 262 Thumbs Up

Dear Stefanie: I am from Chile and working in a Company which provides Consultancy for LEED Certification. We had a big issue twice with both, CS and NC pojects because of prerrequisite regarding ventilation rates. We had to make an appeal and by fortune, the two projects were able to achieve certification. Biggest problem for us is that areas considered as to be conditioned and/or ventilated for us are not regularly occupied so to achieve outdoor rates required is very difficult. Another issue is that in countries like Peru there is no heating neccessary, only cooling and demonstrate this in all credits including comissioning is very complicated.

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Daniel Rohe Peck, Hannaford, and Briggs
May 08 2013
LEEDuser Member
40 Thumbs Up

CHANGING FIXTURES TO MEET PREREQUISITE

I have a building that was built before 1993 with airators that are 2.2. Inorder to meet the prequisite I have to change the Airators to .5. Can I just go ahead and change them out and then submit for approval. Or do I have to report as is, make a plan to conform, and then change them?

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G May 08 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1432 Thumbs Up

Hi Daniel,

You can change out the aerators and complete the credit form using the 0.5 gpm flow rate.

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Daniel Rohe Peck, Hannaford, and Briggs
Apr 18 2013
LEEDuser Member
40 Thumbs Up

MULTIPLE BUILDINGS CONNECTED AS ONE.

I am trying to put together a water fixture inventory and calculations for an office complex that has three buildings built in different years that are attached as one building. The first building was built before 1994. The second building was built in 1998 and the third building was built in 2007. when filling out the fixture inventory do I seperate each building and do the calculations? And in the end put all three buildings calculations together. Or do I list each buildings fixtures and do a weighted flush rate. and then do the calculations off the weighted flush rates?

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Apr 18 2013 LEEDuser Member 2013 Thumbs Up

Count each as a separate fixture group. That will allow you to associate the occupants and transients in each building with the fixtures that they use.

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American University Sustainability American University
Mar 25 2013
LEEDuser Member
853 Thumbs Up

Sinks in medical offices?

We're trying to certify a building on our campus that contains the student health center. Each of the exam rooms has a sink in it for the doctor to wash hands before/after the exam. Do we need to include these in our calculations? Please advise.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Mar 25 2013 LEEDuser Expert 13738 Thumbs Up

I'd say that now that LEED HC is live and you are in LEED v3 that you can exclude them. Exam sinks are 'process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making.' in LEED HC and you want to maintain a decent flow rate. Explain this in a narrative.

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Lyle Axelarris Civil/Structural Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, O+M Design Alaska
Feb 20 2013
LEEDuser Member
540 Thumbs Up

WEp1 Form - lav duration and "all fixtures installed >1/1/94"

I have two questions about the LEED Online WEp1 form:

1. Table 3a on page 87 of the Reference Guide (updated 4/2010) shows a default lavatory faucet duration of 15 seconds, but Table WEp1-4 on the LEED Online form gives a default duration of 30 seconds. Can someone please confirm that the correct duration to use for non-metered lavs. is 30 seconds?

2. The LEED Online form gives the option (at the very top) to select "All relevant fixtures and fittings installed or replaced after January 1, 1994". If I select that, what happens? The Performance Calculation template does not appear, so where would I perform the calculations to earn WEc2 points (since typically the calc's are done on the WEp1 form and linked to WEc2)?

I appreciate your help.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Feb 21 2013 LEEDuser Member 2013 Thumbs Up

1. The Addendum change the default duration to 30 seconds. I've been through the question on a previous CI project and found the answer. That said, I submitted with 15 seconds and the review team accepted.

2. You have to choose the Performance Calculation to get points in WEc2. The other two options are sufficient to meet the prerequisite but not to get points.

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Lyle Axelarris Civil/Structural Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Design Alaska Feb 21 2013 LEEDuser Member 540 Thumbs Up

Michael,

Thank you for your timely and thorough response. I apologize for not first checking the LEED Interpretations/Addenda database.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Feb 22 2013 LEEDuser Member 2013 Thumbs Up

It's never easy to get the full answer, with the regular addenda and a constant stream of CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide. One of the benefits of LeedUser is being able to ask questions like this. I do it all the time.

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Gwen Sheinfeld Director, Corporate Sustainability Healthy Buildings
Feb 20 2013
LEEDuser Member
90 Thumbs Up

Flush & Flow Fixture Installations

If our potential project is currently installing flush & flow fixtures, but wants to start the performance period, is it acceptable to enter the new flush & flow rates as long as they are all installed by the completion of the performance period or will they have to delay the performance period until installation is entirely completed?

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Feb 21 2013 LEEDuser Member 2013 Thumbs Up

In one of those strange twists to the LEED rating system, neither WEp1 nor WEc2 have a performance period. That means that as long as the fixtures are performing as promised on the date of submission you should be ok.

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Alicia Silva CEO Revitaliza consultores
Feb 03 2013
LEEDuser Member
1393 Thumbs Up

Dishwashers included?

Dishwashers should not be included in the form correct? Since in the preliminary review, we were asked to include kitchen sinks in the calculations, but we only have two dishwashers in the project building (a mixed-use office building).
Thank you in advance.

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Hannah Bronfman Sustainability Consultant, YR&G Feb 04 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1200 Thumbs Up

Hi Alicia

No, dishwashers should not be included. This prerequisite is only looking at indoor plumbing fixtures and fittings.

If you have no kitchen sinks, just include a note to the reviewers that there are none and you should be good!

Thanks

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Alexa Stone ecoPreserve: Building Sustainability Feb 04 2013 LEEDuser Member 2225 Thumbs Up

Alicia and Hannah, there is a LEED CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide that states that kitchen sinks should not be included. Alicia, you were asked to include them? CIR text below...
"For hospitality projects, commercial kitchen sinks and bar sinks including pot sinks, prep sinks, wash down, and cleaning sinks are considered process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making. and are not included in the water use calculations. Hand washing sinks located in commercial kitchen areas that do not pass through a grease interceptor should be included in the water use calculations under the kitchen sink category."

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Alicia Silva CEO, Revitaliza consultores Feb 07 2013 LEEDuser Member 1393 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the responses. We were asked to include kitchen sinks; since our project building is a 55 floors mixed-used office building and contains two kitchens they found unusual that no sinks were included in the form.
In the Review Response we will add a narrative stating that two dishwashers are in the kitchen areas, and we will add the hand washing sinks located in the kitchen as kitchen sink category. Thanks a lot!

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Lili Pan LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Managing Director , L GEES 智利捷达 Oct 12 2013 LEEDuser Member 170 Thumbs Up

Jeff. Health care project / hospital project is different than commercial projects (office, shopping mall), kichen sinks need to be included.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Oct 14 2013 LEEDuser Expert 13738 Thumbs Up

Actually, Jeff's comment is pretty spot on and he's quoting the standards for commercial kitchens which most hospitals do have. Hospitals also have staff break rooms which typically have sinks in them. Those sinks are the ones that need to be included in these calculations. The ones in Dietary need to be reviewed very carefully using the information Jeff posted.

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Bruce Albright LEEDAP O+M PJS
Jan 10 2013
Guest
45 Thumbs Up

LEED 2009 O+M WE-P1

We can use some guidance on revising our submittal template to meet the reviewers clarification request. Under the Reduced Occupancy Guidance for LEED the reviewer is asking that we adjust our submittal to be inline with ASHRAE standard 62.1 defult values for a floor in the building that is unoccupied. Then to account for this as a usage group distributing the default occupants reasonably to the variuos fixture types. The floor is completly vacant and has not been built out yet. Thank you in advance for your replies.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 29 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Bruce, can you anticipate what the usage of the floor is likely to be, and use that?

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Bruce Albright LEEDAP O+M, PJS Jan 30 2013 Guest 45 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your suggestion. I have since learned that the default value for office space used in the ASHRAE 62.1 audit is 5 people per 1000 sq. ft.

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RUMI ENGINEER
Nov 13 2012
LEEDuser Member
131 Thumbs Up

Flow rate for Kitchen Sink

I just want to understand at what pressure is flow rate of kitchen sink (2.2 GPM) defined

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 23 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Rumi, it doesn't appear that the LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. reference guide offers a specific definition for this, in psi.

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory Colliers International
Oct 11 2012
LEEDuser Member
2013 Thumbs Up

Fitness Center water use

We have a fitness center in our building and I'm looking for guidance on how to model water use in the facility. It appears obvious to model the facility as a separate fixture group as it has an identifiable set of users which are different (although overlapping) with the building FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories.. If a building FTE does use the center he will be tracked there as a transient.

While the data related to toilet use may be close to accurate for the center FTEs and visitors (in the lack of any other data,) the shower use pattern is obviously wrong as a very high percentage of the transients will use the showers.

Has anyone dealt with this before and how did you handle it?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Oct 11 2012 LEEDuser Expert 8666 Thumbs Up

We had a very similar situation at a project recently Michael, and it sounds like you have it well in hand. We adjusted the assumptions around fitness center users (transients) to reflect that they all used the toilet one time and that a high percentage (I think we used 80%) also used the shower. We derived those assumptions from conversations with the center staff and custodians. The LEEDOnline form can accomodate those changes readily. I would also recommend clearly explaining your assumptions about use patterns in your submittal - walk the reviewer through your logic about how fitness center users behave and your basis for those assumptions.

Hope that helps,

Dan

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Oct 11 2012 LEEDuser Member 2013 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the quick response Dan. I figured that would be the approach but it's good to have some confirmation. I've learned the value of explaining anything out of the ordinary to the reviewer!

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Tara Bennett
Sep 21 2012
Guest
25 Thumbs Up

Baseline Water Use Formula

I'm looking for the actual formula/equations used for the calculations that are done automatically on the WEp1 active form. I thought I could work through it logically, but my numbers are not matching what's being returned on the form when I enter the data. Does anyone know where I can find the actual formulas used behind the scenes in these tables? Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer, Lile Engineering LLC Oct 25 2012 LEEDuser Member 1230 Thumbs Up

You should carefully document the logic you used to obtain the fixture uses you used in your data. Upload this in a file along with your other plumbing data. Uncheck the "default" box where you used your own calculation.

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Zachary Goodnough
Aug 27 2012
Guest
289 Thumbs Up

Multiple fixture types in a common space

In each bathroom of our project building there are 5 blow-out fixtures and 1 standard water closet that is handicapped accessible. The two types of fixtures have different flush rates. In my submittal, I included both fixtures under the same fixture family and fixture group and then altered their usage rates to be proportional to the amount of each fixture. In other words, I had the blow-out fixtures being used 5 times more than the standard water closet. My LEED reviewer has said that in order for the calculator to perform correctly, there can only be one fixture from each fixture family to each fixture usage group. It sounds like they want me to figure out a how big the subset of the building population is that uses the handicapped accessible toilets, but I’m not sure how feasible getting that number is. Would another acceptable solution be to use the average of all fixture flush rates? Any other thoughts or comments would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

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Jessica Hawley Sustainability Consultant, EBI Consulting Aug 27 2012 LEEDuser Member 852 Thumbs Up

I think the issue is that you assumed the handicapped (HC) fixture would only be used by the HC population, which is often untrue. The calculator will do the math for you, so don't manipulate any of the usage rates. Just list each type of fixture within the fixture family, it's associated flush rate, and let the calculator do it's thing. I would not average the flush rates. I have been seeing this method rejected more and more frequently.

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David Sheridan LEED Specialist, USGBC Aug 27 2012 LEEDuser Member 359 Thumbs Up

If you include blow-out fixtures and conventional WCs in one fixture group the water calculator will double count (it will apply the entire occupancy to both kinds of fixtures). The fixture group is intended to identify the occupants who will be using a particular type of fixture, so you need to designate the number of FTEs and transients who will be using the HC WCs. I agree with EBI that this number does not have to be the actual number of handicapped occupants, as non-handicapped occupants will also use the fixtures (unless access is restricted). So set up two fixture groups and split the FTEs and transients between them, perhaps on the basis of proximate floor area. Explain in a narrative so the review team can understand your rationale.

Blow-out fixtures begs a different question: why are you using them? Are you certain that the WCs are blow-out fixtures and not conventional WCs?

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Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal ecocentric cc
Jul 09 2012
LEEDuser Member
1583 Thumbs Up

policy wording

our review just came back and the reviewers made the following comment:

"The economic assessment policy is incomplete, as it does not require that maintenance cost savings be included in the economic assessment.
Technical Advice: Please provide a revised policy that accounts for potential water supply and disposal cost savings, as well as maintenance cost savings as part of the required economic assessment of conversion to high-performance plumbing fixtures and fittings."

1. 'potential water supply and disposal cost savings' surely means 'water utility savings and sewage utility savings', which is included in the policy we submitted - or am i missing something?

2. we had submitted the policy document with an amendment which specifically amended the policy to include "potential maintenance cost savings". again: i don't understand what else we should include?

before i send a clarification request to the review team, maybe one of you can help me shed some light on this?

many thanks!

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Jul 11 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7163 Thumbs Up

Jutta, if you used the copy of the policy that is currently available in the Documentation Toolkit, then I'm not sure why the reviewer would have marked it pending. Section 6 of the draft policy clearly indicates that the economic assessment will consider:
3. Water utility savings
4. Sewage utility savings
5. Potential Maintenance Costs

Beyond spelling it out that way, I don't think there's much else you can do. I'd go ahead and send the clarification request to see if you can get any other details.

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Jutta Berns-Mumbi principal , ecocentric cc Jul 11 2012 LEEDuser Member 1583 Thumbs Up

Jason, thank you. since the "potential maintenance cost savings" were included in a policy addendum, it seems to me that they may have overlooked this part of our documentation and will raise this and the other query with them.

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Chris Stigler
Jul 06 2012
Guest
40 Thumbs Up

Adjustable flush Valve Calculations

We are working on a large building pursuing EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. certification. The proposed retrofit urinal flush valves and new toilet flush valves have an adjustable flush valve which would be set at a low flow level during the performance period.

It seems that all calculations would be done at the installed rate, but the valves allow the building owner/maintenance staff to adjust to a higher flow at a later date. How does USGBC view this?

Thanks!

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THREE Consultoria THREE Consultoría Medioambiental Jul 06 2012 LEEDuser Member 332 Thumbs Up

Hi Chris,
Are you talking about existing toilets with screws that regulate flush?
In that case, I would recommend to perform a water audit for 20% of the fixtures and make sure these are all adjusted to product specs.

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Jason Franken Sustainability Professional Jul 11 2012 LEEDuser Expert 7163 Thumbs Up

Chris, it sound like you're also hinting at the fact that the building owner could potentially game their WEp1 performance by using the most efficient flush rates that the valves can provide in the prerequisite calculations and then go back after the fact and reset the flush valves to use more water than initially reported. I'm not sure why the building owner might want to do this, unless a) they don't pay for water or pay very little for water (which is common) and/or b) they have occupant or maintenance compliants about the performance of low-flow, high-efficiency fixtures.

To answer your question, GBCI reviewers will take your submitted documentation at face value, as long as you can provide cut sheets that verify the technical data used in your calculations. However, the whole LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. system depends on the customer providing accurate certification documentation in good faith to GBCI. If this is just something you're curious about, these are my thoughts and feel free to do with them what you will. If the building owner has actually approached you with this question/plan, I'd suggest having a discussion with them about the basic environmental intent of this prerequisite and chat a bit about water scarcity issues that are becoming more and more relevant (and damaging) all over the world. Hope this helps.

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Julia Thielke Project Manager
Jun 15 2012
LEEDuser Member
122 Thumbs Up

Shower at Sauna

Hi
We are currently dealing with a hotel project that has saunas installed. Does anyone know if the showers at the sauna can be excluded from the water use calculation?
Our idea would be to exlude them either by declaring that the showers are exceptional water user (like process waterProcess water is used for industrial processes and building systems such as cooling towers, boilers, and chillers. It can also refer to water used in operational processes, such as dishwashing, clothes washing, and ice making.) or by claiming that the FTEs have been already included in the room usage pattern.
Has anyone experience with such a issues?
Thanks

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