EBOM-v4 MRp1: Ongoing purchasing and waste policy

  • Watch out for the curveball

    Your team must develop and adopt a compliant ongoing purchasing and waste policy to achieve LEED certification, since this is a prerequisite policy.

    However, you only have to demonstrate actual compliance with the policy if you pursue the related credits. The exception to this (here’s the curveball!) is for ongoing waste diversion. This prerequisite requires you to either divert 75% of ongoing waste (and achieve MRc4: Solid Waste Management – Ongoing), or conduct a waste audit.

    Project teams should definitely use the template created by USGBC as the foundation for the policy (see the Doc Toolkit). Customizing the template is encouraged so that the policy reflects your building’s operational practices. But remember that all prerequisite requirements must be addressed, so take care when removing or adjusting content.

    What’s New in LEED v4

    • This prerequisite is a combination of two LEED 2009 prerequisites, MRp1: Sustainable Purchasing Policy and MRp2: Solid Waste Management Policy.
    • Teams must now determine the top five most purchased product categories and address them in the policy.
    • A minimum ongoing waste diversion requirement has been added to this prerequisite. Projects that don’t meet the diversion requirement and achieve MRc4: Solid Waste Management – Ongoing must perform a waste audit.
    • Furniture is now covered by the facility maintenance and renovations prerequisite and credits—it is no longer considered a “durable good”.
    • Minimum recyclable storage requirements have been added to align with the prerequisite criteria in the BD&C v4 rating systems.

    Readiness Review Questions

    • Do you have purchasing data available to help you determine the top five product categories purchased at your building? What sustainability criteria are relevant for each product category?
    • What are the different components of the building waste stream? Which waste streams are within the building and site management’s control? 

    • Who will be responsible for managing and enforcing the various aspects of this policy? How will the responsible parties track, measure and evaluate both purchasing and waste management? 

    • What are the building’s goals for purchasing and waste management? How will targets be assessed? 

    • What actions are necessary for the policy to take effect prior to the start of the performance period?
    • How can you involve your vendors in supporting your goals? 

    • If less than 75% of ongoing waste is diverted, thereby requiring a waste audit, who will perform the audit? Does the project team have the time and resources to conduct the audit? Or does it make more sense for the waste hauler to conduct the audit?
    • Is there a location onsite where waste can be sorted and audited? Does the building have enough space for staff to sort the materials and conduct the audit onsite, or will off-site processing be necessary?

    FAQs

    We already do a waste audit every year. Will this audit count for LEED compliance?

    The prerequisite lays out specific procedures and requirements for the audit. Review the LEED Reference Guide carefully (see the Waste Audit Procedures section) to see if your current audit will work.

     

    I don’t know what my tenants are purchasing, so how do I determine the building’s top five product categories?

    The policy needs to cover products purchased by the building management, at a minimum. This means you can develop the policy based on the purchases you’re responsible for and have data on. The Multitenant Buildings section under Project Type Variations in the LEED Reference Guide includes additional information for buildings with tenants. 

  • MR Prerequisite 1: Ongoing purchasing and waste policy

    Intent

    To reduce the environmental harm from materials purchased, used, and disposed of in the operations within buildings.

    Requirements

    Establishment

    Environmentally preferable purchasing

    Have in place an environmentally preferable purchasing (EPPEnvironmentall preferable products (EPP) are those identified as having a lesser or reduced effect on health and the environment when compared with competing products that serve the same purpose.) policy for products purchased during regular operations of the building. Include at a minimum:

    • Ongoing Purchases

      • The five most purchased product categories based on total annual purchases.
      • Paper, toner cartridges, binders, batteries, and desk accessories.
      • Lamps (indoor and outdoor, hard-wired and portable fixtures)
      • Food (required for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. Schools and Hospitality only)
    • Durable GoodsProducts with a useful life of approximately two or more years and that are replaced infrequently. Examples include furniture, office equipment, appliances, external power adapters, televisions, and audiovisual equipment. Purchases

      • Office equipment, appliances, and audiovisual equipment
      • Electric powered equipment

    The policy should address the criteria in the following credits:

    • Materials and Resources Credit: Purchasing—Ongoing
    • Materials and Resources Credit: Purchasing—Lamps

    The policy must cover at least those product purchases within the building and site management’s control.

    Solid Waste Management

    Establish storage locations for recyclable materials, including mixed paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics, and metals. Establish safe storage areas for batteries and mercury-containing lamps.

    Have in place an environmentally preferable solid waste management policy that addresses reuse, recycling, or composting of products purchased during regular operations of the building. Include at a minimum:

    • Ongoing waste

      • The five most purchased product categories based on total annual purchases.
      • Food (required for EBOM Schools and Hospitality only)
    • Durable goods waste

      • Office equipment, appliances, and audiovisual equipment
      • Electric powered equipment
    • Hazardous Waste
      • Safe disposal of batteries and lamps (indoor and outdoor, hard-wired and portable fixtures)

    The policy must cover at least those product purchases within the building and site management’s control.

    Performance

    Maintain a high-performing solid waste management program by conducting a waste stream audit of ongoing consumables at least once every five years or by diverting 75% of ongoing waste and achieving Materials and Resources Credit Solid Waste Management—Ongoing.

MRp Ongoing Purchasing and Waste policy template

This template meets the requirements of MRp Ongoing Purchasing and Waste policy and may be downloaded by the project team, modified as necessary, and provided as supporting documentation in a LEED application.

Waste Stream Audit Protocol

Project teams can use this protocol to help comply with the LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. credits requiring waste stream audits. It can be useful in any situation where you want to establish a baseline for the types and quantities of waste leaving the building.

26 Comments

0
0
Ana Villarroya
Feb 24 2017
Guest

European standards for bio-based materials

Project Location: Spain

I'm working on a building's purchasing and waste policy and I'm using LEED's template. In section iv (procedures and strategies for implementation) it states that bio-based products shall meet the Sustainable Agriculture Network’s Sustainable Agriculture Standard. I have two questions here:
1. Just to be sure, food and beverages are considered into this category, right?
2. Is the EU organic products label (a European ecolabel for cultivated products) considered a valid standard here?

Thank you very much.

1
7
0
Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 24 2017 LEEDuser Expert 6003 Thumbs Up

My understanding is that the policy must address food only if your project is a school or hospitality building (check out MRc1 Purchasing - ongoing on LEEDuser for details about food purchases and bio-based products as well). That said, if a food product (e.g. coffee) is one of your top 5 purchases, you'd need to include sustainability criteria for it in your policy.

LEED v4 accepts a few additional labels that weren't accepted under v2009, including Canada Organic and European Community Organic Production. Is that the EU label you're referring to?

2
7
0
Ana Villarroya Feb 25 2017 Guest

Trista, thank you very much for your answer, it's really helpful.

Yes, the EU label I'm talking about is the EC Organic Production, the one that looks like a leaf made of stars. So I understand that if a food product shows that label, it's considered sustainable under LEED v4, right?

Thanks again

3
7
0
Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 25 2017 LEEDuser Expert 6003 Thumbs Up

That's correct! And if you check out the MRc1 purchasing calculator (here: http://www.usgbc.org/resources/purchasing-calculator) you can confirm which labels are accepted... and that particular label is included in the drop-down list of Sustainable Agriculture label options so you know it's good!

4
7
0
Ana Villarroya Feb 26 2017 Guest

That's very helpful. Thanks again, Trista!

5
7
0
Ana Villarroya Feb 28 2017 Guest

Now working on a different category within this policy... I've read that LEED accepts some European equivalents to EnergyStar label for electronics (TCO and Blue Angel). In Europe we also have the EU Energy Label that rates appliances from D (worst efficiency) to A+++ (best efficiency). Does LEED accept an EU Energy Label A or better (A, A+, A++ and A+++) as a valid standard for sustainability?

6
7
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Feb 28 2017 Guest 4635 Thumbs Up

Yes and no. On CI projects I've gotten back comments which indicated that the review teams are in the habit of accepting certain energy labels. That said, the rating system does not include these, so to be on the safe side you should do the Energy Star compliance calculations.

7
7
0
Ana Villarroya Feb 28 2017 Guest

OK, thank you Michael!

Post a Reply
0
0
RYAN BEN SABILALA
Feb 16 2017
LEEDuser Member
3 Thumbs Up

Consumable Materials for Equipment

Just want to make sure if the consumable materials like oils, gaskets, O-rings etc. used for HVAC units and water pumps are excluded in MR credit category during Policy and plan formulation and /or credit requirement.

And under FMR Policy, are base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). elements the only items that should be addressed in Facility maintenance waste? How about for the HVAC and MEPs?

1
1
0
Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Feb 24 2017 LEEDuser Expert 6003 Thumbs Up

Yes, those types of ongoing consumables are excluded from the policy and USGBC hasn't defined any sustainable criteria for them.

To your second question, the policy template developed by USGBC isn't as clear about this as it could be. But under the Requirements section for the related FMR waste credit (MRc5: Solid waste management - facility maintenance and renovation) it states: "Exclude furniture and furnishings that pose human health concerns (e.g., mold) as well as components not considered base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, and materials and products installed in the project (e.g., flooring, casework, wall coverings). elements; mechanical, electrical, and plumbing components; and specialty items, such as elevators." I think the best approach is to recycle/divert these materials from landfills whenever possible, but know that you can't include them in your MRc5 calculations.

Post a Reply
0
0
VISHESH AGARWAL
Oct 21 2016
Guest
92 Thumbs Up

Ongoing purchasing and waste policy

Project Location: India

Thanks in advance
can any share the link of LEED V4 Ongoing purchasing and waste policy Tempelate.

1
1
0
Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G Oct 21 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6003 Thumbs Up

Hi Vishesh, all of the policy templates are posted in the LEED Credit Library on USGBC's website.

Here's a link to the Ongoing Purchasing and Waste policy template: www.usgbc.org/resources/mrp-ongoing-purchasing-and-waste-policy-template

Post a Reply
0
0
Trevor Anderson Sustainability Consultant Steven Winter Associates
Apr 26 2016
Guest
20 Thumbs Up

Waste Stream Audit

Project Location: United States

Under LEED v4, is the waste audit requirement the same for projects achieving initial certification and recertification, or do recertifying projects need to conduct one waste audit for each year of the recertification period?

1
2
0
Trista Little Sustainability Manager, YR&G May 01 2016 LEEDuser Expert 6003 Thumbs Up

That's an interesting question, and unfortunately I don't have a definitive answer. It'd be great if someone else could chime in to help clear this up. In the meantime here's what I'm struggling with about these requirements:

In LEED v4, a waste audit is required only if you don't achieve a 75% ongoing consumables diversion rate or higher. And the waste audit isn't it's own credit anymore... it's a requirement within MRp1.

In the Recertification Guidance (October 2013), a waste audit is required only once every 5 years if v2009 MRc7 is achieved (where the threshold is 50% diversion). Otherwise you have to do it annually.

I think there's a few scenarios here that raise some questions...

Scenario 1: You achieve 75% - 100% diversion, and you'll submit for recertification in under 5 years. This scenario seems the most straightforward - you wouldn't have to complete an audit at all, as long as it's been less than 5 years since your previous audit.

Scenario 2: You achieve 75% - 100% diversion, but your recertification period is 5 years. You could skip the audit under the requirements of v4 MRp1, but do you still have to do an audit per the Recertification Guidance since it's been 5 years?

Scenario 3: You achieve 50% - 74% diversion, but you're in the v4 rating system where there's no MRc6. Do you have to do only one audit for v4 MRp1, rather than annual audits, since you've hit the 50% requirement in the Recertification Guidance?

Scenario 4: You achieve 0% - 49% diversion, but you're in the v4 rating system where there's no MRc6. Do you have to do only one audit to meet v4 MRp1, or do you have to do annual audits to comply with the Recertification Guidance?

It seems like your requirements are likely to change depending on how long your recertification cycle is and what diversion rate you're achieving. Reaching out directly to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)./USGBC may be a good idea in this case... please let us know what you find out if you do!

2
2
0
Trevor Anderson Sustainability Consultant, Steven Winter Associates May 05 2016 Guest 20 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your reply Trista. As you've clearly pointed out in your response, there is a lot information still up in the air regarding the waste audit component of this prerequisite. For now, I was just being proactive, but I'm sure I'll have to reach out to the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)./USGBC about this in the near future.

Post a Reply
0
0
LEED Pro Consultant Bioconstruccion & Energia Alternativa
Jan 13 2015
LEEDuser Member
2755 Thumbs Up

EBOM on Core and Shell (not LEED) building

Project Location: Mexico

We are in the process of certifying a Core and Shell building which does not have a previous LEED certification. There is an inquiry regarding tenant engagement and responsibilities, in order to comply with several requirements of the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. certification.

Should we take in account tenant spaces (this includes office, retail and restaurant spaces) for the development of the policy (prerequisite) as well as their implementation (credits); or may we focus only on building-level purchases?

1
3
0
Anne White Program Coordinator, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jan 13 2015 LEEDuser Expert 94 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your question. EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. v4 Materials and Resources Prerequisite 1: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy recommends including purchases by building tenants. This will prepare the project team to achieve MR credit 1: Purchasing - Ongoing which covers the entire building's ongoing consumableA product that has a low cost per unit and is regularly used and replaced in the course of business. Examples include paper, toner cartridges, binders, batteries, and desk accessories. Also known as ongoing purchases..

However, if you choose to exclude tenant purchases beyond the 10% gross square foot exemption, the purchases for those tenant spaces must be estimated and assumed non-compliant.

2
3
0
LEED Pro Consultant Bioconstruccion & Energia Alternativa Jan 13 2015 LEEDuser Member 2755 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your quick answer. Would the "Suplemental Guidance to the MPR" as well as the "Reduced Occupancy Guidance" (both) from version 2009, apply for LEED v4?

3
3
0
Anne White Program Coordinator, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jan 13 2015 LEEDuser Expert 94 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your question. In short, the answer is No. The MPRs have been updated for v4 and reduced occupancy guidance for v4 is contained in each individual credit. I would suggest reviewing the v4 Reference Guide for specific guidance.

Post a Reply
0
0
Michelle DiPenti Project Coordinator HDR, Inc.
Oct 27 2014
LEEDuser Member
172 Thumbs Up

Ongoing Consumables in HC Clinic

Project Location: United States

Is there a clear answer on which ongoing consumables to include in the policy? As I go down the list of our "most purchased product categories based on total annual purchases," I'm finding some medical supplies, like needles and microscope slides and some things that seem more in line with the credit examples, such as toilet tissue and paper towels.

Should I 1) exclude the medical items and move on down the list to the office supplies, or 2) include the medical items as much as possible and either use the Healthy Hospital Initiative as guidance or develop our own sustainability criteria?

Thank you!

1
4
0
Anne White Program Coordinator, Transwestern Sustainability Services Oct 29 2014 LEEDuser Expert 94 Thumbs Up

Hello Michelle,

Thank you for your question. The LEED v4 O+M: EB reference guide states that the Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy "This prerequisite requires that the project institute a policy for typical purchases for ongoing operations..." Additionally, in the Step By Step guidance section states "Review purchasing records to determine which five product purchasing categories under the building management's control have the highest cumulative annual cost." I would ask if the medical items affect ongoing operations of the building and if they are under building management control. If yes, then you could include the product category of medical supplies.

We've worked with a school on the v4 MR policy and their most purchased categories were: ongoing consumables for office and classroom use, instructional materials and textbooks, cleaning supplies, electronic equipment and food. Since each project is unique, it may just be that if you have a single tenant building, that medical supplies may be a most purchased category.

2
4
0
Michelle DiPenti Project Coordinator, HDR, Inc. Jan 15 2015 LEEDuser Member 172 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Anne.

We researched the medical supplies category further and many of the items do not have sustainable criteria to meet. There are not "green" alternatives.

Has anyone dealt with this situation?

Thanks.

3
4
0
Anne White Program Coordinator, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jan 16 2015 LEEDuser Expert 94 Thumbs Up

Thank you Michelle for the comment. As for the medical supplies, you could either exclude them or include them and come up with your own criteria for sustainability. The policy must cover at least those product purchases within the building and site management's control. If the medical supplies are a tenant purchase, then you could exclude the purchases. The LEED v4 O+M:EB reference guide goes on to also states that if the Top 5 purchases do not align with the categories in the prerequisite, that project teams may add to those listed in the requirements. Additionally, purchasing goals can be determined by the team, there is no performance threshold requirement for the prerequisite.

4
4
0
Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Jan 16 2015 LEEDuser Expert 22864 Thumbs Up

Practice GreenHealth really does a great job covering environmentally preferred purchasing (EPPEnvironmentall preferable products (EPP) are those identified as having a lesser or reduced effect on health and the environment when compared with competing products that serve the same purpose.) for healthcare. They run the Healthier Hospitals Initiative which also has standards (planks) around purchasing these types of materials. Any policy developed for a HC project that incorporated these standards ought to be well in compliance with the EB+OM standard as these programs are robust and well established.

You may need to engage the hospital's Materials Management Department and reference EPP before they understand what you're saying. The facilities people don't understand.

Post a Reply
0
0
Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory Colliers International
May 18 2014
Guest
4635 Thumbs Up

Waste stream audit

We have been unable to achieve the waste stream audit credit in Hungary as waste haulage is government controlled and the waste haulers are unable (or unwilling) to provide this service. Any idea how to deal with the performance requirement for this prerequisite?

1
1
0
Anne White Program Coordinator, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jan 13 2015 LEEDuser Expert 94 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your question Michael.

A possible solution would be for the building team to weigh the trash and recycling before the haulers pick it up. A waste stream audit of ongoing consumables is required to be performed once every 5 years or by diverting 75% of ongoing waste AND achieving Materials and Resources Credit 4: Solid Waste Management - Ongoing.

Post a Reply

Start a new comment thread

Jun 24 2017
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2017 – BuildingGreen, Inc.