Healthcare-v2009 IEQc8.2: Daylight and views - views

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    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for Healthcare

    IEQ Credit 8.2: Daylight and views - views

    Intent

    To provide building occupants a connection to the outdoors through the introduction of daylight and views into the regularly occupied areas of the building.

    Requirements

    Provide access to views that meet the following criteria below.

    INPATIENT UNITS (1 point)

    A minimum of 90% of the inpatient units, staff areas, and public areas shall be within 20 feet—or twice the window head height, whichever is smaller—of the perimeter. All such perimeter areas must have windows that provide at least an 11° angle of unobstructed view in the vertical and horizontal direction.

    NON-INPATIENT AREAS (1-2 points)

    In the block planning stage, configure the building floor plates such that the area within 15 feet of the perimeter exceeds the perimeter area requirement as determined by the table outlined below.

    Confirm at the conclusion of detailed planning that 90% of the perimeter rooms have windows that provide at least an 11° angle of unobstructed view in the vertical and horizontal direction.


    Perimeter Non-IPU Area with Window Access Required      
    Floor plate area (bgsf) Threshold A:
    1 point
    Threshold B:
    2 points
    Floor plate area (bgm2) Threshold A:
    1 point
    Threshold B:
    2 points
    Up to 15,000 7348 8248 Up to 1,395 683 766
    20,000 8785 9985 1,800 816 928
    25,000 10087 11587 2,325 937 1076
    30,000 11292 13092 2,785 1,049 1,216
    35,000 12425 14525 3,250 1,154 1,350
    40,000 13500 15900 3,715 1,254 1,477
    45,000 14528 17228 4,180 1,350 1,601
    50,000 and larger 15516 18516 4,600 and larger 1,441 1,720



    For both in-patient and non-inpatient areas, portions of side lit areas beyond the 15’ view area boundary that meet the requirements of IEQ Credit 8.1: Daylight and Views—Daylight may be included in the qualifying areas of this credit.

    For calculation methodology for floor plates that vary in size and configuration, see the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Design & Construction, 2009 Edition Healthcare Supplement.

20 Comments

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Ammar Nahya
Jun 23 2014
LEEDuser Member

Exempt spaces from the views calculation

There are several spaces in a healthcare facilty that require a certain amount of privacy are are inelgible for views such as certain exam room. can these spaces be exempt from the calculation?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jun 23 2014 LEEDuser Expert 13581 Thumbs Up

You need to consult the EQ space matrix: http://www.usgbc.org/resources/eq-space-type-matrix . This will have the spaces that are exempt. This document can be used as a resource for several EQ credits.

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Lauren Bellamy
Jul 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
19 Thumbs Up

Full Height Glazing

Per step 2 for noninpatient buildings and areas "for portions of the perimeter wall with full-height glazing, the qualifying area may be extended beyond the 15-foot limit to twice the head height of the windows; both single story and multi-story spaces are eligable".

This statment brings about two main questions:

1) does full-height only include floor to ceiling glazing or can there be a base (i.e. 2'6" to the glazing but extends to ceiling height)? is there some where to find the true definition of full height glazing?

2) the qualifying multistory space: if the building has an atrium with glazing 2 1/2 stories high can the height of these windows be used to gain perimeter SF on the first floor? and can they also be used for perimeter SF on the 2nd floor as well?

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Shannon Roberts Project Manager, Sustainable Design Services HDR Architecture, Inc.
Jun 03 2013
Guest
164 Thumbs Up

Projects with basements

I am working on a Clinic that has one basement floor entirely below grade. There are no inpatient areas in this project so we only need to comply with the Non inpatient portion of the credit that gives a perimeter area threshold per floor plate. From looking at the Reference Guide, my understanding is that this project cannot meet the requirements for the credit since the basement floor plate will not have any windows to provide views in the perimeter areas and the credit is based on the worst performing floor plate, even though there is an additional 400,000 sq ft of clinic space spread over 4 floors above grade that complies with flying colors. Could someone tell me if I am correct? It seems to me that there should be some sort of calculation that averages the areas of perimeter spaces with views, otherwise any project that has the tiniest fraction of the building completely below grade will not comply.

Also, the calculations section of the reference guide gets into some semantics about "qualifying walls" in regards to below grade walls but is pretty vague and confusing as to whether the basement has no qualifying walls and therefore is an exception, or just does not meet the credit requirements.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jun 03 2013 LEEDuser Expert 13581 Thumbs Up

Shannon

I agree with you on the lack of guidance on basement floors and would love additional information or examples. I'm dealing with the same thing on a project where the radiology lin accs, PET scanners, MRI, CTs are all in the basement and are located along the outside walls to reduce radiation exposure, wall depths, etc. At the same time, I feel for the staff who have to work down there and think we should be better about light wells.

The way I read the credit (and I may be wrong here) is that the whole project is averaged out over the entire building for (1) perimeter rooms and (2) qualifying rooms. However, assuming that your 4 stories are over just the 1 story and all of the 4 stories qualify and there are no 'unqualified' rooms taken out, your project will be screwed if there are any occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space. below grade spaces. You're not likely to have that 10% offset from the above grade areas to apply to your below grade level until the building is over 9 or 10 stories tall. I hope that makes sense. Here's hoping someone from GBCI will read this thread and provide an assist.

Then there is the direct link between IEQc8.2 and IEc8.1!

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Marian Keeler Senior Associate Thornton Tomasetti / Sustainability
Apr 17 2013
LEEDuser Member
3323 Thumbs Up

Small Buildings are Ineligible?

We've just heard interesting news via the GBCI "contact us" portal and we'd be interested in a reality check. Our building has four floors of roughly 5,000 sf each. When we select the "Under 15,000 sf" option, the views calculator defaults to the threshold of 7,348 sf, which is obviously unworkable. We were told that our building is ineligible for this credit. It hardly seems fair or logical, not to mention sustainable, that a small building should be excluded from attempting this credit. Project like ours (situated on urban infill sites, in high density neighborhoods, located near transit) are in most respects more efficient and "sustainable" than the average building on which these credit assumptions are based. We intend to use the total sf for this credit calculator, as has been counseled above. Has anyone had experience in obtaining this credit for a small building?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 17 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Marian, could you quote us the relevant text from your GBCi contact, assuming it was in email form?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Apr 18 2013 LEEDuser Expert 13581 Thumbs Up

Marian, I am not sure why the 7,348 sf is becoming a critical floor area for LEED HC. (See conversation below with Olivier.) This may be something GBCI needs to explain more to project teams. If you can post the text as Tristan suggested, it may help us on the forum to help parse it out.

As you well know, not all credits are available to all projects despite the sustainability of the project in a broader sense. I think the key is understanding why 7,348 sf is important.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 18 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Marian sent me the relevant text, which I'll paste here. Basically it just sounds to me as though they haven't written the credit language for buildings this small, and it would require a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide or LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. to get them to extrapolate down further.

Quoting from GBCI: (note that this does not include the full inquiry, but I think everyone will get the idea)

1a. The floor plate area refers to the area of one floor plate. The Threshold values refer to the perimeter areas within 15 feet. If your project floor plate is less than the Threshold A value of 7,348, then yes, the credit is not applicable. The project team could potentially attempt one point for inpatient units but unfortunately, that doesn't offer the two points needed for IEQc8.1. There is discussion that this issue could potentially become a LEED Interpretation and reviewed by the TAGLEED Technical Advisory Group (TAG): Subcommittees that consist of industry experts who assist in developing credit interpretations and technical improvements to the LEED system. to see if the table could be extrapolated to floor plates lower than 15,000 square feet.

1b. All floor plates refer to the "Up to." value. So for future reference, a floor plate with a bGSF of 20,236 sf should be concerned with the 25,000 category.

2. Yes, obtaining points in IEQc8.1 is contingent upon achieving two points in IEQc8.2. This is a know discussion point and is being reevaluated.

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Marian Keeler Senior Associate, Thornton Tomasetti / Sustainability Apr 18 2013 LEEDuser Member 3323 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan and Susan - I'm following up with the developers of the credit. Failing a satisfactory answer, it is time for a LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org.. One thing we noted on the table is that the threshold ratios of spaces with views to "non-viewing" spaces seem to range from about 31% for a building 50,000 sf and over and 49% for a building 15,000 sf (per floor plate). So there seems to be some math at work here that makes it hard to propose alternative compliance. Essentially, the larger the building, the lower the requirement is.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Apr 19 2013 LEEDuser Expert 13581 Thumbs Up

Let us know how it goes Marian!

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Olivier Brouard Sustainable Energy Engineer
Apr 05 2013
Guest
240 Thumbs Up

Calculating Perimeter views for Non-Inpatient Areas IEQ8.2 ?

Hi everyone,

I am stuck with something not as straightforward as it sounds like.

For IEQ Credit 8.2 LEED Healthcare Supplement provides a table named :

1- Perimeter Non-IPU Area with Window Access Required. What does "non IPU" means ?

It provides the following categories then:
- Floor plate area (bgsf)
- Threshold A:1 point
- Threshold B:2 points

2- Does the Floor plate area (bgsf) refer to the overall surface areas of the building or concern the perimeter surface areas within 15 feet ? I am confused with the title of the table.

3 -Also, if my building has a bGSF of 20,236 sqft, then should I be concerned by the 20,000 or 25,000 category?

4- Finally, LEED Credit IEQ 8.1 specifies the requirement : RequirementsAchieve a minimum of two points under IEQ Credit 8.2: Daylight and Views—Views.
If my building is not getting any points for IEQ 8.2 whereas I have 2 point for IEQ 8.1, then I won't have any points for IEQ 8.1 at all ?

Thank you very much.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Apr 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 13581 Thumbs Up

This isn't one of my strength areas credit-wise but I'll give it a shot. Hopefully, someone else who has been working on earning this credit wll chime in.

1. Non-IPU means not an inpatient unit. The HC supplement has different standards for perimeter settings for inpatient and non inpatient units.

2. BGSF is the building gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features., so floor plans.

3. Yes, I would want to be at the 20,000 s.f. category. Read the definitions on floor area calcs and see what you can legitamately remove from the cals (some definitions are exterior of wall and some are interior of wall)

4. That is how I've been interpreting the credit. The project earns 8.2 before earning 8.1 which never seemed fair to me. It sets up one credit as a pre-req for another.

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Olivier Brouard Sustainable Energy Engineer Apr 05 2013 Guest 240 Thumbs Up

Hi Susan,

thanks for your quick feeback.
Unfair is pretty much was I think this is as well for daylighting credits. I don't see why they should be depending on each other. And actually if 8.1 depends on 8.2 prerequisite, then 8.2 credits should be named 8.1 first since it is a prerequisite >_O.

I believe there is something not really fair as well regarding the denominator (floor bgsf). Assuming there are a lot of of not regularly occupied space on a floor, then the amount of qualified regularly occupied within 15' will be even smaller and the threshold very hard to reach when calculating the ratio. Question bullet 2 should take into account the perimeter space as the bgsf to make it fair since we are dealing with views on the perimeter.

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Olivier Brouard Sustainable Energy Engineer Apr 11 2013 Guest 240 Thumbs Up

Hi Susan,

Looking back at question #2, how would you interpret the answer when my floor plate is 6,300 GSF (>15,000 GSF)?

The project falls below the floor plate threshold (>7,348 GSF) and there the credit language does not provide a method for interpolating compliance thresholds.

Then what would be the threshold applied to my floor plate ?

Thank you,

Olivier

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Kathy Wislocky Project Manager Isgenuity LLC
Dec 31 2012
Guest
373 Thumbs Up

Calculating Views for Healthcare Interiors Projects?

Has anyone contemplated an alternate compliance path for calculating views for a healthcare interiors project? Our project is actually using LEED CI since overall that rating system works best for our project. But for a credit like IEQ c 8.2 for Views, this is tough to achieve for a healthcare setting with exam rooms an so many occupiable spaces that require a certain amount of privacy. I'd like to try and use the LEED for Healthcare IEQ credit 8.2 as a loose guide to achieve alternate compliance for views, but I can't understand the logic to translate it to an interiors project. What I really need is a % of views achieved based on the various healthcare programs. (Exam rooms at least __%, Nurse stations at least ___%, etc.)

Does anyone have any creative ideas or experience with this? Thanks

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jan 02 2013 LEEDuser Expert 13581 Thumbs Up

How certain are you that the project mets the intent? I ask this because this credit is not often achieved in any program area and even lesss in healthcare. Do you want to spend your project dollars documenting this? Consider that the credit for non inpatient areas is to provide views for 90% of the building perimeter. Inpatient rules are to place staff areas and public areas by the windows (within 20').

I think you can incorporate the LEED HC standards into the CI program for healthcare. You must do this with the GBCI and you must maintain the rigor of the credit in the program you are applying for certification.

The credit logic recognizes that spaces like exam rooms and treatment areas have privacy demands that are more important than views. It also recognizes that outpatients may not spend the majority of their visits in a treatment space. Similarly, hospital staff can spend the entire day buried inside a building without glimpsing the outside. Imagine working a 12 hour shift deep in the bowels of a hospital and not seeing the sun once.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Dec 11 2012
LEEDuser Moderator

posts on old forum

Before LEEDuser set up these credit-specific Healthcare forums, there was a general Healthcare forum on which this IEQc8.2 question was posted. I am reposting the Q&A here for convenience:

Q: What do I need to do to comply with IEQc8.2? I would like to earn 2 points but don’t understand the two threshold levels and how to comply too either one. My building is only 2,700 sf, is my building too small to qualify? Please let me know.

A: Your project is not too small to qualify. But it probably is not an inpatient unit either. They give you 20 feet in that option to cover the depth of a patient sleep room and bring it back to 15 feet everywhere else. Follow the non-inpatient area guidelines and you may need to interpolate the point chart in the RG for a project your size.

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Joel Register Webmaster Perkins+Will
Nov 28 2012
Guest
212 Thumbs Up

Useable Square Footage

I am trying to determine what is considered "useable square footage" of a floor plate. The credits refers to both total floor plate and useable square footage. Any ideas?

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jan 02 2013 LEEDuser Expert 13581 Thumbs Up

Useable square footage is pretty much what is sounds like. Generally it is the area left after vertical circulation and structure are 'removed' from the total floor plate. It gets pretty technical beyond that. Your project probably has a space program document and the information should be in there.

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