Hospitality-EBOM-v4 MRc1: Purchasing - ongoing

  • Track sustainable purchases in key categories

    Credit achievement is based on the cost of environmentally preferable purchases compared to the cost of total, ongoing consumablesOngoing consumables have a low cost per unit and are regularly used and replaced in the course of business. Examples include paper, toner cartridges, binders, batteries, and desk accessories. purchased. All consumables (environmentally preferable and not) must be tracked. Teams must track relevant purchases made by both the building management and tenants during the performance period.

    The following ongoing consumable product categories must be tracked:

    • Paper
    • Toner cartridges
    • Binders
    • Desk accessories (e.g. staplers, plastic organizers, etc)
    • Batteries

    But as you know from developing your Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy for MRp1, projects must also determine their top five most-purchased product categories, based on annual purchases, and track those items as well.

    If your top five align with the categories listed above, that’s fine. But if they don’t align, you must include your project-specific top five categories in the policy and track them under this credit.

    Watch out for electric-powered equipment

    Electric-powered equipment is considered an “ongoing” purchase, and is also included in the scope of this credit. This means electric-powered equipment must be included in yourOngoing Purchasing and Waste Policy and tracked under this credit.

    Additionally, you must develop a phase-out plan to replace your remaining non-compliant electric-powered equipment with compliant models when they reach the end of their useful life. This requirement is new to LEED v4 and may be tricky to meet in multi-tenant buildings where the owner and building management don’t have direct control over tenant purchasing.

    Food: An additional requirement for school and hospitality buildings

    This credit gets more difficult to achieve if you’re working on a school or hospitality project. These building types must track all food purchases and demonstrate that at least 25% of these purchases meet the applicable sustainability criteria. This requirement is in addition to meeting the requirements for both ongoing consumables and electric-powered equipment.

    To earn exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements., at least 50% of food purchases must be compliant (and you must meet the exemplary performance thresholds for ongoing consumables and electric-powered equipment as well).

    Effective tenant outreach is key

    Collecting purchasing data from tenants can be challenging, so early and effective tenant outreach is key if you plan on pursuing this credit. LEED v4 does allow teams to exclude up to 10% of the project’s total floor area from the credit calculations, but this allowance may not be enough if several tenants are unwilling to participate.

    Don’t forget about your prerequisite policy

    This credit builds on the policy developed for the MRp1 Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy. The policy is essentially a blueprint for this credit and should include key information about your top five most-purchased product categories, the project’s environmentally preferred purchasing goals, and who should be involved in the process.

    But remember: although the policy is only required to cover purchases under the building management’s control, this credit covers all purchases in the building—tenants included. That means that if you’re planning to pursue the credit, your policy should reflect the entire building’s purchases.

    Credits combined from LEED 2009

    For those familiar with LEED 2009, this credit combines what were previously two separate credits. Teams must now track both ongoing consumables and electric-powered equipment—and meet the credit thresholds for each—to earn this credit. The credit thresholds are the same —60% sustainable ongoing consumables and 40% sustainable electric-powered equipment—but the credit is worth only one point.

    An exemplary performance point can be earned if 95% of ongoing consumables and 80% of electric-powered equipment meet the sustainability criteria.

    And don’t forget—if your building falls into the school or hospitality building types, you also have to meet the food purchasing requirements outlined above.

    Updated sustainability criteria under LEED v4

    Several familiar criteria are still in play for this credit that were relevant in LEED 2009, including recycled content, rechargeable batteries, FSCIndependent, third-party verification that forest products are produced and sold based on a set of criteria for forest management and chain-of-custody controls developed by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international nonprofit organization. FSC criteria for certifying forests around the world address forest management, legal issues, indigenous rights, labor rights, multiple benefits, and environmental impacts., Energy Star, and EPEATThe Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) is a green electronics registry, which requires manufacturers to meet “environmental performance criteria” and then rates qualified products as Gold, Silver or Bronze. EPEAT was created by the Environmental Protection Agency and the nonprofit Greener Electronics Council. .

    However, some new criteria have been added to the mix, and the minimum thresholds for some familiar criteria have been ratcheted up. These changes are likely to make the credit more difficult to achieve, given that the new criteria options are fairly limited, and the bar has been set higher for familiar standards.

    Ongoing consumables

    Post-consumer recycled content

    Products must meet the EPA Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines for Recycled Content for their product type. See the Documentation Toolkit for a summary of EPA’s recycled content guidelines for specific product types.

    Product types that are not covered by the EPA Guidelines get credit for their recycled content with no minimum. However, pre-consumer recycled content no longer contributes to credit compliance, as it did under LEED 2009

    Extended use

    Extended use refers to rechargeable batteries and re-manufactured toner cartridges. There are no changes from LEED 2009 here.

    FSC certified

    No changes. SFI (Sustainable Forestry Initiative) products are still not approved by USGBC and therefore do not contribute to credit compliance.

    Biobased material

    This is a new criterion under LEED v4. Bio-based materials are composed of biological products, renewable agricultural materials, or forestry products. To qualify as sustainable, bio-based materials must meet the Sustainable Agriculture Network’s (SAN) Sustainable Agriculture Standard, for FSC if they are forestry products.

    The most well-known label that meets the SAN standard is the Rainforest Alliance. Products can self-declare conformance with SAN but they must meet additional requirements (see MRc3 Purchasing – facility maintenance and renovation for details). Given the extra legwork required, it’s likely not worth the effort to document bio-based materials other than those that carry the Rainforest Alliance label.

    Electric-powered equipment

    EPEAT rated

    EPEAT rated products must have a Silver rating or better to contribute to credit compliance. In LEED 2009, any level of EPEAT rating was sufficient, including Bronze.

    The EPEAT program covers the following equipment types as of March 2016: desktop computers, laptops/notebooks, workstations, thin clients, displays (computer monitors), televisions, printers, copiers, scanners, multifunction devices, fax machines, digital duplicators and mailing machines.

    Energy Star qualified

    Energy Star may be used to demonstrate compliance only if the equipment type is not covered by the EPEAT program.

    For example, if you purchase an Energy Star qualified laptop that is not EPEAT Silver rated, you will not earn any credit for that purchase, since laptops are covered by EPEAT.

    Replacement of gas-powered equipment

    It’s rare for the equipment covered by this credit to use gas, but replacing existing gas-powered equipment with electric models (battery or corded) counts towards credit compliance. Gas-powered equipment that does not have an electric alternative can be excluded from the credit calculations completely.

    Food and beverages

    Local sourcing

    Local foods and beverages are defined as harvested and produced within a 100-mile radius of the project—no change from LEED 2009.

    Under LEED v4, only foods and beverages can use the local criteria for credit compliance. The local sourcing criterion no longer applies to other types of ongoing consumable products.

    Sustainable agriculture

    All of the labels that were accepted under LEED 2009 are still accepted under LEED v4: USDAUnited States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is the U.S. federal department that administers programs that provide services to farmers. Organic, Food Alliance Certified, Rainforest Alliance Certified, Protected Harvest Certified, Fair Trade, and Marine Stewardship Council’s Blue Eco-Label.

    Some additional labels are also accepted under LEED v4: Canada Organic and European Community Organic Production.

    Calculating compliance: only the sustainable portion counts

    Only the sustainable portion of a product counts towards credit compliance. This is a major departure from LEED 2009, which counted the total cost of a product towards compliance if at least one approved sustainability criterion was met.

    For example, if you purchased $1,000 worth of 30% recycled content office paper, the value that contributes to earning the credit drops from $1,000 under LEED 2009 to $300 under LEED v4.

    But, products that meet more than one sustainability criterion still earn credit for both criteria. In this scenario, the dollar value that contributes for the first sustainability criterion is simply added to the dollar value that contributes for the second criterion.

    For example, $20 worth of USDA Organic apples that were grown 90 miles from your building would contribute $40 towards earning the credit.

    This new approach to calculating compliance rewards teams for purchasing products that contain higher proportions of sustainable materials or that meet multiple sustainability criteria.

    USGBC has created a calculator to help teams track purchases, the sustainability criteria met, and the contribution to credit compliance. This calculator is posted in the Resources tab.

    FAQs for MRc1

    What are some good strategies for earning this credit and avoiding a documentation nightmare?

    There are a few ways to focus your purchasing and documentation efforts that can help you earn this credit more easily.

    First, swap out the products you spend the most money on annually for versions that meet one or more of the sustainability criteria. Good products to target include:

    • paper products
    • disposable kitchen goods
    • computers, laptops, and monitors

    Second, target higher-cost products where 100% of the cost will count towards credit compliance. Rechargeable batteries and remanufactured toner cartridges are good examples.

    Third, select products that meet more than one sustainability criterion. This allows you to apply a greater percentage of the cost towards credit compliance.

    And finally, get familiar with USGBC’s MR calculator and document purchases at regular intervals so there are no surprises at the end of your project’s performance period. This calculator is posted in the Resources tab.

    If a product meets more than one of the sustainability criteria, can more than 100% of the product cost contribute toward credit compliance?

    Yes. Even if the total contributing dollar value exceeds 100% of the actual product cost, the full amount calculated contributes to credit compliance. For example, if you purchase apples that come from a farm within 100 miles and are also USDA Organic certified, the purchase would contribute 200% of the actual cost of the apples.

    Note that electric-powered equipment that meets both the EPEAT Silver and the ENERGY STAR criteria is only eligible to contribute 100% of the actual cost. This is because EPEAT takes ENERGY STAR’s metrics into account, and so double counting is not permitted in this case.

    I purchased a product with pre-consumer (a.k.a. post-industrial) recycled content. Does that count?

    No. While this criterion counted as sustainable under LEED 2009, it no longer contributes to earning the credit under LEED v4.

    If only part of a food purchase is locally sourced, can it still contribute towards credit compliance?

    Yes, the portion of the product that was sourced locally contributes towards compliance.

    It can be tricky to tease out what percentage was locally sourced when it comes to products with multiple ingredients. Focus on procuring whole products locally (eggs, milk, fruits, and vegetables, for example), in order to streamline and simplify your documentation efforts.

    Does a product labeled under the USDA BioPreferred Program count for anything?

    No. The USDA BioPreferred Program (a.k.a. USDA Certified Biobased) is another bio-based material label on the market. However, the USDA BioPreferred program doesn’t include any metrics for tracking whether bio-based products come from sustainably harvested crops, so LEED does not recognize this label.

    If equipment is leased, instead of purchased, is there any LEED credit benefit to the property for leasing Energy Star Equipment?

    Yes, electric powered equipment that is leased to the project space is allowed to be included in the credit calculation. The cost of leased equipment for this calculation is the cost of the lease contract during the performance period. If leased equipment is included in the credit, all leased equipment (within the credit scope) must be included.

  • MR Credit 1: Purchasing - ongoing

    Intent

    To reduce environmental harm from materials used in the operations and maintenance of buildings.

    Requirements

    Establishment

    None.

    Performance

    Ongoing Consumables

    Purchase at least 60%, by cost, of total ongoing consumables that meet at least one of the following criteria. Include the product categories identified in the Materials and Resources prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy. Lamps are excluded from the calculation. Each purchase can receive credit for each criterion met.

    • Postconsumer recycled content. The content of purchases must meet or exceed the levels listed in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines. Products not covered by the Guidelines can get credit for their recycled content with no minimum.
    • Extended use. Batteries must be rechargeable. Toner cartridges for laser printers must be remanufactured.
    • Sustainable agriculture. Food and beverages must be labeled USDAUnited States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is the U.S. federal department that administers programs that provide services to farmers. Organic, Food Alliance Certified, Rainforest Alliance Certified, Protected Harvest Certified, Fair Trade, or Marine Stewardship Council’s Blue Eco-Label, Canada Organic logo in accordance with Organic Products Regulations (SOR/2009-176), or labeled with the European Community Organic Production logo in accordance with Regulations (EC) No. 834/2007 and (EC) No. 889/2008.
    • Local sourcing of food and beverages. The food or beverage must contain raw materials harvested and produced within 100 miles (160 kilometers) of the site.
    • Bio-based materials. Bio-based products must meet the Sustainable Agriculture Network’s Sustainable Agriculture Standard. Bio-based raw materials must be tested using ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services Test Method D6866 and be legally harvested, as defined by the exporting and receiving country. Exclude hide products, such as leather and other animal skin material.
    • Paper and wood products. Paper and wood products must be certified by the Forest Stewardship Council or USGBC-approved equivalent.
    Electric-Powered Equipment

    Purchase at least 40%, by cost, electric-powered equipment that meets at least one of the following criteria. Include product categories specified in Materials and Resources prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy. In addition, create a phase-out plan to replace remaining products with compliant equipment at the end of their useful life.

    • EPEATThe Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) is a green electronics registry, which requires manufacturers to meet “environmental performance criteria” and then rates qualified products as Gold, Silver or Bronze. EPEAT was created by the Environmental Protection Agency and the nonprofit Greener Electronics Council. rating. The equipment must have a silver Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) rating or better.
    • ENERGY STAR rating. If the equipment does not yet fall under the EPEAT rating systems, it must be ENERGY STAR® qualified or performance equivalent for projects outside the U.S. [Europe ACP: ENERGY STAR Equivalent]
    Food and Beverages

    Purchase at least 25%, by cost, of total combined food and beverage purchases must meet at least one of the following criteria. Exclude wine, beer, and liquor purchases from the credit calculations.

    • Sustainable agriculture. The food or beverage must be labeled USDA Organic, Food Alliance Certified, Rainforest Alliance Certified, Protected Harvest Certified, Fair Trade, or Marine Stewardship Council’s Blue Eco-Label, or labeled with the European Community Organic Production logo in accordance with Regulations (EC) No. 834/2007 and (EC) No. 889/2008.
    • Local sourcing. The food or beverage must contain raw materials harvested and produced within 100 miles (160 kilometers) of the site.

    Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

    Europe ACP: ENERGY STAR Equivalent

    Projects in Europe may use the following approved standards in place of ENERGY STAR:

    • EU Energy Star
    • TCO
    • Blue Angel

Web Tools

Purchasing Calculator

Use the Purchasing Calculator to track and document purchases for LEED v4 O+M MR Credit Purchasing - Ongoing, LEED v4 O+M MR Credit Purchasing - Facility Maintenance and Renovation, and LEED v4 O+M MR Credit Purchasing - Lamps. The calculator includes a separate summary for LEED v4 O+M: Schools and LEED v4 O+M: Hospitality projects. Use the summary tab in the calculator to complete the form in LEED Online.

EPA Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines

This credit references the EPA comprehensive procurement guidelines (CPG) but the burden is on teams to go find the minimum recycled content for each product type. We've gathered info on the relevant products into one document.

Purchasing Calculator

Use this calculator from USGBC to tally purchases and document credit compliance.

Sample Products and Calculations – Ongoing Purchasing Example

These samples show what data to look for on a product sheet and how to calculate contributing value to earning purchasing credits.

0 Comments

Start a new LEED comment thread

Feb 19 2017
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2017 – BuildingGreen, Inc.