NC-2009 EAc3: Enhanced Commissioning

  • NC, Schools, CS EAc3 & EAp1 Enhanced Cx Diagram
  • Benefits of commissioning

    You may think of commissioning, including hiring a commissioning agent, as an added cost—and it is. It’s likely to reduce your operational costs, however, by yielding 5%–10% improvements in energy efficiency and ensuring that facilities personnel know how to operate key building systems. It’s also a great way to catch mistakes like missing or incorrectly installed equipment, avoiding occupant complaints and callbacks, indoor air quality and thermal comfort problems, premature equipment failure, and litigation.

    Commissioning (Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included.) is the process of verifying that the building’s systems operate as intended and according to the owner’s requirements as set forth in project documents. Commissioning helps fill the gap between the design team, whose members usually aren’t meant to be responsible for checking minor construction details, and subcontractors, who may inadvertently err on key items like fan power settings or sensor locations. The commissioning agent (CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements.) also  provides the owner with the expert oversight of an engineer.

    What is fundamental vs. enhanced commissioning?

    Fundamental Commissioning is a LEED prerequisite, although there are different compliance paths available depending on the project’s size. For projects less than 50,000 ft2, the CxA may be involved in the project as an associate of the contractor, construction manager, architect, or engineer and may have other project responsibilities. For projects over that size, the CxA may be still be from the same firm as a project team member, as long as he or she is not otherwise involved in the project. In both cases an independent consultant contracted to the owner is also an option, and may bring more value by offering better objectivity and  a different perspective than someone associated with the design team.

    Mechanical system imageCommissioning agents discovered that the triple-duty valve (in white circle) for this condenser water system serving a chiller and cooling tower was 80% closed. This inappropriate solution to an oversized pump was costing over $6,700 per year in wasted pumping energy. Courtesy Portland Energy Conservation, Inc.

    For the Enhanced Commissioning credit, an independent consultant is required to be the CxA. Enhanced commissioning can offer additional benefits by involving the CxA earlier during design (instead of at the bid stage), by requiring the CxA to develop an operations manual and verify that staff are trained with it, and by requiring the CxA to review operations within 8–10 months of substantial completion.

    Scope of commissioning

    Include at least the following in the scope of commissioning:

    • Heating, cooling, refrigeration, ventilation systems and controls
    • Lighting and daylighting controls
    • Domestic hot water systems
    • Renewable energy systems

    Choosing enhanced or fundamental commissioning

    LEED divides the commissioning process into two parts, with the commissioning process for both enhanced and fundamental starting at or before design documents. Fundamental commissioning focuses on installation and verification of the mechanical and electrical systems during construction. Enhanced commissioning covers a broader scope of systems, and involves broader participation of the CxA, beginning during construction documents and continuing through occupancy.

    The Enhanced Commissioning credit is open to any project, but project teams often choose not to pursue it due to the increased cost and uncertainty around its benefits. Enhanced  commissioning fees are typically $0.90–$1.20/ft2 for LEED-NC and LEED for Schools projects. These fees represent a 25%–40% cost increase over fundamental commissioning, while providing almost double the scope of work. All projects benefit with enhanced commissioning, though it can be more obvious for large or more complex projects. Projects can choose to make the decision for pursuing enhanced until after receiving the bid proposal, in order to evaluate the actual cost, but should hire a commissioning agent by the end of design development for enhanced commissioning.

    Scope of work for LEED Commissioning credits

  • FAQs for EAc3

    Who can perform enhanced commissioning services?

    Generally, the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. for Enhanced Commissioning must not have any connection to the design or construction of the building.  The CxA can be a subcontractor to the design team or construction manager, but the preferred option is for CxA to be directly contracted by the owner. For more details on who can be the CxA, see the Design Development section of the Checklists tab.

    Can non-design consultants on the project provide enhanced commissioning services?

    Yes. Consultants who provide non-design services, such as LEED services or energy modeling, can also be the CxA for the project. However, if those firms have affected the design of the building, they should not be selected as the CxA.

    If my project uses a District Energy System (DES) is enhanced commissioning required for the DES?

    Maybe. Consult Treatment of District of Campus Thermal Energy in LEED V2 and LEED 2009. Depending on the characteristics of your project, commissioning of upstream DES equipment may be required. Commissioning is required only for DES equipment utilized by the LEED project. For example, a project that utilizes district steam but not chilled water is only required to commission DES steam equipment. Commissioning of DES equipment can be performed by the owner of the DES equipment or by an independent third party.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

Expand All

  • Owners' Project Requirements (OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project.) are developed and signed off on by the owner with assistance from the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements., or developed by the CxA for owner approval. The OPR works as the guideline to develop a design that meets the owner’s requirements. See the Documentation Toolkit for a template and sample OPR


  • Spray painted photocell.In commissioning a new facility, the commissioning agent discovered that this outdoor photocell controlling the exterior and parking lot lighting had been sprayed with paint and did not function properly. Courtesy Portland Energy Conservation, Inc.The project will benefit from the Owner’s active role in developing the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. with specific goals for energy efficiency and other systems. Owners often find it helpful to state goals in terms of a minimum acceptable level and a specified payback period, for example, “The building is aimed to save 20% energy as compared to a code compliant building with a total payback of less than 5 years. Our goal is to provide a comfortable space with user controlled lighting and ventilation to minimize waste and maximize comfort. The operations and maintenance staff are to be aware and able to support the intent of smooth controls. Owners typically work with the architects to put the project goals on paper. Revisiting meeting notes from initial project discussions can be helpful in assimilating client goals.


  • Commissioning generates an average savings of 28 percent of predicted annual energy use, according to the 2004 study, “The Cost-Effectiveness of Commissioning New and Existing Commercial Buildings: Lessons from 224 Buildings.” (See Resources.)

Schematic Design

Expand All

  • Develop the Basis of Design (BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines.), working with the design team, including at least the architect, mechanical, electrical and plumbing engineers with lighting designer. Along with the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project., the BOD facilitates constant discussion on realistic owner’s goals and the team’s input in addressing them. The architect, owner, and engineer update the OPR and BOD throughout the project to maintain accuracy for the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements., and they are used as benchmarks during cost estimating and value engineering. The BOD also has a general role in project development, beyond its use in commissioning requirements. Items like water conservation, renewable energy and indoor air comfort goals should be included although it is not a common practice. See the Documentation Toolkit for a template and sample BOD.


  • Projects with district energy systems must commission, for the prerequisite, all “downstream” equipment—systems installed for the building’s use and included in the project costs. Downstream equipmentDownstream equipment consists of all heating or cooling systems, equipment, and controls located within the project building and site associated with transporting thermal energy into heated or cooled spaces. This includes the thermal connection or interface with the district energy system, secondary distribution systems in the building, and terminal units. may include air handling units, variable-air-volume (VAVVariable Air Volume (VAV) is an HVAC conservation feature that supplies varying quantities of conditioned (heated or cooled) air to different parts of a building according to the heating and cooling needs of those specific areas.) boxes, duct work, pumps, controls and fans. “Upstream” district energy equipment, such as chillers, boilers, cogenerationThe simultaneous production of electric and thermal energy in on-site, distributed energy systems; typically, waste heat from the electricity generation process is recovered and used to heat, cool, or dehumidify building space. Neither generation of electricity without use of the byproduct heat, nor waste-heat recovery from processes other than electricity generation is included in the definition of cogeneration. equipment and other components of a district heating and cooling plant that serve the project building may need to be commissioned for the Enhanced Commissioning credit.


  • Making project intent clear and specific in writing the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. and BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. pays off in numerous ways. The CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. is better able to accurately bid on the job, and better establish a clear commissioning plan. The more vague the project goals, the less effective commissioning presence will be.


  • The architect, mechanical and electrical engineer, and lighting designer describe the standards, goals and performance levels of the designed building systems in the BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines..


  • The owner can include additional building systems in the commissioning scope, such as the building envelope, fire and safety systems, and water collection systems.


  • Financial incentives for energy efficiency, including commissioning as an integral component may be offered by state and local agencies. For example, New York State pays a portion of a commissioning agent fees and provides further incentives if some energy efficiency recommendations are implemented. See Resources for more information on incentives.


  • Commissioning costs per square foot for multifamily or similar buildings may be higher than open-floor commercial spaces due to the number of systems to be installed and the higher sampling rate of commissioned systems.


  • Payback may be faster for commissioning of systems-intensive facilities such as healthcare facilities and laboratories. A lot can go wrong in the complex controls and building management systems in these facilities, and because of the level of energy consumption involved, those mistakes can be expensive. Commissioning activities like testing and balancing, functional performance testingThe process of determining the ability of the commissioned systems to perform in accordance with the owner's project requirements, basis of design (BOD), and construction documents., and sequence verification are particularly useful here while enhanced commissioning activities of staff training verification and manual development highly valuable.


  • If properly implemented, commissioning will pay for itself within a year of operation, or even during design.  Savings are likely to be realized from:

    •   Reduction or elimination of change orders
    •   Reduction or elimination of requests for information
    •   Proper system and component selection
    •   Improved performance.

Design Development

Expand All

  • For best value the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. hiring process should start during design development when mechanical systems are identified and the CxA should hired by the end of design development.  Put together the Cx RFP and select the CxA. This is more critical if the project is pursuing the Enhanced Commissioning credit. The process may include soliciting proposals from independent parties. See the Documentation Toolkit for help in writing the Cx RFP and hiring the right CxA


  • ASHRAE Guideline 0 and most commissioning guidelines and process handbooks suggest hiring a CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. before the MEP engineer, if possible, in order to kick off the commissioning process at the beginning of the project, and ensuring the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. is adhered to throughout design development. However, most RFP processes for commissioning agent begin after the architect and MEP engineer have been hired. The RFP process should involve the architect and mechanical engineer to be sure that it accurately reflects the project’s requirements. The mechanical engineer lists all the building systems equipment to be commissioned and identifies the required sampling rates in the RFP. If the systems are not yet defined, a description of the mechanical design direction would be included in the project intent and RFP.


  • Request that proposals provide fee breakdowns for fundamental and enhanced commissioning. This would allow the owner to know the cost differential between the services and consider enhanced commissioning.


  • The CxA’s main role is to provide third-party verification that the design is installed and operating as per construction documents. The CxA is not meant to fill the role of the MEP engineer, but rather to be a technical expert in the owner’s team. It is in the owner’s or client best interest to hire a CxA by design development and introduce the project goals, team and schedule.


  • Although the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. is not expected to deliver much during design, the presence of the CxA in the team meetings and drawings development is more integrated into the process. The team also gets to learn more about the commissioning activities and tailor the drawings based on what the CxA is looking for during document review.


  • Early hiring and meeting attendance by the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. during Enhanced Commissioning may be perceived as high cost, but should allow reduced on-site presence during construction and reduced errors during design and installation. It facilitates a preventive rather than reactive involvement.


  • Choose your CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements., depending on the size of your project, the owner's preferences, and whether you are attempting the enhanced credit or simply the prerequisite.
 

    Who can the the Commissioning Agent?


  • An independent consultant, as compared to one from the same firm as the design team, is in the best position to truly represent the owner’s interests during design and construction, including installation of key systems. As commissioning agents are often experienced mechanical engineers, they can provide input into the project design and any recommendations on improved project efficiency.

     

    Commissioning Authority QualificationsFrom the LEED Reference Guide ©USGBC


  • Enhanced commissioning fees are typically 20%-30% more than fundamental commissioning while providing double the benefits. The return on investment is substantially more when the commissioning agent is involved early and is committed to revisit the project in operation.


  • Include commissioning costs during initial project budgeting to avoid later surprises.


  • Wait until receiving bids to decide whether or not to pursue EAc3: Enhanced Commissioning. If you request two different fees for the two scopes, you can easily assess the cost and benefits of Enhanced Commissioning.


  • New construction projects had median commissioning costs of $1.00/ft2 (or 0.6% of average total construction costs) in a 2004 study of 224 buildings, and yielded a median simple payback period of 4.8 years from energy-efficiency improvements (and excluding quantified non-energy impacts).

Construction Documents

Expand All

  • Incorporate commissioning specifications in Division 1 for general information and commissioning notes into mechanical and electrical specifications. See the Documentation Toolkit for a sample specification.


  • The commissioning agent develops a commissioning plan based on the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project., BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. and commissioning meeting. The commissioning plan works as the guidebook of commissioning for the rest of the team. It demystifies the process and lists the responsibilities of the design and construction team. The plan discusses the roles of key team members, includes the latest versions of the OPR and BOD, specifies system sampling rates, anticipates pitfalls, and provides a commissioning schedule. In addition, the commissioning agent provides a general commissioning schedule based on the design and construction schedule that may or may not be defined at that moment.


  • A good commissioning specification clarifies subcontractor responsibilities associated with verification and testing. Doing so eliminates any potential change orders associated with “extra” work required for systems commissioning.


  • Dedicate a project team meeting to commissioning process to review each team member’s role and scope and to ensure they know what is required for LEED certification.


  • Specifications need to include commission details. If the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. is not on board by this point, refer to standard commissioning specifications to ensure it is included in the bid package.


  • Refer to the commissioning plan regularly throughout the project to understand the roles and responsibilities of all team members relative to completing a quality project. It is a valuable document and is regularly under-utilized. Additionally, the commissioning plan should be updated to include contractor information and a more specific and accurate scope once equipment has been selected during the design phase (if previously not defined).


  • Specifications eliminate potential change orders associated with “extra” work required for systems commissioning by sub contractors. These specifications inform the commissioning agent’s responsibility and how it will impact the sub-contractors presence on site. Poorly written specifications that do not include details would leave uncertainties and gaps in contractor’s expectations.


  • The CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. meets the design team to explain the commissioning scope and collaboration with the design and construction team. The CxA provides commissioning specifications to be included in the specification book and reviews 50% Construction Documents and specifications to make sure they are aligned with the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. and include commissioning activities. The CxA reviews the construction bid submittals by prospective contractors.


  • Even after the 50% construction documents review, CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. will not be required to meet again. Even then, it is useful to let the CxA know of the design progress. Include them on the weekly meeting-minutes mailing lists. Design changes may affect the commissioning plan, to be commissioned equipment list, and probably the commissioning scope.


  • Construction documents review by the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. is a great opportunity to get a third-party technical assessment on the design. The CxA works on behalf of the owner to match up the design with the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project.. During the design review, the CxA may be able to identify an over-sized system, for example, or limited controls or incorrect fan unit location.




  • The CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. is involved in the bid selection process, after approving the specifications and bid package.


  • Clarify the involvement of contractors in the commissioning process during bid meetings to avoid padding of fees. Contractors may increase their bids because of seeing the commissioning specifications and being unfamiliar with expectations around their level of involvement.

Construction

Expand All

  • CxA with air handling unit.A CxA checks filter placement on a newly installed air handling unit. YRG PhotoThe CxA stays abreast of construction progress by attending at least some meetings and receiving updates. As equipment is installed, the CxA verifies installation of equipment to be commissioned, and performs functional testing in collaboration with subcontractors, including running the duct system under performance specifications and ensuring that they are balanced as required. The CxA runs the heating and cooling systems to ensure there are no installation problems, and the subcontractor corrects any defects or leaks.


  • Normal subcontractor testing can often be performed in coordination with commissioning.  Proper coordination of these activities can reduce total commissioning time and reduce system problems. The commissioning process may require additional coordination time for subcontractors, which can result in additional contract costs. During the construction team bidding phase, include Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. coordination (at a minimum) in the scope of the mechanical, electrical and controls subcontractors.


  • The CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. develops a commissioning report for the owner and project team including reports on all visits, observations and recommendations. A Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. Report is the final deliverable. It lists all of the activities carried out, testing results and recommendations. Typical recommendations may refer to misbalanced vents, incorrect fan power, incorrect system sizing, dampers not present where specified, and incorrectly installed switches. The CxA is available for a final meeting and to discuss all recommendations for clarifications. Note that the commissioning process is not completed until all open items or deficiencies have been corrected or accepted by the owner. Finally, the CxA completes the LEED Online documentation and uploads all required documents.


  • The commissioning agent’s involvement in team meetings, both in pre-construction and construction, provides the subcontractors the chance to understand the role, tasks and expectations of a CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements.. Construction teams benefit from learning how the commissioning activities help their job, decrease their onsite presence by taking responsibility for quality control, and reduce contractors’ liability. For example, a malfunctioning air vent, if not commissioned, will eventually be found after months of fault finding and may cause out of pocket expenses for the sub-contractor.


  • Functional testing, in which the whole system, and depending on scope, individual components are tested, is a critical part of commissioning. Observations range from larger scale to very basic, such as diffusersIn an HVAC context, diffusers disperse heating, cooling, or ventilation air as it enters a room, ideally preventing uncomfortable direct currents and in many cases, reducing energy costs and improving indoor air quality (IAQ). In light fixtures, diffusers filter and disperse light. supplying more than 10% of the recommended fan rate, outside air enthalpy sensor placed in a return air flow instead of supply flow, or incorrect temperature sensor settings.


  • LEED documentation can be submitted prior to the final commissioning report being completed, including verification of commissioned systems. A contract to complete these items is sufficient.


  • The CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. develops a systems manual for the commissioned systems in collaboration with the facilities management—carrying the design intentA written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. into building operations. Before occupancy, the CxA verifies the facilities staff is trained to operate the building systems as intended by the designer. CxA is the only person who has attended design meetings and is continuing their contract into operations to communicate how the controls work and the strategies identified to save energy. For example, if the designer and owner have agreed on a specific heating set point that needs to be communicated to the operator. The CxA also reviews all equipment warranties and verifies that all requirements to keep the warranty valid are clearly stated.


  • The CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. documents system startup procedures and operations as part of the training manual. While this may seem like a basic step, it is not standard practice, and is essential for when the facilities staff changes or is absent. Specific measures such as set points, setbacks, controls, and part-load adjustments are can mean the difference between energy efficiency and wastefulness.


  • Enhanced commissioning extends into the system startup phase, bridging the gap between design into the operations hand-over. Design and installation is only the first part of running an energy-efficient building. The real benefits are realized during operation. The CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. provides a common link between the design team, installation contractors, and the operations team, providing added value at all steps of the process.

Operations & Maintenance

Expand All

  • The CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. develops commissioning report including all testing and observations. A Commissioning Report is the final deliverable for the commissioning prerequisite. It lists all the activities carried out, testing results and recommendations. The CxA is available for a final meeting and to discuss all recommendations for clarifications.


  • LEED compliance does not require the implementation of commissioning report recommendations, but after having paid the commissioning exercise, not implementing the recommendations would be a waste of money.


  • Commissioning agent with facilities personnelWith enhanced commissioning, the CxA ensures that an operations manual is developed and staff training takes place after installation. YRG PhotoThe CxA oversees the staff training on equipment operation. During the first several months of occupancy, conduct as many training sessions as necessary with the CxA to ensure correct operation by the staff.


  • Stagger equipment training to allow staff to become familiar with the systems. Make sure that this is reflected in contracts because typically the training is scheduled for same time to reduce the contractor’s presence on site. This stagger might delay the payment to the contractor and conflict with the contract, but provides the owner with a conformation of smooth operation


  • Commissioning agent with BAS metersThe commissioning agent checks the meters installed on the building monitoring system. YRG PhotoCommissioning supports a smooth transition from design into operations by avoiding future change orders. It ensures the equipment is installed per manufacturer’s instructions and aligned with the design intentA written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project.. It reduces waste of energy and money due to incorrect control settings or system settings that aren’t fully optimized.


  • Meet training requirements for facilities staff and occupants, with verification by the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements..


  • CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. to revisit the project after 8–10 months of occupancy. Facility managers and owners can use this opportunity to discuss challenges and issues that arose since construction completion. The CxA reviews the maintenance log and confirms the operations and maintenance manual matches with the actual operations.


  • If pursuing IEQc7.2: Thermal Comfort—Verification, including a user survey on thermal comfort issues, the results can be discussed with the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. to identify any problems. The user survey can be scheduled before the CxA visits to get the results available on time. 


  • Maximize the value of the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements.’s 10-month visit by having the facilities personnel thoroughly prepare a detailed agenda developed in collaboration with the CxA. Among other things, this will make sure the CxA completes the commissioning plan’s full scope within one visit.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    EA Credit 3: Enhanced commissioning

    2 Points

    Intent

    To begin the commissioning process early in the design process and execute additional activities after systems performance verification is completed.

    Requirements

    Implement, or have a contract in place to implement, the following additional commissioning process activities in addition to the requirements of EA Prerequisite 1: Fundamental Commissioning of Building Energy Systems and in accordance with the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Design and Construction, 2009 Edition:

    • Prior to the start of the construction documents phase, designate an independent commissioning authority (CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements.) to lead, review, and oversee the completion of all commissioning process activities.
      • The CxA must have documented commissioning authority experience in at least 2 building projects.
      • The individual serving as the CxA:
        • Must be independent of the work of design and construction.
        • Must not be an employee of the design firm, though he or she may be contracted through them.
        • Must not be an employee of, or contracted through, a contractor or construction manager holding construction contracts.
        • May be a qualified employee or consultant of the owner.
      • The CxA must report results, findings and recommendations directly to the owner.
    • The CxA must conduct, at a minimum, 1 commissioning design review of the owner’s project requirements basis of design, and design documents prior to the midconstruction documents phase and back-check the review comments in the subsequent design submission.
    • The CxA must review contractor submittals applicable to systems being commissioned for compliance with the owner’s project requirements and basis of design. This review must be concurrent with the review of the architect or engineer of record and submitted to the design team and the owner.
    • The CxA or other project team members must develop a systems manual that provides future operating staff the information needed to understand and optimally operate the commissioned systems.
    • The CxA or other project team members must verify that the requirements for training operating personnel and building occupants have been completed.
    • The CxA must be involved in reviewing the operation of the building with operations and maintenance (O&M) staff and occupants within 10 months after substantial completion. A plan for resolving outstanding commissioning-related issues must be included.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Although it is preferable that the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. be contracted by the owner, for the enhanced commissioning credit the CxA may also be contracted through the design firms or construction management firms not holding construction contracts.

    The LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Design and Construction, 2009 Edition provides detailed guidance on the rigor expected for the following process activities:

    • Commissioning design review
    • Commissioning submittal review
    • Systems manual.

Publications

Best Practices in Commissioning New Construction

The New Construction Building Commissioning Best Practice is intended to cover the general new construction commissioning process that is applicable to most systems. It is necessarily non-specific in most cases, but where a practice seems unclear by its varied application, more detail is given.


The Cost-Effectiveness of Commissioning New and Existing Building Commercial Buildings: Lessons from 224 Buildings

A meta-analysis of studies of a large sample of commissioned buildings, this paper, which is concerned with national-level energy goals, was presented at the 2005 National Conference on Building Commissioning, and is a shorter form of a study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.


Best Practices in Commissioning Existing Buildings

Published by the Building Commissioning Association, this report draws on a number of sets of guidelines to identify the key phases of the commissioning process, and provides a glossary of terms.


Costs and Benefit of Commissioning New and Existing Commercial Buildings

This presentation-format overview of commissioning looks at the reasons for and scope of commissioning, with a focus on the potential for cost savings and avoiding problems.


Stay On-line: Data Center Commissioning

An ASHRAE Journal article, this examines the special challenges of ensuring reliability in mission-critical systems supporting facilities such as data centers. (Mark Hydeman, Reinhard Seidl and Charles Shalley, 2005)


Establishing Commissioning Costs

Offering guidance for estimating commissioning costs during the design and construction phases of a project, this article addresses LEED requirements and special circumstances that can affect the cost of commissioning. (Portland Energy Conservation, 2000; revised 2002)

Web Tools

Establishing Commissioning Fees

This article, which appeared in the ASHRAE Journal, uses data for 19 actual projects to look at commissioning costs in various ways. (Ronald J. Wilkinson, 2000)

Commissioning Agents

Use these templates to find and assess a commissioning agent for your project.

Owner's Project Requirements (OPR)

The OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. works as the guideline in development of a design that meets the owner’s requirements.

Basis of Design (BOD)

Prepared by the design team, the BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. explains through narrative and documentation how the proposed design meets the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project..

Commissioning Specifications

Incorporate commissioning specifications into Division 1.

Commissioning Plan

The commissioning plan works as the guidebook for commissioning, discussing the roles of key team members, and providing a commissioning schedule, among other requirements.

Commissioning Report

The commissioning report is the final deliverable from the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements., including reports on all visits, observations and recommendations.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 EA

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each NC-2009 EA credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictsions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

261 Comments

0
0
Timothy Casper Voith & Mactavish Architects
Oct 24 2014
LEEDuser Member
245 Thumbs Up

Separate CxA's for Fundamental and Enhanced Cx?

Project Location: United States

In a traditional design-bid-build project, does the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. need to be responsible for both fundamental and enhanced Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included.? Or can these credits be split between two CxA's?

1
2
0
Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Oct 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 15687 Thumbs Up

They can be split but the enhanced CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. has to have oversight of the fundamental CxA. Read through this thread as I've posted about the requirements before based on a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for a v3 project.

2
2
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Oct 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

Susan is right (back from Greenbuild). The key is to have that oversight clear and obvious from the start, and that the contracts and narrative of the enhanced report show this.

I have been involved in these relationships (in both roles by the way), and as long as the two firms work together and keep communication open and easy, it can work.

Post a Reply
0
0
Margaret Manuel Tetra Tech
Oct 22 2014
LEEDuser Member

Commissioning of renewable energy systems

Project Location: United States

EAc3 requires the individual serving as the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. to "be independent of the work of design and construction." It also states this person "must not be an employee of, or contravted through a contractor holding construction contract." Typically, PV companies are turn-key, one stop, design-build-commission. If there was a single company / subcontractor that designed, provided, installed, tested and commissioned a complete roof mounted PV solar system, will this credit be denied to our team? If so, is there any way around this - AFTER the fact?

1
2
0
Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Oct 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 15687 Thumbs Up

Does the project already have a CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements.? It seems to me that the PV people can do their turn key thing with the CxA doing oversight. As for the after the fact? I'm hoping Scott will have better thoughts for you when he is back from Greenbuild.

2
2
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Oct 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

Susan is right again. This is a very typical delivery method, but as long as the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. oversees the testing, and has some say in the methodology, then that is acceptable. Installers often say "commissioning" when they really mean "check out". I have seen great variation in the procedures used.

For example, there was a case where the PV was reporting negative values from their proprietary metering to the BAS system, which was programed to subtract the production from the building use...as you have already guessed, building energy use went up!

The key to PV is the integration to the building systems and electrical metering, and many times that is not something the installer is doing, so there are still items to be commissioned.

As for the "after the fact", I would strongly recommend that the CxA develop a testing protocol and get out there and do the performance testing and provide an addendum to the commissioning report if it is already issued.

Post a Reply
0
0
Gina Dederer URS Deutschland GmbH
Oct 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
6 Thumbs Up

Contract between owner and CxA

Project Location: Germany

We recently had this credit denied based on the fact that our contract did not explicitly state that the 10 month follow-up review is included in the activities of EAc3, even though we provided a confirmation letter that was signed by both parties and stated that we were contracted for both Fundamental and Enhanced Commissioning, including post-construction commissioning activities.
This appears to go above and beyond any requirement I know. If you follow the logic of the reviewer, the contract would have to explicitly name each commissioning task in order to count towards the credit. However, that was not requested, just the 10-month review.
We are now appealing this decision by providing the actual post-construction commissioning report with a timeline that shows that the review was carried out within the 10 months.
No real question here but just sharing our experience and inviting comments.

1
3
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Oct 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

Gina, thank you for sharing. Just a couple of questions. First, did this come up in pre-review questions at all? Seems like this should be the kind of thing that should have been handled in that way. Having to appeal and pay that cost for something that is so obviously correct is not good. I have heard some refer to this kind of thing as a "phantom requirement". The good thing about an appeal is it will go to a different reviewer.

Not that I am agreeing with them, but I have always recommended a detailed scope in the contract that does spell out these kinds of tasks, but frankly that has more with making sure that the scope is correct, and there are things that are quite valuable and go beyond LEED requirements. It also helps to protect from low scope/low cost providers.

2
3
0
Nilo Regojo Oct 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 205 Thumbs Up

We included the follow up review in our Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. contract scope but didn't complete the follow up visit within 10 months of project completion. Can we still pursue the Enhanced Cx credit?

3
3
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Oct 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

Well, that is another problem. The idea of the review with this timing is that the contractors would typically still be under warranty at that time, and could address any new action items that might come out of the review. It sounds like you have not done your submittal yet, so at this point the reviewers would expect to see the report based on the date of substantial completion.

Since we normally upload information well before 10 months, KJWW included a chapter in the report, but it is blank. There have been projects that went that long, and so we did the visit, wrote it up, and put it in the report we had already uploaded. If the project is already certified, then the owner gets some punched pages ready to go into their binderGlue used in manufacturing wood products, such as medium-density fiberboard (MDF), particleboard, and engineered lumber. Most binders are made with formaldehyde..

So, you have not complied with that requirement. Since you have done all the work, I would do the review immediately, and hopefully your contractors will be reasonable and work to resolve any action items that come up. Then submit and beg for forgiveness. State the facts and what you did to resolve the condition, and hope for the best.

You could also contact them for a conference call to discuss the situation as well.

Post a Reply
0
0
Robin Dukelow, LEED AP BD+C Sustainability Consultant; Project Manager Henderson Engineers, Inc.; Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC
Sep 23 2014
LEEDuser Member
22 Thumbs Up

Who Can Be the Commissioning Authority

Hello, I am trying to locate the full document but only have been able to find the Table that was published. Does anyone know where I can find this information? - Thank you!

1
1
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Sep 23 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

This is located in the reference guide under EAp1. There was another document that came out, but it was focused on v2.2, but is very similar to what came out in v2009. Know that LI #10244 has a significant affect on this table, and reverses a previous LI on the very topic.

You can find the v2.2 table by going to the LEED Credit Library - v2009 - E&A - EAp1 - Resources. The LI above can be found under LEED Credit Library - v2009 - E&A - EAc3 - Interpretations.

Post a Reply
0
0
Q. Tang
Aug 26 2014
LEEDuser Member
2 Thumbs Up

Independence of CxA - enhanced commissioning

Hello experts,

i'm not sure about the independence of the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. at enhanced commissioning for a projekt lager than 50,000 ft2.
Is the CxA allowed to be a member of a subsidiary firm of the builder-owner?
The CxA will not be involved in any design or construction tasks.

Thank you very much for your help.

1
1
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Aug 26 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

It all depends on what you mean by "Owner/Builder". If the company is truly the owner of the building, then anyone that is qualified by experience to be a CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. from the owners organization or a subsidy can do the work.

However, if this is a design/build process, where the building will be immediately sold or leased to another user, then please read my post below. They have clarified that the CxA can be contracted through the builder, but cannot be from that company or be a subsidy.

Post a Reply
0
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC
Jul 28 2014
LEEDuser Expert
6464 Thumbs Up

Major Change to Who Can Be a CxA!

I was trying to do some catching up, and the July Addenda has a very significant change to who can be the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements.. Basically, this negates a huge number or replies I have made to questions related to single contract situations.

Please look at LI #10244 as "reversed" on 07/01/2014. Here is the significant part:

"**Update 07/01/2014: Ruling has been reversed and revised to allow the CxA to be contracted to the general contractor or a subcontractor of the general contractor in limited circumstances.

In the design build scenario, a ˜disinterested independent third party firm may be hired by the design build contractor or a subcontractor to the design build contractor under the following constraints:

1. The commissioning firm may not be a subsidiary or partner of the general contractor or of any other firm that has been contracted to the general contractor to provide design and construction services for the project.

2. Though the commissioning firm is not contracted directly to the owner, the owner or an owner's representative must approve of the selection of the commissioning firm, and of the commissioning scope of work within the commissioning contract.

3. The CxA must directly report to the owner or owner's representative (or simultaneously report to the owner or owner's representative and other parties) throughout the commissioning process.

As noted above, the CxA must lead, manage and oversee all commissioning processes, including both fundamental and enhanced commissioning, consistent with the requirements for EA Credit 3: Enhanced Commissioning."

This is significant, and is listed as applying to any v2.2 or v2009 product for EAc3. I will be checking on v4, but cannot see them not making this applicable there as well.

1
1
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Jul 28 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

Update to the Update. Just reviewed the v4 reference guide. While not quite as straight forward as this LI, it does appear to allow this kind of contractual relationship too...should have read that part just a little closer!

Here is what it says under qualifications of a CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements.:

"If an owner requires a single contract through one entity (such as a government agency contracting through a general contractor), the CxA may be a qualified employee of the design or construction team for this prerequisite. If the project team is also attempting the enhanced commissioning credit, however, the CxA must be independent of the design or construction firm."

Then Table 1 is much simpler than under v2009 and while you could still interpret "subcontractor" to be an architect or engineer in this situation, the above "special circumstances" as it is called would seem to allow a third party CxA to be contracted to either the contractor or design team, as long as there is a direct reporting component to owner.

Post a Reply
0
0
Jalal Avades President AGR Consulting, LLC
Jul 07 2014
LEEDuser Member
226 Thumbs Up

Commissioning Manual and Report

Our project commissioning exercise filled more than 30 binders and if we scan them and upload them it will be couple of Giga Bytes of files. Does anyone run into this; that only a summary would be included and stating that the complete document(s) were handed to the owner where they in turn will confirm that?

1
1
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Jul 07 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

Now that is a REPORT! I have had some pretty big projects, and pretty big files, but I still uploaded all the information, just in multiple files, mostly by category.

In my opinion, if you upload more than a summary, but less than the complete report, you would be fine. So I would include the executive summary (something that I feel is important), the action log, design reviews, examples of submittal reviews, examples of pre-functional checklists, examples of functional performance tests, etc. So you would still be providing a lot of information, but more examples of the hundreds of documents you have.

Post a Reply
0
0
Anthea Ng
Jun 12 2014
LEEDuser Member
157 Thumbs Up

Disinterested Sub-contractor of MEP Design Firm?

Hello. For achieving EA C3 Enhanced Commissioning, Wwe noted the clause in guidebook "Must not be an employee of the design firm, though he or she may be contracted through them". We are considering if a Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. sub-contractor through MEP design firm is acceptable to be disinterested / independent.
Just wondering, if MEP design firm can employ a sub-contractor, the sub-contractor is not literally "disinterested" while MEP design firm is the party to pay...

1
1
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Jun 13 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

Yes, the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. can be contracted through the design team, including the engineer. However (and I am an engineer) would not recommend it. The person that pays will always have an advantage in any contract. It would not be genuine of me to oppose contractors holding the CxA contract if I would support engineers holding the contract, would it?

An architect holding the subcontract is reasonable, as they have a direct contract with the owner, and are as interested in getting the right services from all their subconsultants.

Post a Reply
0
0
Chris Flint Chatto Integrated Designer ZGF Architects
Mar 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
87 Thumbs Up

developer owned design build project

We are working on a design-build team developing a project that will be leased to a government agency. The developer, then, is both owner and general contractor, creating confusion as to how the commissioning agent be contracted. Is the fact that GC owner as well trump the non-GC direct contracting? Or would be it preferable to contract the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. through the architecture or engineering design firm, or even the government tenant, who developed the project requirements, if at all possible?

Thanks!

1
1
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Apr 02 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

You do present a different wrinkle in this issue, that in this case the owner of the building is the developer. The owner has always been able to do the commissioning, or hire the commissioning, so my first reaction is that yes, if the developer hires the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements., that could work. If the developer is hiring all the different members of the team, ie has separate contracts with AE and GC etc, then the CxA could even be a sub to the AE team if desired. If the developer is actually a contractor (there are many that do both), then I am not sure it matters, as they are going to owner the building a lease to the tenant.

However, this is my opinion, and I think a clear argument can be made for this position. Perhaps asking for a conference call first would be good just to make sure. They might recommend a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide however, and that would be the final decider.

Post a Reply
0
0
Shevaun Barrie Inland Technical Services
Mar 21 2014
LEEDuser Member
1023 Thumbs Up

New DES commissioning

Hi,
We are commissioning a building that will be connected to a DES that was completed in 2012, so it is considered "new". LEED Canada 2009 Interpretation Guide for District Energy Systems says: "A DES that is three years old or less at the date of the project building’s substantial completion is considered “new” construction and is to be commissioned in accordance with the requirements of EAc3 for the relevant LEED Canada rating system for the project."
How can we fulfil the requirements for EAc3 if the documentation provided by the DES original Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. agents doesn’t fulfil EAc3 requirements (i.e. there is no schematic review, warranty visit, etc?). We will be providing the EAc3 submittals for the building systems, and we don't want to lose this credit because the original Cx agent wasnt required to complete these tasks, and they are not tasks we can complete now.
The time for CIRs has nearly come & gone and the team seems un-inclined to submit one. Has anyone had any experience with a situation like this?
Thank you very much for your advice,
Shevaun

1
1
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Mar 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

Interesting situation. I would find it hard to hold a current team to what was done up to 3 years ago. They might have been totally different owners or design/construction teams. So, again this is my opinion, working through all the tasks of EAp1 and EAc3 for the DES, knowing that you cannot do them all, should be sufficient. There could still be a review of the design, but it would be more like a retro-commissioning effort in a way. Any acceptable comments could then be incorporated in the programming (where there is often the most optimization) during the performance testing.

But, that is my opinion. You could just ask for a conference call too, which is what I would do regardless of intent to submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide. Often the review team will help with these kinds of questions, and are careful about what they can commit to, and what might require a CIR. That is a good first step to an answer, and our firm has found them quite helpful on all sorts of credits.

Really, GBCI is not looking to fail projects, they have a hard job of ensuring that the buildings certified are valid and meet the intent of the credits and bring value to their clients and design/construction teams.

Post a Reply
0
0
Magda Aghababyan CEO Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd.
Mar 20 2014
LEEDuser Member
583 Thumbs Up

Not all systems are implemented by the time of occupancy

Dear all,

Can you please advise me on a situation where the design states part of the building to be conditioned and the other part is ventilated but by the time occupancy happens the owner has decided to postpone implementation of the air conditioning system (due to financial constraints) but has completed the ventilation system.

Is it possible to commission only the systems that are established at the time of occupancy and do the final submission for LEED or do we have to wait until all the systems are implemented to do the final submission?

1
1
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Mar 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

I think you have more issues than just commissioning. Hopefully someone else will chime in, but I think that if the AC is not going to be implemented as part of this project, ie for several years or ever, then you have a different project and documentation, specifically the energy modeling, adjusted to meet what was designed. That could have a large effect on the energy savings depending on the situation. If the AC is delayed by a few months, then it is just like seasonal testing, and the systems could be commissioned at the time they are installed, however an AC system is so significant to a project, I am not sure that GBCI would view this as “incidental” to the project, so you might have to wait to submit until the AC is installed and operational. There are always some open items in the action log, and sometimes some testing that must wait for appropriate temperatures (seasonal), but the AC could stretch that to far.

Post a Reply
0
0
Melinda Shah Architect Schooley Caldwell Associates
Mar 13 2014
LEEDuser Member
28 Thumbs Up

Timing of systems manuals

The LEED NC multiple building project we are working on has been occupied for 6-18 months (depending on the building) and we have everything ready to submit everything for the construction review except the systems manuals that are required for enhanced commissioning. The commissioning agent is telling us that they cannot complete the manuals until the commissioning is complete which could be another year if we run out of cold weather. It seems crazy to have to delay the rest of the submission that long. Has anyone else had a similar issue with getting the systems manuals completed?

1
3
0
David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Mar 13 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1298 Thumbs Up

The credit template allows the commissioning authority to upload a draft of the systems manual if it is pending completion. The contract between the owner and commissioning authority is also required to be uploaded in this case. Financial information located within the contract can be redacted/omitted.

Hope this helps!

2
3
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Mar 13 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

Melinda, we submit draft reports all the time, just for the reason you mention. It is important to tell the reviewers what remains to be done due to seasonal testing or action item resolution. For the Systems Manual, about the only thing that I can think would not be done if the building is occupied is the 10 month review, and we always put a place holder in our manuals to insert that once completed. The contract shows that a review is contracted.

So my answer would be no, I have not have a problem getting the Systems Manual submitted in a timely manner after completion of construction. That being said, some projects take a little longer than others since we depend on a lot of information from others on the design and construction teams for that manual.

3
3
0
Jalal Avades President, AGR Consulting, LLC Jul 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 226 Thumbs Up

Our project commissioning exercise filled more than 30 binders and if we scan them and upload them it will be couple of Giga Bytes of files. Does anyone run into this; that only a summary would be included and stating that the complete document(s) were handed to the owner where they in turn will confirm that?

Post a Reply
0
0
Tim Rogers Designer The Clark Enersen Partners
Feb 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
161 Thumbs Up

Comprehensive Envelope Commissioning

Is it still possible to earn Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. by doing comprehensive envelope commissioning? If so, do we just need to use the standard practices for Building Enclosure Commissioning, or do we need to go above and beyond?

I am concerned because our LEED Online credit form has the check box for Exemplary Performance still, but the credit language on USGBC's website shows the new v4 credit language even in the v2009 credit library. Do we need to update our credit form perhaps? (We have Version 3.0 of the credit form)

1
3
0
Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Mar 04 2014 LEEDuser Expert 7187 Thumbs Up

I would check with the folks at the USGBC. Ask for a consult

2
3
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Mar 05 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

I agree with Dylan. Envelope commissioning should still be a way to get exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements..

As for scope, that is still very much open as far as I have seen. My guess is if you engage an experienced firm to do the work, they know the scope that is appropriate for the project to bring the value and results that are needed, and they have probably submitted to GBCI before and have a good idea of the scope they are looking for.

While our firm does not provide the service, we collaborate with a few very good firms, and I have certainly learned that a significant amount of the value in envelope commissioning is during the design and submittal phases, seconded only by the mock-up and isolated assembly testing. If a problem is found during overall testing at the end of construction, it is likely too late to do anything!

3
3
0
Chris Ladner Partner, Viridian Mar 05 2014 Guest 2203 Thumbs Up

There are reference documents for enclosure commissioning; NIBS Guideline 3-2012 and ASHRAE Guideline 0-2005, that you can use to help develop a scope of services. We usually meet with the client before a contract is developed to discuss the project scope, enclosure type, performance testing, etc. This helps the team and the BECx provider better understand the potential opportunities and costs associated with the commissioning.

Post a Reply
0
0
Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C ThemaVerde, France
Feb 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
814 Thumbs Up

Commissioning performed by Owner - Contract Document?

In one of our projects the owner is willing to perform Fundamental and Enhanced Commissioning having one of their engineers that has the proper experience work on it.
They are wondering what would replace the contract document ensuring CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. involvement post-construction (that is required to be uploaded on LEEDOnline for enhanced commissioning) ?

1
1
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Feb 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

I would have the owner develop a letter on letterhead stating that they are doing the commissioning, and perhaps a very short listing of the tasks being done as a part of the scope that match the requirements of EAp1 and EAc3. This is what I did when I was the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. for our building project a few years ago, and it was accepted. Of course, there is a lot of other information to be uploaded for EAc3 that shows what was done in the process.

Post a Reply
0
0
John Mader
Feb 09 2014
LEEDuser Member
2 Thumbs Up

Enhanced Commissioning 2009 NC for Multi-Family Residential

There are 50 units in a new rental apartment building for which the owner is seeking to achieve the credit for Enhanced Commissioning. Common areas do not pose a problem, but access to residential units might, especially 8-10 months after completion. Questions:
1. How many units should be subjected to commissioning tests, etc.
2. Should it be the exact same units that are tested just before the end of construction and post-construction?
3. May the units be occupied during the post-construction testing?
4. How many days are required to do post-construction testing in a unit?

1
2
0
David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 10 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1298 Thumbs Up

Sampling is based upon the owner's requirements but we tend to see 10-20% sampling rates as typical. This percentage increases as the number of deficiencies increase.

For our 8-10 month post occupancy visit we check all deficiencies identified during the intitial functional testing.

I'd suggest working with the owner to educate the residential occupants the benifits from your site work post-occupancy.

2
2
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Feb 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

John, I agree with David on the percentage. The range of 10% to 20% is a good one. The other criteria would be random (at least to the contractors, you can certainly have a plan, but you do not need to let them know it) and unique properties. Perhaps in your case there are units that have two exposures that might be more of an issue, or other systems that some units have that others do not.

To your second question, you are not thinking of the post occupancy visit correctly. We do not assume that more testing is required. The intent is to gather information from the operators on what has been happening and what issues there have been. David has a good suggestion, we also quickly discuss some of the major action items found during the commissioning, just to make sure that something has not reoccurred. This is also a great way to show how the action log can be used as a management tool. Often when something happens, it has happened before and the resolution during commissioning can be a great hint to what is going on at that time.

Normally the visit has a set duration agreed during the scope definition stage. Often we can do some testing on the day if an issue has risen, but more often than not we are going to help the owner and the contractor come up with a plan on how to address the issue and come to resolution. In general, on the projects we have been involved with, there were minor, easily fixed issues that came up during the warranty period, but they had more to do with device or equipment failure than operational problems (programing). Your results may be different!

Post a Reply
0
0
Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert
Dec 12 2013
LEEDuser Member
9068 Thumbs Up

Full Envelope Commisioning Scope

Anyone have a defined scope here?

1
8
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Jean, please clarify what you're looking for?

2
8
0
Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Dec 21 2013 LEEDuser Member 9068 Thumbs Up

Depth of scope example:
Level 0: check the as built componant quality matches the construction documents.
Level 1: checking locking, opening and closing functions of all doors and windows.
Level 2: Level 1 + blowerdoor test results review or visual inspection of all seals and weather strippings including shafts and permutations.

3
8
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 23 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Jean, I think if you start BECx (building enclosure commissioning) during or after construction, you are too late. Read Verifying Performance with Building Enclosure Commissioning for an introduction to considerations and key standards.

4
8
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Dec 26 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

There are many levels of envelope commissioning as there are systems commissioning. We do not provide this service in-house, but we partner with several very competent firms that do this. Typically this service needs building scientists. I must agree with Tristan, that if you are starting the process after design, then it is too late. A blower door testA blower door test gives an overall value for airtightness of a space, and can help identify air leaks. The testing unit consists of a calibrated fan that is sealed onto the unit entrance. The fan creates a continuous flow of pressure into the unit (or out of the unit when using theatrical fog to locate leaks). Devices detect the rate of pressure retention and loss due to possible air leaks in the construction. is great to confirm the overall performance, but if the foundational issues were not addressed in design, submittal review, AND installation, corrections are going to be difficult to impossible, and will probably involve lawyers.

While this is a massive simplification of the scope, here is a very short version of what was included as scope on a recent project where we are the prime CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. with a subconsultant doing envelope commissioning (and I am not listing all the normal process management and documentation).

Pre-Design Phase:
Assist in Establishing OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project.
Assist in overall Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. Plan
Verify criteria of OPR against BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines.
Preliminary review of Construction Documents

Design Phase:
Conduct envelope Cx kickoff
Verify criteria of OPR against revised BODs
Perform peer review at 35%, 65%, and 95% design completion
Assist in finalized Cx Plan
Coordinate mock-up requirements

Construction Phase:
Review shop drawings and submittals
Perform Job Site Observations during installation (in this case every two weeks for 5 months)
Prepare installation checklists and functional performance tests
Verify contractor completion of installation checklists
Witness performance tests

It has been my experience that the design and submittal services are critical to the success of envelope commissioning. This even more than MEP commissioning is where the benefit is accrued…before something is installed. In MEP, a lot depends on the programming, so must wait until a lot of work is done. In the case of the envelope, once installed it can be too late, so the work is pushed much earlier and is more important. I need to encourage one of my colleagues in these building science firms to help on this forum!

5
8
0
Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Jan 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 9068 Thumbs Up

Thanks guys. You see, in Germany, I reckon we are doing much of this already...for example, we have to constantly check the envelope is meeting the manditory requirements of ASHRAE 90.1 and that means right from the get-go. It's just not been documented in the QA CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. way, and I reckon that with minimal extra effort, we could include this as envelope commissioning.

Our CxA QA process is in place...it just needs a few extra items to be captured in the documentation.

6
8
0
Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Jan 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 9068 Thumbs Up

Add these resources to the links tab:

ASHRAE-Guideline-0-The-Commissioning-Process
http://unmsrmc.org/rfp/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/ASHRAE-Guideline-0-The...

NIBS Guideline 3-2012 http://www.wbdg.org/ccb/NIBS/nibs_gl3.pdf

7
8
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Jan 21 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

Jean, we have been working with several highly qualified envelope commissioning firms, and they tend to come from building science world. There is some specialized education and experience they have that we depend on when they are partners of ours. So I would caution you to evaluate the service you provide and the staff you assign to this kind of work. One other aspect that I do for my firm is risk management. In general, we do not feel that there is high risk in commissioning. You still have to meet the standard of care, no doubt, but in general the EOR is liable for design and the contractor for construction. We could be held liability if there was negligence in not finding something, but ultimately the underlying issue is still the design and construction.

I am not so sure about envelope commissioning. There has been major litigation over envelopes, and often for extremely high dollars, with some really spectacular failures. Again, we do not provide this service, but most of our partners are also providing forensic engineering. So with this kind of exposure, I think an envelope CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. could be dragged in if there was an issue.

8
8
0
Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Jan 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 9068 Thumbs Up

Thank you for the caution. It is well noted. You make a good point about the experience of the building science guys. It would be good to hire in the expert to do the work whilst we prepare documentation with him.

The US is such a different animal. The Germans love their rules...that's why so much of this stuff is already a legal requirement (instead of CxAs they have 3rd party auditors, typically from TÜV-Rheinland, but these guys just check by the letter of the law...which in turn often sites industry norms like DIN). The converse is that if it's not legally required, then they tend not to do it. So a lot can still go wrong, and does. And in the few projects where I was on the Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. team, we always found issues to mittigate...some quite major ones including life safety issues. So over the years, I've become a big fan of the Cx process.

Thanks for sharing.

Post a Reply
0
0
Everardo Ocampo LEED A.P., CxA Digital Energy, Inc.
Nov 19 2013
Guest
99 Thumbs Up

Campus DES Cx - LEED Submittal Requirements

I'm working on a project at a Campus where an existing DES is being retro-commissioned. The DES will serve a new LEED building that is attempting to attain EA c3 (Enhanced Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included.). The DES and the new LEED building are being commissioned by separate 3rd parties. By reading the Guidance Document provided by LEED, it is understood that the DES shall be commissioned in accordance with LEED EB: O&M, EA Credit 2.2. My question is with respect to the LEED submittals. What documents exactly is LEED looking for as proof that the DES was retro-commissioned? I'm assuming this documentation can be uploaded as supplemental information to EA c3.

1
2
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Dec 02 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

First, this would be a good question to send to the review team through the contact email. In my opinion, uploading the RCx report would be the minimum, and perhaps some letter or memo from the owner on intended actions coming out of it. Only my opinion however.

2
2
0
Everardo Ocampo LEED A.P., CxA, Digital Energy, Inc. Dec 12 2013 Guest 99 Thumbs Up

Thank you for the reply Scott. Tentative plan is to submit the RCx Report along with a list of implemented Low-Cost/No-Cost measures, Training Program, and Capital Plan. Soon we'll see how LEED reviewers respond.

Post a Reply
0
0
Lisa Logan Senior Sustainability Consultant Noresco
Nov 17 2013
LEEDuser Member
13 Thumbs Up

Systems Manual - third party PV system

Reviewer said that we need to include the PV for our project in the systems manual. The PV was exisitng (previously commissioned) and is owned, operated and maintained by a third party. The building owner will never touch the system because thier contract tells them they can't. It makes no sense to include operation information in the systems manual because it may indicate to the building owner that they can and should mess with the system. I would agree to include a note that the system is part of the building and also include contract contact information but that is it. Would you agree?

1
3
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Nov 18 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

I agree with your plan Lisa. The way I approach a Systems Manual is how the particular user would normally interact with the systems, not how a service person or maintenance staff would. So in this case, a caution against doing any work on the system, and perhaps how to contact the provider and any interface to know power contribution to the building, that kind of thing.

2
3
0
Lisa Logan Senior Sustainability Consultant, Noresco Nov 18 2013 LEEDuser Member 13 Thumbs Up

Thanks. The system is independent of the building and anything produced goes back to the grid. The PV owner and building can both access information on PV performance online. Thank you again for your timely response!

Lisa

3
3
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 18 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

I agree and wonder if perhaps the way it is set up on the building wasn't clearly communicated somehow to the reviewer. Making this setup super-explicit and even contacting GBCI to clarify may be helpful.

Post a Reply
0
0
Thomas Nichols LEED AP (O+M) 4 Elements Group
Oct 28 2013
LEEDuser Member
341 Thumbs Up

Systems Manual for Enhanced Commissioning

We received a comment that we need to include system single-line diagrams in our systems manual.

Can anyone clarify what the GBCI wants? A duct single line or the HVAC system single line?

Thanks,

1
1
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Oct 28 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

Typically we start with the contract document diagrams, and often ask the design team to simplify them from “construction” documents to operations documents. If there are not good control diagrams, then we will use the control system submittal diagrams for things like AHU’s and other devices. Some projects have very good airflow diagrams that show schematically all the air handling and distribution.

A very few times, we have had to develop something separate. To date, we have not gotten this comment.

Post a Reply
0
0
Alicia Silva CEO Revitaliza consultores
Oct 18 2013
LEEDuser Member
1634 Thumbs Up

System's Manual in American English

After submitting the documentation for this credit, we have been requested to translate the System's Manual to America English.

The System's Manual we uploaded is composed of 494 pages, 486 of which are ALREADY in American English. The 8 pages in a language other than American English are an occupancy sensor operation manual.

I can't imagine having to translate almost 500 pages to American English.

Isn't this excessive, since LEED is supposed to be a world-leading standard?

GH

1
3
0
Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Oct 21 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15687 Thumbs Up

Why don't you get the 8 pages the reviewers likely can not read translated? It sounds to me that the vast majority of the manual are already in some form of English.

2
3
0
Alicia Silva CEO, Revitaliza consultores Oct 21 2013 LEEDuser Member 1634 Thumbs Up

We would gladly translate these 8 pages.

We are wondering what will happen with our next project, which includes a 500-page manual in spanish? The cost of translating it is greater than the LEED consultancy.

BTW, the operating personnel is spanish speaking, therefore it is USELESS for our client to translate it.

Half of the LEED projects are registered outside of the US. This is a handicap for us and for the rest of the projects trying to reach high standards of sustainability.

GH

3
3
0
Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Oct 28 2013 LEEDuser Member 9068 Thumbs Up

I would concure and also say that the requirement is to HAVE a systems manual. If the reviewers can deturmine an acceptable systems manual exists, that should be good enough.

Post a Reply
0
0
Shevaun Barrie Inland Technical Services
Sep 05 2013
LEEDuser Member
1023 Thumbs Up

Health Care vs Canada New Construction 2009

Hi,
Does anyone know if there are any extra requirements aside from the optional BECx in LEED for HC vs Canada NC 2009? I can't see any but have been told there are more visits required. Am I missing something?
Thank you!

Shevaun

1
5
0
Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Sep 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15687 Thumbs Up

Shevaun,

I'm not aware of how the Canadian version of NC is written but the US version of NC has no requirement for building envelope commissioning. In HC, there is one point for BECx and one point for ECx. The Enhanced portion of HC is the same activities as the NC version minus a point value for the same amount of work. For building shellThe exterior walls, roof, and lowest floor of a building, which serve to separate and protect the interior from the elements (precipitation, sunlight, wind, temperature variations). Cx, the HC version requires you to follow the NIBS guideline which is easy to obtain online. How many visits this requires is dependent on the different types of building envelope a project has.

I'm not sure if I answered your question.

2
5
0
Shevaun Barrie Inland Technical Services Sep 05 2013 LEEDuser Member 1023 Thumbs Up

Thank you Susan, I can't find any differences between Canada NC 2009 & US LEED for HC requirements for HVAC/energy/lighting systems enhanced Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included., so I think they are the same. I'm going to have one more read through the credits and call it even.

Shevaun

3
5
0
Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Sep 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 15687 Thumbs Up

My only advice for MEP commissioning in hospitals is to do what is right for the facility in addition to meeting LEED. You'll want to commission life safety and emergency systems in hospitals. Your owner may require additional systems to be commissioned.

4
5
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Sep 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

Susan, I could not agree more. There are several systems that are critical in a healthcare environment that should be tested. One major test we recommend is the blackout test…it is vital that this works right when patients are in the building, and it can only really be done when the building is not occupied.

5
5
0
Shevaun Barrie Inland Technical Services Sep 05 2013 LEEDuser Member 1023 Thumbs Up

Yes, in addition to LEED requirements our hospital facility services often include Cxing the electrical, IMIT, communications and security systems, elevators, med.gas and equipment; coordinating and witnessing full building systems integration verifications; and coordinating and witnessing multiple post-occupancy 'doomsday' testing scenarios. Some educational facilities are beginning to request commissioning of these other systems as well.

Post a Reply
0
0
Panupant Phapant SCG Cement - Building Materials Co.,Ltd.
Aug 25 2013
LEEDuser Member
120 Thumbs Up

Can an employee from contruction management firm be CxA

Hi
According to the EAp1 Fundamental Commissioning and EAc3 Enhanced Commissioning' s requirements regarding the qualifications of the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. as follows:
- EAp1: The invidual serving as the CxA must be independent of the
project's design and construction management, though the CxA may
be an employee of any firms providing those services. The CxA may
be a qualified employee or consultant of the owner.
- EAc3: The invidual serving as the CxA
* Must be independent of the work or design and construction
* Must not be an employee of the design firm, through he or she may
be contracted through them
* Must not be an employee of, or contracted through, a contractor or
construction manager holding construction contracts.
* May be a qualified employee or consultant of the owner.

For our project with gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) over 50,000 sq.ft, the owner hires a construction management firm to help the owner to supervise, monitor and control contractors' construction works. According to the EAp1's requirement, An employee of the construction management firm who is independent of the construction management activities is qualified as the CxA for the fundamental commissioning. However, the EAc3's requirement do not mention about this point. Please advise whether an employee of the construction management firm who is independent of the construction management activities is qualified as the CxA for the enhanced commissioning (EAc3).

Thank you very much.

1
1
0
Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Aug 28 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6464 Thumbs Up

This rests squarely on the contractual relationships. Take a look at Table 2, Commissioning Authority Qualifications on Page 221 of the BD+C v2009 Reference Guide. This clearly says that a “Construction manager not holding constructor contracts” can be qualified for both Fundamental and Enhanced commissioning.

So, if your Construction Manager is not at risk, does not hold contracts with those actually doing construction, then they should qualify. If your CM is between the owner and the contractors and has a profit position in the process, then a disinterested employee could do Fundamental only.

All this being said, the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. that is assigned much comply with the qualifications requirement regardless.

Post a Reply
0
0
Bill Holub
Aug 15 2013
Guest
16 Thumbs Up

Tenet as the Enhanced CxA

I was hoping for some feedback from the group on situation concerning the Enhanced CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. similar to others previously discussed. Thanks in advance.

In this instance, the building is developer owned, the building is design-build with the A/E services sub-contracted as GC (Arch) and Mechanical and Electrical Contractors (MEP). The only tenet is an independent (not the A/E of record) AE firm, which has contracted to the developer for the building. The tenet AE firm would like to provide the CX1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. services for the building. If the AE was the Owner, this situation appears to be clearly acceptable, as an employee of the Owner can provide CX services. However, as a 'tenet' this does not meet the letter of the credit, particularly as the AE firm has been significantly involved with design decisions, OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project., and design review and is clearly not a disinterested third party.

Finally does the answer change if the tenet AE provides civil engineering services for the site?

I’m planning on a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide anyway, but wanted any insight or advice on moving forward with this situation.

Thanks in advance,

Start a new LEED comment thread

Dec 17 2014
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2014 – BuildingGreen, Inc.