NC-2009 IEQc4.1: Low-Emitting Materials—Adhesives and Sealants

  • No reason not to earn this credit

    IEQc4.1 requirementsIt shouldn’t cost you anything to earn this credit—it will just take a little work (the same is true for the related credit, IEQc4.2: Low-Emitting Materials—Paints and Coatings). Your first priority should be to specify only adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. that comply with the credit’s VOC limits, and enforce those specifications on the jobsite. Research low-VOC adhesives and sealants before construction begins and provide lists of acceptable materials to contractors to help ensure that the right products are used. 

    Proactive communication on the jobsite

    Making sure that VOC limits are observed demands proactive communication between the designer, contractor, and all subcontractors who do work inside the building. Subcontractors have to be educated about the requirements, and their contracts should require that they document their compliance.

    If you make a mistake, you can still earn the credit

    Unlike some LEED credits where only a certain percentage of the materials have to comply, this credit is all-or-nothing—all adhesives and coatings must comply.

    However, if a non-compliant adhesive or sealant gets used by mistake, or if you need to bend the VOC limits to meet the requirements of a warranty or fire code, you can still earn the credit following the “VOC budget process.” You’ll simply have to do some calculations to show that your extra use of VOCsA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. was offset by very low use of VOCs elsewhere. You have to meet the budget for adhesives and sealants separately from paints and coatings (for IEQc4.2), though—you’re not allowed to create a combined VOC budget covering multiple IEQc4 credits.

    Multiple benefits

    Earning this credit is a key part of a construction indoor-air-quality management plan, and will help you earn another LEED point via the testing path in IEQc3.2: Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan—Before Occupancy, by reducing the amount of VOCs in the air.

    Using low-VOC adhesives and sealants is not only beneficial to occupants, but can improve air quality and the health of construction workers who are constantly exposed to construction pollution.

    Verify your information

    Don’t allow the use of products that merely claim to be “low VOC.” Everyone specifying and purchasing products must actually find the VOC grams per liter (g/L) information, usually on the product’s technical data sheet or material safety data sheet, and compare that number with VOC limits listed for different uses determined by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule #1168 and Green Seal-36 for aerosol adhesives. Product sheets often provide the maximum g/L (like “<100 g/L”) rather than a specific amount. That’s okay as long as the maximum is under the allowable limit. 

    Only 20% of product cut sheets selected at random need to be uploaded to LEED Online to document this credit although it is best to keep all product cut sheets on file in case the credit is audited.

  • FAQ's for IEQc4.1

    Is there a shortcut to the VOC budget method if you have just one product that is used minimally on a project?

    Yes, if you have just one non-compliant product, then you can balance it out with just one really good, low VOC product, as long as all your other products meet the requirement. For example, if you have two gallons of non-compliant adhesive that is 100 g/L over its required threshold, then you can balance it out with enough compliant product where you show you are at least 100g/l under the required threshold, thus balancing the VOC budget.

    How is VOC % less water determined for aerosol adhesives?

    This is usually found on a product cut sheet or MSDS1. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) are detailed, written instructions documenting a method to achieve uniformity of performance. 2. A report that manufacturers of most products are required to make available to installers and purchasers, informing them of product information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures, the existence of potentially hazardous ingredients, and providing instructions for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of products. If you cannot find the information, contact the manufacturer or technical services for the product and they should be able to provide this number for you. The method for dermining this is explained in SCAQMD Method 305-9, Determination of (VOC) In Aerosol Applications.

    Do products applied to the weather barrier need to comply with VOC thresholds?

    GBCI has issued a clarification that the actual barrier does not need to comply with this credit. Any applied products that are "touched by the indoor air" would need to be considered for IEQc4.1, but if they fall outside of this they can be excluded.

    Do grout and caulking need to be included, and if so, what is the application category?

    Yes, grout and caulking need to be included. There is no specific category for them, however. Projects have successfully used ceramic tile adhesive—VOC limit 65g/l—and Architectural Sealant—VOC limit 250 g/l—successfully, the latter being especially appropriate if you are using a product other than ceramic tiles. Since most mortars, grouts, and thinsets are largely cementitious, with inherently low VOC content, they will comply under most categories, anyway. Choose a logical category and explain it in a narrative if necessary.

    How do I determine what application my product falls under?

    SCAQMD Rule 1168 includes definitions of categories that can be helpful in determining where and how your product should be categorized to determine corresponding VOC thresholds.


    What are the adhesives and sealants to be included in the documentation?

    All adhesives and sealants used onsite within the weather barrier need to be included. This should address general construction adhesives, flooring adhesives, fire-stopping sealants, caulking, duct sealants, plumbing adhesives and cove base adhesives.

    Our project didn't use some common adhesive types, and our LEED reviewer asked about this. Are we supposed to justify not using certain adhesives in our documentation?

    No, but it might not hurt. Items commonly included in the credit are general construction adhesives, flooring adhesives, fire-stopping sealants, caulking, duct sealants, plumbing adhesives, and cove base adhesives. If your project doesn't report using one or more of these, your LEED reviewer might ask you to verify your list of documented items, to check that something wasn't inadvertently omitted. In LEEDuser's opinion, a brief narrative noting what you used and verifying that you're conscious of the fact that some common items weren't used might anticipate and answer this type of review comment.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Schematic Design

Expand All

  • There is no reason not to earn this credit, as long as you are willing to take a bit of extra time to specify compliant products, and make sure that only those products are used on the jobsite.

Design Development

Expand All

  • construction work applying adhesivesLow-VOC adhesives benefit both the project and construction workers. Photo – ITW TACC Start researching and selecting compliant low-VOC adhesives and sealants needed for the project.


  • First check the allowable VOC levels for each product type you are using – see the summary of VOC limits in the Low-Emitting Material Limits document (see Documentation Toolkit) and then make sure the products specified do not exceed those limits.  


  • Keep VOC requirements in mind when selecting all materials used indoors. Watch out for warranty restrictions that call for use of a manufacturer-specified adhesive or sealant (which may or may not comply). 


  • Finding adhesives and sealants that are compliant with the credit requirements may sometimes take a little extra time, but is rarely a problem.

Construction Documents

Expand All

  • Make sure low-emitting requirements have been integrated in construction specifications. Products must be at or below the recommended VOC limits. VOC levels can be found on a product’s MSDS or technical data sheet and are measured in grams per liter (g/L).


  • Guidance on incorporating LEED specifications into construction documents, along with samples, is available from MasterSpec and from the Whole Building Design Guide (see Resources).


  • Identifying VOC requirements directly on the drawings as well as in the specs is a good way to remind the contractor and subcontractors of the requirements, but be careful to make sure the information is consistent between the drawings and the specs. 


  • It is best to require subcontractors to supply all LEED-required VOC information on the products they purchase at the time they are submitting products for approval. This way contractors do not wait until the end of construction to supply information, and you have the opportunity to review products for LEED compliance before products are purchased.


  • Specify compliant products by brand name whenever possible. It is best to distribute a list of acceptable products and the VOC limit chart from the LEED rating system at the contractor and subcontractor orientation meetings. 


  • Low-emitting products can be part of a more comprehensive IAQ management plan, as required for IEQc3.1: Construction Indoor Air Quality Plan—During Construction. A comprehensive IAQ plan covers all adhesives, sealants, paint, coatings, composite materials, and overall construction best practices protecting air quality.  


  • Achieving this credit can also help achieve IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan—Before Occupancy, if your project pursues the air-testing option for this credit. Using low-VOC products improves your odds of passing the air quality tests. 


  • Only products installed within the weather barrier need to comply with VOC limits, according to the credit requirements. For adhesives and sealants that are part of the weather barrier, the LEED requirements are ambiguous, so it is best to err on the side of caution and use low-VOC products. Remember that the intention of the credit is to make sure all adhesives and sealants that have the potential to interact with indoor air are compliant. 


  • Products assembled off-site or factory-finished are exempt from this credit, because it is assumed that VOCs have off gassed before arriving at the site.


  • Using low-emitting adhesives and sealants is a no-cost measure.  


  • Some water-based adhesives and sealants that are credit-compliant may not be as strong as non-water-based adhesives and sealants. However, this is usually not a problem, as adhesive and sealants are often stronger than they need to be. 


  • Some contractors might charge a premium for implementing and documenting this credit but, in general, costs should be minor or nonexistent as more firms start incorporating these as standard best practices. 


  • Hiring construction teams with LEED experience is helpful, as is reviewing LEED requirements and responsibilities with the contractor during the bidding process. Construction teams without LEED experience can be successful with this credit, but will require more training and a closer eye on quality control to make sure compliant materials are used and that items are documented correctly.  


  • Implementing an IAQ plan and use of low-emitting materials demands accountability. It is best if subcontractors are contractually required to implement their parts of the IAQ plan. 

Construction

Expand All

  • Preparation Before Construction Begins


  • The general contractor (GC) should be oriented to all LEED-related issues, including IAQ management, low-emitting materials, environmental material tracking tools, construction waste management, and so on. A list of acceptable products for each use type, and the list of VOC limits, should be provided to aid subcontractors in product selection. 


  • The GC should hold orientation meetings with the subcontractors to review the LEED responsibilities related specifically to their trades. This exercise helps to build trust and is crucial for obtaining buy-in from all participants in the process.


  • Coordination and communication among the GC, subcontractors and design team early in the process can minimize scheduling delays and pushback from subcontractors.


  • Give the GC and subcontractors the following tools to help them track materials data for all MR and IEQ credits. (See the Documentation Toolkit for access.)

    • Materials Calculator:  This is a master tracking spreadsheet that the GC can use internally to compile product information received from the subcontractors. The spreadsheet tracks LEED values across multiple LEED MR and IEQ credits.
    • Environmental Materials Reporting Form: This is a material tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values for products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing. 
    • Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form: This is a VOC tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing.
    • Low-Emitting Material Limits: These tables, found with each credit here on LEEDuser, summarize the maximum VOC limits for different types of adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, composite wood, and flooring products. When subcontractors search for low-emitting products, they should consult these charts.

  • Research compliant, low-emitting products before construction begins. If product decisions are made after construction begins, with less time to carefully review data sheets, there is a much greater risk of using a non-compliant product. 


  • There is some room for interpretation in VOC limits, because the limits are determined by product usage and product type. For example, cove-base adhesives have a VOC limit of 50 g/L, and a multipurpose construction adhesive has a VOC limit of 70 g/L. If you use a multipurpose adhesive on a cove base, it is up to you whether to use either 50 g/L or 70 g/L as your VOC limit. Erring on the side of caution with a lower limit is generally a good idea.


  • When researching low-emitting products, double-check that the manufacturer’s information does not use misleading language. A common example is a product cut sheet that uses the term “low-emitting” without providing a specific VOC g/L value. Many cut sheets give a maximum value of, for example, VOC < 100g/L. That’s fine as long as 100 g/L meets the criteria for that product—just enter 100 g/L VOC amount for LEED documentation.


  • It is common for an MSDS to list the chemical contents of a product without giving an overall VOC g/L number. You’ll need to contact the manufacturer or check cut sheets to get the total VOC number. (See the Documentation Toolkit for a sample cut sheet.)


  • Obtain VOC levels, in writing, from the manufacturer, for the actual products used on the project—don’t rely on VOC quotes given over the phone.


  • The VOC value on an MSDS can be unreliable when several different products are listed on one sheet. Get clarification from the manufacturer on the actual VOC content of the product you are using.


  • The GC should be aware of any warranty issues that may exist if alternative adhesives or sealants are used. For example, a carpet company’s warranty may require a certain adhesive that does not meet the VOC requirements. To keep the warranty valid, use the adhesive or sealant specified in the warranty and use the VOC budget method to show a weighted average VOC compliance, or use carpet from a company that offers a low-VOC option.


  • If noncompliant materials are used onsite accidentally, or due to a warranty or other issue, you can use the VOC budget method. This method compares the total amount of VOCs (in grams per liter) used in the design case to the total amount of VOCs that would have been used if every product exactly met LEED VOC allowances. The calculation must be determined for adhesives and sealants separately from paints and coatings. For example, it won’t necessarily help your case to use low-VOC paints but also some high-VOC sealants. (See the compliance example below for adhesives and sealants.)


  • Using the VOC budget method is usually successful, but can be time-consuming to document.


  • During Construction


  • Throughout construction, the GC should collect material safety data sheets (MSDS) from subcontractors and completed VOC tracking forms for all products used onsite associated with this credit.


  • Assign someone to be responsible for inputting the subcontractors’ tracking forms into the master spreadsheet. A LEED consultant or an administrative assistant in the GC’s office may be the best choice for this role. 


  • Review subcontractor product suggestions ahead of time to avoid the purchase of inappropriate materials and eliminate the need for costly change orders.


  • Streamline documentation and research by keeping a master spreadsheet of all the items being tracked for each material across MR and IEQ credits. For example, you may need to ask the millworker for regional information for MRc5, certified wood information for MRc7, and information about coatings installed on-site for IEQc4.1. If one spreadsheet collects all the data, it can streamline your documentation, associated research, and help with quality control. (See the Materials Calculator in the Documentation Toolkit.)


  • A master spreadsheet helps ease information collection for subcontractors, giving them a road map of exactly what types of information to collect for each product.  


  • The GC functions as the overall quality assurance provider for this credit. Responsibilities include conducting weekly reviews of subcontractor product safety data sheets and tracking forms, as well as spot checks in dumpsters to determine which products are actually being used.


  • Post signs at the construction site that reminds subcontractors to follow LEED requirements for low-VOC products. (See Documentation Toolkit for sample signs.) 


  • Schedule the application of adhesives and sealants so that offgassing does not contaminate other absorptive materials. This is required if projects are attempting IEQc3.1: Construction Indoor Air Quality Plan—During Construction. For example, do not store or install acoustic ceiling tile before flooring and wall adhesives are put down, because ceiling tiles will absorb the off-gassing of paint and floor adhesives and contaminate the air over a longer time period.


  • It is usually a good idea to do a “mini air flush” (if your project is not attempting IEQc3.2) before occupancy to help remove any lingering VOCs from the construction process. This can be as simple as putting industrial sized fans in the window and pumping in fresh air overnight or running the HVAC exhaust on high for a few days. (See IEQc3.2: Construction Indoor Air Quality Plan—Before Occupancy if the team wants to do a full flush-out for an additional LEED point.)


  • Transfer all the data collected in the master material tracking spreadsheet to the LEED Online form and upload the product cut sheets.

Operations & Maintenance

Expand All

  • Provide the owner with a list of compliant, low-emitting adhesives and sealants used on the project so that O&M staff can use these products for future renovations.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    IEQ Credit 4.1: Low-emitting materials - adhesives and sealants

    1 Point

    Intent

    To reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants.

    Requirements

    All adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. used on the interior of the building (i.e., inside of the weatherproofing system and applied on-site) must comply with the following requirements as applicable to the project scope1:

    • Adhesives, Sealants and Sealant Primers must comply with South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule #1168. Volatile organic compound (VOC) limits listed in the table below correspond to an effective date of July 1, 2005 and rule amendment date of January 7, 2005.

      Architectural Applications VOC Limit

      (g/L less water)

      Specialty Applications VOC Limit

      (g/L less water)

      Indoor carpet adhesives 50 PVC welding 510
      Carpet pad adhesives 50 CPVC welding 490
      Wood flooring adhesives 100 ABS welding 325
      Rubber floor adhesives 60 Plastic cement welding 250
      Subfloor adhesives 50 Adhesive primer for plastic 550
      Ceramic tile adhesives 65 Contact adhesive 80
      VCT and asphalt adhesives 50 Special purpose contact adhesive 250
      Drywall and panel adhesives 50 Structural wood member adhesive 140
      Cove base adhesives 50 Sheet applied rubber lining operations 850
      Multipurpose construction adhesives 70 Top and trim adhesive 250
      Structural glazing adhesives 100
      Substrate Specific Applications VOC Limit

      (g/L less water)

      Sealants VOC Limit

      (g/L less water)

      Metal to metal 30 Architectural 250
      Plastic foams 50 Roadway 250
      Porous material (except wood) 50 Other 420
      Wood 30
      Fiberglass 80
      Sealant Primers VOC Limit (g/L less water)
      Architectural, nonporous 250
      Architectural, porous 775
      Other 750
      This table excludes adhesives and sealants integral to the water-proofing system or that are not building related.



    • Aerosol Adhesives must comply with Green Seal Standard for Commercial Adhesives GS-36 requirements in

      effect on October 19, 2000.

      Aerosol Adhesives VOC weight (g/L minus water)
      General purpose mist spray 65% VOCsA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. by weight
      General purpose web spray 55% VOCs by weight
      Special purpose aerosol adhesives (all types) 70% VOCs by weight




    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Specify low-VOC materials in construction documents. Ensure that VOC limits are clearly stated in each section of the specifications where adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. are addressed. Common products to evaluate include general construction adhesives, flooring adhesives, fire-stopping sealants, caulking, duct sealants, plumbing adhesives and cove base adhesives. Review product cut sheets, material safety data (MSD) sheets, signed attestations or other official literature from the manufacturer clearly identifying the VOC contents or compliance with referenced standards.

Publications

Specifying LEED Requirements from ARCOM MasterSpec

Guidance and sample language on incorporating VOC limits into Specifications.


South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule 1168 South Coast Air Quality Management District

Outline of Rule 1168 for adhesive and sealant applications.

Web Tools

USGBC’s LEED Resources page

Includes additional resources and technical information.

Organizations

Green Seal Standard 11 (GS–11)

Green Seal is an independent, nonprofit organization that strives to achieve a healthier and cleaner environment by identifying and promoting products and services that cause less toxic pollution and waste, conserve resources and habitats, and minimize global warming and ozone depletion. GS–36 sets VOC limits for commercial adhesives. 


Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG) — Federal Green Construction Guide for Specifiers

Support on incorporating LEED requirements into specifications. 

Materials Calculator

Teams can use this tool to track all materials across various MR and IEQ credits. It helps teams develop a roadmap of what information needs to be tracked for different products. It can also be used early on to create the baseline budget and ensure the products that are being used will apply to the various credit thresholds.

Environmental Materials Reporting Form

This is a materials tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values of products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing.

Letter to Contractor for MR and IEQ Credits

Use a letter like this sample to orient the contractor to their responsibilities for all MR and IEQ credits. This letter is an introduction that can be customized for the credits your project is pursuing.

Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form

This is a VOC tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing. Use it specifically for earning low-emitting materials credits, but in conjunction with documentation for MR credits.

Jobsite Signs

Products with VOC content not meeting credit requirements for VOC levels can inadvertently get used on the jobsite. A sign like this sample helps remind subcontractors and construction workers of their responsibilities.

Product Cut Sheets

Look to product cut sheets for information on the VOC content of adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid.. The example here clearly displays information needed for documentation.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 IEQ

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each NC-2009 IEQ credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

386 Comments

0
0
Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Sep 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
2351 Thumbs Up

Plumbing piping insulation?

Should plumbing piping insulation be considered for this credit when you are using rigid or flexible glass fiber?

1
1
0
John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Sep 10 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1948 Thumbs Up

I have not have an issue with reporting the insulation, but you are required to report the insulation adhesive.

Post a Reply
0
0
Michelle Rosenberger Partner ArchEcology, LLC
Sep 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
5195 Thumbs Up

Aerosol Adhesives

The VOC content limit for aerosol adhesives is expressed as a percentage by weight per the requirements and per the LEEDuser FAQ above (though the link doesn't seem to work). Yet when I go into the EQ4.1 form to enter the aerosol product, the form tells me that I have to convert the aerosol VOC percentage back to a typical grams per liter value.

First of all, why? Is this solely because the table on the form is geared for g/l and a percentage won't fit? If so, why is the compliance based on percentage if you're going to have to convert it anyway?

I received g/l documentation first and requested the % documentation to make sure of compliance so I have both pieces of information. Thankfully since I don't know how to make that conversion. However, what is the limit then for that converted g/l value? The docs are telling me 64.8% VOCsA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. and that complies, but the g/l provided is 497 g/l less water. That figure doesn't seem to comply with any limit I have.

The form says I have to convert both the percentage and the limit, but provides no direction in either case. How is this done? And what justifies this effort if the percentage complies?

1
1
0
Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Sep 10 2014 LEEDuser Member 5195 Thumbs Up

Hi all,
FYI, a kind GBCI reviewer has responded to me directly that there is indeed a form issue here with the table that they are apparently working on. She indicates that it is okay to put the percentage figures in both "g/l" boxes of the table and that the reviewer will understand. I very much appreciated the prompt response.

Post a Reply
0
0
Sahar Abi-Ziki
Sep 03 2014
Guest
57 Thumbs Up

epoxy for ceramic joints

Hello,
We are going to use epoxy sealant for joints between ceramic walls and floors in the showers, and I was wondering if this is acceptable if COV is less then 250g/l? we are also using epoxy sealant for concrete slabs in parking garage, what is the COV level required ? Thank you

1
5
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Sep 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

Epoxy grout used at ceramic tile qualifies as “Ceramic Tile Adhesive,” so the VOC limit is 65g/L.

If your parking garage is unconditioned and open to the outdoors, it is exempt from IEQc4 VOC restrictions. See LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #1767:
http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=1767

2
5
0
Sahar Abi-Ziki Sep 03 2014 Guest 57 Thumbs Up

Thank you but the parking garage is underground, what would be the VOC level?

3
5
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Sep 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

Is the garage separated from the occupied, conditioned building by solid, impenetrable walls?
If so, it does not matter that the garage is underground. LI#1767 states that an underground garage that is unconditioned and open to the exterior is not technically interior space. IEQc4 VOC limits only apply to interior space.

4
5
0
Sahar Abi-Ziki Sep 03 2014 Guest 57 Thumbs Up

it is not a separate garage, there is openings with rest of the building. Voc would be then 250g/l??

5
5
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Sep 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

If the openings between the garage and the building have self-closing doors to prevent automotive exhaust from entering the building, then this still qualifies as an interior/exterior separation.

For sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. that fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between surfaces, the VOC limit is 250g/L for Architectural Sealants used within the weatherproof enclosure.

However, if you are asking about liquid sealersSealers are coatings applied to either block materials from penetrating into or leaching out of a substrate, to prevent subsequent coatings from being absorbed by the substrate, or to prevent harm to subsequent coatings by materials in the substrate. applied to concrete to resist water, alkalies, acids, ultraviolet light, or staining, these products would be Waterproofing Concrete/Masonry Sealers. According to IEQc4.2, the VOC limit is 400g/L for concrete sealers used inside the weatherproof enclosure.

Post a Reply
0
0
Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Sep 01 2014
LEEDuser Member
2142 Thumbs Up

PU foam

Under what category would a 1-compnent mounting Polyurethane foam fall and consequently what would be the maximum VOC level allowed?

1
2
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Sep 02 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

If the spray polyurethane foam (SPF) product is marketed solely as insulation, IEQc4.1 probably does not apply to it.

However, SPF is often sold in cans with a nozzle for sealing around wall penetrations, filling gaps & crevices, or as a mounting adhesive. Since SCAQMD bases VOC limits on a manufacturer’s claims, one must consider all types of applications recommended on product packaging and in product data. If a manufacturer recommends the product for filling & sealing gaps, it must meet SCAQMD VOC limits for “Sealants”. If the manufacturer promotes the product as an adhesive for plastic foam, then the VOC limit for “Substrate-Specific Plastic Foam Applications” applies.

I have seen data from several makers of canned, single-component SPF that self-identify their products as “Plastic Foam Adhesives” that comply with SCAQMD-1168’s 50 g/L VOC limit.

For more information and concerns related to SPF use, see US-EPA’s SPF webpages:
http://www.epa.gov/dfe/pubs/projects/spf/spray_polyurethane_foam.html,
http://www.epa.gov/dfe/pubs/projects/spf/types_of_spray_polyurethane_foa...,
http://www.epa.gov/dfe/pubs/projects/spf/exposure_potential.html, and others.

If that's too much, Tristan wrote an article that summarizes this nicely:
http://www2.buildinggreen.com/blogs/epa-raises-health-concerns-spray-foa...

2
2
0
Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Sep 02 2014 LEEDuser Member 2142 Thumbs Up

Jon, First of all thanks for your excellent explanation. The product is saying that it can be used for insulating dividing walls, fill gaps and seal prefabricated constructions. So I guess we need to look at it as a Plastic Foam Adhesive with a limit of 50 g/L
Thanks.

Post a Reply
0
0
Stephanie Santiago Venegas Engineering Management & Construction Inc
Jul 31 2014
LEEDuser Member

LOW VOC for vinyl tackboard adhesive

We are going to be installing Vinyl fabric faced tackboards at our current school project, NC v.2009, and are having trouble finding a compliant Low VOC adhesive. Currently we found one with a VOC content of 450g/l, I think it is too high and am referencing IEQc4.1 for SealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid.- Other 420g/l. Is this correct?

1
2
0
John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Jul 31 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1948 Thumbs Up

I believe you would be looking at "Special Purpose Contact Adhesive - VOC Limit 250" You may want to use "GreenGuard" or "Floorscore" for reference as to a suitable adhesive; ask your contractor if a VCT tile adhesive that meets the Floorscore criteria would be an appropriate adhesive.

2
2
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jul 31 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

John-David – Is “Special Purpose Contact Adhesive” the right category? These types of contact adhesives are only for certain substrates. One type is “unsupported vinyl,” which is an unreinforced vinyl film without any kind of backing. For a “vinyl fabric faced tackboard,” Stephanie might need a regular Contact Adhesive, a Multipurpose Construction Adhesive, or a Panel Adhesive.

Post a Reply
0
0
LEED Consultant Green Building and Alternative Energy
Jun 20 2014
LEEDuser Member
1375 Thumbs Up

Cementious materials as adhesives

Up in the Bird's Eye View the following statement is made:

"Since most mortars, grouts, and thinsets are largely cementitious, with inherently low VOC content, they will comply under most categories, anyway."

We are using cement-based adhesives for ceramic flooring and our providers have not the VOCsA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. data about the material. Can we assume the material will comply with the requirements due to its cement-based composition?

1
1
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jun 21 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

Never assume. Always verify
First, look at your project specifications. Has your specifier required or allowed “latex-modified” or “epoxy-based” products, liquid under-tile waterproofing or crack-suppression membranes, or other products with integral organic-based binders? If so, the products may contain VOC. For these, your Specs should probably also call out the 65g/L VOC limit for “Ceramic Tile Adhesives” for these items.
If your specification do not allow such products, exclusively requiring cementitious products, you may be safe. To be sure, you should still check the contractor’s submittals to ensure that they are using the specified products and to verify whether any substitutions have allowed organic-based products. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS1. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) are detailed, written instructions documenting a method to achieve uniformity of performance. 2. A report that manufacturers of most products are required to make available to installers and purchasers, informing them of product information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures, the existence of potentially hazardous ingredients, and providing instructions for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of products) should confirm whether the product is entirely cementitious.

Post a Reply
0
0
jack larson
Jun 05 2014
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

aDHESIVE FOR wood skiriting -

Three quick questions

1) Where would you classify adhesives for wooden skirting? Would it be under wood flooring adhesives? 100g/l, or Wood under substrate specific application

2) If the intended use of the product is rubber adhesive, and I am using this adhesive for skirting? Where and how would you classify it?

3) Can someone please expound on the section of Substrate specific application, and give me an example? For example when would use wood under substrate specific application, or metal to metal?

Thanks

1
1
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Jun 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

If you are a Contractor or sub, work with your project’s design team and LEED-APs to determine which products are suitable to your project. SCAQMD Rule 1168 (http://www.aqmd.gov/docs/default-source/rule-book/reg-xi/rule-1168.pdf?s...) defines product categories and describes which VOC limits apply. USGBC’s LEED Interpretations database (http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations) includes rulings for IEQc4.1 that describe how that standard applies to LEED.

To your specific questions:

1. I assume that “skirting” means baseboard or similar trim. SCAQMD-1168 defines “wood flooring adhesive” as one “used to install a wood floor surface” (parquet tiles, wood planks, or strips). This definition does not extend to baseboards.
See SCAQMD definitions for “Multipurpose Construction Adhesive” or “Contact Adhesive.” Review product labels & manufacturer’s data. If recommended for these uses, the VOC limit listed under “Architectural” & “Specialty” Applications applies.

2. “Off-label” use is not allowed, so you can’t use a “rubber flooring” or “cove base” adhesive on wood baseboards unless the manufacturer recommends it for wood as well. SCAQMD-1168 states that, if a product is labeled for more than one use, the lowest VOC standard applies (except as in Item 3 below).

3. The “Substrate Specific Applications” are for adhesives not covered by the “Architectural” & “Specialty” Applications in the top part of the VOC table. If bonding dissimilar substrates together, the higher VOC limit applies.
Therefore, if the product does not match any of the definitions for “Architectural” or “Specialty” adhesives, use the “Substrate Specific” VOC limits (30g/L, if gluing wood baseboards to wood or metal substrates, 50g/L, if to plastic foam or other porous substrate, or 70g/L, if to fiberglass).

Post a Reply
0
0
jack larson
May 17 2014
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

DOOR ADEHSIVE

I have a special synthetic resin adhesive developed for flush door construction. Designed to give strong permanent bonds on typical door components such as hardwood, wood, MDFMedium-density fiberboard (MDF): Panel product used in cabinets and furniture; generally made from wood fiber glued together with binder; similar to particleboard, but with finer texture, offering more precise finishing. Most MDF is made with formaldehyde-emitting urea-formaldehyde binder., particle board mineral based insulation, etc.

The total voc content for the product is about 43, where would you classify it? under which category ?

1
3
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications May 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

Jack – Chances are, if the adhesive is used for flush door construction, it is being applied entirely off-site, in the shop or factory that manufactures the door. If this is the case, IEQc4.1 does not apply. IEQc4.1 only applies to products applied on-Site, within the weatherproof enclosure.

The product sounds like it could be a composite woodComposite wood consists of wood or plant particles or fibers bonded by a synthetic resin or binder. Examples include particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), wheatboard, and strawboard. laminating adhesive. Remember that Credit IEQc4.4 prohibits the use of urea-formaldehyde1. Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring VOC found in small amounts in animals and plants but is carcinogenic and an irritant to most people when present in high concentrations, causing headaches, dizziness, mental impairment, and other symptoms. When present in the air at levels above 0.1 ppm, it can cause watery eyes; burning sensations in the eyes, nose, and throat; nausea; coughing; chest tightness; wheezing; skin rashes; and asthmatic and allergic reactions. 2. A known carcinogen with no known safe exposure level. Formaldehyde occurs naturally, but appears in unnaturally high concentra­tions in many buildings because it is an ingredient in binders used in many building materials and furnishings. in laminating adhesives regardless of whether they are applied in the shop or on-site. If your project is seeking IEQc4.4, you need to confirm that this product contains no added urea formaldehydeUrea formaldehyde is a combination of urea and formaldehyde used in some glues and adhesives, particularly in composite wood products. At room temperature, ureaformaldehyde emits formaldehyde, a toxic and possibly carcinogenic gas. (NAUF).

It sounds as though this product should not be applied on-site because it exceeds the 30g/L VOC limit for “wood glue” set by SCAQMD-1168 & IEQc4.1. Shop application should be okay as long as the product is NAUF.

2
3
0
Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz May 19 2014 LEEDuser Expert 14358 Thumbs Up

Jack - I'm not clear if you are an architect/engineer/contractor or a manufacturer. If you're an architect/engineer/contractor, Jonathan's advice is right on. If you're a manufacturer, you'll want to review and understand LEED v4 for your product since that is the new standard and it is different from v3. There are v4 boards on this forum.

3
3
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications May 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

Jack - Even if you are a manufacturer, if you are preparing documentation right now for a LEED-2009 Project, everything I posted above still applies to you...for now.
Since you posted your question in the LEED-2009 forum, I presume that is the version that you are working under.
USGBC has just released LEEDv4, which has a whole new set of standards for everyone on future projects.

Post a Reply
0
0
Nick Shaffer
May 06 2014
Guest
5 Thumbs Up

VOC budget shortcut

Is there an interpretation or language in the reference guide I am missing to support the statement above of "Is there a shortcut to the VOC budget method if you have just one product that is used minimally on a project?"

I am about to do this and wonder if I need to reference an interpretation.

1
3
0
Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz May 07 2014 LEEDuser Expert 14358 Thumbs Up

You can do the VOC budget method to prove you've offset the one product. No need to do all products in this credit.

2
3
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications May 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

See EQc4.1 LI# 1822, dated July 7, 2007.
The Inquiry includes the question, "If a VOC Budget calculation becomes necessary, is it sufficient to demonstrate that low emissions from a limited number of low-VOC products offset excess emissions of a few non-compliant products, without calculating emissions for EVERY applicable product on the Project? . Similar issues with...VOC Budgets exist in...EQc4.2"
The Ruling states that this question is inquiring "whether all adhesive and sealant products are required for the VOC budget calculation. In this case, if VOC emissions from a few products can be offset through VOC budget calculation with VOC emissions from a different set of products due to the scale of application, the project is not required to include all other adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. used in the project in the VOC budget calculation. Applicable Internationally."
This interpretation was under LEEDv2.1. I believe that the abbreviated VOC Budget calculation has been incorporated into the current 2009 LEEDonline Credit Forms, so I am not sure that citing the LI is absolutely necessary. To be safe, citing the LI couldn't hurt.

3
3
0
Nick Shaffer May 19 2014 Guest 5 Thumbs Up

Susan and Jonathan, this is just what I needed thank you!!

Post a Reply
0
0
Nouran Abdel-Rahman
Apr 17 2014
Guest
30 Thumbs Up

Wood Cladding adhesives

We are applying wood cladding for the walls. To assign the cladding panels, firstly we apply wood framing to the walls then fasten the panels to them. I want to know the classification of primer and paint used for wood framing. Also, the classification of Adhesive used for cladding panels.

1
1
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Apr 17 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

The product seems to be a “Panel Adhesive”.
Indoor Environmental Quality Credit 4.1 defines categories of adhesives based on Rule 1168 of the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD).
By this definition, a “Panel Adhesive” is “an adhesive used for the installation of plywood…and similar pre-decorated or non-decorated panels to studs [framing] or solid surfaces.”
For Panel Adhesives, the VOC Content must not exceed 50 grams per liter.
For primers and paints, see categories defined under Indoor Environmental Quality Credit 4.2.
The VOC limit will depend on whether you are using opaque paints or clear wood finishes.

Post a Reply
0
0
Guillermo Hernandez Espinoza Civil Engineer, LEED Green Associate
Apr 07 2014
LEEDuser Member
334 Thumbs Up

PVC Lubricant

Hello.
Should a PVC Lubricant and a pvc cleaner be classified under the IEQc4.1?

Thanks.

1
1
0
John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Apr 14 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1948 Thumbs Up

No, but be wary that your "lubricant" is not actually classified as a sealant.....

Post a Reply
0
0
E H Sustainability Architect
Feb 19 2014
LEEDuser Member
3008 Thumbs Up

Masonry Joint Sealant

Hello. Would Masonry joint sealant fall in under the "Other" category for a VOC limit of 420 g/L?

1
1
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

Masonry joint sealant would be an Architectural Sealant, VOC limit 250g/L.
See SCAQMD 1168 for definitions of adhesive & sealant types. SCAQMD defines "Sealant" as "any material with adhesive properties that is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between two surfaces," and "Architectural Sealant" as one "applied to stationary structures." Since masonry is typically part of a stationary structure, masonry joint sealant qualifies as an Architectural Sealant.
Since IEQc4.1 addresses products used inside buildings, Architectural Sealant is typically the only sealant type relevant to IEQc4.1.
SCAQMD's VOC limit chart (shown in the LEED Reference Guide) also lists "Roadway" sealant & two types of roofing sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid., but these are normally exterior applications outside the scope of IEQc4.1. Presumably, "Other" sealants would be those not intended for use on buildings--perhaps on automobiles, boats, or aircraft--also beyond IEQc4.1's scope.
The SCAQMD list also includes a couple of adhesive types that are not ordinarily applied to buildings.

Post a Reply
0
0
Valentin Grimaud Thermal Engineer TERAO Green Building Engineering
Jan 20 2014
LEEDuser Member
974 Thumbs Up

PVC floor adhesive

Dear experts, we are purchasing the PVC floor adhesive, but i'm not sure which category is more suitable for this kind of adhesive in leedonline form, we considered "Rubber Flooring Adhesives" but i PVC is actually belong to plastic not rubber at all, should i select "Other Sealant" as baseline for this item?

1
2
0
Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jan 20 2014 LEEDuser Expert 14358 Thumbs Up

There is no special category for this adhesive, it is flooring adhesive and the limit is 50 g/L. Is the flooring unusual and that is leading you to thinking the VOC limit would be higher?

2
2
0
Valentin Grimaud Thermal Engineer, TERAO Green Building Engineering Jan 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 974 Thumbs Up

Thank you Susan, I'm sure worrying about the circumstance like you said, if there is no special category for this adhesive, then how can I execute this comparison with baseline through leedonline form even I have the adhesive with <50 g/L? Should I choice on casual one category has 50 g/L as baseline or treat it through Special Circumstances?

Post a Reply
0
0
Ralph Bicknese Principal Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects
Jan 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
190 Thumbs Up

VOC testing method

Does GBCI require a certain testing method for VOC compliance? Our contractor would like to use a waterproof silicone sealant (GE Silicone II Window & Door) and the MSDS1. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) are detailed, written instructions documenting a method to achieve uniformity of performance. 2. A report that manufacturers of most products are required to make available to installers and purchasers, informing them of product information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures, the existence of potentially hazardous ingredients, and providing instructions for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of products we were provided stated that the testing method used to determine it VOCsA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. was WPSTM C1454. Is there any difference between this and ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services and is that a concern to the GBCI review team?

1
2
0
John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Jan 27 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1948 Thumbs Up

I have yet to have a sealant refused due to the testing method, many MSDS1. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) are detailed, written instructions documenting a method to achieve uniformity of performance. 2. A report that manufacturers of most products are required to make available to installers and purchasers, informing them of product information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures, the existence of potentially hazardous ingredients, and providing instructions for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of products do not state the testing method.

I believe this is more of a concern for credit 4.3 and CI credit 4.5 furnishings.

2
2
0
Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE ∙ Sustainability ∙ Construction ∙ Specifications Apr 15 2014 LEEDuser Member 408 Thumbs Up

You must report VOC in grams per liter (g/L) on the LEED-Online forms

LEED does not reference ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services testing methods to measure VOCsA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.. The “WPSTM” test numbers cited by the manufacturer of GE Silicones appear to be internal designations used only by that company. Since they report VOC in g/L “EXCL. H2O & EXEMPTS”, they are probably using the correct standard.

South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rules 1168 & 1113 describe the appropriate procedures for calculating VOC content for adhesives & sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. under IEQc4.1 and for architectural coatings under IEQc4.2. Also under IEQc4.2, Green Seal Standards cite US EPA Reference Test Method 24 for paints. These are all essentially the same procedures.

When manufactures follow these procedures, VOC content is ALWAYS expressed either in grams per liter (g/L) or in pounds per gallon (lbs/gal). Cut sheets often refer to this as “Theoretical” or “Regulatory” VOC Content, and they often include the note, “less water and exempt compounds.” If you find these words or references to SCAQMD, EPA, or “Method 24”, the manufacturer has probably used the correct method.

Also under IEQc4.1 , Green Seal Standard GS-36 sets VOC limits for aerosol adhesives as a percentage by weight. Therefore, except for aerosol adhesive, if you find VOC’s reported in units other than g/L (or lbs/gal), the wrong VOC calculation method has been used.

Just note that, under IEQc4.1 & IEQc4.2, LEED for Schools prescribes additional emissions limits (measured in micrograms per cubic meter) based on California Department of Health Services Standards.

Post a Reply
0
0
Susan Di Giulio Project Manager Zinner Consultants
Jan 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
1046 Thumbs Up

Products listing 0% Volatiles

Hi,
We don't have any chemists here but we were wondering if, when an MSDS1. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) are detailed, written instructions documenting a method to achieve uniformity of performance. 2. A report that manufacturers of most products are required to make available to installers and purchasers, informing them of product information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures, the existence of potentially hazardous ingredients, and providing instructions for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of products lists Volatiles = 0%, but does not list VOCsA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. in g/L formt, can we assume that VOCs=0 as well? We see this all the time in grouts, for example, that are inert materials plus water.
Thanks!

1
1
0
John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Jan 27 2014 LEEDuser Expert 1948 Thumbs Up

I would not assume that, they are not always linked.

Volatility (chemistry)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In chemistry and physics, volatility is the tendency of a substance to vaporize. Volatility is directly related to a substance's vapor pressure. At a given temperature, a substance with higher vapor pressure vaporizes more readily than a substance with a lower vapor pressure

Post a Reply
0
0
Valentin Grimaud Thermal Engineer TERAO Green Building Engineering
Dec 16 2013
LEEDuser Member
974 Thumbs Up

Adhesive for Thermal insulation material

The adhesive used for cohering thermal insulation material of piping (like Armacell) should be included in which category of LEED? I think that shold be "Sheet Applied Rubber Lining Operations" but not sure.

1
1
0
John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Dec 16 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1948 Thumbs Up

I googled " Sheet Applied Rubber Lining Operations" and found the following:

Rubber Linings are a premium form of corrosion protection for some of the most severe chemical and abrasive environments. Natural and butyl rubber linings withstand a variety of high-concentration acids and are the optimum choice for high heat and abrasive environments. Additionally, the elasticity of a rubber lining easily accommodates thermal expansion and contraction as well as vibration..."

I would think it would be more apt to list as "Special Purpose Contact Adhesive"

Good luck!

Post a Reply
0
0
Albert Sagrera Architect Societat Organica
Dec 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
617 Thumbs Up

Signatory IEQc 4.1, 4.2 and 4.4

I would like to know if the signature of the form must be of the owner of the building, or if it could be of the constructor.
Thanks

1
4
0
John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Dec 11 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1948 Thumbs Up

Contrator or Architect, as the owner is not (usually) involved in the specification or application of these products.

2
4
0
Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability, Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores Jan 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 687 Thumbs Up

I'm aware that the previous version of the form (v3) clearly indicated that the signatory should be made by the contractor, however, in the newest version (v4) this information isn't present in the form. It is only stated there that "All adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. used on the inside of the weatherproofing system and applied on-site have been included in the tables above" but it doesn't indicate who has to sign this statement. Can you please confirm this?

Thank you.

3
4
0
Mara Baum Healthcare Sustainable Design Leader, LEED Fellow, HOK Jan 03 2014 LEEDuser Expert 7574 Thumbs Up

My understanding is that many of the signatory requirements have gone away. In some cases they were causing undue hassle and problems for project teams. I can't speak to this particular credit, though.

4
4
0
Kathryn West LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Green Globes Professional, Guiding Principles Compliance Professional, Energy Ace Jan 06 2014 Guest 3005 Thumbs Up
Post a Reply
0
0
Therese Malm WSP Environmental
Nov 22 2013
Guest
263 Thumbs Up

VOCs in Prefabricated buildings

Hi,
I'm working on a building which is largely made out of units which are prefabricated off site. The credit language for this, and the other VOC credits appears to imply that it applies only to adhesives / sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. / Paints etc used on the interior of the building (i.e., inside of the weatherproofing system and applied on-site). With the prefabricated structure, very few of these will be applied on site. I image they would therefore off-gas prior to construction. Can I assume that they do not have to be included in these credits?
The wording is slightly less clear for carpets and composite woodComposite wood consists of wood or plant particles or fibers bonded by a synthetic resin or binder. Examples include particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), wheatboard, and strawboard. products - if these are also fitted off site would they be within the bounds of IEQc4.3 and 4.4?

1
2
0
John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Nov 22 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1948 Thumbs Up

HMMMMM, this is a very interesting question........

Firstly, I am trying to imagine the "units" you are asking about; are the moveable partitions? then, in theory, EQc4.1 and 4.2 would seem to only account for Adhesives, sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid., paints and coatings applied "on-site", but, as the wording for EQc4.3 is "All flooring must comply with the following as applicable to the project scope...." I would think would need to comply.

As well, EQc4.4 is a straight forward :Composite woodComposite wood consists of wood or plant particles or fibers bonded by a synthetic resin or binder. Examples include particleboard, medium-density fiberboard (MDF), plywood, oriented-strand board (OSB), wheatboard, and strawboard. and agrifibre products "used" on the interior of the building (i.e., inboard side of the weatherproofing system and applied on-site) shall contain no added urea-formaldehyde1. Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring VOC found in small amounts in animals and plants but is carcinogenic and an irritant to most people when present in high concentrations, causing headaches, dizziness, mental impairment, and other symptoms. When present in the air at levels above 0.1 ppm, it can cause watery eyes; burning sensations in the eyes, nose, and throat; nausea; coughing; chest tightness; wheezing; skin rashes; and asthmatic and allergic reactions. 2. A known carcinogen with no known safe exposure level. Formaldehyde occurs naturally, but appears in unnaturally high concentra­tions in many buildings because it is an ingredient in binders used in many building materials and furnishings. resins. Laminating adhesives used to fabricate on-site and shop-applied composite wood and agrifibre assemblies must not contain added urea-formaldehyde resins."

Secondly, as a self-proclaimed sustainability geek, I'd like to ask; would you not "want" everything to comply; "To reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants."

2
2
0
Therese Malm WSP Environmental Nov 25 2013 Guest 263 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the feedback. Some units are walls and floors and some are rooms, but all are pretty much fully fitted including finishes.
As I understand the wording I'd agree, that I think in this case IEQ4.3 and 4.4 apply to everything, including off-site, but for the purposes of documentation IEQ4.1 and 4.2 are only applicable for site applied substances.
While I'd encourage the client to pursue low-VOC materials in any case, I'm actually not sure whether this will affect the final Indoor air quality? How long does it take these materials to off-gas? Surely building off site is a bit like having a flush-out (IEQc3.2)? I guess this is why they talk about materials applied "on-site"... in any case I suppose it makes sense to track all relevant materials whether they are applied on site or not, in case GBCI has a different interpretation?

Post a Reply
0
0
Kathleen Gaffney Consigli Construction Co
Nov 06 2013
LEEDuser Member
63 Thumbs Up

Sample Templates not working

Has anyone else noticed that the sample template downloads isn't working. The page is blank? Neither the link from here or directly from LEED Online.

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 06 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Kathleen, I'm not having trouble with either link.

You do have to open the sample forms in Adobe Reader, so if your web browser isn't set up to do that, you might not be seeing the forms.

Post a Reply
0
0
THREE Consultoria THREE Consultoría Medioambiental
Oct 02 2013
LEEDuser Member
356 Thumbs Up

Concrete volume stabilizer

Under which category does a concrete volume stabilizer classify? It´s a granular powder without metal particles, ready mix which only needs water.

1
1
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 03 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

I don't know. Is it properly categorized as an adhesive or sealant? If it is a concrete admixture I wouldn't necessarily include it in the credit scope. What is the VOC level?

Post a Reply
0
0
Lewis Hewton Cundall
Sep 26 2013
LEEDuser Member
354 Thumbs Up

Records of contractor submittals

Following on from my previous query - Is it common practice to upload (or a portion of) contractor statements to accompany the product cutsheets. i.e. contractor X, confirms it used X litres of X product on X date?

I see that the "all adhesives & sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid.....have been included in this table" confirmation check box in a way supersedes the need to provide this information but am interested to see what the common approach is.

Thanks

Lewis.

1
2
0
Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 03 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Lewis, unless I am missing a documentation requirement I am not aware that this kind of statement is used. Have you seen it required somewhere?

In general, provide what LEED documentation you are asked for, but not anything additional.

2
2
0
Lewis Hewton Cundall Nov 04 2013 LEEDuser Member 354 Thumbs Up

Hi Tristan, thanks for the comments. We will only upload what is asked for and nothing additional.

Post a Reply
0
0
Lewis Hewton Cundall
Sep 26 2013
LEEDuser Member
354 Thumbs Up

Same product, multiple contractors

Hi all,

quick query regarding filling out the online submission form:

If we have multiple contractors (i.e. three) using the same product are we expected to combine this as one line item in the submission form or is it acceptable to provide it as three different line items?

Because it will impact on how the 20% cutsheet uploaded calculation works perhaps it would be expected to combine the entries but I would prefer to enter them separately.

Any thoughts/experience?

1
2
0
Mara Baum Healthcare Sustainable Design Leader, LEED Fellow, HOK Sep 26 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7574 Thumbs Up

Your situation is a common one. It's also common for the same product to be used for wildly different functions. In the past I haven't repeated the same sealant or adhesive more than once on the form, but others may have approached this differently.

2
2
0
Lewis Hewton Cundall Sep 26 2013 LEEDuser Member 354 Thumbs Up

Thanks Mara. I expect it would OK either way provided the 20% upload requirement is sufficiently exceeded.

Post a Reply
0
0
Nilufer Senses MS Architect/ LEED Green Assoc.
Sep 25 2013
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

Acrylic Concrete Primer

I wonder that under which category an "acrylic concrete primer" should be evaluated. We have a Siloxane Acrylic Primer in order to use in architectural concrete walls in interior with a very high VOC value, 739 gms/lt. I doubt that this material fits in the credit.

Thanks

1
2
0
John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Sep 25 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1948 Thumbs Up

My first comment would be, for the Health and welfare of all involved, could you research a little more to find a product with a lower VOC?

That being said, under Rule 1168 Sealant Primers - Architectural -Porous limit is 775 g/l, therefore your product should be compliant.

2
2
0
Nilufer Senses MS Architect/ LEED Green Assoc. Sep 25 2013 Guest 47 Thumbs Up

I appreciate for your response. I also believe that it is needed to find another product with a lower VOC.
Thanks

Post a Reply
0
0
Fred Van Riper
Sep 16 2013
Guest
19 Thumbs Up

Pipe Thread Sealant

Does the pipe thread sealant used by the plumber need to comply with LEED NC IEQ Low emitting materials? If so, what are the VOC limits for pipe thread sealant?

Thanks!

1
3
0
Mara Baum Healthcare Sustainable Design Leader, LEED Fellow, HOK Sep 16 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7574 Thumbs Up

Good question. Pipe thread - the stuff that looks like really wide dental floss - is not covered by this credit as it is not a liquid-based adhesive.

2
3
0
Fred Van Riper Sep 17 2013 Guest 19 Thumbs Up

Mara ... thanks for the response. I am actually talking about a liquid pipe thread sealant. It is called Rectorseal No. 5.

Thanks!

3
3
0
John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Sep 17 2013 LEEDuser Expert 1948 Thumbs Up

Good morning,Rectorseal No. 5. has a VOC content of 317 g/L (http://ows.rectorseal.com/product-data/rectorseal-no-5/RectorSeal%20No%2...)
In the past I have reported liquid pipe thread sealant as an architectural sealant ( max 250 g/L ) under Rule 1168.
If it hasn't been used, ask your plumber to find a compliant sealant.

If it's to late, you could submit under the Other sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. category (as you do with duct sealant, for example) or you can utilize the VOC budget method.

Good luck.

Post a Reply
0
0
MT A Moriyama & Teshima Architects
Sep 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
128 Thumbs Up

Blueskin Primer

I am looking for clarification on the Primer for Blueskin SA.

1) Confirmation that the adhesive is considered part of the air/vapour barrier, and not applicable.

2) If it is applicable, which application does it fall under (adhesive primer for plastic)?

Blueskin Primer VOC content = 450 g/L
Blueskin LVC VOC content <240 g/L

Start a new LEED comment thread

Sep 16 2014
Type the characters you see in this picture. (verify using audio)
Type the characters you see in the picture above; if you can't read them, submit the form and a new image will be generated. Not case sensitive.

Copyright 2014 – BuildingGreen, Inc.