NC-2009 IEQc4.1: Low-Emitting Materials—Adhesives and Sealants

  • No reason not to earn this credit

    IEQc4.1 requirementsIt shouldn’t cost you anything to earn this credit—it will just take a little work (the same is true for the related credit, IEQc4.2: Low-Emitting Materials—Paints and Coatings). Your first priority should be to specify only adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. that comply with the credit’s VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits, and enforce those specifications on the jobsite. Research low-VOC adhesives and sealants before construction begins and provide lists of acceptable materials to contractors to help ensure that the right products are used. 

    Proactive communication on the jobsite

    Making sure that VOC limits are observed demands proactive communication between the designer, contractor, and all subcontractors who do work inside the building. Subcontractors have to be educated about the requirements, and their contracts should require that they document their compliance.

    If you make a mistake, you can still earn the credit

    Unlike some LEED credits where only a certain percentage of the materials have to comply, this credit is all-or-nothing—all adhesives and coatings must comply.

    However, if a non-compliant adhesive or sealant gets used by mistake, or if you need to bend the VOC limits to meet the requirements of a warranty or fire code, you can still earn the credit following the “VOC budget process.” You’ll simply have to do some calculations to show that your extra use of VOCs was offset by very low use of VOCs elsewhere. You have to meet the budget for adhesives and sealants separately from paints and coatings (for IEQc4.2), though—you’re not allowed to create a combined VOC budget covering multiple IEQc4 credits.

    Multiple benefits

    Earning this credit is a key part of a construction indoor-air-quality management plan, and will help you earn another LEED point via the testing path in IEQc3.2: Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan—Before Occupancy, by reducing the amount of VOCs in the air.

    Using low-VOC adhesives and sealants is not only beneficial to occupants, but can improve air quality and the health of construction workers who are constantly exposed to construction pollution.

    Verify your information

    Don’t allow the use of products that merely claim to be “low VOC.” Everyone specifying and purchasing products must actually find the VOC grams per liter (g/L) information, usually on the product’s technical data sheet or material safety data sheet, and compare that number with VOC limits listed for different uses determined by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.) Rule #1168 and Green Seal-36 for aerosol adhesives. Product sheets often provide the maximum g/L (like “<100 g/L”) rather than a specific amount. That’s okay as long as the maximum is under the allowable limit. 

    Only 20% of product cut sheets selected at random need to be uploaded to LEED Online to document this credit although it is best to keep all product cut sheets on file in case the credit is audited.

  • FAQ's for IEQc4.1

    Is there a shortcut to the VOC budget method if you have just one product that is used minimally on a project?

    Yes, if you have just one non-compliant product, then you can balance it out with just one really good, low VOC product, as long as all your other products meet the requirement. For example, if you have two gallons of non-compliant adhesive that is 100 g/L over its required threshold, then you can balance it out with enough compliant product where you show you are at least 100g/l under the required threshold, thus balancing the VOC budget.

    How is VOC % less water determined for aerosol adhesives?

    This is usually found on a product cut sheet or MSDS1. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) are detailed, written instructions documenting a method to achieve uniformity of performance. 2. A report that manufacturers of most products are required to make available to installers and purchasers, informing them of product information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures, the existence of potentially hazardous ingredients, and providing instructions for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of products. If you cannot find the information, contact the manufacturer or technical services for the product and they should be able to provide this number for you. The method for dermining this is explained in SCAQMD Method 305-9, Determination of (VOC) In Aerosol Applications.

    Do products applied to the weather barrier need to comply with VOC thresholds?

    Any applied products that have the potential to communicate their emissions to the indoor air would need to be considered for IEQc4.1, but if they have little or no potential they can be excluded. This leaves room for interpretation, so projects are encouraged to take an inclusive view of what they include. For more detail, reference LEED Interpretations 809, 811, 3716, and 5955. These are not explicitly applicable to all LEED projects and credits, but nonetheless offer the most specific guidance LEEDuser has found on this issue.

    Do grout and caulking need to be included, and if so, what is the application category?

    Yes, grout and caulking need to be included. There is no specific category for them, however. Projects have successfully used ceramic tile adhesive—VOC limit 65g/l—and Architectural Sealant—VOC limit 250 g/l—successfully, the latter being especially appropriate if you are using a product other than ceramic tiles. Since most mortars, grouts, and thinsets are largely cementitious, with inherently low VOC content, they will comply under most categories, anyway. Choose a logical category and explain it in a narrative if necessary.

    How do I determine what application my product falls under?

    SCAQMD Rule 1168 includes definitions of categories that can be helpful in determining where and how your product should be categorized to determine corresponding VOC thresholds.


    What are the adhesives and sealants to be included in the documentation?

    All adhesives and sealants used onsite within the weather barrier need to be included. This should address general construction adhesives, flooring adhesives, fire-stopping sealants, caulking, duct sealants, plumbing adhesives and cove base adhesives.

    Our project didn't use some common adhesive types, and our LEED reviewer asked about this. Are we supposed to justify not using certain adhesives in our documentation?

    No, but it might not hurt. Items commonly included in the credit are general construction adhesives, flooring adhesives, fire-stopping sealants, caulking, duct sealants, plumbing adhesives, and cove base adhesives. If your project doesn't report using one or more of these, your LEED reviewer might ask you to verify your list of documented items, to check that something wasn't inadvertently omitted. In LEEDuser's opinion, a brief narrative noting what you used and verifying that you're conscious of the fact that some common items weren't used might anticipate and answer this type of review comment.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Schematic Design

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  • There is no reason not to earn this credit, as long as you are willing to take a bit of extra time to specify compliant products, and make sure that only those products are used on the jobsite.

Design Development

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  • construction work applying adhesivesLow-VOC adhesives benefit both the project and construction workers. Photo – ITW TACC Start researching and selecting compliant low-VOC adhesives and sealants needed for the project.


  • First check the allowable VOC levels for each product type you are using – see the summary of VOC limits in the Low-Emitting Material Limits document (see Documentation Toolkit) and then make sure the products specified do not exceed those limits.  


  • Keep VOC requirements in mind when selecting all materials used indoors. Watch out for warranty restrictions that call for use of a manufacturer-specified adhesive or sealant (which may or may not comply). 


  • Finding adhesives and sealants that are compliant with the credit requirements may sometimes take a little extra time, but is rarely a problem.

Construction Documents

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  • Make sure low-emitting requirements have been integrated in construction specifications. Products must be at or below the recommended VOC limits. VOC levels can be found on a product’s MSDS or technical data sheet and are measured in grams per liter (g/L).


  • Guidance on incorporating LEED specifications into construction documents, along with samples, is available from MasterSpec and from the Whole Building Design Guide (see Resources).


  • Identifying VOC requirements directly on the drawings as well as in the specs is a good way to remind the contractor and subcontractors of the requirements, but be careful to make sure the information is consistent between the drawings and the specs. 


  • It is best to require subcontractors to supply all LEED-required VOC information on the products they purchase at the time they are submitting products for approval. This way contractors do not wait until the end of construction to supply information, and you have the opportunity to review products for LEED compliance before products are purchased.


  • Specify compliant products by brand name whenever possible. It is best to distribute a list of acceptable products and the VOC limit chart from the LEED rating system at the contractor and subcontractor orientation meetings. 


  • Low-emitting products can be part of a more comprehensive IAQ management plan, as required for IEQc3.1: Construction Indoor Air Quality Plan—During Construction. A comprehensive IAQ plan covers all adhesives, sealants, paint, coatings, composite materials, and overall construction best practices protecting air quality.  


  • Achieving this credit can also help achieve IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan—Before Occupancy, if your project pursues the air-testing option for this credit. Using low-VOC products improves your odds of passing the air quality tests. 


  • Only products installed within the weather barrier need to comply with VOC limits, according to the credit requirements. For adhesives and sealants that are part of the weather barrier, the LEED requirements are ambiguous, so it is best to err on the side of caution and use low-VOC products. Remember that the intention of the credit is to make sure all adhesives and sealants that have the potential to interact with indoor air are compliant. 


  • Products assembled off-site or factory-finished are exempt from this credit, because it is assumed that VOCs have off gassed before arriving at the site.


  • Using low-emitting adhesives and sealants is a no-cost measure.  


  • Some water-based adhesives and sealants that are credit-compliant may not be as strong as non-water-based adhesives and sealants. However, this is usually not a problem, as adhesive and sealants are often stronger than they need to be. 


  • Some contractors might charge a premium for implementing and documenting this credit but, in general, costs should be minor or nonexistent as more firms start incorporating these as standard best practices. 


  • Hiring construction teams with LEED experience is helpful, as is reviewing LEED requirements and responsibilities with the contractor during the bidding process. Construction teams without LEED experience can be successful with this credit, but will require more training and a closer eye on quality control to make sure compliant materials are used and that items are documented correctly.  


  • Implementing an IAQ plan and use of low-emitting materials demands accountability. It is best if subcontractors are contractually required to implement their parts of the IAQ plan. 

Construction

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  • Preparation Before Construction Begins


  • The general contractor (GC) should be oriented to all LEED-related issues, including IAQ management, low-emitting materials, environmental material tracking tools, construction waste management, and so on. A list of acceptable products for each use type, and the list of VOC limits, should be provided to aid subcontractors in product selection. 


  • The GC should hold orientation meetings with the subcontractors to review the LEED responsibilities related specifically to their trades. This exercise helps to build trust and is crucial for obtaining buy-in from all participants in the process.


  • Coordination and communication among the GC, subcontractors and design team early in the process can minimize scheduling delays and pushback from subcontractors.


  • Give the GC and subcontractors the following tools to help them track materials data for all MR and IEQ credits. (See the Documentation Toolkit for access.)

    • Materials Calculator:  This is a master tracking spreadsheet that the GC can use internally to compile product information received from the subcontractors. The spreadsheet tracks LEED values across multiple LEED MR and IEQ credits.
    • Environmental Materials Reporting Form: This is a material tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values for products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing. 
    • Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form: This is a VOC tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing.
    • Low-Emitting Material Limits: These tables, found with each credit here on LEEDuser, summarize the maximum VOC limits for different types of adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, composite wood, and flooring products. When subcontractors search for low-emitting products, they should consult these charts.

  • Research compliant, low-emitting products before construction begins. If product decisions are made after construction begins, with less time to carefully review data sheets, there is a much greater risk of using a non-compliant product. 


  • There is some room for interpretation in VOC limits, because the limits are determined by product usage and product type. For example, cove-base adhesives have a VOC limit of 50 g/L, and a multipurpose construction adhesive has a VOC limit of 70 g/L. If you use a multipurpose adhesive on a cove base, it is up to you whether to use either 50 g/L or 70 g/L as your VOC limit. Erring on the side of caution with a lower limit is generally a good idea.


  • When researching low-emitting products, double-check that the manufacturer’s information does not use misleading language. A common example is a product cut sheet that uses the term “low-emitting” without providing a specific VOC g/L value. Many cut sheets give a maximum value of, for example, VOC < 100g/L. That’s fine as long as 100 g/L meets the criteria for that product—just enter 100 g/L VOC amount for LEED documentation.


  • It is common for an MSDS to list the chemical contents of a product without giving an overall VOC g/L number. You’ll need to contact the manufacturer or check cut sheets to get the total VOC number. (See the Documentation Toolkit for a sample cut sheet.)


  • Obtain VOC levels, in writing, from the manufacturer, for the actual products used on the project—don’t rely on VOC quotes given over the phone.


  • The VOC value on an MSDS can be unreliable when several different products are listed on one sheet. Get clarification from the manufacturer on the actual VOC content of the product you are using.


  • The GC should be aware of any warranty issues that may exist if alternative adhesives or sealants are used. For example, a carpet company’s warranty may require a certain adhesive that does not meet the VOC requirements. To keep the warranty valid, use the adhesive or sealant specified in the warranty and use the VOC budget method to show a weighted average VOC compliance, or use carpet from a company that offers a low-VOC option.


  • If noncompliant materials are used onsite accidentally, or due to a warranty or other issue, you can use the VOC budget method. This method compares the total amount of VOCs (in grams per liter) used in the design case to the total amount of VOCs that would have been used if every product exactly met LEED VOC allowances. The calculation must be determined for adhesives and sealants separately from paints and coatings. For example, it won’t necessarily help your case to use low-VOC paints but also some high-VOC sealants. (See the compliance example below for adhesives and sealants.)


  • Using the VOC budget method is usually successful, but can be time-consuming to document.


  • During Construction


  • Throughout construction, the GC should collect material safety data sheets (MSDS) from subcontractors and completed VOC tracking forms for all products used onsite associated with this credit.


  • Assign someone to be responsible for inputting the subcontractors’ tracking forms into the master spreadsheet. A LEED consultant or an administrative assistant in the GC’s office may be the best choice for this role. 


  • Review subcontractor product suggestions ahead of time to avoid the purchase of inappropriate materials and eliminate the need for costly change orders.


  • Streamline documentation and research by keeping a master spreadsheet of all the items being tracked for each material across MR and IEQ credits. For example, you may need to ask the millworker for regional information for MRc5, certified wood information for MRc7, and information about coatings installed on-site for IEQc4.1. If one spreadsheet collects all the data, it can streamline your documentation, associated research, and help with quality control. (See the Materials Calculator in the Documentation Toolkit.)


  • A master spreadsheet helps ease information collection for subcontractors, giving them a road map of exactly what types of information to collect for each product.  


  • The GC functions as the overall quality assurance provider for this credit. Responsibilities include conducting weekly reviews of subcontractor product safety data sheets and tracking forms, as well as spot checks in dumpsters to determine which products are actually being used.


  • Post signs at the construction site that reminds subcontractors to follow LEED requirements for low-VOC products. (See Documentation Toolkit for sample signs.) 


  • Schedule the application of adhesives and sealants so that offgassing does not contaminate other absorptive materials. This is required if projects are attempting IEQc3.1: Construction Indoor Air Quality Plan—During Construction. For example, do not store or install acoustic ceiling tile before flooring and wall adhesives are put down, because ceiling tiles will absorb the off-gassing of paint and floor adhesives and contaminate the air over a longer time period.


  • It is usually a good idea to do a “mini air flush” (if your project is not attempting IEQc3.2) before occupancy to help remove any lingering VOCs from the construction process. This can be as simple as putting industrial sized fans in the window and pumping in fresh air overnight or running the HVAC exhaust on high for a few days. (See IEQc3.2: Construction Indoor Air Quality Plan—Before Occupancy if the team wants to do a full flush-out for an additional LEED point.)


  • Transfer all the data collected in the master material tracking spreadsheet to the LEED Online form and upload the product cut sheets.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Provide the owner with a list of compliant, low-emitting adhesives and sealants used on the project so that O&M staff can use these products for future renovations.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    IEQ Credit 4.1: Low-emitting materials - adhesives and sealants

    1 Point

    Intent

    To reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants.

    Requirements

    All adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. used on the interior of the building (i.e., inside of the weatherproofing system and applied on-site) must comply with the following requirements as applicable to the project scope1:

    • Adhesives, Sealants and Sealant Primers must comply with South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.) Rule #1168. Volatile organic compound (VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.) limits listed in the table below correspond to an effective date of July 1, 2005 and rule amendment date of January 7, 2005.

      Architectural Applications VOC Limit

      (g/L less water)

      Specialty Applications VOC Limit

      (g/L less water)

      Indoor carpet adhesives 50 PVC welding 510
      Carpet pad adhesives 50 CPVC welding 490
      Wood flooring adhesives 100 ABS welding 325
      Rubber floor adhesives 60 Plastic cement welding 250
      Subfloor adhesives 50 Adhesive primer for plastic 550
      Ceramic tile adhesives 65 Contact adhesive 80
      VCT and asphalt adhesives 50 Special purpose contact adhesive 250
      Drywall and panel adhesives 50 Structural wood member adhesive 140
      Cove base adhesives 50 Sheet applied rubber lining operations 850
      Multipurpose construction adhesives 70 Top and trim adhesive 250
      Structural glazing adhesives 100
      Substrate Specific Applications VOC Limit

      (g/L less water)

      Sealants VOC Limit

      (g/L less water)

      Metal to metal 30 Architectural 250
      Plastic foams 50 Roadway 250
      Porous material (except wood) 50 Other 420
      Wood 30
      Fiberglass 80
      Sealant Primers VOC Limit (g/L less water)
      Architectural, nonporous 250
      Architectural, porous 775
      Other 750
      This table excludes adhesives and sealants integral to the water-proofing system or that are not building related.



    • Aerosol Adhesives must comply with Green Seal Standard for Commercial Adhesives GS-36 requirements in

      effect on October 19, 2000.

      Aerosol Adhesives VOC weight (g/L minus water)
      General purpose mist spray 65% VOCs by weight
      General purpose web spray 55% VOCs by weight
      Special purpose aerosol adhesives (all types) 70% VOCs by weight




    Credit substitution available

    You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Specify low-VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. materials in construction documents. Ensure that VOC limits are clearly stated in each section of the specifications where adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. are addressed. Common products to evaluate include general construction adhesives, flooring adhesives, fire-stopping sealants, caulking, duct sealants, plumbing adhesives and cove base adhesives. Review product cut sheets, material safety data (MSD) sheets, signed attestations or other official literature from the manufacturer clearly identifying the VOC contents or compliance with referenced standards.

Publications

Specifying LEED Requirements from ARCOM MasterSpec

Guidance and sample language on incorporating VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits into Specifications.


South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule 1168 South Coast Air Quality Management District

Outline of Rule 1168 for adhesive and sealant applications.

Web Tools

USGBC’s LEED Resources page

Includes additional resources and technical information.

Organizations

Green Seal Standard 11 (GS–11)

Green Seal is an independent, nonprofit organization that strives to achieve a healthier and cleaner environment by identifying and promoting products and services that cause less toxic pollution and waste, conserve resources and habitats, and minimize global warming and ozone depletion. GS–36 sets VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits for commercial adhesives. 


Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG) — Federal Green Construction Guide for Specifiers

Support on incorporating LEED requirements into specifications. 

Materials Calculator

Teams can use this tool to track all materials across various MR and IEQ credits. It helps teams develop a roadmap of what information needs to be tracked for different products. It can also be used early on to create the baseline budget and ensure the products that are being used will apply to the various credit thresholds.

Environmental Materials Reporting Form

This is a materials tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values of products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. for filing.

Letter to Contractor for MR and IEQ Credits

Use a letter like this sample to orient the contractor to their responsibilities for all MR and IEQ credits. This letter is an introduction that can be customized for the credits your project is pursuing.

Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form

This is a VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. for filing. Use it specifically for earning low-emitting materials credits, but in conjunction with documentation for MR credits.

Jobsite Signs

Products with VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content not meeting credit requirements for VOC levels can inadvertently get used on the jobsite. A sign like this sample helps remind subcontractors and construction workers of their responsibilities.

Product Cut Sheets

Look to product cut sheets for information on the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content of adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid.. The example here clearly displays information needed for documentation.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 IEQ

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

511 Comments

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Diaa El-Masry General Manager Qatar Green Leaders
Aug 23 2016
LEEDuser Member
307 Thumbs Up

A material with zero VOC content

Project Location: Qatar

Hello,
We are submitting data about certain materials that has "zero" VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content according to manufacturer's datasheet. However, the datasheet is referencing 0 g./L (without mentioning "Less Water"). Do we still need to provide a statement from manufacturer to prove that the "zero" content is measured "Less Water"?

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Aug 23 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3482 Thumbs Up

Datasheets often miss the fine print to add the term "less water", so I would not be overly concerned.

As well, according to SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT DISTRICT RULE 1168 - ADHESIVE AND SEALANT APPLICATIONS

(31) GRAMS OF VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. PER LITER OF ADHESIVE OR SEALANT, LESS WATER AND LESS EXEMPT COMPOUNDS is the weight of VOC per combined volume of VOC and adhesive or sealant solids, and can be calculated by the following equation:
Grams of VOC per Liter of Adhesive or Sealant, Less Water and Less
Exempt Compounds =
W s - W w - W es V m - V w - V es
Where: Ws
Ww =
Wes = Vm = Vw = Ves =
= weight of volatile compounds, in grams weight of water, in grams
weight of exempt compounds, in grams volume of material, in liters
volume of water, in liters
volume of exempt compounds, in liters
For adhesives or sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. that contain reactive diluents, the VOC content of the adhesive or sealant is determined after curing. The grams of VOC per liter of any adhesive or sealant, except a low solids adhesive or sealant shall be calculated by the following equation:
Grams of VOC per Liter of Adhesive or Sealant, Less Water and Less
Exempt Compounds =
Wrs - Wrw - Wres Vrm - Vrw - Vres
Where: Wrs
Wrw =
Wres =
Vm = Vrw =
Vres =
weight of water not consumed during curing, in grams
weight of exempt compounds not consumed during curing, in grams
volume of material prior to reaction, in liters
volume of water not consumed during curing, in liters
volume of exempt compounds not consumed during curing, in liters

OR

(32) GRAMS OF VOC PER LITER OF MATERIAL is the weight of VOC per volume of material, to be used for a low-solids adhesive or sealant, and can be calculated by the following equation:
Grams of VOC per Liter of Material = Ws - Ww - Wes Vm
Where: Ws = Ww = Wes =
Vm =
weight of volatile compounds, in grams weight of water, in grams
weight of exempt compounds, in grams volume of material, in liters

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Diaa El-Masry General Manager, Qatar Green Leaders Aug 25 2016 LEEDuser Member 307 Thumbs Up

Dear Mr. John-David,

Thanks for the reply. However, my question was about the "zero" content of VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.. Do I still need to prove the calculations were based on "less water"? At the end, "There is NO VOC"!! It's a ZERO equation.

Whether it is calculated with water or less water, does it make any difference?

Post a Reply
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Melissa Merryweather Director Green Consult-Asia
Jul 28 2016
LEEDuser Member
3101 Thumbs Up

shop applied adhesive in a laminate flooring

Project Location: Vietnam

Our product uses a laminated flooring product. If the laminating adhesive and the finish product are both factory- applied, then do we need VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. tests? The flooring has a FloorScore certification so it will comply with IEQ 4.3. There is a VOC test but it was done for the whole product and it would be impossible to separate out the components.

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Aug 10 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3482 Thumbs Up

Only the adhesives used on-site for flooring are required to meet the requirements of this credit.

The Floorscore certification is required for IEQc4.3.

http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/IEQc4.3

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Aug 10 2016 LEEDuser Member 3101 Thumbs Up

Great, this is what I'd remembered but then I couldn't find the confirmation in the manual--I'll re-read it since it must be in there somewhere! thanks so much.....

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Roger Henry Aug 25 2016 Guest

Does this same methodology pertain to offsite applied coatings such as paint. We are using a water base product to paint our equipment in the factory to be sent to a LEED site and questions have come up about the paint needing to meet LEED VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.'s.

Thanks

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Aug 26 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3482 Thumbs Up

Only adhesives, sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid., paints and coatings used on the interior of the building (i.e., inboard side of the weatherproofing system and applied on-site) must comply with the requirements as applicable to the project scope.

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Anna Okviana Total Bangun Persada
Jul 28 2016
Guest
9 Thumbs Up

Epoxy mortar for anchoring rebar in concrete

Project Location: Indonesia

Hai, my project use epoxy glue for anchoring rebar from brick wall to column and slab in indoor area. Does it must meet LEED requirement for adhesive and sealant? In my opinion epoxy glue does not contact with indoor air because it will located inside brick wall or concrete. Let me know if my opinion was false. And what type of adhesive i can use for the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit. Thanks before.

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Diego Fernandez Atmos Systems
Jul 08 2016
Guest
8 Thumbs Up

decorative glass film applies to EQc41?

Project Location: Spain

Hello! In our project in Spain we want to use decorative glass film to put on site. Is it subject to EQc41?
Thank you

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Randy Weatherly Architect/Landscape Architect Ambler Architects
Jun 26 2016
LEEDuser Member
38 Thumbs Up

Classification of PVC adhesive and Primer

Project Location: United States

I have classified PVC water pipe glue as "PVC Welding Adhesives" and the Purple PVC primer as "Adhesive Primer for Plastic". Is this correct"

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Jun 27 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3482 Thumbs Up

Yes, I agree.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator Bywater Woodworks, Inc.
Jun 21 2016
Guest
43 Thumbs Up

mirror mastics that contain carcinogenic ingredient

Project Location: United States

The two mirror mastics that I found both contain carcinogenic ingredients, however they both meet the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit of 250 g/L. One of the two is less toxic than the other and the more toxic product is specified for our project. It contains benezene.

I'd prefer no one use either of these two products in the 4 enclosed bathrooms where we have substantial glass mirrors getting applied to the wall/substrate. The other contains di "isononyl" phthalate.

Has anyone found a mirror mastic adhesive that does NOT contain any carcinogenic ingredients?? If so, please mention product & how well it worked.

THANKS

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant DCarbon
May 25 2016
LEEDuser Member
1110 Thumbs Up

Greenguard

Project Location: Greece

Would a product which is Greenguard gold certified automatically prove compliance with the credit requirements similarly to LEED for Schools?

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects May 25 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3482 Thumbs Up

Yes, correct.

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant, DCarbon May 25 2016 LEEDuser Member 1110 Thumbs Up

Thanks! However, although this is quite obvious how can we reference it through LEED Online, because there is not such an option other than Rule 1168?

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects May 25 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3482 Thumbs Up

You still are required to provide the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content,and have supplementary documentation available.

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Gustav Alfaro Mechanical Engineer
May 21 2016
LEEDuser Member
272 Thumbs Up

Air-supply plenum

For an office application we have an air-supply plenum for conditioning the space, what is the maximum content of VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. allowed for the plenum sealing material?

Thanks in advance.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE May 22 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

USGBC addressed duct sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. in LI#5241 (http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=5241): “Project teams may classify duct sealants under ‘Other’, as listed in the SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. Limits table.” For “Other” sealants SCAQMD-1168 allows up to 420g/L.

This LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. aligns with a previously issued technical bulletin from the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors’ National Association (SMACNAThe Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA) is an international association of union contractors, in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Brazil.).

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Donna Juselis LEED Consultant Commissioning WorCx
Apr 08 2016
LEEDuser Member
148 Thumbs Up

n/a

Project Location: United States

deleted

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Patricia Taylor Project Coordinator Spectra Contract Flooring
Mar 23 2016
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

Adhesive credits

Project Location: United States

As a Flooring contractor, I get many customers that request we submit LEED information many different ways. A couple have asked that I break out the qty and total material cost for adhesives.
Can Adhesives be listed in IEQ category AND also count toward project material cost?
I thought that adhesives needed to meet the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. requirement, but that the adhesive cost could not be counted in material cost.

(Ex: List Shaw carpet adhesive VOC content and GLP on the Carpet worksheet, and then also fill out separate worksheet for Shaw carpet adhesive qty and cost) - is this correct?

Thanks in advance for any insight.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Mar 27 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

Patricia—What you describe is not unusual. The emissions reporting done for interior products under IEQc4.1 through IEQc4.4 is completely independent of the material cost reports done for Materials and Resources credits. Credits MRc3 through MRc6 all tally up material costs for all products specified in CSI MasterFormat Divisions 03 through 10 (plus a few Sections from 31 & 32). Likewise, MRc7 tracks wood costs for these same Divisions.

The MR credits measure achievement based on the costs and the characteristics (for example, recycled content) of each product in the CSI Divisions listed above divided by the total cost of ALL materials in those same Divisions. (See the LEEDuser MR Credit forums.)

The cost information requested in your example above probably duplicates that which you submit to the Prime Contractor for billing purposes. If a project’s LEED documentation team has access to detailed billing information, such duplicate reporting often becomes unnecessary.

Finally, be aware that documentation requirements for LEEDv4 differ from previous versions, so you can expect further changes in LEED data requirements.

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Patricia Taylor Project Coordinator , Spectra Contract Flooring Mar 28 2016 Guest 47 Thumbs Up

Thank you for the reply Jon.

I am still a little confused. I understand that IEQ are separate from MR credits. That is why I am needing clarification as to whether or not adhesives can count toward both.

I already listed adhesive VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. in the IEQ report. My customer is requesting that I also provide cost and recycled content for my adhesives for MR.

Can adhesives qualify for both? I have already provided the total carpet material cost. Do I also need to provide the total adhesive cost separately?

I was under the impression from all I have read, that adhesives are IEQ credit only, and cannot count toward material credit also.

Thanks again for the reply.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Mar 28 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

Patricia—The fact that adhesives contribute to IEQ credits does not exclude them from consideration under MR. Since flooring adhesives are usually specified in CSI MasterFormat Division 09, they also figure into the metrics for MR credits.

That said, adhesives rarely contain reused, recycled, regional, renewable, or wood materials that might contribute to credits MRc3 through MRc7. In these cases, only the costs are relevant to these credits.

Some LEED documentation teams calculate their projects’ “total material cost” by summing the costs of each individual product purchased. They may need your figures to complete that total. See the LEEDuser MR pages for more guidance.

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Patricia Taylor Project Coordinator , Spectra Contract Flooring Mar 28 2016 Guest 47 Thumbs Up

Got it.
Thank you!

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Erin Holdenried Sustainable Design Manager AECOM
Mar 01 2016
LEEDuser Member
193 Thumbs Up

Grout additive?

What category would a grout additive fall under? Thanks!

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Mar 10 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3482 Thumbs Up

Ceramic Tile Adhesives
max 65 g/l

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K
Feb 08 2016
LEEDuser Member
717 Thumbs Up

GBCI clarification

In the FAQ's section above it is written that "GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). has issued a clarification that the actual barrier does not need to comply with this credit. Any applied products that are "touched by the indoor air" would need to be considered for IEQc4.1, but if they fall outside of this they can be excluded." Can you share a link to this official clarification or where can we find it (was it published as Interpretation or in one of the addendas)?

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Jan 28 2016
LEEDuser Member
3858 Thumbs Up

Actual Use vs Indicated Use

We will use a Contact Adhesive which is a one-part solvent-based high performance contact adhesive with < 550 g/l VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.. This will be used to prepare the surface of a thermal insulation. Therefore the supplier states that it has to be classified as a adhesive primer for plastic. Can we classify it as such because of the use of this adhesive, regardless of the fact that the product sheet says "contact adhesive"?

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Feb 06 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

Emmanuel—No. Classify products based on their labeling and use them for their recommended applications. If the label says, “contact adhesive,” the product cannot qualify for a higher VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit based on an off-label use.

SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.-1168 states, “If anywhere on the container of any adhesive or sealant, on any sticker or label affixed thereto, or in any sales or advertising literature, any representation is made that the adhesive or sealant may be used for any another source specific rule application, for which there is a lower VOC standard, then the lowest VOC standard shall apply.” For “contact adhesive,” the VOC limit is 80g/L or 250g/L for a subset of “special-purpose contact adhesives used with particular substrates.

You wrote that this application glues plastic insulation. If this is plastic foam insulation, you may need to find an adhesive that complies with the 50g/L VOC specified in SCAQMD-1168’s table of “Substrate Specific Applications.”

On the other hand, if the adhesive is applied off-site or if it is “integral to the waterproofing system” of the building, you may omit it entirely from IEQc4.1 documentation.

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A Brockelman Architect, Director of Sustainable Design Perry Dean Rogers | Partners Architects
Jan 20 2016
LEEDuser Member
24 Thumbs Up

Acrylic Adhesive for Threaded Rod Installed in Solid Concrete

Project Location: United States

Hello,
What category does this product fall under for VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content?
-Acrylic Adhesive for Threaded Rod Installed in Solid Concrete; "two-component methyl methacrylate adhesive."
It's basically a concrete anchoring adhesive.
(Red Head A7 product)
"Architectural Sealant", with limit of 250 g/L?

Thank you,
Anne

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Lyle Axelarris Civil/Structural Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Design Alaska Jan 20 2016 LEEDuser Member 1796 Thumbs Up

Anne, I use the "Substrate Specific Adhesive - porous materials (except for wood)" category for all concrete anchor adhesives. The VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit is 50 g/L. Hope that helps.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Jan 20 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

Hi Lyle—I think you’re right. SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. defines porous material as “a substance which has tiny openings, often microscopic, in which fluids may be absorbed or discharged,” and offers examples that “include, but are not limited to, wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, and plastic foam.” Based on these examples, I have a heck of a time classifying concrete as “porous” and the definition does not delineate an absolute threshold between "porous" and "non-porous."

However, a 2007 LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. addressed whether to classify concrete as a porous or non-porous substrate. LI#1822 held that, if a substrate could qualify as either porous or non-porous, it is correct to apply the most restrictive criteria. Since 50g/l is more restrictive than most other alternatives on the list, it is probably the right choice.

Incidentally, I have had very little luck finding VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. data for “Red Head A7 Acrylic Adhesive.” I am not sure whether it meets the 50g/L limit.

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Lyle Axelarris Civil/Structural Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Design Alaska Jan 20 2016 LEEDuser Member 1796 Thumbs Up

Hi Jon. As a Building Envelope guy, I can definitely confirm that concrete is a porous material - it's capillarity and hygric storage potential can be either a benefit or a hindrance, depending on it's relationship to the building envelope control layers.
I don't know the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit for Red Head A7, but I know that Hilti HY-150 Max has a VOC content of 7 g/L. Given that HY-150 is epoxy and Red Head A7 is acrylic, this could an apples and oranges thing. There are some conditions that would cause the structural engineer to specify acrylic vs. epoxy, but oftentimes either will do given that it meets strength requirements and code approvals.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Jan 21 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

Concrete can definitely take on water, but it is not nearly as spongy as the materials that the definition gives as examples. Everything is relative. As a metrics guy who also works in code enforcement, I prefer clear cut definitions. The SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. definition of “porous” is awfully mushy. It would be clearer if it used a measurable, non-subjective threshold of, say, capillary or hygric storage potential.

I have found something on a third-party website saying that ITW Red Head A7 Acrylic Adhesive contains 2g/L VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate., but I could find no actual VOC data from the manufacturer. The same website called this product as a “Multipurpose Construction Adhesive” with a 70g/L limit, but I have found little to support that classification.

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A Brockelman Architect, Director of Sustainable Design, Perry Dean Rogers | Partners Architects Jan 21 2016 LEEDuser Member 24 Thumbs Up

Hi All,
Thank you for your input.
As for the product, I contacted Red Head directly, and they emailed me a document which states that ITW Red Head A7 Acrylic Adhesive contains 13.9g/L VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate., including MSDS1. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) are detailed, written instructions documenting a method to achieve uniformity of performance. 2. A report that manufacturers of most products are required to make available to installers and purchasers, informing them of product information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures, the existence of potentially hazardous ingredients, and providing instructions for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of products sheets.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc.
Jan 18 2016
LEEDuser Member
3027 Thumbs Up

Top and trim

Project Location: Japan

What are top and trim adhesives? Looking up the internet, it seems to be an automotive spray type adhesive. Why does it show up in this architectural adhesive list? Is it correct to list spray type adhesives as top and trim?

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Jan 18 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

You are correct that, in LEED-NC, Credit IEQc4 only addressed interior architectural adhesives & sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid., but it bases its VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits on those published in SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. Rule 1168, which “applies to all commercial and industrial sales and applications” of these types of products indoors or out. Therefore, the list includes a handful of “non-architectural” specialty and roadway products that one is not likely to encounter during construction of a building.

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Noriko Yasuhara Woonerf Inc. Jan 19 2016 LEEDuser Member 3027 Thumbs Up

Thank you so much, Jon!

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Z Smith Eskew+Dumez+Ripple
Jan 15 2016
LEEDuser Member
98 Thumbs Up

IEQc4 - Schools v2009- Alternative Compliance from CA to SCAQMD

Project Location: United States

We are working on a LEED Schools v2009 project. We'd like to pursue the Alternative Compliance Method for IEQc4.1 through 4.6 wherein we can count VOCs via the SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. rules instead of the California 01350.

The link to the official Errata that details how alternative compliance can work is dead (http://www.usgbc.org/Docs/Archive/General/Docs4311.pdf).

My understanding was that this Errata only covered 4.1 - 4.2 - is this the case or can we use SCAQMD VOC limits for 4.6 as well?

Does anyone know where to find the Errata? I've searched high and low. I've also noticed that the link to V2.2 forms that we are supposed to use to pursue the alternative compliance path is also dead. Does anyone know where to find samples of these forms?

Any help is appreciated.
Thanks

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Ralph Bicknese Principal, Hellmuth + Bicknese Architects Jan 15 2016 LEEDuser Member 470 Thumbs Up

Z, I just emailed you what I think you are looking for; the Errata not the forms. Please let us all know how it turns out.

Cheers,
Ralph

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MARIA ESTHER LAMADRID LEED AP BD+C ECOSYNC SA de CV
Dec 14 2015
Guest
43 Thumbs Up

n/a

Project Location: Mexico

How should i classify an elastomeric butyl rubber sealant- sealant tape used in the metal roof

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Feb 02 2016 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

Maria—You are lucky. Unless your project is pursuing LEED for Healthcare, IEQc4 documentation is not required to include exterior roofing and waterproofing products.

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Sarfaraj Khan Commissioning & Sustainability Consultant Green Consulting
Dec 10 2015
Guest
36 Thumbs Up

Duct Seal level

Project Location: United Arab Emirates

Minimum duct seal level must comply with table 6.4.4.2A- Ashrae 90, i have this in my specification for duct and i think it apply only to G.I Duct, Not to pre insulated duct, please anyone can clarify this

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Anastasia Makarenko EcoStandard
Nov 26 2015
Guest
190 Thumbs Up

rust oleum magnetic primer

Dear all,
could anyone please help me define the type of the following material - Rust oleum Magnetic primer which is used to create magnetic surface at the wall. It has a VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. level of 420 g/l.
I have absolutely no idea on how to identify it..Thanks a lot in advance.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Anastasia, I haven't come across this one exactly but if you look through this forum you'll see some examples of nonstandard coatings being puzzled through. How will the wall be used? Perhaps it could be called a graphic arts coating.

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Anastasia Makarenko EcoStandard Nov 30 2015 Guest 190 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much for your assistance!
The wall will be used as a notice board in meeting rooms.
Well, I thought of graphic arts coatings category as well, but i'm not sure about it. I think it could also be considered as a metallic pigmented coating, but the problem with that is that according to the rule 1113 there must be elemental metallic pigment, and our primer has steel in it, not elemental metal. There are several categories that seem to be appropriate but there is always a little mismatch with each of them..
I'll try to look through this forum more accurately, thank you!

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Nov 30 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

In January 2006, SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. issued an advisory addressing Dry‐Erase Coatings, Chalkboard Coatings, and Magnetic Board Coatings and other coatings not addressed in the SCAQMD-1113 Table of Standards. They reissued the advisory in July 2011 reasserting the original interpretation:

Section (c)(3)(A) of SCAQMD-1113 “explains that if any sticker or label affixed on the container of the coating, any sales or advertising literature, or any representation is made that the coating may be used as, or is suitable for use as, a coating that is listed in the Table of Standards with a lower VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit than the default category [250 g/L, per Section (c)(1)], then the lowest VOC standard shall apply.”

Therefore, since this product’s label says it is a primer, I would use the primer/sealer/undercoater category with a VOC limit of 200 g/L.

See the IEQc4.2 forum for more information.

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Anastasia Makarenko EcoStandard Nov 30 2015 Guest 190 Thumbs Up

Jon, thank you very much for this information, this is really helpful!

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Jason Biondi Managing Director Energy Cost Solutions Group
Oct 26 2015
LEEDuser Member
440 Thumbs Up

VOC Limit - Thread Cutting Oils

Project Location: United States

What is VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit for "Thread Cutting Oils" as per SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. Standards to comply with LEED requirements ?

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Oct 26 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. Rules 1168 & 1113 do not have a category for “thread cutting oil.” This type of product appears to be a lubricant used in metalworking, rather than an adhesive, sealant, or coating. As such, these oils would not be relevant to IEQc4.1 or IEQ4.2.

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Gaura Saxena
Aug 27 2015
Guest
18 Thumbs Up

HVAC duct insulation adhesive

Project Location: India

Hi
For a project using an adhesive for HVAC duct insulation, what should be the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit that should be followed for since the standards does not mention any value directly for the insulation adhesive. Should we use multipurpose construction adhesive (70 g/L) or special purpose contact adhesive (250 g/L)?
A prompt response is highly appreciated.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Aug 31 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

Use an adhesive product that the insulation manufacturer recommends, but base the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit on the characteristics of the adhesive and of the substrates to which the adhesive is applied.

For example, does the adhesive glue the insulation directly to metal ductwork? Does it adhere the insulation to itself, or do you apply the adhesive to a foil, paper, or fabric wrapping on the outside of the insulation?

Refer to SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. 1168 for definitions of the adhesive categories. First, compare product data for the adhesive to the “Substrate-Specific Application” types (foam, fiberglass, foil, or porous materials) to see whether the product matches these applications.

It might also be a “Contact Adhesive” if the application method matches that described in its SCAQMD definition. (However, a “Special Purpose Contact Adhesive” is for use only on the substrates named by its definition.)

If the adhesive is recommended exclusively for duct insulation, it is not a “Multipurpose Construction Adhesive.” By definition, this type is for use with various materials.

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cathy keagle
Aug 18 2015
LEEDuser Member
391 Thumbs Up

metal roof sealant

Which category does Novaflex metal roof sealant fall into?
Thanks

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Aug 18 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

IEQc4.1 specifically excludes adhesives and sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid. integral to the waterproofing system. Therefore, you will not find roof sealants on the table of VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits (see http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=100000701 ).

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Erin Holdenried Sustainable Design Manager AECOM
Aug 12 2015
LEEDuser Member
193 Thumbs Up

non-aerosol spray adhesives?

For a non-aerosol spray adhesive, must it comply with SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. 1168 or GS-36?

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Aug 13 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.-1168 explicitly excludes products that it defines as Aerosol AdhesiveAerosol adhesive is an aerosol product in which the spray mechanism is permanently housed in a nonrefillable can. Designed for hand-held application, these products do not need ancillary hoses or spray equipment. Aerosol adhesives include special-purpose spray adhesives, mist spray adhesives, and web spray adhesives. (SCAQMD Rule 1168): “Any adhesive packaged as an aerosol product in which the spray mechanism is permanently housed in a nonrefillable can designed for hand-held application without the need for ancillary hoses or spray equipment.”

Green Seal’s VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits only apply to products that meet the GS-36 Definition: “Aerosol Adhesive is a mixture of rubber, resins, and liquid and gaseous solvents and propellants packaged in a container for hand-held application.” GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. -36 measures aerosol VOC content as a percent by weight.

For products that do not meet either definition, for adhesives sprayed by other means, and for spray products that report VOC content in g/L, use SCAQMD-1168.

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Erin Holdenried Sustainable Design Manager, AECOM Aug 17 2015 LEEDuser Member 193 Thumbs Up

Thanks! The conflicting definitions had me flummoxed.

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Claire DeCamp Senior Architectural Associate UCD Design and Construction Management
Jul 21 2015
LEEDuser Member
30 Thumbs Up

Spray Foam Insulation

Project Location: United States

I recently had a project manager approach me concerning spray foam insulation that has been specified on a project. The contractor has expressed to the PM that he thinks the product is going to be of concern for the LEED submittal due to the application measures the crew needs to take for applying. I have yet to see the product submittal/cut sheet (it's not my project, I have requested it). But the PM was able to tell me it is being applied within the weather proofing system of the building.... If this is the case, and there are VOCs in the product I imagine this credit applies but I have been unable to locate which category I would put spray foam insulation under. Any thoughts? Thanks!

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Jul 21 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

For discussions of spray polyurethane foam (SPF), see http://www.leeduser.com/comment/redirect/52816 & http://www.leeduser.com/comment/redirect/35584. I am not sure either discussion is conclusive, but there was plenty to discuss. There are several similar conversations on this forum, as this appears to be a hot topic.

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Melinda Orova
Jul 14 2015
Guest
26 Thumbs Up

adhesive powder

Dear All,
Our project uses a cement based adhesive powder that will be mixed with water and then applied. We have data for the powder that it has 0 g/l VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate., and the applied quantity in kg.
We use the VOC budget method for LEED compliance. My question is that should we use the quantity of the powder or the water+powder mixture in the VOC budget?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Melinda, I would suggest going with just the powder, as this would be the more conservative calculation.

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Mauricio Ramirez
Jun 09 2015
Guest
823 Thumbs Up

Do Indoor water seal must comply VOC requirements?

Hello. In our project we have a large underground structure to house an IMAX Theater. Since we're below freatic line, we need to apply in the interior face of the concrete structure an additional water seal (actually a weatherproof product). Since the discussion in the forum I assume that as long as this product in in the interior side and touches the interior air, it need to comply with VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. requirements. But I have a question: That's required even if that there will be more products (finishes) applied over it? It will not be emitting to the air at the operational stage. Thank you.

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer, Lile Engineering LLC Jun 09 2015 LEEDuser Member 2693 Thumbs Up

My first thought is yes, it needs to comply. There is a category for Waterproof Concrete/Masonry SealersSealers are coatings applied to either block materials from penetrating into or leaching out of a substrate, to prevent subsequent coatings from being absorbed by the substrate, or to prevent harm to subsequent coatings by materials in the substrate. that allows 400 g/L VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. - is the product you need to apply worse than that? I am not familiar with design requirements for the freatic line, sounds interesting. Tell us more, I don't come up with a google hit for the word.

If the product you need to install isn't compliant with 400g/L, it might be a special circumstance that ideally should be checked out with the LEED review team in a conference call before construction phase. I think you have a strong case that it has to be installed.

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Pia Öhrling Piacon
May 22 2015
LEEDuser Member
107 Thumbs Up

Cleaners

Project Location: Sweden

Should a cleaner used before the adhesive (to make the Surface clean) fullfill IEQc4.1?
If it should which category should be used?

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous May 22 2015 LEEDuser Expert 20761 Thumbs Up

Cleaners are not covered in LEED.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE May 22 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

Absolutely right!

A cleaner used simply to prepare a substrate for an adhesive by removing dirt & residue from the surface is not an adhesive or an adhesive primer.

By comparison, to improve the bond to some substrates, some adhesives require an adhesive primer or an adhesive bonding primer to prepare the surface. These are not cleaners. They are coatings and adhesives that remain on the surface. SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.-1168 defines these primers as a subset of “adhesives,” so primers use the same VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits as the adhesives applied over them. [Exception: Adhesive Primers for Plastic and for Traffic Marking Tape have their own categories.]

If your product is just a cleaner, it is not applicable to IEQc4.1. However, as with all chemicals used inside the building, your project’s IEQc3 Construction IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Plan should address proper handling and ventilation during use.

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Lyle Axelarris Civil/Structural Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, O+M Design Alaska
Apr 14 2015
LEEDuser Member
1796 Thumbs Up

aerosol line saver (also posted in IEQc4.1)

Project Location: United States

I also posted this in IEQc4.1 since I do not know where, if anywhere, this product would go:
Has anyone considered reporting the use of aerosol "line saver"? This is the stuff sprayed over chalk lines during construction to preserve construction reference lines for layout. It's applied within the building (on the slab, or plywood subfloor), but doesn't seem to fit well into any SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. categories. Does it even need to be reported? Thank you in advance.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Apr 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5048 Thumbs Up

See response under IEQc4.2: http://www.leeduser.com/comment/redirect/57315.

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Panupant Phapant SCG Cement - Building Materials Co.,Ltd.
Mar 23 2015
LEEDuser Member
458 Thumbs Up

VOC limits for the welding of PP-R

Dear All
Our project uses PP-R pipe (Polypropylene Random Copolymer) for chilled water piping. The PP-R pipes is connected together by welding. There is the vocA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits for PVC, CPVC, ABC and plastic cement welding but we cannot find the VOC limit for the welding of PP-R. Please advise whether there is VOC limit for PP-R.
Thank you

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