EBOM-v4 MRc3: Purchasing - facility maintenance and renovation

  • No minimum scope of work

    This credit covers materials purchased for both renovations and routine maintenance. There’s no minimum scope of work for this credit, so remember to include all materials purchased to maintain your building (e.g. paint touch-ups) in addition to products purchased for renovations or fit-outs.

    Purchases for all maintenance and renovation activities (environmentally preferable and not) must be tracked. Teams must track relevant purchases made by both the building management and tenants during the performance period.

    Furniture can earn a point too

    Option 2 provides an opportunity to earn a point for environmentally preferred furniture purchases. Teams must track furniture purchases (environmentally preferable and not) made by both the building management and tenants during the performance period.

    No relevant purchases, no problem

    Option 3 is for buildings that had no renovations or maintenance activities and did not purchase any furniture. But remember, products and materials used during the course of routine maintenance are now included in the scope of this credit, even if tenants make those purchases.

    Effective tenant outreach is key

    Collecting purchasing data from tenants can be challenging, so early and effective tenant outreach is key if you plan on pursuing this credit. LEED v4 does allow teams to exclude up to 10% of the project’s total floor area from the credit calculations, but this allowance may not be enough if several tenants are unwilling to participate.

    Don’t forget about your prerequisite policy

    This credit builds on the policy developed for MRp2 Facility Maintenance and Renovation Policy. The policy is essentially a blueprint for this credit and should include key information about the project’s environmentally preferred purchasing goals and who should be involved in the process.

    But remember: although the policy is only required to cover purchases under the building management’s control, this credit covers all purchases in the building—tenants included. That means that if you’re planning to pursue the credit, your policy should reflect the entire building’s purchases.

    Changes from LEED 2009

    For those familiar with LEED 2009, this credit includes a number of major changes.

    A new option has been added. Option 3 is for buildings that experienced no alterations and did not purchase any furniture. Previously, buildings that didn’t have qualifying facility maintenance and renovations during the performance period could not attempt this credit.

    There is no minimum scope of renovation work required to be eligible for this credit. In other words, products and materials used during the course of routine maintenance are now included in the scope of this credit. This is very different from LEED 2009, which laid out specific requirements for “qualifying” facility alterations and additions.

    Furniture has been added. Furniture is no longer tracked as a “durable good” like it was in LEED 2009. Furniture has its own compliance option worth 1 point, like it did as a durable good in LEED 2009, but the minimum threshold has been raised from 40% sustainable purchases to 75%.

    The calculation methodology has changed. In LEED v4 only the sustainable portion of a product counts towards credit compliance. This is a big change from LEED 2009, where a product’s full purchase price contributed to credit compliance even if only a portion of it met the credit requirements.

    The good news is that items still earn weighted credit if more than one sustainability criterion is met. But again, it’s only the percentage of the item that is sustainable that counts towards compliance.

    Local product requirements have changed. Local products must now be sourced (extracted, manufactured, and purchased) within 100 miles of the site, rather than 500 miles. But, it gets trickier than that. If the product meets the 100-mile radius requirement, it must also meet at least one other sustainability criteria (and is then valued at 200% of the cost). If the product meets the 100-mile requirement but does not have an additional environmental attribute, it does not contribute at all.

    Updated sustainability criteria under LEED v4

    Several familiar criteria are still in play for this credit that were relevant in LEED 2009, including recycled content, FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts., locally-sourced, and low-VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.. However, some new criteria have been added to the mix, and the rules for some familiar criteria have changed.

    Recycled Content

    Post-consumerWaste generated by end users (households or commercial, industrial and institutional facilities) of a product no longer able to be used for its intended purpose that is recycled into raw material for a new product. recycled content is valued at its full value, while pre-consumer recycled content is valued at half its full value. Products no longer need to contain a minimum percentage of recycled content to contribute to earning the credit.

    For example, if a $100 product contains 20% post-consumer content and 20% pre-consumer content, the contributing value is $20 for post-consumer and $10 for pre-consumer, for a total of $30.

    FSC-Certified

    No changes. SFI (Sustainable Forestry Initiative) products are still not approved by USGBC and therefore do not contribute to credit compliance.

    If a product contains both FSC certified woodWood from a source that has been determined, through a certification process, to meet stated ecological and other criteria. There are numerous forest certification programs in general use based on several standards, but only the Forest Stewardship Council's standards, which include requirements that the wood be tracked through its chain-of-custody, can be used to qualify wood for a point in the LEED Rating System. and non-certified wood, only the percent (by weight) that is FSC certified may contribute toward compliance. See the Calculating FSC Credit Contributions section of the Reference Guide for additional guidance.

    Biobased Material

    This is a new criterion under LEED v4. Biobased materials are composed of biological products, renewable agricultural materials, or forestry products. To qualify as sustainable, bio-based materials must meet the Sustainable Agriculture Network’s (SAN) Sustainable Agriculture Standard, for FSC if they are forestry products.

    The most well-known label that meets the SAN standard is the Rainforest Alliance. Products can self-declare conformance with SAN but they must meet additional requirements (see the Reference Guide for details). Given the extra legwork required, it’s likely not worth the effort to document bio-based materials other than those that carry the Rainforest Alliance label. Even with that label, there are a limited number of products that are certified and that are relevant in building purchases.

    Material Reuse: Onsite

    This includes salvaged, refurbished, or reused products. Components used for their original function or in a new role are eligible for this credit.

    Material Reuse: Off-Site

    This includes salvaged, refurbished, or reused products. There is no minimum percentage of the product that must be salvaged.

    The cost that contributes toward compliance is either the actual cost paid for the material, or the replacement value, whichever is greater.

    Furniture taken from the building owners’ previous facility may be counted towards compliance if it was purchased at least two years before the LEED registration date. Leased furniture can contribute if the furniture has been in use for two years or more.

    Extended Producer Responsibility

    This is a new criterion under LEED v4. Products purchased from a manufacturer that participates in an extended producer responsibility program may contribute towards credit achievement. 50% of the total cost of these items contributes towards compliance.

    GreenScreen v1.2 Benchmark

    This is a new criterion under LEED v4. Products must have fully inventoried chemical ingredients to 100 ppmParts per million. and have no Benchmark 1 hazard materials.

    If any of the ingredients are assessed with the GreenScreen List Translator, 100% of the cost may contribute towards this criterion.

    If all ingredients have undergone a full GreenScreen Assessment, 150% of the cost may contribute towards this criterion.

    Cradle to Cradle Certified

    This is a new criterion in LEED v4. Products with Cradle to Cradle certification contribute different amounts to earning this credit, based on the program version and level of certification. See the LEED Reference Guide for details.

    REACH Optimization (International Alternative Compliance Path)

    This is a new criterion in LEED v4. REACH is a label for end use products and materials that do not contain substances that meet REACH criteria for substances of very high concern.

    If the product contains no ingredients listed on the REACH Authorization or Candidate list, 100% of the cost contributes toward credit achievement.

    Product Manufacturer Supply Chain Optimization

    This is a new criterion in LEED v4. The intent of this criterion is to encourage purchasing products from manufacturers that have robust and validated safety, health, hazard, and risk programs in place for each of their building materials or products. It also ensures that each manufacturer’s supply chain has programs for optimizing environmental and human health and safety throughout their suppliers, and are transparent in their health and safety claims.

    Low VOC Emissions

    This criterion has been expanded in LEED v4 to include VOC requirements for the following products:

    • Thermal and acoustic insulation
    • Flooring materials and finishes
    • Ceiling materials and finishes
    • Wall materials and finishes

    These products must be either inherently low-emitting or be tested for compliance with CDPH Standard Method V1.1-2010, Section 8.

    VOC Content Requirements for Wet-Applied Products

    Green Seal Standard GS-11 is no longer a low VOC standard for paints and coatings for this credit.

    Low Formaldehyde Emissions

    No significant changes from LEED 2009. All composite woodComposite wood consists of wood or plant particles or fibers bonded by a synthetic resin or binder. Examples include particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), wheatboard, and strawboard. must be constructed from materials with low formaldehyde emissions that meet the CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it. requirements for ULEF resins or no-added formaldehyde based resins.

    Local Sourcing

    This criterion has changed significantly from LEED 2009. To count towards compliance, a product must meet one of the criteria listed above. It also must also be extracted, manufactured, and purchased within 100 miles, as the crow flies, from the project site.

    If the product meets both criteria, it is valued at 200% of its cost. If it meets just the 100-mile radius requirement, it contributes 0%.

    Calculating compliance: Only the sustainable portion counts

    Only the sustainable portion of a product counts towards credit compliance. This is a major departure from LEED 2009, which counted the total cost of a product towards compliance if at least one approved sustainability criterion was met.

    For example, if you purchased a product for $100 that contains 40% post-consumer recycled content, the value that contributes to earning the credit drops from $100 under LEED 2009 to $40 under LEED v4.

    But, the minimum thresholds previously associated with several sustainability criteria have been removed, which may benefit your project.

    For example, if you purchased a product for $1,000 that includes 60% material salvaged off-site, the value that contributes to earning the credit under LEED v4 is $600. Under LEED 2009, the product contributes $0 because it does not meet the minimum threshold of 70% salvaged material.

    This new approach to calculating compliance rewards teams for purchasing products that contain higher proportions of sustainable materials or that meet multiple sustainability criteria.

    USGBC has created a calculator to help teams track purchases, the sustainability criteria met, and the contribution to credit compliance. This calculator is posted in the Resources tab.

    Be diligent with product documentation

    The documentation requirements vary depending on the sustainability criterion. Documentation must be submitted for 100% of the following products: wood products, bio-based materials, GreenScreen v1.2 Benchmark, Cradle to Cradle certification, and REACH Optimization. See Option 1 & Option 2, Step 5 under the Step-By-Step Guidance section of the Reference Guide for additional information. 

    FAQs for MRc3

    If my product meets more than one of the sustainability criteria, can it be double counted in the calculations?

    Yes, it can. Each purchase receives credit for each criterion met. But remember that only the percentage of the item that is sustainable that counts towards compliance. Try using the USGBC purchasing calculator, posted in the Resources tab, to determine the total contribution made by a product.

    So does any facility maintenance activity count for this credit now? What about if we only painted a room?

    Yes, routine maintenance is now covered in the scope of this credit. Any materials used during routine maintenance, such as painting touch-ups or ceiling tile repairs, must be tracked under this credit.

  • MR Credit 3: Purchasing - facility maintenance and renovation

    Intent

    To reduce the environmental harm from materials used in building renovations.

    Requirements

    Establishment

    None.

    Performance

    Option 1. products and materials (1 point)

    Purchase at least 50%, by cost, of the total maintenance and renovation materials that meet at least one of the following criteria. Include products specified in Materials and Resources prerequisite: Facility Maintenance and Renovation Policy. There is no minimum scope of renovation or new construction work required for eligibility of this credit. Each purchase can receive credit for each criterion met.

    • Recycled content. Recycled content is the sum of postconsumer recycled content plus one-half the preconsumer recycled content.
    • Wood products. Wood products must be certified by the Forest Stewardship Council or USGBC-approved equivalent.
    • Bio-based materials. Bio-based products must meet the Sustainable Agriculture Network’s Sustainable Agriculture Standard. Bio-based raw materials must be tested using ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services Test Method D6866 and be legally harvested, as defined by the exporting and receiving country. Exclude hide products, such as leather and other animal skin material.
    • Materials reuse. Reuse includes salvaged, refurbished, or reused products.
    • Extended producer responsibility. Products purchased from a manufacturer (producer) that participates in an extended producer responsibility program or is directly responsible for extended producer responsibility. Products valued at 50% of their cost.
    • GreenScreen v1.2 Benchmark. Products that have fully inventoried chemical ingredients to 100 ppmParts per million. that have no Benchmark 1 hazards.
      • If any ingredients are assessed with the GreenScreen List Translator, value these products at 100% of cost.
      • If all ingredients are have undergone a full GreenScreen Assessment, value these products at 150% of cost.
    • Cradle to Cradle Certified. End use products are certified Cradle to Cradle. Products will be valued as follows:
      • Cradle to Cradle v2 Gold: 100% of cost
      • Cradle to Cradle v2 Platinum: 150% of cost
      • Cradle to Cradle v3 Silver: 100% of cost
      • Cradle to Cradle v3 Gold or Platinum: 150% of cost
    • International Alternative Compliance Path – REACH Optimization. End use products and materials that do not contain substances that meet REACH criteria for substances of very high concern. If the product contains no ingredients listed on the REACH Authorization or Candidate list, value at 100% of cost.
    • Product Manufacturer Supply Chain Optimization. Use building products that:
      • Are sourced from product manufacturers who engage in validated and robust safety, health, hazard, and risk programs which at a minimum document at least 99% (by weight) of the ingredients used to make the building product or building material, and
      • Are sourced from product manufacturers with independent third party verification of their supply chain that at a minimum verifies:
        • Processes are in place to communicate and transparently prioritize chemical ingredients along the supply chain according to available hazard, exposure and use information to identify those that require more detailed evaluation
        • Processes are in place to identify, document, and communicate information on health, safety and environmental characteristics of chemical ingredients
        • Processes are in place to implement measures to manage the health, safety and environmental hazard and risk of chemical ingredients
        • Processes are in place to optimize health, safety and environmental impacts when designing and improving chemical ingredients
        • Processes are in place to communicate, receive and evaluate chemical ingredient safety and stewardship information along the supply chain
        • Safety and stewardship information about the chemical ingredients is publicly available from all points along the supply chain
    • Low emissions of volatile organic compounds. The following products must either be inherently nonemitting or be tested and determined compliant in accordance with California Department of Public Health Standard Method V1.1–2010, using the applicable exposure scenario. The default scenario is the private office scenario; classroom furniture may use the school classroom scenario. Both first-party and third-party statements of product compliance must follow the guidelines in CDPH SM V1.1–2010, Section 8. Organizations that certify manufacturers’ claims must be accredited under ISO Guide 65. Laboratories that conduct the tests must be accredited under ISO/IEC 17025 for the test methods they use. Projects outside the United States may use (1) the CDPH standard method or (2) the German AgBB Testing and Evaluation Scheme (2010). Test products either with (1) ISO 16000-3: 2010, ISO 16000-6: 2011, ISO 16000-9: 2006, ISO 16000-11:2006, or (2) the DIBt testing method (2010). U.S. projects must follow the CDPH standard method.
      • thermal and acoustic insulation
      • flooring materials and finishes
      • ceiling materials and finishes
      • wall materials and finishes
    • VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content requirements for wet-applied products. In addition to meeting the general requirements for VOC emissions (above), on-site wet-applied products must not contain excessive levels of VOCs, for the health of the installers and other tradesworkers who are exposed to these products. To demonstrate compliance, a product or layer must meet the following requirements, as applicable. Disclosure of VOC content must be made by the manufacturer. Any testing must follow the test method specified in the applicable regulation.
      • All paints and coatings wet-applied on site must meet the applicable VOC limits of the California Air Resources Board (CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it.) 2007, Suggested Control Measure (SCM) for Architectural Coatings, or the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.) Rule 1113, effective June 3, 2011.
      • All adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. wet-applied on site must meet the applicable chemical content requirements of SCAQMD Rule 1168, July 1, 2005, Adhesive and Sealant Applications, as analyzed by the methods specified in Rule 1168. The provisions of SCAQMD Rule 1168 do not apply to adhesives and sealants subject to state or federal consumer product VOC regulations.
      • For projects outside North America, all paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants wet-applied on site must either meet the technical requirements of the above regulations, or comply with applicable national VOC control regulations, such as the European Decopaint Directive (2004/42/EC), the Canadian VOC Concentration Limits for Architectural Coatings, or the Hong Kong Air Pollution Control (VOC) Regulation.
      • If the applicable regulation requires subtraction of exempt compounds, any content of intentionally added exempt compounds larger than 1% weight by mass (total exempt compounds) must be disclosed.
      • If a product cannot reasonably be tested as specified above, testing of VOC content must comply with ASTM D2369-10; ISO 11890, part 1; ASTM D6886-03; or ISO 11890-2.
      • For projects in North America, methylene chloride and perchloroethylene may not be intentionally added in paints, coatings, adhesives, or sealants.
    • Low emissions of formadehyde. Built-in cabinetry and architectural millwork containing composite woods must be constructed from materials documented to have low formaldehyde1. Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring VOC found in small amounts in animals and plants but is carcinogenic and an irritant to most people when present in high concentrations, causing headaches, dizziness, mental impairment, and other symptoms. When present in the air at levels above 0.1 ppm, it can cause watery eyes; burning sensations in the eyes, nose, and throat; nausea; coughing; chest tightness; wheezing; skin rashes; and asthmatic and allergic reactions. 2. A known carcinogen with no known safe exposure level. Formaldehyde occurs naturally, but appears in unnaturally high concentra­tions in many buildings because it is an ingredient in binders used in many building materials and furnishings. emissions that meet the California Air Resources Board requirements for ultra-low-emitting formaldehyde (ULEF) resins or no-added formaldehyde based resins. Salvaged and reused architectural millwork more than one year old at the time of occupancy is considered compliant, provided it meets the requirements for any site-applied paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants.
    • USGBC approved program. Other USGBC approved programs meeting leadership extraction criteria.

    For credit achievement calculation, products sourced (extracted, manufactured, and purchased) within 100 miles (160 km) of the project site are valued at 200% of their base contributing cost.

    Pilot Alternative Compliance Path Available

    The following pilot alternative compliance paths is available for this credit. See the pilot credit library for more information.

    MRpc102 - Legal Wood

    AND/OR

    Option 2. furniture (1 point)

    Purchase at least 75%, by cost, of total furniture and furnishings that meet one or more of the following criteria. Each purchase can receive credit for each criterion met.

    • Recycled content. Recycled content is the sum of postconsumer recycled content plus one-half the preconsumer recycled content, based on cost. The recycled content value of an assembly is determined by weight. The recycled fraction is multiplied by the cost of the assembly to determine the recycled cost value.
    • Wood products. Wood products must be certified by the Forest Stewardship Council or USGBC-approved equivalent.
    • Bio-based materials. Bio-based products must meet the Sustainable Agriculture Network’s Sustainable Agriculture Standard. Bio-based raw materials must be tested using ASTM Test Method D6866 and be legally harvested, as defined by the exporting and receiving country. Exclude hide products, such as leather and other animal skin material.
    • Materials reuse. Reuse includes salvaged, refurbished, or reused products.
    • Extended producer responsibility. Products purchased from a manufacturer (producer) that participates in an extended producer responsibility program or is directly responsible for extended producer responsibility. Products valued at 50% of their cost.
    • GreenScreen v1.2 Benchmark. Products that have fully inventoried chemical ingredients to 100 ppm that have no Benchmark 1 hazards.
      • If any ingredients are assessed with the GreenScreen List Translator, value these products at 100% of cost.
      • If all ingredients are have undergone a full GreenScreen Assessment, value these products at 150% of cost.
    • Cradle to Cradle Certified. End use products are certified Cradle to Cradle. Products will be valued as follows:
      • Cradle to Cradle v2 Gold: 100% of cost
      • Cradle to Cradle v2 Platinum: 150% of cost
      • Cradle to Cradle v3 Silver: 100% of cost
      • Cradle to Cradle v3 Gold or Platinum: 150% of cost
    • International Alternative Compliance Path – REACH Optimization. End use products and materials that do not contain substances that meet REACH criteria for substances of very high concern. If the product contains no ingredients listed on the REACH Authorization or Candidate list, value at 100% of cost.
    • Product Manufacturer Supply Chain Optimization. Use building products that:
      • Are sourced from product manufacturers who engage in validated and robust safety, health, hazard, and risk programs which at a minimum document at least 99% (by weight) of the ingredients used to make the building product or building material, and
      • Are sourced from product manufacturers with independent third party verification of their supply chain that at a minimum verifies:
        • Processes are in place to communicate and transparently prioritize chemical ingredients along the supply chain according to available hazard, exposure and use information to identify those that require more detailed evaluation
        • Processes are in place to identify, document, and communicate information on health, safety and environmental characteristics of chemical ingredients
        • Processes are in place to implement measures to manage the health, safety and environmental hazard and risk of chemical ingredients
        • Processes are in place to optimize health, safety and environmental impacts when designing and improving chemical ingredients
        • Processes are in place to communicate, receive and evaluate chemical ingredient safety and stewardship information along the supply chain
        • Safety and stewardship information about the chemical ingredients is publicly available from all points along the supply chain
    • Low emissions of volatile organic compounds. Products must have been tested, following ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1–2011, and must comply with ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Sections 7.6.1 (valued at 50% cost) or 7.6.2 (valued at 100% cost), using either the concentration modeling approach or the emissions factor approach. For classroom furniture, use the standard school classroom model in CDPH Standard Method v1.1. Salvaged and reused furniture more than one year old at the time of use is considered compliant, provided it meets the requirements for any site-applied paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants.
    • USGBC approved program. Other USGBC approved programs meeting leadership extraction criteria.

    For credit achievement calculation, products sourced (extracted, manufactured, purchased) within 100 miles (160 km) of the project site are valued at 200% of their base contributing cost.

    Pilot Alternative Compliance Path Available

    The following pilot alternative compliance paths is available for this credit. See the pilot credit library for more information.

    MRpc102 - Legal Wood

    OR

    Option 3. no alterations or furniture purchasing (1 point)

    Make no alterations to the project space and do not purchase any furniture.

LEED v4 O+M:EB Platinum Office

Complete documentation for achievement of MRc - Purchasing - facility maintenance and renovation on the LEED v4 O+M:EB Platinum StopWaste.org headquarters office building at 1537 Webster Street, Oakland, CA. Project documentation was shared with LEEDuser through cooperation with that organization, and the LEED consultant, BuildingWise LLC

Purchasing Calculator

Use this calculator from USGBC to tally purchases and document credit compliance.

Sample Products and Calculations – Ongoing Purchasing Example

These samples show what data to look for on a product sheet and how to calculate contributing value to earning purchasing credits.

Sample Product Info and Calculations

These sample show what to look for on a product sheet and how to calculate contributing value for this credit.

9 Comments

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Pablo Fortunato Suarez Principal ESD Consultant/Architect GreenArc Sustainable Building & Architecture
Mar 17 2017
LEEDuser Member
3623 Thumbs Up

solid surface for countertops

The scope of materials covers - thermal and acoustic insulation,
flooring materials and finishes, ceiling materials and finishes and wall materials and finishes.

Are solid surface for countertops also covered? Which criteria should apply?

Hoping for your reply.

Pabs

Post a Reply
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Pablo Fortunato Suarez Principal ESD Consultant/Architect GreenArc Sustainable Building & Architecture
Mar 16 2017
LEEDuser Member
3623 Thumbs Up

roller shades/blinds

My queries:
1) Are roller shades/blinds part of the criteria for this or any related MR credits?
2) Does LEED O+M v4 consider products with low emissions under GREENGUARD?
3) Or Okeo-tex standard 100 as assessment of harmful substances in textiles?

Hoping for your reply.

regards,
Pabs

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Kimberly Schlaepfer Sustainability Coordinator LEED AP O+M, BD+C, YR&G Mar 29 2017 LEEDuser Expert 882 Thumbs Up

Hi Pablo,

1) Yes, roller shades/blinds can be included here if they meet any one of the sustainability requirements, and are being installed as part of the renovation.
2) GREENGUARD Gold certification requires products meet the requirements of CDPH Standard Method v1.1 2010, which is the LEED requirement for low-emitting products. Any GREENGUARD Gold products will contribute to LEED. Any GREENGUARD certification other than Gold, will not qualify for LEED.
3) I have never heard of the Okeo-tex standard 100 assessment, and LEED does not reference this standard as compliant. It may be worth checking out LEED Interpretations to see if this can be used in lieu of GreenScreen Hazard Assessments.

I hope this helps!

Post a Reply
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Pablo Fortunato Suarez Principal ESD Consultant/Architect GreenArc Sustainable Building & Architecture
Feb 02 2017
LEEDuser Member
3623 Thumbs Up

carpet

This is related to the previous query. I see no reference to certification from the Carpet and Rug Institute which was present in v3. Is this certification not accepted in v4?

thank you and regards,
Pabs

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Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 02 2017 LEEDuser Expert 5920 Thumbs Up

That's correct (though I'm not sure why it's no longer accepted). A good way to verify the accepted criteria is by checking out the USGBC calculator used to document this credit. You can download the calculator from the Credit Library under the Resources tab for this credit (www.usgbc.org/node/2613487?view=resources&return=/credits/existing-build...).

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 03 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

You can also find this calculator under the Doc Toolkit above!

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Pablo Fortunato Suarez Principal ESD Consultant/Architect, GreenArc Sustainable Building & Architecture Feb 06 2017 LEEDuser Member 3623 Thumbs Up

Thank you Trista and Tristan. The CRIColor-rendering index, or CRI, is a scale of 0 to 100, used by manufacturers of fluorescent, metal halide, and other non-incandescent lighting equipment to describe the visual effect of the light on colored surfaces. Natural daylight is assigned a CRI of 100. Green Label Plus certificate provided has the following info: (for pre-dyed and post dyed nylon backing of carpet products)
"This product complies with California DPH Section 1350 Version 1.1 Private Office Scenario."
"A USGBC recognized third party certification program for LEED v4 EQ Credit Low-Emitting Materials."
"ANSI accredited program Product Certification #0754."

Post a Reply
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Lorne Mlotek BASc., LEED AP BD+C, O+M LeadingGREEN Training and Consulting Inc, Viridis EC LLC
Jul 16 2014
Guest
1600 Thumbs Up

Example confusion in Ref Guide

On page 367 example 1

The carpet meets the extended producer responsibility criteria which should count 50% of its value - but the entire 100% is counted.

Which is correct?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 16 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Lorne, the calculation looks to me like it's in error. I would always trust the actual credit language over a calculation example.

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