NC-2009 IDc1: Innovation in Design

  • NC_CS_CI_IDc1_Type3_Innovation Diagram
  • Time to get creative

    This credit is your project’s opportunity to demonstrate leadership in the green building industry and to let your team contribute creative approaches to the field of sustainable design. It’s also a great way for your project to achieve up to five additional points. 

  • Three paths to points

    There are three different ways to achieve points under this credit:

    • Path 1 – Innovation in Design: Use an innovative approach to something not already covered in the LEED rating system. This approach must represent an innovative design approach to a problem, must be comprehensive in scope, and must have a quantifiable environmental benefit. Approach this path as if you were creating a new LEED “ID credit” from scratch.
    • Path 2 – Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements.: Go well beyond the performance thresholds of existing LEED credits. As a general rule, you go to the next threshold level over the credit requirement. For example, in WEc3: Water Use Reduction, you receive points for 30%, 35%, and 40% reductions in water use, while the ID point is for a 45% reduction; and for MRc5: Regional Materials, you receive points for sourcing 10% and 20% of materials (by cost) locally, while the ID point is for 30% locally sourced materials. Projects can only earn up to three points through this path.
    • Path 3 – Pilot Credit: Choose a pilot credit from USGBC's LEED pilot credit library, and try to achieve it while also documenting your work. This path was added to IDc1 in the July 2010 LEED addenda, and gives project teams a chance to help LEED evolve by testing credits that are still works-in-progress. LEEDuser offers guidance on all the pilot credits, and participation in LEEDuser's forum is a requirement.

    “Creative” doesn’t have to mean “costly”

    There are plenty of opportunities to earn Path 1 ID credits through no- and low-cost strategies. A great example is green cleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices., which requires the use of low-toxicity cleaning agents, cleaning machines that reduce impact on indoor air quality, and training maintenance staff in hazard reduction. 

    Take a close look at all the sustainability practices that your project is already planning or participating in and examine the possibilities of applying them to an ID credit. Some opportunities include recycling, composting, procurement and cleaning policies, landscape management, education initiatives, and many more.

    Use LEED-EBOM as a resource

    There is a consistent source of ID credit opportunities for all rating systems to be found in the LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance (EBOM) rating system (see LEEDuser's guide to EBOM for more information). Implementing operational practices and policies—for example, site management plans, purchasing programs, and green cleaning—can help you achieve ID credits and set the stage for successful, sustainable operation of your project building. 

    Operational credits fall outside the realm of design and construction, and the creation of a plan is easy with the available templates, but the commitment to implement the plan is just as important, if not more so.

    Educational programs

    It is common to use an educational program about the sustainability of the LEED project to earn a point under IDc1. Educational programs must consist of at least two separate components, including a kiosk, a website, a case study, a lecture series, signage, etc.

    To meet the requirement of having two components, you should understand some key distinctions. For example, a kiosk in a building lobby is typically viewed as signage and would be part of an overall signage program, not a second component. The information presented on the kiosk may also impact how it is categorized—it should be unique from that which is presented elsewhere. For example, if a project team creates a website (educational outreach) and places a kiosk (signage) in the lobby, but the kiosk only includes a link to the website, both of these items would only count as one component of the educational program. In contrast, if a project team implements a signage program (signage) and a kiosk, but the kiosk includes an in‐depth case study (case study), this could be viewed as two individual components. The educational program must also be about building-specific strategies employed on the LEED project as opposed to a marketing or user education tool.

    A staff sustainability team could be part of an educational strategy, but simply saying that one has been created in a narrative does not provide enough information. You should also provide specific information regarding the goals and methods of delivering the sustainable education component to the public or staff, such as work on signage, lectures, or outreach for home improvement, etc. Also, keep in mind that the group should distinguish itself from other strategies.

  • Consider these questions when approaching this credit

    • Can your project achieve double the credit requirements, or the next incremental percentage threshold, for any existing LEED credits?
    • Is your project undertaking sustainable design strategies that are above or beyond the intent of existing LEED credits? 
    • What makes your project special? Are there opportunities for innovation uniquely suited to your climate, region, building or use type, or project team? 
    • Is your building owner interested in pursuing sustainability goals through building operations and maintenance? If so, can your project adopt credits from the LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. rating system?

    Innovation credit submittal process

    Innovation credits are often denied, but GBCI typically encourages project teams to try another strategy if one they have proposed is not feasible to meet the credit requirements. The credit may  be denied outright with instruction to submit an alternative strategy, or denied pending clarification with technical advice asking for more explanation of how the submitted strategy is viable or the option to submit an alternative. Project teams may attempt new strategies in the construction phase if a particular innovation credit was denied in the design phase.

    FAQs for IDc1

    Our project wants to (fill in the blank) as an innovative strategy. Is this eligible for IDc1?

    Usually the answer to this question is "maybe." There are very few preapproved innovation strategies (education is one of them—see above), so with all but a few it is hard to say definitively whether or not it will be approved on a LEED project. However, there are some reliable guidelines that any project should consider:

    • The approach must be "innovative," i.e., not standard practice.
    • The approach must be comprehensive in scope. For example, many projects ask whether they can earn an innovation point for using a specific technology that is considered new or different, for example, an elevator that uses novel technology to offer energy efficiency. Use of a specific technology would not be considered comprehensive. (Doubly so in this case because energy efficiency is already covered under a LEED credit.) If you are starting out by considering a single technology, consider how you can expand that into a project-wide theme.
    • The approach must have a quantifiable environmental benefit.

    You should also consider that earning an ID credit basically requires you to write a LEED credit, set certain quantifiable measures, and meet them. So a good test is to put your idea in terms of a LEED credit. What is the credit name, intent, and requirements? Could this same credit be used on another project (is it repeatable?), or is it extremely unique?

    Many ideas will not hold up after applying these tests. Remember that a strategy might be a good idea even if it is not recognized for an ID credit, and that not every good idea meets the standards demanded by LEED.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Consider whether one or both paths to earning points under this  credit are suitable for your project:

    • Path 1 – Innovation in Design: Use an innovative approach to something not already covered in the LEED rating system. This approach must represent and innovative design approach to a problem, must be comprehensive in scope, and must have a quantifiable environmental benefit. Approach this path as if you were creating a new LEED “ID credit” from scratch.
    • Path 2 – Exemplary Performance: Go well beyond the performance thresholds of existing LEED credits.

  • No more than three of the points can be awarded for Exemplary Performance through Path 2, so to max out your points here you’ll need to also pursue Path 1 – Innovative Strategies. 


  • Brainstorm strategies for ID credits (Path 1) early, and involve your entire team, including designers, builders, owners, facilities managers, and occupants. Consider sustainability strategies that may fall outside the LEED rating system. Find out if the team has worked on any past LEED projects that pursued interesting ID credits. 


  • Using your preliminary LEED scorecard, note which Exemplary Performance thresholds might be attainable. Credits that are eligible for Exemplary Performance are noted throughout the LEED Reference Guide.

Schematic Design

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  • If considering Path 1, develop a list of 6–8 ID credits that may be appropriate for your project and discuss the opportunities, costs, and barriers to implementation of each with your project team.


  • When pursuing ID credits under Path 1 – Innovation in Design, use the published catalog of ID credits from pre-LEED 2009 rating systems  as a reference for possible approaches. However, note that simply because a strategy has been approved for a project in the past does not necessarily guarantee that it will be approved on a different project. In other words, the approach must be specific to the project in order to be considered for this credit. 


  • Attempt as many Path 2 – Exemplary Performance credits as possible. You can only earn points for three credits, but try for more than that, to maximize environmental benefit, and your chances of earning all three points—in case one falls through. 


  • Setting these increased thresholds as a goal early in the process can be cost-effective and make the ID credit for Exemplary Performance fairly easy to achieve.


  • Innovation in Design credits developed for Path 1 must be comprehensive and provide a quantifiable environmental benefit. ID credits are not awarded solely for using specific products or technologies, especially when the product aids in the achievement of another LEED credit. For example, if you purchase highly efficient windows, you cannot gain an ID credit for this because it will contribute to the overall energy efficiency of your building, which is included in EAp2 and EAc1.


  • The intent of a proposed innovation credit cannot be identical to or repetitive of the intent of LEED credits within the rating system in which your project is currently pursuing credit points. (Looking to other rating systems for ideas, however, is recommended.)


  • Other rating sytems such as LEED-EBOM can be a great resource for ideas for innovation credits. (See LEEDuser's list of LEED-EBOM credits and associated guidance.) When adapting these credits, it may be appropriate to meld the requirements to fit your rating system. For example, if pursuing LEED-EBOM MRc4: Reduced Mercury in Lamps, you would not in a design and construction rating system be required to document the solid waste management strategy which is a part of that credit, which is operations-focused.

Design Development

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  • Create a detailed narrative or plan for the ID credits that you have chosen and coordinate input from various interested parties. For example, if you are developing a Comprehensive Recycling Plan, you would need input from the staff responsible for coordinating the collection efforts, the recycling company to confirm that they can expand the scope of recycling beyond what is required in the LEED prerequisite, and the occupants to confirm that receptacles for recyclables are accessible and convenient and that the expectations of what should be recycled are understood.


  • Target more approaches than needed, with the expectation that some may be eliminated during design and construction. Submit your five best approaches, but have at least one or two backup strategies in case any are denied during the design submittal review. 

Construction Documents

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  • Verify that design-related ID credits have been included in the plans and specifications.


  • Complete documentation in LEED Online.


  • For Path 1 – Innovation in Design credits, documentation includes:

    • Title and a statement of intent for the proposed credit.
    • Environmental benefits associated with your approach.
    • Requirements proposed for your project to comply.
    • A narrative of the strategies employed by the project to meet the above intent and requirements.
    • Upload any related documents, plans, or product cut sheets associated with the strategy 

  • For Path 2 – Exemplary Performance, the ID credits are tied to those you have already documented for the standard credit page. This is an easy selection on the credit page.


  • Document as many ID credits in LEED Online as you can for the design submittal. This way you can have confirmation that you have achieved the credit. If your anticipated credits are rejected, then you can submit others for the construction submittal. 


  • For post-construction or operations-related credits, circulate draft plans among the owner, maintenance staff, and occupants if necessary to coordinate important components of the credit strategy and confirm your approach.

Construction

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  • Track your design-submittal ID credits so that you know whether they have been accepted. If they have not, read the comments from the reviewer and consider what it might take to achieve them or whether you might be better off pursuing a different ID credit. 


  • If you choose to pursue a different credit, prepare the documentation for the submittal promptly.  

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Commit to implementing the submitted ID credits in the way that they were proposed. Ensure that policies and plans are followed through and that there are enough human and financial resources to achieve the goals of the credits. In some cases, the successful implementation of these credits will help to demonstrate the success of the project as a whole into the future.   


  • Implement the operational ID credits that you submitted, even if they weren’t approved. Often these credits can have considerable cultural impact on the occupants by making sustainability strategies tangible. 


  • Operational strategies are intended to provide a platform for continuous improvement, which often leads to both material and financial savings. Be ambitious in the implementation of these strategies, and continue to set high goals for your project, year after year.  

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    ID Credit 1: Innovation in design

    1-5 Points

    Intent

    To provide design teams and projects the opportunity to achieve exceptional performance above the requirements set by the LEED Green Building Rating System and/or innovative performance in green building categories not specifically addressed by the LEED Green Building Rating System.

    Requirements

    Credit can be achieved through any combination of the Innovation in Operations and Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. paths as described below:

    Path 1. Innovation in design (1-5 points for NC and CS, 1-4 points for Schools)

    Achieve significant, measurable environmental performance using a strategy not addressed in the LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations, LEED 2009 for Core and Shell Development, or LEED 2009 for Schools Rating Systems.

    One point is awarded for each innovation achieved. No more than 5 points (for NC and CS) and 4 points (for Schools) under IDc1 may be earned through Path 1—Innovation in design.

    Identify the following in writing:

    • The intent of the proposed innovation credit.
    • The proposed requirement for compliance.
    • The proposed submittals to demonstrate compliance.
    • The design approach (strategies) used to meet the requirements.
    Path 2. Exemplary performance (1-3 points)

    Achieve exemplary performance in an existing LEED 2009 for New Construction, Schools and Core & Shell prerequisite or credit that allows exemplary performance as specified in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Design & Construction, 2009 Edition. An exemplary performance point may be earned for achieving double the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold of an existing credit in LEED.

    One point is awarded for each exemplary performance achieved. No more than 3 points under IDc1 may be earned through Path 2—Exemplary performance.

    Path 3. Pilot credit (1-4 points)

    Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library at www.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant and complete the required documentation. Projects may pursue up to 4 Pilot Credits total.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Substantially exceed a LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations performance credit such as energy performance or water efficiency. Apply strategies or measures that demonstrate a comprehensive approach and quantifiable environment and/or health benefits.

Technical Guides

Guidance on Innovation in Design (ID) Credits

Supplementary description of ID credit compliance from USGBC.

Publications

Innovation in Design Credit Catalog

Listing of hundreds of ID credit approaches.

Acoustical Design Credit

Innovation in Design

Enhanced acoustical design is only a prerequisite and credit in the LEED for Schools rating system only, but it is a good candidate for use as an innovation credit in other rating systems. Armstrong, a major manufacturer, pursued acoustics as an innovation path in its own LEED-EB certification in 2007. Shown here is a summary of how Armstrong earned the point.

Viewshed Protection Credit

Innovation in Design

Denali National Park and Preserve is the home to panoramic vistas that draw visitors from around the world. The intent of this innovation credit was to document efforts to protect and preserve the visitors center viewshed as part of the sustainable design of the facility.

Active Design Credit

Innovation in Design

An "active design" or "design for health" credit successfully earned an innovation point through IDc1 for a New York City project. The project wanted to comprehensively integrate into the design of the project features that would encourage regular physical activity in occupants, while also bringing environmental benefits. The project team hopes that other projects will use this thorough documentation as an example to pursue similar approaches.

560 Comments

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Matt Dem
May 22 2015
LEEDuser Member
146 Thumbs Up

Can I lock the credits not to be touched by other team members ?

Project Location: United States

Hi,

Is there any feature in LEED online to lock the credits not to be changed by other team members ? I was about to submit for design final submission but then the owner postponed it for one attachment. Everything is ready to go and I have already gone through the checklist. Now, I do want to keep all the related credits in locked position until I submit it because I do not want go through and check every single attachment and form again.

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Ritch Voss Sr. Assoc - Sr. Architect Dahlin Group Architecture + Planning
May 22 2015
Guest
3 Thumbs Up

Innovation Credit - Health & Safety of Occupants

My Client wants to occupy the Community Center building during proposed phased renovation. There are about 20 admin staff, 35 preschool children, language classes, dance/aerobics classes, weddings and conferences that take place daily. The building was built in the 1960s and most likely contains asbestos and lead.
I want to convince him to have a Hazardous Waste Report performed and then close the building during renovation and find other venues for the other users during the year construction.
Can we get an Innovation credit for this Life/safety & Air Quality strategy?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 22 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Ritch, what is the innovation angle?

It sounds a bit like what you're recommending is fairly common sense, if not perhaps required on a regulatory basis. I don't see the LEED angle, myself. Looks to me like there is enough merit in the suggestion on its own, without the extra LEED carrot.

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Ritch Voss Sr. Assoc - Sr. Architect, Dahlin Group Architecture + Planning May 22 2015 Guest 3 Thumbs Up

It's a carrot for the Client to spend money he doesn't want to spend. I'm going to make the recommendation anyway but if there's something in it for him he's usually more willing to pursue it.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE May 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 1922 Thumbs Up

Ritch—What you describe sounds an awful lot like LEED for Schools Prerequisite SSp2, Environmental Site Assessment (ESA), which calls for a Phase I ESA, followed by a Phase II ESA if contamination is suspected, and then remediation if contaminants are found.

The “Bird’s Eye View” comments on LEEDuser’s SSp2 webpage (http://www.leeduser.com/credit/Schools-2009/SSp2) point out that the Phase I ESA has become common, and that some commercial real estate lenders may even require it. Therefore, ESAs are often a normal development expense. The downside is that, if the ESAs uncover contamination, remediation can be expensive.

The upside is that the finished building is safer, and the Owner may be less liable than if contaminants had been discovered later. Finally, if remediation includes abatement of asbestos or certain other contaminants (not lead paint) the project can earn SSc3 BrownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination (may include hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants). They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. (EPA) Redevelopment (http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/SSc3).

Is this carrot enough?

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Ritch Voss Sr. Assoc - Sr. Architect, Dahlin Group Architecture + Planning May 27 2015 Guest 3 Thumbs Up

Thanks Jon. I hadn't considered it a BrownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination (may include hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants). They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. (EPA) site. Great suggestion.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE May 28 2015 LEEDuser Member 1922 Thumbs Up

Getting back on-topic: Going for SSc3 gives you one more potential credit, but if you are still looking for IDc1 ideas, try pursuing one of the Pilot Credits.

To document IDc1, you must show that your innovation is comprehensive, quantifiable, & “significantly better than standard sustainable design practices.” This last one can be the hardest because it requires you first to identify just which sustainable practices are “standard.” This can be a moving target. The Pilot Credits offer “pre-approved” strategies that USGBC already sees as “beyond the standard.”

I have also found that, if your proposal resembles an existing Pilot Credit in any way, LEED Reviewers tend to compare the two and question why your innovation’s scope, metrics, & thresholds differ from the Pilot Credit. Although USGBC certainly never intended to promote Pilot Credits in lieu of encouraging project teams to develop their own Innovations, in my experience, LEED Review Teams tend to nudge projects in that direction.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE May 28 2015 LEEDuser Member 1922 Thumbs Up

AND, of course, don’t forget to check out the Innovation Catalog in the USGBC LEED Credit Library. These, too are strategies that have worked for others. Many former Pilot Credits have closed recently and graduated to the Innovation Catalog, so the catalog now offers several more options than it did in previous iterations. (I’m impressed!)

If you want to develop your own ID Credits, study the examples in the Pilot Credit Library & Innovation Catalog. They could help you discern what qualifies as “innovative” & “comprehensive” and show you ways to develop metrics for quantifying your innovations.

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Matt Dem
May 21 2015
LEEDuser Member
146 Thumbs Up

Can I defer any ID credit to submit it w/ construction package ?

Project Location: United States

Hi,

I previously filed an innovation credit with my design preliminary submission and received an comment from GBCI therefore it is pending. I am getting ready to submit my design final package but want to apply for a different innovation credit and defer it to the construction package. Would it be done ? If so, do I need to mention in my response that I am changing the credit and deferring it to the construction package ?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 22 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Matt, it seems fine to defer to Construction. The Design review is more a benefit to you to get credits reviewed on the sooner side.

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Matt Dem May 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 146 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan.

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Candice Rogers Paladin, Inc
Mar 26 2015
LEEDuser Member
298 Thumbs Up

Using LEEDv4 Fundamental and Enhanced ECx to achieve ID LEED2009

Project Location: United States

Hello,
This question has 2 parts.
1). Our project would like to submit LEEDV4 Fundamental and Enhanced Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included. for Envelope only as ID points in a project registered for LEED 2009. The project is doing Fundamental Cx for the MEP systems. Can you confirm the project will be able to earn these points if Enhanced Cx is not pursued under 2009 for the MEP systems?
2) we intend to follow the full extent of envelope Cx from design - warranty following NIBS Guideline. One question is allowable sampling for functional testing of finest ration and panel assemblies. Will mockup testing then rigorous field observation satisfy the functional test requirements, or is there a minimum threshold for assembly sampling that must be met? I didn't see definitive guidance on testing methods which should be applied.
Many thanks!

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Expert 7288 Thumbs Up

Comment to Question 1: Yes, it has been pretty consistent that an ID point is awarded for envelope Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included., but you would only get 1 point, not 2 like you would under v4.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Expert 7288 Thumbs Up

Comment on Question 2: While I do not an envelope Cx1. Commissioning (Cx) is the process of verifying and documenting that a building and all of its systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the owner's project requirements. 2. The process of checking the performance of a building against the owner's goals during design, construction, and occupancy. At a minimum, mechanical and electrical equipment are tested, although much more extensive testing may also be included., I play one on TV...no sorry, I have worked with many very qualified providers over the years. Frankly, I think you will see scope all over the map. My main comment would be that while MEP commissioning has tremendous value during the testing phase, in envelopes, it has to be designed and detailed right, then the submittals have to be right, and initial installation must be checked (or mocked up). If you wait for the final installation, and it fails, lawsuits probably follow, as fixes become expensive. So the more work done early, the better. Personally, I would think a mockup test, and then maybe a test early in installation followed by observation would be a good method, but like the TV doc, that is about all my advice is worth.

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Candice Rogers Paladin, Inc May 12 2015 LEEDuser Member 298 Thumbs Up

Scott -

I realize I never properly thanked you for the response to my question.

So...Thank You!

Best -
Candice

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Rick Alfandre Principal Alfandre Architecture
Mar 23 2015
LEEDuser Member
513 Thumbs Up

Innovation and Design - Green Building Education

We are in between preliminary and final design review, and are thinking of pursuing an I&D credit for Green Building Education. It is not clear to us from reviewing the information if it is a design credit or construction credit? Or can we submit for it during either review phase?

Thank you.

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deborah lucking associate, fentress architects Mar 23 2015 LEEDuser Member 1518 Thumbs Up

We have found it works better for us to submit as a construction credit, as there will be more data available - percentage of recycled material, as an example - at that stage.
Nonetheless, start preparing for it at the design stage, especially if you plan to install signage.

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Glen Phillips Director of Sustainable Education, GreenCE, Inc. Mar 23 2015 Guest 658 Thumbs Up

IDc1 is uniquely labeled as either design or construction, and depending on the selected innovation strategy, will usually fit better into one area than the other. I agree with Deborah that GBE (assuming you are doing 2 of the following: tour, signage, and/or case study) fits best into the construction submittal, since while the documentation requirements are fairly loose for ID credits, it is advisable to include signage photos, a draft of the case study, and/or a tour outline so that the certification reviewer can see that the measures address the project comprehensively.

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jorge calderon earth lab
Mar 17 2015
Guest
223 Thumbs Up

standard sustainable design practices

Hi, we documented an ID credit where the comment are:

The strategy consists of ensuring the survival and reproduction of plants while promoting the care and value of nature among the people. Documentation describing the strategy has been provided. An Innovation in Design strategy must be significantly better than standard sustainable design practices and meet two basic criteria: 1. quantitative performance improvements (comparing a baseline and design case) and 2. a comprehensive strategy (more than one product or process)

"However, the community outreach strategy is not quantified nor significantly better than standard sustainable design practices"

The question is, in this case for the community outreach strategy
: What are the standard sustainable design practices? and How can I quantified it?

Thank you in advance

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Glen Phillips Director of Sustainable Education, GreenCE, Inc. Mar 17 2015 Guest 658 Thumbs Up

To substantiate this as an eligible ID credit strategy, it will be the responsibility of the project team to hang some metrics on this and show a "significant" improvement. While this sounds potentially insurmountable, you are lucky here in that LEED has deemed "biodiversity" as one of the 7 Impact Categories from LEED v4, so while the hard scientist in me would prefer that these benefits be quantified in more concrete units of measure (like tons of carbon dioxide), it is likely that a simple increase in the number of established species could alone warrant a quantification, as LEED appears to accept an increase in biodiversity as inherently good without qualification.

To contrast this with "standard design", you will essentially define (and justify) the baseline, and if you quantify this based on # of established species (or similar), you can simply show that the design case is significantly improved over your self-defined standard design.

Now you just need a really good narrative, and an open minded cert reviewer. Good Luck!

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Brian Harris Principal TcaArchitecture Planning
Feb 20 2015
LEEDuser Member
97 Thumbs Up

Innovation In Design Credits

Project Location: United States

After a design or construction submittal review, if one (or more) of the ID credits is not accepted, may it be replaced with a different ID attempt on the re-submittal?

Myles Huddart
LEED AP BD+C

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Feb 20 2015 LEEDuser Expert 17212 Thumbs Up

Swap away. I always like to have a couple of extra ID ideas in case something gets rejected. It can be easier to document a new credit instead of massaging a submitted credit that got shut down. Swapping out between design and construction reviews is not a problem. If you have a final construction review and still need that ID point, you'll have to appeal to get them to consider the new ID credit. I'm sure someone outlines that in this forum.

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Teresa Stern President T. Stern Sustainability Inc.
Jan 28 2015
LEEDuser Member
6 Thumbs Up

Panelized construction as ID in NC

I've reviewed all the ID points for NC that I can find here and in the ID Catalogue and haven't found any reference to achieving an ID point for panelized or modular construction. It would provide multiple energy and waste reduction benefits, but these are either included in other LEED credits or expressing excluded, as relates to MRc2. However, the materials efficiency aspect is not covered in the main credit set, and in LEED Homes there is a credit for Framing Efficiency including a path for modular components. For mixed-use projects using LEED NC has anyone been successful in achieving a related ID point? If so, details appreciated...

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Glen Phillips Director of Sustainable Education, GreenCE, Inc. Jan 28 2015 Guest 658 Thumbs Up

Did you consider MRpc63 (Pilot credit for Whole Building LCA)? I expect that this would be rather time intensive to document, and I can't say if any of the whole building LCA software knows how to address modular construction, although it does seem like it might offer a plausible way forward if your client is especially motivated to be recognized for the modular approach. Since this credit (or pilot credit for LEED 2009) is specific to the structure and enclosure, it seems like a good match for this type of strategy.

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jorge calderon earth lab
Jan 06 2015
Guest
223 Thumbs Up

plant nursery

Hi, I think this interesting innovative idea may give us an ID point. From pruning the green roof we have created a plant nursery where we have new plants that give away our visitors.
Does anyone knows if it fits in a pilot credit or in a diferent rating system from NC?

Thanks in advance

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 16 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Jorge, to me, this falls into a category of "great thing that you're doing, but not a LEED ID credit."

Review the guidance above and think about whether it meets the standards of ID credit approaches.

It could be the seed of an idea (pun intended) that could grow into an ID credit, but this activity in itself I don't think would qualify.

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jorge calderon earth lab
Jan 06 2015
Guest
223 Thumbs Up

educational strategy

Hi, we have a project that is an museum and auditorium with many educational components, as tour, video, activities, interactive web page, etc.

Is it possible to obtain two ID credits for educational strategy, documenting in one the education about recycling of course with two components and in other educating about Sustainability with two diferent components?

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Kath Williams LEED Fellow 2011, Principal, Kath Williams + Associates Jan 06 2015 LEEDuser Member 1725 Thumbs Up

In three attempts to separate a project's education strategies into component-specific programs that would earn individual ID points, the review comments always agreed that a comprehensive educational program would include all components to meet the proposed intent. Upon preliminary review, we were advised to combine the submission into one ID credit. Overall, that seems appropriate as that is how green education programs do work best in occupied buildings--separate components lead to one important outcome.

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Stella Stella
Oct 15 2014
Guest
254 Thumbs Up

Green Cleaning

Project Location: Philippines

Hi,
We are trying to document Green cleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. towards 1 point under Innovation for our LEED NC project.Is it sufficient to just follow the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. requirement for IEQ P3 & 3.1 to document compliance under ID?Please let me know?

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Nena Elise Oct 15 2014 LEEDuser Member 4053 Thumbs Up

Hi Stella,

Yes have done so on many projects. Just be sure to follow the LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. requirements including uploading the Green CleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. Policy and filling out a copy of the LEED EBOM IEQ P3 form and uploading it (the performance period is not applicable).

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Ashley Bertling
Oct 01 2014
Guest
17 Thumbs Up

Potential ID Credit

Project Location: United States

Good Morning!

We'd like to use vegetable oil in our elevators instead of using hydraulic oil. Think this will count? The elevator technician said it will work just the same.

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Kath Williams LEED Fellow 2011, Principal, Kath Williams + Associates Oct 01 2014 LEEDuser Member 1725 Thumbs Up

Earning an "eco elevator" credit has proven very frustrating for several of our project teams. The reviewers have said that the environmental impact of the elevator must be calculated and documented. We have worked with two major manufacturers of "eco elevators" and they could not provide any comparison or documentation that proves measured lessening of impact on environment. Just saying it..and even with a common sense approach as with vegetable oil...will not achieve the credit.

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MOHD HAFIZI MOHAMAD
Sep 18 2014
Guest
41 Thumbs Up

ID Credit for Herbs Garden

Hi All.
Currently, we have more than 10 percent of herbs garden from our total landscape areaThe landscape area is the total site area less the building footprint, paved surfaces, water bodies, and patios.. Can we scoring one point for ID?
Thanks

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Batya Metalitz Technical Director, LEED, USGBC Sep 23 2014 LEEDuser Expert 2698 Thumbs Up

Hi Mohd - check out the Local food production pilot credit as a possible way to do this.

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MOHD HAFIZI MOHAMAD Sep 23 2014 Guest 41 Thumbs Up

Hi Batya, That helps a lot.
Thank you so much

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Tammy Dalton President Tamara Dalton Design Studios
Aug 07 2014
LEEDuser Member
128 Thumbs Up

ID point for Green Cleaning- need advice

I am planning to pursue an ID point for Green CleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. for a NC v2009 project. To be acceptable, must the credit be designed/planned/organized exactly like the credits offered in the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. rating system for Green Cleaning? I guess the question is, what are the least or most basic parameters for "green cleaning" that would be awarded, or do the reviewers expect green cleaning to be presented as if it were an EBOM project (which covers a prerequisite green cleaning policy, and then the specific credits for products, equipment, etc.)? Any insight would be great! Thanks!

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Scott Adams Principal, Sustainable Integration LLC Aug 12 2014 Guest 85 Thumbs Up

I have created this particular ID credit myself. We used the requirements for IEQc3.3 Green CleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. - Purchase of Sustainable Cleaning Products and Materials. In order to get approved we were also required to meet the IEQp3 Green cleaning policy requirements in their entirety. As each Green Cleaning credit is a stand alone credit worth one point I would imagine that you could develop multiple ID credits by using multiple Green Cleaning credits.

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Courtney France
Aug 05 2014
LEEDuser Member
24 Thumbs Up

Water Performance Measurement Innovation approach for BD+C

Per the LEED Credit Library, there seems to be confusion, or room for interpretation, on how to pursue Whole Building Water Performance Measurement for an Innovation credit in BD+C projects. (Reference http://www.usgbc.org/node/4552279?return=/credits/new-construction/v2009...)

First - can you clarify if the total potable waterPotable water meets or exceeds EPA's drinking water quality standards and is approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction; it may be supplied from wells or municipal water systems. meter for the entire building is required to be automated/electronic reporting? In the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. rating system, the whole building meter seems acceptable to be hand-read, however the statement "This is acceptable if the meter is electronic data-logging readings but not acceptable if it is a plan to hand-read weekly." in the Innovation Catalogue contradicts this.

Second - (grammar punctuation makes this confusing) please clarify if the whole building water meter is required to have automated DAILY readings per the Innovation approach for BD+C projects? The Innovation Catalogue states 'Additional Requirements for Innovation credit:', but it is unclear due to lack of a comma if the DAILY readings are required for both the whole building AND one subsystem, or just for the one subsystem water meter only?

Clarification on the above two items will greatly help guide BD+C projects to accurately pursue and document this credit approach since the LEED credit library is lacking for all supporting resources and interpretations. Thank you!

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Nena Elise
Jul 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
4053 Thumbs Up

ID credit for saltwater pool?

I have done a lot of research and can not find any cases of getting an ID credit for using a saltwater pool. Does anyone know of any?

If not do you think it would be an excepted strategy?

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Ralph Bicknese Principal, Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects Jul 15 2014 LEEDuser Member 263 Thumbs Up

I have not heard of a case of this being tried or accepted as an ID credit either but I would think you could build a case based on not using a chlorine or bromine based system. You could cite potential hazards with those (in use, and possibly in manufacturing) and how salt water based systems are better for individuals and the environment.

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Jul 15 2014 Guest 4788 Thumbs Up

I wouldn't 100% count on it. It seems somewhat business as usual. Additionally, the reference guide states that "the process or specification must be comprehensive. [...] measures that address a limited portion of a project or are not comprehensive in other ways are not eligible." I'd talk up the quantitative environmental benefits and don't get discouraged if you get questioned in your preliminary review comments you may be able to persuade them with your final review response.

The reference guide also says " the level of effort involved in achieving an ID credit should be extraordinary." "Installing a single green product or addressing a single aspect of a sustainability issue is not a sufficient level of effort."

Are you already going for the Sustainable Education ID point? it's more tried and true...

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 16 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Strikes me as a single technology, not comprehensive in scope—so not going to meet the threshold for this credit. Now, if it were part of a green housekeeping program reducing chemical use throughout the facility...

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Nena Elise Jul 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 4053 Thumbs Up

Thanks all for the feedback!

Yes, I get that its a single technology. It is replacing a standard practice (chlorinated pool) that requires ongoing chemicals that are harmful for people and the environment. So it does have much more of an ongoing impact then a "single technology" would.

We will probably go for a more slam dunk ID though.

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Ralph Bicknese Principal, Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects Jul 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 263 Thumbs Up

I wouldn't necesarily give up on this. We have gone for and been awarded single-technology ID credits before - like low-mercury lighting - on LEED-NC projects. But as others haave suggested this may not be a slam-dunk. Still, unless you are maxed out on other ID credits I would suggest you go for it. Your approach seems innovative to the point not a technology so widely adopted - yet, and is environmentally and IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. positive, and is worthy of much broader support.

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Kath Williams LEED Fellow 2011, Principal, Kath Williams + Associates Jul 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 1725 Thumbs Up

This is a situation where there are great advantages to submitting for a split review. We've often "tested" innovation credits during design review and then have had a follow up opportunity (with plenty of time to plan and work on it) at construction credit review time. Single technologies or strategies that are not "comprehensive" seem to be denied on a regular basis. There are additional strategies that could be included in pool design (circulation system, filtering for reuse, etc.) construction, maintenance, and operations to make this a "green pool" or as Tristan commented, make the pool chemicals part of green housekeeping.

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Ralph Bicknese Principal, Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects Jul 23 2014 LEEDuser Member 263 Thumbs Up

I totally agree with the approach Kath suggested as that will give you the best chance to get the Innovation Credit accepted.

Kath - it is great to hear from you!

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Tracy Baker CTA Inc.
Jun 26 2014
LEEDuser Member
241 Thumbs Up

Innovation in Design credit denied

We attempted an Innovation in design credit for our project. The strategy for this was reusing existing foundation elements in the support of a new 18 story high rise building. The existing foundation elements (piers, etc) were placed and then the project permit was revoked and the project abandoned. The foundation elements sat exposed to weather for 9 years before our new project came along.
This credit was denied in its first review during the PreCertificaton Final Review. The reviewer states that the strategy aids in the achievement of MRc1.1 Building Reuse. We did not see this as a viable option given that there never was a finished building in place to reuse.
Will this get reviewed again in the Design/Construction Review?
Can I contact by email to further clarify our intent/strategy?
Do I have to pay / enter the Appeal process since it was Denied?

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Glen Phillips Director of Sustainable Education, GreenCE, Inc. Jun 26 2014 Guest 658 Thumbs Up

I'm afraid you are most likely out of luck on this approach, as central to Path 1 (Innovation in Design) eligibility is that the strategy not be addressed by any other LEED credits. Since the reviewer has confirmed that this strategy is already addressed within an existing credit (even if it isn't feasible to achieve in full), this strategy is essentially ineligible.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 27 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Tracy, have you applied this material to MRc2? That's your fallback for material like this that doesn't fit with MRc1. We talk about that on our guidance for those pages.

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Tracy Baker CTA Inc. Jun 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 241 Thumbs Up

Tristan,
Thank you. I think this will be my fallback plan. I did not believe MRc1 worked because the strategy is to reuse a 'previously occupied building'. In this case there never was a building.
For MRc1 - we are already attempting this credit. We may be able to get an exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. credit as well. Thanks for your help.
Tracy

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Gustavo De las Heras Izquierdo Arch. Eng. LEED AP BD+C; O+M Revitaliza Consultores
Jun 23 2014
Guest
446 Thumbs Up

Educational Program

What do I have to do to apply for the Educational Program credit?

Since I have not seen it here:
http://www.usgbc.org/pilotcredits/all/all
nor here:
http://www.usgbc.org/credits/new-construction/v2009/pilot-credits

I am afraid that I will have to submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide. Is that right?

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Glen Phillips Director of Sustainable Education, GreenCE, Inc. Jun 26 2014 Guest 658 Thumbs Up

It (kind of) depends on the Rating System.

For v3 (2009) and previous versions, CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide #3115 applies, and to paraphrase, you need 2 actively instructional elements (signage, case study, and/or tours).

I don't know if this CIR will be deemed eligible for use on v4 projects at some point, although as of right now, the CIR is not expressly allowed for v4. That said, a case could still be made to use it, and as it still can be reasonably applied to LEED v4 projects (and doesn't overlap with any of the new v4 credits), I expect that this would likely be accepted.

As a tip, this type of information can be found here: http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

An educational program is a pretty standard IDc1 appoach. There is guidance about what you need to do, both in our guidance above, and in the LEED Reference Guide.

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Crista Shopis Senior Engineer, LEED AP Taitem Engineering
Jun 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
153 Thumbs Up

Case study for education program

Are there known elements/requirements to include in a "case study" as one of the strategies towards the Green Education ID credit? Is there an outline somewhere that can be followed? My client is fairly private, but perhaps if they knew the requirements of a case study, they might feel as though they could accomplish them without divulging personal information that they would rather keep private.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 10 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Crista, one resource I point people to is the case studies database on BuildingGreen.com. A number of these have been used to earn LEED credit, and there is a variety of project types and owners.

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Sara Curlee BWBR
Jun 09 2014
LEEDuser Member
619 Thumbs Up

EBOM Credit MRp2 Solid Waste Management Policy

I am working on a NCv2009 project, and it is considering using MRp2 Solid Waste Management Policy as an Innovation Credit. I have a two part question.

As this is a prerequisite with related credits, does LEED require the NC innovation credit involve both creating the policy and then following the guidelines of each related credit? Almost making the prerequisite and three associated credits a "package" of sorts, similar to how LEED treats IEQp3/c1 Green CleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices.? This would make the minimum percentages from MRc7, MRc8 and MRc9 all applicable, right?

Assuming the above is true, when looking at MRc7 On-going Consumables, has anyone had any luck using waste to energy count in the required percentage of reused, recycled or composted waste stream? The new building I am working on sits on a campus. The current buildings compact their waste, which is then burned by the local district energy provider. This building will likely do the same, and I am curious if this will help their percentages at all for this credit.

Thanks for your help!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Sara, sorry for the slow response but I think these questions would be better posted on those specific EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. forums.

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Tim Crowley LEED AP / Founder www.BCdesignbuild.com
Jun 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
1279 Thumbs Up

Maximum points for Innovation in Design

I'm working on a project in which we have already been awarded (2) points for Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. + another (2) points for Innovation in Design (for a green housekeeping plan as well as a radon mitigation system) + (1) point for having a LEED AP on the team and finally (1) point for the school as a teaching tool. That totals (6) points in the Innovation in Design category. Are we maxed out with these (6) points or can we attempt others even though we have already submitted the Construction Final Application?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 06 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Congrats, you are maxed out, my friend!

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Tim Crowley LEED AP / Founder, www.BCdesignbuild.com Jun 06 2014 LEEDuser Member 1279 Thumbs Up

Tristan - Thanks for the info.

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Susan Di Giulio Project Manager Zinner Consultants
May 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
1333 Thumbs Up

Zero-Waste program vs separate programs for food and e-waste

Hi,

We are working with some great clients in a city anxious to test-drive a zero-waste program. We have 2 CI-2009 projects with these clients. In terms of how to optimize all that good will, I was wondering if it would be acceptable to go for 2 ID credits in the garbage zone: composting of food waste and recycling of e-waste, on each project.

Anxious for feedback.

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Laurie Thorwart Heller & Metzger PC
May 12 2014
Guest
49 Thumbs Up

"Borrowing Credits" addenda/redline?

Hi all,

Seems as though a lot of people have similar questions about "borrowing credits" from other rating systems. I think that I've tracked down that line of logic:

You can use v4 of this credit in a 2009 project, and v4 allows you to borrow credits from other systems (pg. 781 of current BD+C v4 guide).

That said, this is where the logic sort of ends for me, since the text in the v4 guide reads: "Points can also be earned by achieving selected credits from other LEED rating systems." The implication here is that there is an approved list (i.e. "selected credits") that exists somewhere, but I can't find any evidence of such a list's existence. Is there an approved credit-from-another-rating-system list somewhere out there, or will they be approved strictly on a project-by-project basis?

Thanks in advance!

Jake

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Donald Green Sustainability Consultant, Integrated Environmental Solutions May 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 1524 Thumbs Up

Jake,

If you go into the LEED Credit Library at USGBC.org, at the left side list - very bottom there is an Innovation Catalog. As well at the bottom of each credit after you open them up it notes, in a gray box, if you can use the v4 version of that credit in a v2009 project. Go to SSc8 fro example - there is a link to an article about using v4 credits in a v2009 project - it gives you the complete list - or link below.

http://www.usgbc.org/articles/use-v4-credits-your-v2009-project

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Laurie Thorwart Heller & Metzger PC May 12 2014 Guest 49 Thumbs Up

Donald,

Thank you so much for your reply, that's exactly what I was looking for. I've spent the last 5 years or so trying to ignore USGBC's website since it wasn't very well designed, but I suppose I should start keeping an eye on it!

Thanks again,

Jake

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Tiffany Moore LEED Documentation Consultant Built Kansas City LLC
Apr 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
997 Thumbs Up

SSc10 as an ID strategy in NC

Under the category of borrowing credits from other rating systems, I am looking at the potential to use the "Joint Use of Facilities" credit from Schools as an ID credit for NC.

The project is a higher ed building designed to support and incubate entrepreneurial partnerships with business, and host programs for outside organizations and the community.

Does anyone have experience using SSc10 as an ID credit or opinions on whether this approach seems reasonable for this project?

Thanks!

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David Edenburn ESD Consultant Commtech Asia
Apr 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
264 Thumbs Up

On-going Commissioning

Has anyone been able to use EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. EAc2.3 (On-going Commissioning) as an ID point for a LEED-CI project? I have a client ready to do it but before we pay the CxAThe commissioning authority (CxA) is the individual designated to organize, lead, and review the completion of commissioning process activities. The CxA facilitates communication among the owner, designer, and contractor to ensure that complex systems are installed and function in accordance with the owner's project requirements. I want to make sure we can get it.

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Scott Bowman LEED Fellow, Integrated Design + Energy Advisors, LLC Apr 26 2014 LEEDuser Expert 7288 Thumbs Up

Sorry, I have not seen this used before. You could ask a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide or proceed but have something else as backup (or use this as backup to something else).

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David Edenburn ESD Consultant, Commtech Asia Apr 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 264 Thumbs Up

Scott: Thanks for the quick response. Generally it is a rule of thumb that almost any EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. credit can be brought over for an ID point, but I would like to see if anyone has actually done it for this particular case. I may put in a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide, but not sure if we have the time. I just wanted to pad my point buffer a little.

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Bernardo Ruiz Montoya
Apr 04 2014
Guest
30 Thumbs Up

Green educational program

Hi experts,

I’m currently pursuing the point given for the Innovation and Design (green educational program). The signage has already been installed in the building, but we’re missing another way to compliment this action. The leaders proposed to create a local network with information about the LEED advantages, but I’m worried that this Intranet (local network) will not be accepted given the fact that it’s only for the people who works inside this company, and the general public will not be aware of the information. What is your opinion and experience about this situation?

Also about the signage and at the moment you’re going to register the credit on LEED online, do you think it’s recommended for the project to include pictures that display the location of these signboards, or it’s ok to just send the design of the signboards?

Thank you,

Bernardo

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Webly Bowles Associate Principal, Green Building Services Apr 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 30 Thumbs Up

Bernardo - The Intranet communication will not be enough to provide the active education required. If you can also make the case study information available to the public, you're more likely to meet the requirements. For the signage - you can include a floor plan with the location of the signs and images, text, or illustrations about the information on the signs.

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