NC-2009 IDc1: Innovation in Design

  • NC_CS_CI_IDc1_Type3_Innovation Diagram
  • Time to get creative

    This credit is your project’s opportunity to demonstrate leadership in the green building industry and to let your team contribute creative approaches to the field of sustainable design. It’s also a great way for your project to achieve up to five additional points. 

  • Three paths to points

    There are three different ways to achieve points under this credit:

    • Path 1 – Innovation in Design: Use an innovative approach to something not already covered in the LEED rating system. This approach must represent an innovative design approach to a problem, must be comprehensive in scope, and must have a quantifiable environmental benefit. Approach this path as if you were creating a new LEED “ID credit” from scratch.
    • Path 2 – Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements.: Go well beyond the performance thresholds of existing LEED credits. As a general rule, you go to the next threshold level over the credit requirement. For example, in WEc3: Water Use Reduction, you receive points for 30%, 35%, and 40% reductions in water use, while the ID point is for a 45% reduction; and for MRc5: Regional Materials, you receive points for sourcing 10% and 20% of materials (by cost) locally, while the ID point is for 30% locally sourced materials. Projects can only earn up to three points through this path.
    • Path 3 – Pilot Credit: Choose a pilot credit from USGBC's LEED pilot credit library, and try to achieve it while also documenting your work. This path was added to IDc1 in the July 2010 LEED addenda, and gives project teams a chance to help LEED evolve by testing credits that are still works-in-progress. LEEDuser offers guidance on all the pilot credits, and participation in LEEDuser's forum is a requirement.

    “Creative” doesn’t have to mean “costly”

    There are plenty of opportunities to earn Path 1 ID credits through no- and low-cost strategies. A great example is green cleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices., which requires the use of low-toxicity cleaning agents, cleaning machines that reduce impact on indoor air quality, and training maintenance staff in hazard reduction. 

    Take a close look at all the sustainability practices that your project is already planning or participating in and examine the possibilities of applying them to an ID credit. Some opportunities include recycling, composting, procurement and cleaning policies, landscape management, education initiatives, and many more.

    Use LEED-EBOM as a resource

    There is a consistent source of ID credit opportunities for all rating systems to be found in the LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance (EBOM) rating system (see LEEDuser's guide to EBOM for more information). Implementing operational practices and policies—for example, site management plans, purchasing programs, and green cleaning—can help you achieve ID credits and set the stage for successful, sustainable operation of your project building. 

    Operational credits fall outside the realm of design and construction, and the creation of a plan is easy with the available templates, but the commitment to implement the plan is just as important, if not more so.

    Educational programs

    It is common to use an educational program about the sustainability of the LEED project to earn a point under IDc1. Educational programs must consist of at least two separate components, including a kiosk, a website, a case study, a lecture series, signage, etc.

    To meet the requirement of having two components, you should understand some key distinctions. For example, a kiosk in a building lobby is typically viewed as signage and would be part of an overall signage program, not a second component. The information presented on the kiosk may also impact how it is categorized—it should be unique from that which is presented elsewhere. For example, if a project team creates a website (educational outreach) and places a kiosk (signage) in the lobby, but the kiosk only includes a link to the website, both of these items would only count as one component of the educational program. In contrast, if a project team implements a signage program (signage) and a kiosk, but the kiosk includes an in‐depth case study (case study), this could be viewed as two individual components. The educational program must also be about building-specific strategies employed on the LEED project as opposed to a marketing or user education tool.

    A staff sustainability team could be part of an educational strategy, but simply saying that one has been created in a narrative does not provide enough information. You should also provide specific information regarding the goals and methods of delivering the sustainable education component to the public or staff, such as work on signage, lectures, or outreach for home improvement, etc. Also, keep in mind that the group should distinguish itself from other strategies.

  • Consider these questions when approaching this credit

    • Can your project achieve double the credit requirements, or the next incremental percentage threshold, for any existing LEED credits?
    • Is your project undertaking sustainable design strategies that are above or beyond the intent of existing LEED credits? 
    • What makes your project special? Are there opportunities for innovation uniquely suited to your climate, region, building or use type, or project team? 
    • Is your building owner interested in pursuing sustainability goals through building operations and maintenance? If so, can your project adopt credits from the LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. rating system?

    Innovation credit submittal process

    Innovation credits are often denied, but GBCI typically encourages project teams to try another strategy if one they have proposed is not feasible to meet the credit requirements. The credit may  be denied outright with instruction to submit an alternative strategy, or denied pending clarification with technical advice asking for more explanation of how the submitted strategy is viable or the option to submit an alternative. Project teams may attempt new strategies in the construction phase if a particular innovation credit was denied in the design phase.

    FAQs for IDc1

    Our project wants to (fill in the blank) as an innovative strategy. Is this eligible for IDc1?

    Usually the answer to this question is "maybe." There are very few preapproved innovation strategies (education is one of them—see above), so with all but a few it is hard to say definitively whether or not it will be approved on a LEED project. However, there are some reliable guidelines that any project should consider:

    • The approach must be "innovative," i.e., not standard practice.
    • The approach must be comprehensive in scope. For example, many projects ask whether they can earn an innovation point for using a specific technology that is considered new or different, for example, an elevator that uses novel technology to offer energy efficiency. Use of a specific technology would not be considered comprehensive. (Doubly so in this case because energy efficiency is already covered under a LEED credit.) If you are starting out by considering a single technology, consider how you can expand that into a project-wide theme.
    • The approach must have a quantifiable environmental benefit.

    You should also consider that earning an ID credit basically requires you to write a LEED credit, set certain quantifiable measures, and meet them. So a good test is to put your idea in terms of a LEED credit. What is the credit name, intent, and requirements? Could this same credit be used on another project (is it repeatable?), or is it extremely unique?

    Many ideas will not hold up after applying these tests. Remember that a strategy might be a good idea even if it is not recognized for an ID credit, and that not every good idea meets the standards demanded by LEED.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Consider whether one or both paths to earning points under this  credit are suitable for your project:

    • Path 1 – Innovation in Design: Use an innovative approach to something not already covered in the LEED rating system. This approach must represent and innovative design approach to a problem, must be comprehensive in scope, and must have a quantifiable environmental benefit. Approach this path as if you were creating a new LEED “ID credit” from scratch.
    • Path 2 – Exemplary Performance: Go well beyond the performance thresholds of existing LEED credits.

  • No more than three of the points can be awarded for Exemplary Performance through Path 2, so to max out your points here you’ll need to also pursue Path 1 – Innovative Strategies. 


  • Brainstorm strategies for ID credits (Path 1) early, and involve your entire team, including designers, builders, owners, facilities managers, and occupants. Consider sustainability strategies that may fall outside the LEED rating system. Find out if the team has worked on any past LEED projects that pursued interesting ID credits. 


  • Using your preliminary LEED scorecard, note which Exemplary Performance thresholds might be attainable. Credits that are eligible for Exemplary Performance are noted throughout the LEED Reference Guide.

Schematic Design

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  • If considering Path 1, develop a list of 6–8 ID credits that may be appropriate for your project and discuss the opportunities, costs, and barriers to implementation of each with your project team.


  • When pursuing ID credits under Path 1 – Innovation in Design, use the published catalog of ID credits from pre-LEED 2009 rating systems  as a reference for possible approaches. However, note that simply because a strategy has been approved for a project in the past does not necessarily guarantee that it will be approved on a different project. In other words, the approach must be specific to the project in order to be considered for this credit. 


  • Attempt as many Path 2 – Exemplary Performance credits as possible. You can only earn points for three credits, but try for more than that, to maximize environmental benefit, and your chances of earning all three points—in case one falls through. 


  • Setting these increased thresholds as a goal early in the process can be cost-effective and make the ID credit for Exemplary Performance fairly easy to achieve.


  • Innovation in Design credits developed for Path 1 must be comprehensive and provide a quantifiable environmental benefit. ID credits are not awarded solely for using specific products or technologies, especially when the product aids in the achievement of another LEED credit. For example, if you purchase highly efficient windows, you cannot gain an ID credit for this because it will contribute to the overall energy efficiency of your building, which is included in EAp2 and EAc1.


  • The intent of a proposed innovation credit cannot be identical to or repetitive of the intent of LEED credits within the rating system in which your project is currently pursuing credit points. (Looking to other rating systems for ideas, however, is recommended.)


  • Other rating sytems such as LEED-EBOM can be a great resource for ideas for innovation credits. (See LEEDuser's list of LEED-EBOM credits and associated guidance.) When adapting these credits, it may be appropriate to meld the requirements to fit your rating system. For example, if pursuing LEED-EBOM MRc4: Reduced Mercury in Lamps, you would not in a design and construction rating system be required to document the solid waste management strategy which is a part of that credit, which is operations-focused.

Design Development

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  • Create a detailed narrative or plan for the ID credits that you have chosen and coordinate input from various interested parties. For example, if you are developing a Comprehensive Recycling Plan, you would need input from the staff responsible for coordinating the collection efforts, the recycling company to confirm that they can expand the scope of recycling beyond what is required in the LEED prerequisite, and the occupants to confirm that receptacles for recyclables are accessible and convenient and that the expectations of what should be recycled are understood.


  • Target more approaches than needed, with the expectation that some may be eliminated during design and construction. Submit your five best approaches, but have at least one or two backup strategies in case any are denied during the design submittal review. 

Construction Documents

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  • Verify that design-related ID credits have been included in the plans and specifications.


  • Complete documentation in LEED Online.


  • For Path 1 – Innovation in Design credits, documentation includes:

    • Title and a statement of intent for the proposed credit.
    • Environmental benefits associated with your approach.
    • Requirements proposed for your project to comply.
    • A narrative of the strategies employed by the project to meet the above intent and requirements.
    • Upload any related documents, plans, or product cut sheets associated with the strategy 

  • For Path 2 – Exemplary Performance, the ID credits are tied to those you have already documented for the standard credit page. This is an easy selection on the credit page.


  • Document as many ID credits in LEED Online as you can for the design submittal. This way you can have confirmation that you have achieved the credit. If your anticipated credits are rejected, then you can submit others for the construction submittal. 


  • For post-construction or operations-related credits, circulate draft plans among the owner, maintenance staff, and occupants if necessary to coordinate important components of the credit strategy and confirm your approach.

Construction

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  • Track your design-submittal ID credits so that you know whether they have been accepted. If they have not, read the comments from the reviewer and consider what it might take to achieve them or whether you might be better off pursuing a different ID credit. 


  • If you choose to pursue a different credit, prepare the documentation for the submittal promptly.  

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Commit to implementing the submitted ID credits in the way that they were proposed. Ensure that policies and plans are followed through and that there are enough human and financial resources to achieve the goals of the credits. In some cases, the successful implementation of these credits will help to demonstrate the success of the project as a whole into the future.   


  • Implement the operational ID credits that you submitted, even if they weren’t approved. Often these credits can have considerable cultural impact on the occupants by making sustainability strategies tangible. 


  • Operational strategies are intended to provide a platform for continuous improvement, which often leads to both material and financial savings. Be ambitious in the implementation of these strategies, and continue to set high goals for your project, year after year.  

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    ID Credit 1: Innovation in design

    1-5 Points

    Intent

    To provide design teams and projects the opportunity to achieve exceptional performance above the requirements set by the LEED Green Building Rating System and/or innovative performance in green building categories not specifically addressed by the LEED Green Building Rating System.

    Requirements

    Credit can be achieved through any combination of the Innovation in Operations and Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. paths as described below:

    Path 1. Innovation in design (1-5 points for NC and CS, 1-4 points for Schools)

    Achieve significant, measurable environmental performance using a strategy not addressed in the LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations, LEED 2009 for Core and Shell Development, or LEED 2009 for Schools Rating Systems.

    One point is awarded for each innovation achieved. No more than 5 points (for NC and CS) and 4 points (for Schools) under IDc1 may be earned through Path 1—Innovation in design.

    Identify the following in writing:

    • The intent of the proposed innovation credit.
    • The proposed requirement for compliance.
    • The proposed submittals to demonstrate compliance.
    • The design approach (strategies) used to meet the requirements.
    Path 2. Exemplary performance (1-3 points)

    Achieve exemplary performance in an existing LEED 2009 for New Construction, Schools and Core & Shell prerequisite or credit that allows exemplary performance as specified in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Design & Construction, 2009 Edition. An exemplary performance point may be earned for achieving double the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold of an existing credit in LEED.

    One point is awarded for each exemplary performance achieved. No more than 3 points under IDc1 may be earned through Path 2—Exemplary performance.

    Path 3. Pilot credit (1-4 points)

    Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library at www.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant and complete the required documentation. Projects may pursue up to 4 Pilot Credits total.

    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Substantially exceed a LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations performance credit such as energy performance or water efficiency. Apply strategies or measures that demonstrate a comprehensive approach and quantifiable environment and/or health benefits.

Technical Guides

Guidance on Innovation in Design (ID) Credits

Supplementary description of ID credit compliance from USGBC.

Publications

Innovation in Design Credit Catalog

Listing of hundreds of ID credit approaches.

Acoustical Design Credit

Innovation in Design

Enhanced acoustical design is only a prerequisite and credit in the LEED for Schools rating system only, but it is a good candidate for use as an innovation credit in other rating systems. Armstrong, a major manufacturer, pursued acoustics as an innovation path in its own LEED-EB certification in 2007. Shown here is a summary of how Armstrong earned the point.

Viewshed Protection Credit

Innovation in Design

Denali National Park and Preserve is the home to panoramic vistas that draw visitors from around the world. The intent of this innovation credit was to document efforts to protect and preserve the visitors center viewshed as part of the sustainable design of the facility.

Active Design Credit

Innovation in Design

An "active design" or "design for health" credit successfully earned an innovation point through IDc1 for a New York City project. The project wanted to comprehensively integrate into the design of the project features that would encourage regular physical activity in occupants, while also bringing environmental benefits. The project team hopes that other projects will use this thorough documentation as an example to pursue similar approaches.

493 Comments

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Bernardo Ruiz Montoya
Apr 04 2014
Guest

Green educational program

Hi experts,

I’m currently pursuing the point given for the Innovation and Design (green educational program). The signage has already been installed in the building, but we’re missing another way to compliment this action. The leaders proposed to create a local network with information about the LEED advantages, but I’m worried that this Intranet (local network) will not be accepted given the fact that it’s only for the people who works inside this company, and the general public will not be aware of the information. What is your opinion and experience about this situation?

Also about the signage and at the moment you’re going to register the credit on LEED online, do you think it’s recommended for the project to include pictures that display the location of these signboards, or it’s ok to just send the design of the signboards?

Thank you,

Bernardo

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Webly Bowles Associate Principal, Green Building Services Apr 06 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6 Thumbs Up

Bernardo - The Intranet communication will not be enough to provide the active education required. If you can also make the case study information available to the public, you're more likely to meet the requirements. For the signage - you can include a floor plan with the location of the signs and images, text, or illustrations about the information on the signs.

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Christopher Law Associate, LEED U.S. Green Building Council
Apr 02 2014
LEEDuser Member
33 Thumbs Up

Apply to LEED Committees by April 10

Hi experts,

Wanted to notify those subscribed to this forum of the ongoing LEED Committee Call for Volunteers. This opportunity is open until next Thursday, April 10th at 8:00 pm EST.

Among the committees seeking volunteers this round is the Pilot Credit Library Working Group. This working group helps shepherd new building strategies for testing by project teams in the Pilot Credit Library.

More information is available at the following pages:

• Volunteer Opportunity Page: Background on each committee seeking volunteers and the specific expertise areas sought during this round of applications. http://www.usgbc.org/committees/volunteer-opportunities/leed-call

• Application Tool: Online survey to submit your self-nomination and expand upon your professional background. https://usgbc.wufoo.com/forms/2014-leed-committees-call-for-volunteers/

• Blog Post: Original March 10th announcement on USGBC.org, which includes further information on the selection process. http://www.usgbc.org/articles/become-leed-committee-member

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Crista Shopis Senior Engineer, LEED AP Taitem Engineering
Mar 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
43 Thumbs Up

Education Program - what if project is private?

The nature of my clients building is private. They would be unwilling to host tours from the public or include too much information on a public website. They have suggested the following measures that they could take towards educating occupants and minimally the public. Would this satisfy the credit intent?

• We will place an article on the Internal website which describes the LEED project, the reasons for doing it and the impact it will have.
• We will do a Town Hall meeting for all staff with visuals and renderings to show the project in its entirety.
• We will post another article on the external website with narrative and description highlighting the LEED project.
• We will distribute an internal newsletter which provides information on the project to all of the staff.
• We will do an internal Lunch and Learn on LEED projects at the FRBNY.

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Scott Bowman Principal - Corporate Sustainability Leader, KJWW Engineering Consultants Mar 25 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3753 Thumbs Up

Not sure, as most of the projects I have been involved with had a high degree of interaction with the public. Occupants and users are still a good audience if in numbers sufficient to warrant the education. Perhaps broadening the education to the foundational need for LEED as a measure and how aspects of the project can be implemented in the occupants home, neighborhood, or community. I would recommend proceeding, putting your best case forward, but have a backup plan if they do not accept it.

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Kath Williams LEED Fellow 2011, Principal, Kath Williams + Associates Mar 25 2014 LEEDuser Member 1070 Thumbs Up

One of the keys to successfully earning the Green Education credit is that whatever is proposed be "interactive." Posting articles does not engage the reader in "active" learning. That's the challenge we have had in six projects that all were secured buildings with no public access. One activity that might work for you is to have employees commit to volunteering within the community to explain lessons learned on the project, to go to schools and work with students on sustainability projects, and even to introduce LEED for other projects. Sign up/pledge sheets as part of the submittal would certainly help.

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Kate Levine
Mar 04 2014
Guest
5 Thumbs Up

Closed Pilot Credit

Does anyone have experience with pursuing a closed pilot credit as an ID credit? We had intended to register for a pilot credit, but it was closed to new registrants before we were able to register. We would still like to pursue the credit, however.

Any input you have would be greatly appreciated.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 05 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Kate, which credit is it? Usually they are closed for a reason -- they are updated with a new version, or incorporated into LEED v4, so you could potentially use the LEED v4 version.

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Kate Levine Mar 05 2014 Guest 5 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Tristan. That's a good call - it turns out it was included in LEED v4. The pilot credit was #21, which is now in the EQ section.

The reason we wanted to pursue it was for low emitting furniture. I'm now wondering if it might be possible to pursue IEQc4.5 (low emitting furnishings), which is only available for schools.

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Kelly Duepner LEED BD+C Christner Inc.
Feb 20 2014
LEEDuser Member
91 Thumbs Up

Known ways to achieve Innovation credit related to Green Labs?

Our office is currently designing two LEED laboratory building. Both owners are interested in implementing a Green Labs program. Anyone have any information on if / how a program like this can be accepted as an Innovation credit?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 20 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Kelly, can you say more about what the green labs program entails and how it goes above and/or complements what LEED covers?

I could see potential for this, but need more specifics.

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Ralph Bicknese Principal, Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects Feb 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 111 Thumbs Up

Kelly, we have been awarded innovation credits for projects using part of what would be in a Green Labs program on science and/or lab projects, especially when the strategies also relate to credits in other LEED systems - such as as a green cleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. program. We have considered other aspects of Green Labs as innovation credits but have not yet attempted them. You would have more opportunity for multiple innovation credits applying Green Labs components as innovation credits one at a time (as long as they seem to have sufficient merit) rather than the entire Green Labs system as an innovation. The process to receive an innovation credit for Green Labs or components of Green Labs would be similar to receiving credit for other innovations.

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Kelly Duepner LEED BD+C, Christner Inc. Feb 21 2014 LEEDuser Member 91 Thumbs Up

Both of these owners currently have no green lab program, so we are helping to find examples or predefined programs. The goals of the programs would primarily would be raising energy awareness and operational conservation within the labs as the equipment in these labs use a large amount of energy. The programs would also focus on recycling and green chemical usage.

One project is also pursuing an ID credit for Green CleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. by utilizing the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. prereq and IEQc3.1Green Cleaning Program.

I was looking to see if there are any known and fairly transparent, and detailed case studies to reference. Or if Labs21 had guidelines to use as a framework that had been acceptable to LEED.

Thanks for your assistance!

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Ralph Bicknese Principal, Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects Feb 24 2014 LEEDuser Member 111 Thumbs Up

We have received Innovation Credits several times based on a comprehensive green cleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. program. Following the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. prereq and IEQc3.1 are a solid path! We have also received ID credits by by pursuing an educational program. Your "energy awareness" component could be part of an educational program (think signage, brochures and/or web info, public and student tours, etc). I would think you may also find a way to qualify for another with a good "green chemical" program. I am not aware of specific case studies. You could check the ID library and as you suggested Labs21.

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Kath Williams LEED Fellow 2011, Principal, Kath Williams + Associates Mar 25 2014 LEEDuser Member 1070 Thumbs Up

Use of the DOE/EPA Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria (EPC) was an innovation credit in earlier versions of LEED. This was due to outstanding work of the then-LEED for Labs committee which evolved into LEED-Application Guide for Laboratories (LEED-AGL). The lab market sector was never seen as a large enough industry to garner scarce LEED resources at a time when warehouses, distribution centers, data centers and the like were rapidly being developed and needed attention and LEED guidance. The AGL was never released for public usePublic or public use applies to all buildings, structures, or uses that are not defined as private or private use..
That being said, the EPC is posted on the Labs21 website and still has terrific best management practices documented for lab designers. Might be useful to generate "innovation" credits in current and future versions of LEED.

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Kelly Duepner LEED BD+C, Christner Inc. Apr 01 2014 LEEDuser Member 91 Thumbs Up

Kath (or anyone else with first hand experience) -
I am looking at the EPC and see that it is made up of credits. Any past experience or hunches on if meeting only one credit from the EPC would gain a LEED ID credit? Or would we need to achieve more than one - to demonstrate a holistic program.

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Kath Williams LEED Fellow 2011, Principal, Kath Williams + Associates Apr 01 2014 LEEDuser Member 1070 Thumbs Up

Our experience has been that the EPC was used as a design guide and complete program. Using one EPC credit could be submitted as a conventional Innovation point, depending, of course, on whether it is an issue not already covered in a LEED credit. Over the course of a decade, the USGBC committee working on "LEED for Labs" found that all but four of the draft "LEED-AGL" prerequisites and credits are now covered in LEED 2009, proving LEED has evolved and does address even some specialized building types, like labs. We have had success using Commissioning of Fume Hoods to ASHRAE 110 standards (as installed) as an innovation credit. Note: it had to be ALL fume hoods in project.

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Kelly Duepner LEED BD+C, Christner Inc. Apr 01 2014 LEEDuser Member 91 Thumbs Up

Is it published anywhere or do you know which are the four credits? Thanks - I'm just trying to get to that info if it is available without having to do the comparison myself.

Good tip about the Commissioning of Fume Hoods.

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Farah A.
Feb 17 2014
Guest
75 Thumbs Up

Innovation in Design

A project team earns an Innovation in Design point for an innovative strategy on a previous project. The project team would like to submit the same innovative strategy for an ID point on a current project. Which of the following statements is true? (Choose 2)

The project team must submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide to see if the ID point will be achieved

Although a precedent was set by the previous project, the current project will not necessarily achieve the ID point

The current project will not achieve the ID point for using the same innovative strategy, because it is no longer innovative

The precedent set by the previous project means that the current project will achieve the ID point

The project team must structure the innovative strategy to be appropriate for the current project's context in order to achieve the ID point

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Which you do think it is? (Help us help you!)

Also, reading the guidance on LEEDuser above will be invaluable.

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Farah A. Feb 17 2014 Guest 75 Thumbs Up

I think the answers are :

Although a precedent was set by the previous project, the current project will not necessarily achieve the ID point

The project team must structure the innovative strategy to be appropriate for the current project's context in order to achieve the ID point

I am a bit confused by the CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide process as I have read ID points do need to go through a CIR process?

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Farah A.
Feb 16 2014
Guest
75 Thumbs Up

Innovation Question

Innovative strategies under the Innovation in Design category can be achieved by a new construction office building by pursuing all of the following EXCEPT: (Choose 1)

A. Meeting the requirements of an applicable credit in the LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. rating system
B. Developing an innovative strategy that goes above and beyond the intent of an existing credit
C. Meeting the requirements of an applicable credit in the LEED for Schools rating system
D. Evaluating a substantial quantity of products or materials being used (or being considered for use in the building) on the basis of an ISO 14040 life-cycle assessment1. Life-cycle assessment is an analysis of the environmental aspects and potential impacts associated with a product, process, or service. 2. The practice of quantifying and characterizing all the resource and pollution flows associated with a process or product, for the purpose of documenting its environmental impact. It is defined by the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) as "a compilation and evaluation of the inputs, outputs and the potential environmental impacts of a product system throughout its life-cycle."
E. Creating an innovative strategy that is not addressed by existing LEED credits, and can demonstrate quantitative performance improvements for environmental benefit

I was told the answer is (B) but surely that is an error? Also, how are choices A and C true?

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Joseph Ford, AIA Architect, RSP Architects Ltd. Feb 16 2014 Guest 289 Thumbs Up

Farah,

Choices A and C would be true because you are allowed to 'borrow' credits from other rating systems to pursue Innovation points.

Choice B would be the most correct answer because you generally cannot pursue an ID credit for any strategy that is already addressed by base credits in the rating system.

That said, I call this the "most" correct answer because I do see it as slightly confusing. In many cases you can go 'above and beyond' the intent of a credit and qualify for an ID credit via Exemplary PerformanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements....a path that is not included in the answers provided.

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sompoche sirichote
Feb 09 2014
LEEDuser Member
160 Thumbs Up

Recycled water for Cooling Tower

Hi, our project is using 100% recycled water for cooling tower. Is this eligible for an ID credit? If so, can we submit the credit at construction review stage since we've already submitted for design review? Thank you.

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Scott Bowman Principal - Corporate Sustainability Leader, KJWW Engineering Consultants Feb 11 2014 LEEDuser Expert 3753 Thumbs Up

No I do not think so, as there are other credits in the Pilot Credit library that could apply, and this very topic is a feature of v4. I recommend taking a look at PC17 and PC18 as options to gain a credit for your system. We too have been using more condensate from cooling coils for make up to cooling towers along with good chemical monitoring and treatment.

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Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Feb 11 2014 LEEDuser Member 1384 Thumbs Up

The project submittal tips document on www.gbci.org says you can pursue LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. WEc4.1 Cooling Tower Water Management for an ID point on a LEED NC Project. One path for earning this credit requires that makeup water consist of at least 50% nonpotable waterNonpotable water: does not meet EPA's drinking water quality standards and is not approved for human consumption by the state or local authorities having jurisdiction. Water that is unsafe or unpalatable to drink because it contains pollutants, contaminants, minerals, or infective agents.. There are some additional requirements here http://www.usgbc.org/node/1732143?return=/credits/existing-buildings/v20...

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Eric Carter Intern Architect Method Studio, Inc.
Jan 28 2014
LEEDuser Member
27 Thumbs Up

Occupant Recycling Program - LEED Interpretation 3920

We've attempted to earn an innovation credit by citing the owner's initiative to recycle materials (batteries, motor oil, electronics, cooking oil, and other fluids from industrial equipment) beyond those required by MRp1. The review team has directed us to meet the requirements found in LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 3920: 1. average recycling rate of 40%; 2. double MRp1 materials benchmark (by weight, volume, or recycling rate); and 3. don't include landscape/regulated waste in calculations.
The landscape and regulated waste requirement is straightforward, but I would like clarification on the other two. Is a waste audit needed to determine the recycling rate? Since it is very unlikely that the additional materials would double the MRp1 benchmark by volume or weight, doubling the recycling rate seems like the only viable option. Am I right to assume this essentially means that if 40% is the average recycling rate for the materials required by MRp1, then a rate of 80% of additional materials diverted from the waste stream would qualify for the credit?
Any suggestions are appreciated.

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Eric Carter Intern Architect, Method Studio, Inc. Feb 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 27 Thumbs Up

We're nearing the completion of our documentation for final construction review and would like to include this credit: anyone have some advice for us?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 19 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Eric, while that LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. is applicable to LEED 2009, I think it's a bit dated with respect to the model that it is providing. I would look at EBOM 2009 MRc7 as your model for compliance here and focus on meeting those requirements (doubling the base requirements of an EBOM credit is typically not required for an NC IDc1 approach).

Is this helpful?

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Eric Carter Intern Architect, Method Studio, Inc. Feb 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 27 Thumbs Up

Tristan, your comment is helpful: I can see why the requirements in EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. 2009 MRc7 are applicable and attainable, but I wonder whether the review team would find them acceptable since they directed us to such a specific LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org.. Do you have any suggestions for how we might make a case for substituting one set of requirements for the other?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 20 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

It is very common and pretty accepted to use an EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. credit for an NC ID credit. I don't think you need to make this case. I am a little surprised the review team pointed you to this older Interpretation when the EBOM path is more clear. You can even us the EBOM templates and forms!

For backup, see GBCI's submittal tips doc. Actually based on that I might amend my original comment and point you to EBOM MRp2.

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Pamela Loomis Anderson Mason Dale Architects
Jan 13 2014
LEEDuser Member
19 Thumbs Up

ID credit for machine roomless elevators

Does anyone have any recent experience being awarded an ID point for using machine roomless elevators - submitting documentation from the manufacturer regarding process load/energy performance savings?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 13 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Pamela, any energy efficiency from the elevator would be captured in EAp2/EAc1, so there would not be a rationale for an ID credit. 

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Pamela Loomis Anderson Mason Dale Architects Jan 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 19 Thumbs Up

I fully concur with the logic of your statement. Perhaps LEED needs to reach out to the elevator companies to advise them against false representation... Kone, Otis, Schindler all have statements on their websites suggesting an ID credit is possible for selecting MRL elevators (see Kone http://www.kone.us/sustainability/leed/). There are even continuing education articles published by Architectural Record suggesting MRL's are eligible for an ID credit (Next Generation Machine-Roomless Elevators - published May 2012 (http://continuingeducation.construction.com/article.php?L=294&C=891&P=6).

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Donald Green Project Manager, Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC Jan 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 282 Thumbs Up

You can achieve the ID credit but not for energy savings as noted by Tristan. You can however pursue the ID credit by pursuing the other environmental benefits such as no hydraulic fluid and savings on materials by having no machine room or elevator pit etc. Kone has been the only elevator vendor that has been able to provide the required documentation thus far.

Thank you,

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 14 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Donald, have you seen this successfully done? I typically advise project teams away from ID approaches that rely on a single technology.

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Donald Green Project Manager, Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC Jan 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 282 Thumbs Up

Yes, with the noted vendor. I understand your point on a single source and I agree, but I felt they needed to know what they are getting themselves into. We just haven't been able to get the required documentation from other vendors. We are actually in the midst of trying it with a different vendor now and will see what happens because we received some documentation but not all that we asked for; we had asked for the same information we received from the successful vendor. We are therefore going to provide a narrative culling information from various sources to hopefully fill in the gaps. If there were other options for this project I wouldn't pursue this ID credit.

Thank you,

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Pamela Loomis Anderson Mason Dale Architects Jan 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 19 Thumbs Up

Many thanks for all the commentary and feedback on the MRL / ID topic. We do have Kone MRL's on the project and are coordinating with their rep. One last question, to clarify whether you would submit as a design or construction ID credit, or if it matters. We're getting ready to submit LEED final design review credits, so I would prefer to have an opportunity to respond to comments by submitting it as a construction credit.

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Michael Johnson Architect Chenevert Architects
Jan 13 2014
LEEDuser Member
367 Thumbs Up

usgbc ID credit catalog - green cleaning

USGBC published a catalog of ID credits that have been pursued. It states the credit category/keywords, whether it was accepted or denied, and gives the basic parameters.

On page 26 of 30, towards the bottom of the page, is the "green cleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices." of an accepted ID credit.

My question is that this seems quite different than what everything else has led me to (btw, im working on a LEED-NC 2009 project. Other posts/resources have led me to believe we should follow EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. credits for green cleaning.

This credit catalog, however, merely states "final cleanup" products and what standard they must conform to.

Additionally, this document makes reference to a two week flush out and replacement with MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filters. As part of IEQc3.2, we are doing a flush out prior to occupancy - not at 2 weeks. Similarly, we are changing filters to MERV 13 just prior to flush out prior to occupancy - not at two weeks.

I suppose I need some guidance as to which path is more likely to get the green cleaning ID credit (EBOM, or what is listed in USGBC ID catalog).

anyone know/have any thoughts on this?

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Donald Green Project Manager, Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC Jan 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 282 Thumbs Up

We always use LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. for this ID credit and have had great success. Provide the IEQp3 template along with the requested Green CleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. Policy. You must also commit to using “sustainable” cleaning products as much as possible, products must meet the criteria set forth in IEQ Credit 3.3. As well commit to purchasing “green” cleaning equipment to meet the criteria set forth in IEQc3.4. Outline both in the Green Cleaning Policy for IEQp3.

Thank you,

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Michael Johnson Architect, Chenevert Architects Jan 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 367 Thumbs Up

thank you Donald. I think the only aspect of all the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. we are currently NOT doing is the assessment of janitorial service many months later. From what I gather, we do not need to be doing that.

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Charles Winkler MEP Department Head KHAFRA
Jan 13 2014
Guest
6 Thumbs Up

use of green power during construction

Does anyone know whether I can obtain an Innovation Credit for use of green power during construction? I have a 15,000 sf New Construction project.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 13 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Charles, can you be more specific? What is the source of the green power? What is it being used for? How much of your construction energy does it account for?

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Charles Winkler MEP Department Head, KHAFRA Jan 13 2014 Guest 6 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan for the response. The local electric utility has an established program for the sale of Green Power that qualifies for LEED Credits under Energy & Atmosphere Credit 6. The owner is planning to purchase Green Power for operation of the facility once occupied. We wanted to know whether we can additionally obtain an Innovation Credit for purchase of Green Power through this local electric utility program, for 100% of the electric power required for construction of the facility.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 13 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

I can't say how GBCI would rule on this but in my opinion, it's a nice thing to do, but not IDc1 material.

One, green power already gets a lot of emphasis in LEED, even if it doesn't cover construction.

Two, I don't know what the ratios would be, but a large amount of construction energy (and pollution) would be through equipment and haulage, which wouldn't be touched by electricity offsets.

It simply doesn't seem that innovative to me, or affecting the most important impacts of the construction process.

Something more innovative in my view would be Pilot Credit 75: Clean Construction.

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Cynthia Kaplan Principal cmk LEED
Jan 09 2014
Guest
9 Thumbs Up

Pre construction ductwork cleaning

My project is a full renovation of a 1920's high school for use as a new middle school. The owner ordered a full video inspection of the existing ductwork. Most of the ductwork showed fair to moderate loose debris. I would like to suggest to the owner that we do a full negative air sweep cleaning of the ductwork systems prior to construction. Is this eligible for an ID credit?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 09 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Cynthia, the question of whether a specific strategy qualifies for ID credit comes up a lot, so we have an FAQ above that goes into some detail. I would recommend reviewing that. (If you are not yet a LEEDuser member you can join using the free trial offer at the top of the page.)

My opinion, based on the kind of guidance we have offered, is that this strategy is not innovative enough, or comprehensive in nature. Duct cleaning is fairy common and a lot of projects simply use new ducts and thus they start out clean.

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Rosemary Mascali Manager Transit Solutions
Nov 20 2013
LEEDuser Member
18 Thumbs Up

ID Credits for Alternative Transportation

I know that you can only achieve 1 exemplary point for alternative transportation by either doubling ridership or developing a comprehensive transportation management plan, but can you try for a different innovation in design credit related to transportation if you've already achieved exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements.? Or is the whole category limited to 1 innovation credit.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 20 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Rosemary, the 1 EP point is achieved in the way you described or through a comprehensive transportation management plan. You can only get one point by doing either or both.

If you have something transportation related that's really outside the scope of those options and the current SSc4 credits, it might be an opion, but it seems unlikely to me. I'd have to hear more specifics.

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Rosemary Mascali Manager, Transit Solutions Nov 21 2013 LEEDuser Member 18 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Tristan. I was specifically thinking of trying to achieve an innovation point by achieving both components of SSc4.3 - Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Refueling Station. That shouldn't be considered a TDM strategy since you're not taking cars off the road.

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Rosemary Mascali Manager, Transit Solutions Nov 27 2013 LEEDuser Member 18 Thumbs Up

I just noticed pilot credit LTpc70 that seems to fit my situation.

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Michael Johnson Architect Chenevert Architects
Nov 19 2013
LEEDuser Member
367 Thumbs Up

Green Cleaning - referencing LEED EB

Apparently LEED-NC projects seeking green cleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. ID credit should reference LEED-EB green cleaning requirements. LEED-EB has 6 different credits for green cleaning (IEQ 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5...)

To get the ID credit, does the project have to conform to ALL of these!?

If not, which one(s)?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 23 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Michael, the answer to both of your questions, straight from the horse's mouth, is contained in USGBC's certification tips on LEED-NC 2009

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Michael Johnson Architect, Chenevert Architects Jan 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 367 Thumbs Up

thank you Tristan. Just seeing this. I must say - LEED really needs to find a way to streamline everything. This is yet another document i was unaware of. Between the matrix for credits, this document youve linked, the credit catalog of innovation credits they put out, the errata, etc... it is out of control. It seems for every credit, there are 3-5 other USGBC documents you must cross reference. i hope they get better in this regard.

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Donald Green Project Manager, Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC Jan 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 282 Thumbs Up

Michael - I responded to a similar question on Green CleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. as an ID credit earlier today, go to the latest string at the top of this page. That may help you.

Good luck,

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Michael Johnson Architect Chenevert Architects
Nov 19 2013
LEEDuser Member
367 Thumbs Up

Green Cleaning - percentages

Green CleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. for ID in LEED-NC i've been directed to reference the Green Cleaning credits in LEED-EB.

The LEED EB green cleaning criteria cite percentages. For example, 20% of equipment must be compliant, and 100% of equipment purchased during performance period must be compliant.

My question is: when used for ID in LEED-NC, do we ignore the low percentages and replace with 100%? or is a smaller percentage still allowed?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Dec 23 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

You would need to comply 100% with equipment purchased for occupancy, per USGBC's certification tips on this credit.

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Kath Williams LEED Fellow 2011, Principal Kath Williams + Associates
Nov 06 2013
LEEDuser Member
1070 Thumbs Up

Manufactured units

As a project design team interviews manufacturers about providing sustainable, stackable housing units, could a comprehensive focus on their process as well as product garner an innovation point? Do "green" manufactured units themselves and the manufacturing process efficiencies contribute anywhere else in LEED 2009?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 06 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Kath, I can't think of any areas these would contribute in the main credits in LEED 2009. If you include pilot credits and LEED v4 credits that might be useful for formulating innovation credits, I would look to v4 MRc1, v4 MRc5, and PC63.

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Sheryl Swartzle LEED administration TLC Engineering for Architecture
Oct 28 2013
LEEDuser Member
537 Thumbs Up

EBOM IEQc3.2 Custodial Effectiveness Assessment for ID credit

How long would a building need to be occupied before a Custodial Effectiveness Assessment was performed in order to earn an ID point in NCv2009?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 30 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Sheryl, I'm not aware of any well-established rule on this issue. I would suggest three months, simply because that is the length of many EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. performance periods. Not that that is relevant here, but in the LEED world, three months seems to be considered long enough to establish a pattern of occupancy.

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Sara Curlee BWBR Apr 01 2014 LEEDuser Member 356 Thumbs Up

The IEQc3.2 Custodial Effectiveness Assessment is not listed as an allowable credit for use in LEED NC 2009 projects, according to the LEED Project Submittal Tips document.

Have people been able to use IEQc3.2 on NC projects? I am a little confused why it is excluded from the list published by the USGBC.

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Sheryl Swartzle LEED administration, TLC Engineering for Architecture Apr 01 2014 LEEDuser Member 537 Thumbs Up

I asked this question of GBCI and received the following response: "This is a performance element of an EBO&M credit, it is not applicable to any BD+C or ID+C projects. The only way to receive and innovation in design credit in this category is to show compliance with IEQp3, which is the green cleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. policy."

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Sara Curlee BWBR Apr 01 2014 LEEDuser Member 356 Thumbs Up

Interesting. Thanks Sheryl!

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Donald Green Project Manager Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC
Oct 25 2013
LEEDuser Member
282 Thumbs Up

Green Houskeeping for v2.2 & v2009

Has anyone been able to submit the same Green Housekeeping Plan for ID credit based on v2009 for a v2.2 project? We have a client with a campus whereby we have a handful of projects still in v2.2 trying to wrap up and a handful of new projects in v2009. It doesn't make sense for the campus to have to have 2 separate and quite different Green Housekeeping Plans simply because they are under different LEED versions.

Can anyone lend some guidance, are we stuck having 2 separate plans?

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Gerren Wagner Energy Opportunities Oct 25 2013 Guest 95 Thumbs Up

Yes, v2.2 projects can use the v2009 requirements for the Green Housekeeping Plan....(usually going forward isn't a problem, it's the backcasting that'll get you in trouble).

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Donald Green Project Manager, Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC Oct 25 2013 LEEDuser Member 282 Thumbs Up

Are you sure as there are some conflicting requirements between the 2 - and that is where we have been running into problems.

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Gerren Wagner Energy Opportunities Oct 25 2013 Guest 95 Thumbs Up

Well, they're two different approaches with different requirements. The v2.2 plan is based on LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 766, but the v2009 plan is based on another rating system (LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating sytems. 2009 IEQp3: Green CleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices. Policy). But I've seen projects use the v2009 plan requirements for a v2.2 project. (Keep in mind that if you have any residential projects - dorms - there are additional requirements for a v2.2 housekeeping plan!)

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Luciana T.
Oct 23 2013
LEEDuser Member
61 Thumbs Up

SSc4.1 Awarded, now going for Exemplary performance. What to do?

Our project already was awarded 6 points for the SSc4.1 Alternative Transportation - Public transportation Access when submitted for design review, but we noticed that we missed several other bus stops and light rail stops close to the site. We now want to apply for Exemplary performanceIn LEED, certain credits have established thresholds beyond basic credit achievement. Meeting these thresholds can earn additional points through Innovation in Design (ID) or Innovation in Operations (IO) points. As a general rule of thumb, ID credits for exemplary performance are awarded for doubling the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold. However, this rule varies on a case by case basis, so check the credit requirements. for that same credit. Do I need to work on the SSc4.1 form, mark it as "in progress", revise all documentation and resubmit, or is there a better way to amend the previous submittal?
Thank you,
Luciana

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Gerren Wagner Energy Opportunities Oct 25 2013 Guest 95 Thumbs Up

It would most likely be easier for you to resubmit the SSc4.1 form and plug in the bus/rail trips there rather than submitting a separate calculation under the ID credit, but it's not a requirement.

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