NC-2009 IEQc4.2: Low-Emitting Materials—Paints and Coatings

  • Verify Your Information

    Don’t allow the use of products that merely claim to be “low VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate..” Everyone specifying and purchasing products must actually find the products’ VOC content in grams per liter (g/L), which is usually found on the product’s technical data sheet or material safety data sheet, and compare that number with VOC limits listed for different uses determined by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.) Rule #1113 and Green Seal GS-11 and GS-03. 

    Only 20% of product cut sheets selected at random need to be uploaded to LEED Online to document this credit although it is best to keep all product cut sheets on file in case the credit is audited.

    FAQs for IEQc4.2

    Is there a shortcut to the VOC budget method if you have just one product that is used minimally on a project?

    Yes. If you have just one non-compliant product, then you can balance it out with just one really good, low-VOC product, as long as all your other products meet the requirement. For example, if you have two gallons of non-compliant paint that is 100 g/L over its required threshold, then you can balance it out with another product you’re using. You would have to be using two gallons that are 100g/L under the required threshold, or four gallons that are 50 g/L under, or 20 gallons that are 10 g/L under, etc.

    Do products applied to the weather barrier need to comply with VOC thresholds?

    Any applied products that have the potential to communicate their emissions to the indoor air would need to be considered for IEQc4.1, but if they fall outside of this have little or no potential they can be excluded.

    How do I determine what application my product falls under?

    Check out the Resources tab for the Green Seal Standard and SCAQMD Rules for more information. These documents can be helpful in determining where and how your product should be categorized to determine corresponding VOC thresholds.

    How should graphic arts paint or coatings be categorized?

    Graphic Arts (Sign) Coating is found in SCAQMD 1113, Table 1 - VOC Limits, with 500 g/l as the current limit.

    The standards referenced for this credit have been updated since those listed in the LEED Reference Guide – does our project need to follow the latest SCAQMD Rules and Green Seal editions, or the ones listed in the reference guide?

    Projects should comply with the editions in the reference guide or applicable LEED addenda issued before the project's registration date.

    How should handheld aerosol spray paints be handled?

    Handheld aerosol spray paints are not covered by Green Seal GS-11 or SCAQMD Rule 1113, the relevant standards under this credit. A CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide under LEED-NC v2.2 was issued that excluded spray paints from this credit, and there have been no rulings reversing this for LEED 2009 projects, although there is not officially a ruling one way or another that applies to LEED 2009. See LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #2486 2/10/2009.

    What are the VOC limits for primers? They seem to be listed in both GS-11 and SCAQMD Rule 1113.

    As stated in the credit language, architectural paints and coatings applied to interior walls and ceilings are subject to GS-11.

    If a project registered after the 4/14/10 addendum, then primers must use the 50 g/L and 150 g/L VOC limits for flat and non-flat paints, respectively. The only exception would be when it can be demonstrated, based on the purpose of the primer and supporting manufacturer data, that the product meets the definition of specialty primers per SCAQMD Rule 1113.

  • An easy, no-cost credit

    Like the similar credit, IEQc4.1: Low-Emitting Materials: Adhesives and Sealants, it shouldn’t cost you anything extra to earn this credit—it will just take some work. Your first priority should be to specify only  paints and coatings that comply with the credit’s VOC limits, and enforce those specifications on the jobsite. Research low-VOC paints and coatings before construction begins and provide lists of acceptable materials to contractors to help ensure that the right products are used.

    Performance should not be an issue

    Major manufacturers offer paints and coatings that are just as durable and perform just as well as their higher-VOC counterparts. Performance of low-VOC products has sometimes been an issue in the past, but the market has largely moved beyond this point.

    Low-VOC acrylic paint is readily available. While it may be more difficult, it is not impossible to find low-VOC oil-based and high-gloss paints. Darker shades of paints also tend to have higher VOC levels. Rust proofing coatings also tend to have higher VOC content, but several name brand providers have low-VOC alternatives.

    Proactive communication on the jobsite

    Sherwin-Williams paintLow-VOC paint like this 0-VOC Acrylic from Sherwin-Williams does not have to sacrifice performance or cost. Photo – Sherwin-Williams

    Making sure that VOC limits are observed demands proactive communication between the designer, contractor, and all subcontractors who do work inside the building. Subcontractors have to be educated about the requirements, and their contracts should require that they document their compliance.

    If you make a mistake, you can still earn the credit

    Unlike some LEED credits where only a certain percentage of the materials have to comply, this credit is all-or-nothing—all paints and coatings must comply. If a non-compliant paint or coating gets used by mistake, or if you need to bend the VOC limits to meet the requirements of a warranty or fire code, you can still earn the credit following the “VOC budget process.” You’ll simply have to do some calculations to show that your extra use of VOCs was offset by very low use of VOCs elsewhere. You have to meet the budget for paints and coatings separately from adhesives and sealants (for IEQc4.1), though—you’re not allowed to create a combined VOC budget covering multiple IEQc4 credits.

    Multiple benefits

    Earning this credit is a key part of a construction indoor-air-quality management plan, and will help you earn another LEED point via IEQc3.1: Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan—During Construction.

    Earning this credit can also help teams pass air quality tests needed to earn IEQc3.2: Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan—Before Occupancy.

    Using low-VOC paints and coatings is not only beneficial to occupants, but can improve air quality and the health of construction workers who are constantly exposed to construction pollution.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Design Development

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  • First check the allowable VOC levels for each product type you are using – see the summary of VOC limits in the Low-Emitting Material Limits document (see Documentation Toolkit) and then make sure the products specified do not exceed those limits.  


  • Select paint colors and sheen levels.


  • Many "zero-VOC" paints contain colorants with as much as 150 g/L of VOCs. Natura from Benjamin Moore uses zero-VOC colorants. Photo – Benjamin MooreIt’s easier to find low-VOC paints if you choose lighter paint colors. Darker colors tend to use more pigment and binders, where VOCs are concentrated. When compiling VOC numbers for paints, make sure that the numbers you get include pigment, not just the base paint.


  • Light colors also make spaces brighter, reducing electric lighting needs.


  • Major manufacturers offer paints and coatings that are just as durable and perform just as well as their higher-VOC counterparts. Poor performance of low-VOC paints and coatings has been an issue in the past, but is no longer a problem for any but the most demanding applications. Interior wall and ceiling paints (in flat and semi-gloss sheens) are readily available. Some specialty coatings such as rust-proofing finishes can be more challenging.

Construction Documents

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  • Make sure low-emitting requirements have been integrated in construction specifications. Products must be at or below the recommended VOC limits. VOC levels can be found on a product’s MSDS or technical data sheet and are measured in grams per liter (g/L).


  • Guidance on incorporating LEED specifications into construction documents, along with samples, is available from MasterSpec and from the Whole Building Design Guide (see Resources).


  • Identifying VOC requirements directly on the drawings as well as in the specs is a good way to remind the contractor and subcontractors of the requirements, but be careful to make sure the information is consistent between the drawings and the specs. 


  • It is best to require subcontractors to supply all LEED-required VOC information on the products they purchase at the time they are submitting products for approval. This way contractors do not wait until the end of construction to supply information, and you have the opportunity to review products for LEED compliance before products are purchased.


  • Specify compliant products by brand name whenever possible. It is best to distribute a list of acceptable products and the VOC limit chart from the LEED rating system at the contractor and subcontractor orientation meetings. 


  • Low-emitting products can be part of a more comprehensive IAQ management plan, as required for IEQc3.1: Construction Indoor Air Quality Plan—During Construction. A comprehensive IAQ plan covers all adhesives, sealants, paint, coatings, composite materials, and overall construction best practices protecting air quality.  


  • Achieving this credit can also help achieve IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan—Before Occupancy, if your project pursues the air-testing option for this credit. Using low-VOC products improves your odds of passing the air quality tests. 


  • Only paints and coatings installed within the weather barrier need to comply with this credit. If paints and coatings are part of the weather barrier, err on the side of caution and use low VOC paints and coatings.


  • Products assembled off-site or factory-finished are exempt from this credit, because it is assumed that VOCs have off gassed before arriving at the site.


  • Using low-emitting paints and coatings should be a no-added-cost measure.  


  • Some contractors might charge a premium for implementing and documenting this credit but, in general, costs should be minor or nonexistent as more firms start incorporating these as standard best practices. 


  • Hiring construction teams with LEED experience is helpful, as is reviewing LEED requirements and responsibilities with the contractor during the bidding process. Construction teams without LEED experience can be successful with this credit, but will require more training and a closer eye on quality control to make sure compliant materials are used and that items are documented correctly.  


  • Implementing an IAQ plan and use of low-emitting materials demands accountability. It is best if subcontractors are contractually required to implement their parts of the IAQ plan. 

Construction

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  • Preparation Before Construction Begins


  • The general contractor (GC) should be oriented to all LEED-related issues, including IAQ management, low-emitting materials, environmental material tracking tools, construction waste management, and so on. A list of acceptable products for each use type, and the list of VOC limits, should be provided to aid subcontractors in product selection. 


  • The GC should hold orientation meetings with the subcontractors to review the LEED responsibilities related specifically to their trades. This exercise helps to build trust and is crucial for obtaining buy-in from all participants in the process.


  • Coordination and communication among the GC, subcontractors and design team early in the process can minimize scheduling delays and pushback from subcontractors.


  • Give the GC and subcontractors the following tools to help them track materials data for all MR and IEQ credits. (See the Documentation Toolkit for access.)

    • Materials Calculator:  This is a master tracking spreadsheet that the GC can use internally to compile product information received from the subcontractors. The spreadsheet tracks LEED values across multiple LEED MR and IEQ credits.
    • Environmental Materials Reporting Form: This is a material tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values for products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing. 
    • Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form: This is a VOC tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GC for filing.
    • Low-Emitting Material Limits: These tables, found with each credit here on LEEDuser, summarize the maximum VOC limits for different types of adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, composite wood, and flooring products. When subcontractors search for low-emitting products, they should consult these charts.

  • Research compliant, low-emitting products before construction begins. If product decisions are made after construction begins, with less time to carefully review data sheets, there is a much greater risk of using a non-compliant product. 


  • When researching low-emitting products, double-check that the manufacturer’s information does not use misleading language. A common example is a product cut sheet that uses the term “low-emitting” without providing a specific VOC g/L value. Many cut sheets give a maximum value of, for example, VOC < 100g/L. That’s fine as long as 100 g/L meets the criteria for that product—just enter 100 g/L VOC amount for LEED documentation.


  • It is common for an MSDS to list the chemical contents of a product without giving an overall VOC g/L number. You’ll need to contact the manufacturer or check cut sheets to get the total VOC number. (See the Documentation Toolkit for a sample cut sheet.)


  • Obtain VOC levels, in writing, from the manufacturer, for the actual products used on the project—don’t rely on VOC quotes given over the phone.


  • The VOC value on an MSDS can be unreliable when several different products are listed on one sheet. Get clarification from the manufacturer on the actual VOC content of the product you are using.


  • The GC should be aware of any warranty issues that may exist if alternative paints or coatings are used. For example, a flooring company’s warranty may require a specific coating that does not meet the VOC requirements. To keep the warranty valid, use the coating specified and use the VOC budget method to show a weighted average VOC compliance (see below).


  • If noncompliant materials are used onsite accidentally, or due to a warranty or other issue, you can use the VOC budget method. This method compares the total amount of VOCs (in grams per liter) used in the design case to the total amount of VOCs that would have been used if every product exactly met LEED VOC allowances. The calculation must be determined for adhesives and sealants separately from paints and coatings. For example, it won’t necessarily help your case to use low-VOC paints but also some high-VOC sealants. (See the compliance example below for paints and coatings.)


  • Using the VOC budget method is usually successful, but can be time-consuming to document.


  • During Construction


  • Throughout construction, the GC should collect material safety data sheets (MSDS) from subcontractors and completed VOC tracking forms for all products used onsite associated with this credit.


  • Assign someone to be responsible for inputting the subcontractors’ tracking forms into the master spreadsheet. A LEED consultant or an administrative assistant in the GC’s office may be the best choice for this role. 


  • Review subcontractor product suggestions ahead of time to avoid the purchase of inappropriate materials and eliminate the need for costly change orders.


  • Streamline documentation and research by keeping a master spreadsheet of all the items being tracked for each material across MR and IEQ credits. For example, you may need to ask the millworker for regional information for MRc5, certified wood information for MRc7, and information about coatings installed on-site for IEQc4.1. If one spreadsheet collects all the data, it can streamline your documentation, associated research, and help with quality control. (See the Materials Calculator in the Documentation Toolkit.)


  • A master spreadsheet helps ease information collection for subcontractors, giving them a road map of exactly what types of information to collect for each product.  


  • The GC functions as the overall quality assurance provider for this credit. Responsibilities include conducting weekly reviews of subcontractor product safety data sheets and tracking forms, as well as spot checks in dumpsters to determine which products are actually being used.


  • Post signs at the construction site that reminds subcontractors to follow LEED requirements for low-VOC products. (See Documentation Toolkit for sample signs.) 


  • Schedule the application of paints and coatings so that off-gassing does not contaminate other absorptive materials. This is required if projects are attempting IEQc3.1: Construction Indoor Air Quality Plan—During Construction. For example, do not store or install acoustic ceiling tile before flooring and wall paints are put down, because ceiling tiles will absorb the off-gassing of paint and contaminate the air over a longer time period.


  • It is usually a good idea to do a “mini air flush” (if your project is not attempting IEQc3.2) before occupancy to help remove any lingering VOCs from the construction process. This can be as simple as putting industrial sized fans in the window and pumping in fresh air overnight or running the HVAC exhaust on high for a few days. (See IEQc3.2: Construction Indoor Air Quality Plan—Before Occupancy if the team wants to do a full flush-out for an additional LEED point.)


  • Transfer all the data collected in the master material tracking spreadsheet to the LEED Online form and upload the product cut sheets.

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Keep a list of compliant, low-emitting paints and coatings used on the project so that O&M staff can use these products for future renovations.

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    IEQ Credit 4.2: Low-emitting materials - paints and coatings

    1 Point

    Intent

    To reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants.

    Requirements

    Paints and coatings used on the interior of the building (i.e., inside of the weatherproofing system and applied onsite) must comply with the following criteria as applicable to the project scope1:

    • Architectural paints and coatings applied to interior walls and ceilings must not exceed the volatile organic compound (VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.) content limits established in Green Seal Standard GS-11, Paints, 1st Edition, May 20, 1993.
    • Anti-corrosive and anti-rust paints applied to interior ferrous metal substrates must not exceed the VOC content limit of 250 g/L (2 lb/gal) established in Green Seal Standard GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. -03, Anti-Corrosive Paints, 2nd Edition, January 7, 1997.
    • Clear wood finishes, floor coatings, stains, primers, sealersSealers are coatings applied to either block materials from penetrating into or leaching out of a substrate, to prevent subsequent coatings from being absorbed by the substrate, or to prevent harm to subsequent coatings by materials in the substrate., and shellacs applied to interior elements must not exceed the VOC content limits established in South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.) Rule 1113, Architectural Coatings, rules in effect on January 1, 2004.
    • Credit substitution available

      You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Specify low-VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. paints and coatings in construction documents. Ensure that VOC limits are clearly stated in each section of the specifications where paints and coatings are addressed. Track the VOC content of all interior paints and coatings during construction.

Organizations

Green Seal Standard 11 (GS–11)

Green Seal is an independent, nonprofit organization that strives to achieve a healthier and cleaner environment by identifying and promoting products and services that cause less toxic pollution and waste, conserve resources and habitats, and minimize global warming and ozone depletion. GS–36 sets VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits for commercial adhesives. 


South Coast Air Quality Management District

SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. is the air pollution control agency for all of Orange County and the urban portions of Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, the smoggiest region of the U.S. The organization is committed to protecting the health of residents, while remaining sensitive to businesses.


Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG) — Federal Green Construction Guide for Specifiers

Support on incorporating LEED requirements into specifications. 


Green Seal Environmental Criteria for Anti-Corrosive Paints (GC-03)

Green Seal is an independent, nonprofit organization that strives to achieve a healthier and cleaner environment by identifying and promoting products and services that cause less toxic pollution and waste, conserve resources and habitats, and minimize global warming and ozone depletion. This document outlines criteria for anti-corrosive paints and can be helpful in defining application type for products.


SCAQMD Rule 1113

SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. is the air pollution control agency for all of Orange County and the urban portions of Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, the smoggiest region of the U.S. The organization is committed to protecting the health of residents, while remaining sensitive to businesses. This document outlines criteria for clear wood finishes, floor coatings, stains, primers, sealersSealers are coatings applied to either block materials from penetrating into or leaching out of a substrate, to prevent subsequent coatings from being absorbed by the substrate, or to prevent harm to subsequent coatings by materials in the substrate. and shellacs, and can be helpful in defining application type for products.

Publications

Specifying LEED Requirements from ARCOM MasterSpec

Guidance and sample language on incorporating VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits into Specifications.

Materials Calculator

Teams can use this tool to track all materials across various MR and IEQ credits. It helps teams develop a roadmap of what information needs to be tracked for different products. It can also be used early on to create the baseline budget and ensure the products that are being used will apply to the various credit thresholds.

Environmental Materials Reporting Form

This is a materials tracking form that helps subcontractors record the environmental values of products they purchase. This can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. for filing.

Letter to Contractor for MR and IEQ Credits

Use a letter like this sample to orient the contractor to their responsibilities for all MR and IEQ credits. This letter is an introduction that can be customized for the credits your project is pursuing.

Low-Emitting Materials Reporting Form

This is a VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. tracking sheet that helps subcontractors record the low-emitting qualities of the products they purchase and can be distributed to each trade subcontractor and submitted to the GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. for filing. Use it specifically for earning low-emitting materials credits, but in conjunction with documentation for MR credits.

Jobsite Signs

Products with VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content not meeting credit requirements for VOC levels can inadvertently get used on the jobsite. A sign like this sample helps remind subcontractors and construction workers of their responsibilities.

Product Cut Sheets

Look to product cut sheets for information on the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content of paints and coatings. The example here clearly displays information needed for documentation, as well as an instance where more information is needed from the manufacturer.

VOC Budget Method

You can use the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. budget method to earn this credit by offsetting materials that go over the VOC limit with materials that are under it. The spreadsheet shown here, along with tips in the Getting It Done tab, demonstrates how to perform the budget method. This spreadsheet was completed by Mary Kay, LEED AP BD+C, a LEEDuser reader, and was approved by GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). on a LEED-NC v2.2 project.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 IEQ

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

Construction Submittal

HardhatDocumentation for this credit is part of the Construction Phase submittal.

597 Comments

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deborah lucking associate fentress architects
Apr 25 2017
LEEDuser Member
3455 Thumbs Up

40 CFR 59, Subpart D (EPA Method 24)

We have a traffic coating product that has VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. below 350g/L, and is compliant with 40 CFRCurrent facilities requirements: the implementation of the owner's project requirements, developed to confirm the owner's current operational needs and requirements. 59, Subpart D (EPA Method 24). I have not managed to find any information about whether this is acceptable under IEQc4.2.

Also, what is the "Ceiling Limit" in the SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. 113 table, and why/how is that different from "Current Limit"? The legend in SCAQMD rule 1113 makes some sense, but does not provide any information when that applies.

Thanks!

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Jun 26 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

Traffic Coatings max - 100 g/l

the effective dates are blank, therefore there is no change and none planned.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator Bywater Woodworks, Inc.
Mar 24 2017
Guest
244 Thumbs Up

phases of project & VOCs

we are a GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. working on a project that is the renovation of a historic bldg and that renovation started a very long time ago '(about 3 yrs ago) and about a year before the project was registered for LEED.

The project also includes a new building that will be adjoining to the old bldg. The project was registered for leed about 2 years ago (1 year or so after the 1st phase started). the phase II of the project which includes the real bulk of renovation and new construction work is what is registered for LEED certification. do we need to include all materials including VOCs for both phase I and phase II or just materials and vocs for products installed during phase II. What time does phase II start at time of registration or at time the phase Ii contract starts aug. 2016? thanks

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Mar 27 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

This is a bigger question than just this credit.

My assessment would be that you set your LEED project area and scope, and at the beginning of the project, all prerequisites and credit requirements begin from that point.

Therefore, if the LEED certification application is being made for the entire project, then all tracking and reporting begins at the design phase of the project overall.

But if work was done before the LEED certification was registered or contemplated, then the date of registration for the project would be your start date.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Mar 27 2017 Guest 244 Thumbs Up

Many Thanks John-David!

Yes the project was registered for LEED v2009 a long time after design was started and even after some of the Phase 1 work was started. My feeling is only this Phase II for which the project is registered under LEED should really apply. As Phase I was really just for repairing the existing building to make is structurally stable / sound like brick and mortar tear off and repair/replacement.

I appreciate your comments on this.
Regards,
Debra

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Celimar Fournier Project Engineer Turner Construction
Mar 14 2017
LEEDuser Member
14 Thumbs Up

Weld-Thru Primer

Project Location: United States

Our structural steel subcontractor is currently using a Sherwin Williams Weld-Thru Primer at the shop location. This is for anti-corrosive/rust purposes. I don't have to include this product as part of this credit, correct?

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Glen Phillips Director of Sustainable Education, GreenCE, Inc. Mar 14 2017 LEEDuser Expert 1595 Thumbs Up

The VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. requirements for NC 2009 apply to only site-applied coatings, so unless their shop is located inside the LEED project, it would be exempt.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Mar 17 2017 LEEDuser Expert 7053 Thumbs Up

When I encounter a shop-applied coating or primer, for steel or any other substrate, I always ask what product will be used if the shop coat gets damaged and requires on-site touch-up after delivery or installation. This situation is common for steel fabrications where welds, mechanical fasteners, or field modification must be re-primed on-site.

Many specifications say to use the same product for on-site touch-up as was applied in the shop. In such cases, I include the shop coating in the IEQc4.2 documentation. If one of these shop coats doesn’t meet the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits, I work with the design team and the contractor to find a compatible compliant repair product to use for on-site touch-up.

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Jason Biondi Managing Director, Energy Cost Solutions Group Mar 19 2017 LEEDuser Member 512 Thumbs Up

Yes, when these welded surfaces are re-primed, one needs to include "Structural Steel primer" for IEQc4.2.

You can document/qualify this coating as "Anti-Corrosive/ Anti-Rust Paint", the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit will be 250 g/l;

In our experience, we have found that Sherwin-Williams metal primer products are SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. compliant.

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Abdalla Anwar Lead Design Architect | Leed Green associate Nesma & Partners
Mar 01 2017
LEEDuser Member
71 Thumbs Up

aerosol paints

Project Location: Saudi Arabia

is there any requirements for aerosol paints? which might be used by construction team for marking junction boxes purposes (inside weatherproof).

the question is there any criteria regarding the aerosol paints (spray paints)?

Thanks in advance for your advise.

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Mar 01 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

See above:

How should handheld aerosol spray paints be handled?

Handheld aerosol spray paints are not covered by Green Seal GS-11 or SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. Rule 1113, the relevant standards under this credit. A CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide under LEED-NC v2.2 was issued that excluded spray paints from this credit, and there have been no rulings reversing this for LEED 2009 projects, although there is not officially a ruling one way or another that applies to LEED 2009. See LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #2486 2/10/2009.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Apr 19 2017 Guest 244 Thumbs Up

we have steel doors that will have a very nasty primer put on in the shop that has carbon black, formaldehyde1. Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring VOC found in small amounts in animals and plants but is carcinogenic and an irritant to most people when present in high concentrations, causing headaches, dizziness, mental impairment, and other symptoms. When present in the air at levels above 0.1 ppm, it can cause watery eyes; burning sensations in the eyes, nose, and throat; nausea; coughing; chest tightness; wheezing; skin rashes; and asthmatic and allergic reactions. 2. A known carcinogen with no known safe exposure level. Formaldehyde occurs naturally, but appears in unnaturally high concentra­tions in many buildings because it is an ingredient in binders used in many building materials and furnishings., cobalt based chemical and other nasty stuff. The mfgr provided a (M)SDS for a touch up/ rust inhibitor spray paint that will be used on site that has less nasty ingredients but VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.'s are given as 57% not in x g/l. Even though you say spray paints don't fall under LEED NC v2009, this is a rust inhibitor paint. VOCs are 57% by weight. Do I need to worry about this product for LEED NC v2009? (it's not a school or hospital.) THANKS!

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Luis Galvan Purchasing Agent Beck Cabinet
Feb 01 2017
Guest
5 Thumbs Up

LEED approved paints and coatins

Project Location: United States

If a lacquer or varnish meets the low VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. criteria required by IEQc4.2 but does not state that it qualifies to meet LEED requirments. Can it still be used for the project to attain the IEQc4.2 point?

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Feb 02 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

The documentation needs to state/verify that the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. requirements of SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. Rule 1113, not LEED.

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Mario S.
Jan 31 2017
LEEDuser Member
812 Thumbs Up

LEED 2009 IEQc4.2

Project Location: Lebanon

We have received a datasheet for a floor coating that do not state the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content. However, the product supplier provided an attestation from the technical department stating that the product has been tested according to LEED requirements and the resulting VOC content is less than 100 (LEED VOC threshold for floor coating).
My question: Is this acceptable for LEED documentation, or do we need to have the actual VOC content indicated?

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Jan 31 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

I have had Manufacturers Letters accepted.

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michelle bombeck Project Associate O'Brien & Company
Jan 24 2017
LEEDuser Member
202 Thumbs Up

Blackening process for steel?

A project of ours is specifying blackened steel for some of the steel in our building. The issue is that the touch up material used for field touch up after welding is highly toxic, despite having 0 VOCs. I don't think this falls under the scope of any LEED credits but our concern is for the workers who have to apply this nasty stuff - has anyone had used the Instablack 333 or Presto Black Gel or have any alternative products they'd suggest?

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Jan 24 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

It seems like a very specific product, but IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. inert after use - I would suggest OSHA approved respirators for field applicators, all unnecessary staff not to be in the area when work is being done, and high ventilation in work areas.

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michelle bombeck Project Associate, O'Brien & Company Jan 24 2017 LEEDuser Member 202 Thumbs Up

Thanks, John-David. I'll pass along your suggestions. Hopefully we'll find an different, more neutral product/process and can avoid the issue entirely!

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Artur Garcia ZERO CONSULTING
Jan 19 2017
LEEDuser Member
7 Thumbs Up

VOCs and regularly occupied spaces

Project Location: Spain

Hi, i'm working in a project of a refrigerated warehouse where most of the surface is not a regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use..
The question is: do non regularly occupied spacesEnclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces that are intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, and that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or nonregularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multioccupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or nondensely occupied spaces based on the concentration of occupants in the space. have to comply with credit requirements in order to achieve the credit? or is it only in regularly occupied spaces where we have to achieve VOCs thresholds.

Thanks

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Jan 19 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

Yes, all spaces that are part of the LEED building and inside the building envelope (inside air/vapour barrier) must comply with all IEQ Credit 4 credits.

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deborah lucking associate fentress architects
Jan 17 2017
LEEDuser Member
3455 Thumbs Up

Compliance to AIM regulations

We received a product submittal that claims "VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. compliant to current AIM regulations". The product is an "aliphatic acrylic-polyester polyurethane" (where have we seen this before? hmm), and the product data provides a list of metal substrates. The product description also states "....dull metallic finish that has excellent resistance to corrosion, chemicals and abrasion". Further down there is language alluding to "alignment of aluminum flakes in aluminum-filled finishes..."
Is this
1. an anti-corrosive/anti-rust paint (VOC limit 250 g/L)
2. an IM coating (VOC limit 100 g/L? or is it still 420 g/L?)
3. a metallic pigmented coating (VOC limit 500 g/L)

Is AIM a reference standard?

Thanks in advance for any expert guidance!

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Jan 18 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

I had not heard of AIM before, but here is what I found:

U.S. NATIONAL AIM RULE
"In 1998, the US EPA issued a nationwide Architectural and Industrial Maintenance (AIM) Coatings rule limiting emissions from volatile organic compounds (VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.) pursuant with the Clean Air Act. The purpose of this rule was based on the EPA’s determination that VOC emissions from the use of architectural coatings had the potential to contribute to ozone levels. Ozone is a major component of smog which had been found to cause negative health and environmental impacts when present in high concentrations at ground level. This rule required products manufactured on or after the implementation date to meet the VOC limits for the defined Architectural and Industrial Maintenance (AIM) coating categories."

For your supplementary Information, you must have a document (MSDS1. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) are detailed, written instructions documenting a method to achieve uniformity of performance. 2. A report that manufacturers of most products are required to make available to installers and purchasers, informing them of product information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures, the existence of potentially hazardous ingredients, and providing instructions for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of products,SDS,TDS,etc.) that states the VOC content in G/L.

As farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). as the category, ask the trade what they are using it for; otherwise, all the categories listed are inherently the same use, I would pick the one that seems most likely. I have never been questioned on the use of the product, especially for a product as obtuse as this.

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deborah lucking associate, fentress architects Jan 18 2017 LEEDuser Member 3455 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the prompt response, John-David!

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Jan 18 2017 Guest 244 Thumbs Up

Rule 1113 defines: "METALLIC PIGMENTED COATINGS are
decorative
coatings, excluding
industrial maintenance and roof coatings, containing at least 0.4 pounds per gallon
(48 grams/liter) of coating, as applied, of elemental metallic pigment (excluding
zinc)."
See http://www.aqmd.gov/docs/default-source/rule-book/reg-xi/r1113.pdf

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Mario S.
Dec 19 2016
LEEDuser Member
812 Thumbs Up

VOC Content Reporting

Project Location: Lebanon

We are working on a LEED project outside the U.S. The datasheets received for the paints and coatings state the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content in g/L excluding water as per ISO 11890-2:2006.
Can this be used to check compliance with IEQc4.2 materials VOC limits?

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Dec 19 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

Yes, I believe so, as per LEED V4 page 671:

"If a product cannot reasonably be tested as specified above, testing of VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content must comply with ASTMVoluntary standards development organization which creates source technical standards for materials, products, systems, and services D2369-10; ISO 11890, part 1; ASTM D6886-03; or ISO 11890-2."

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Mario S. Dec 20 2016 LEEDuser Member 812 Thumbs Up

Ok great, thanks John.

And does this apply to LEED v2009?

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Magda Aghababyan CEO Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd.
Dec 01 2016
LEEDuser Member
1241 Thumbs Up

Interior paint's VOC

Project Location: Sri Lanka

According to Green Seal Standard GS-11, Paints, 1st Edition, May 20, 1993 the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit for interior flat paint is 50 grams/liter of product minus water. We have a paint which falls under this category. The problem we have is the product's technical data sheet says the VOC is lower than 50 g/L. Therefore we have a doubt whether this is acceptable or not as it does not give the exact VOC.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 18 2017 LEEDuser Moderator

Magda, this sounds okay to me. You just need to be under the limit.

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Magda Aghababyan CEO, Co-Energi (Pvt) Ltd. Mar 13 2017 LEEDuser Member 1241 Thumbs Up

Thank you very much

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer Lile Engineering LLC
Sep 27 2016
LEEDuser Member
3218 Thumbs Up

Different VOC Formats

SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. generally lists paints in terms of grams per liter VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content. I have seen several paint manufacturers listing VOCs in other formats. For example I have a paint that is listed in the physical properties section of the MSDS1. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) are detailed, written instructions documenting a method to achieve uniformity of performance. 2. A report that manufacturers of most products are required to make available to installers and purchasers, informing them of product information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures, the existence of potentially hazardous ingredients, and providing instructions for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of products as, say, 500 grams per liter total weight, and 20% VOC less exempt solvents. Is it valid to do the math and say that 20%VOC times 500 grams/liter total weight is 100 grams per liter VOCs? Or will a reviewer reject this argument?

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Oct 13 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

I do not believe so, as per Rule 1113:

(d) Administrative Requirements
(3) Each container of any coating subject to this rule shall display the maximum VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content of the coating, as supplied, and after any thinning as recommended by the manufacturer. The VOC content of low-solids coatings shall be displayed as grams of VOC per liter of material (excluding any colorant added to the tint bases) and the VOC content of any other coating shall be displayed as grams of VOC per liter of coating (less water and less exempt compounds, and excluding any colorant added to tint bases). VOC content displayed may be calculated using product formulation data, or may be determined using the test method in subdivision (e). VOC content calculated from formulation data shall be adjusted by the manufacturer to account for cure volatiles (if any) and maximum VOC content within production batches.

The sales rep or manufacturer should be able to provide, in writing, the VOC content in g/l.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Jan 18 2017 Guest 244 Thumbs Up

Hi John and All,

I greatly appreciate your reply above and have a question that is related. We are a GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. on a LEED NC v2009 (non-school) project which registered on 1/15/16. The Specs call for a granite stone floor sealer that has VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate.'s which are expressed by the Mfgr as follows:
< 400 g/L (excluding water) for EPA purposes
< 10 g/L (including water) for LEED and US State Purposes (Low Solids
Coating)
The Mfgr. rep told me that SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. issued a Rule #1113 change in April 2009 which allows Low Solids Coatings to have max VOC's of 120 g/L including water. Then he said for Low Solids Coatings the VOCs can be in g/L including water. (which seems to be what you say above.) However if our project is a NC v2009 project which references SCAQMD Rule# 1113 7/1/05 and I believe any LEED CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide's after 7/1/05 up until our registration date 1/15/16.

Does LEED allow to use any SCAQMD Rule changes that would be in effect on 1/15/16 - at time of LEED registration? Does this product meet LEED NC v2009?

It seems to be a grey area.

Thank you!
Debra

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Jan 18 2017 Guest 244 Thumbs Up

I found a table where LEED does reference the low solids issue and thus it seems the product meets LEED.

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer Lile Engineering LLC
Sep 27 2016
LEEDuser Member
3218 Thumbs Up

Inverted Marking Paint

Project Location: United States

I've got a contractor who is just wild about Inverted Marking Paint - orange spray paint that can spray upside down. This stuff is in no way LEED compliant. Typically they will use it to mark demolition - say digging a ditch outside, or to mark a wall for demolition or a concrete sawcut. They've sprayed the ends of PVC pipes with it (don't ask me why), and used it various other places.

Now, obviously this isn't a building finish, and will be covered or gone with the demolition debris when the building is done. But this is also part of a pattern of this contractor grabbing whatever can of goop that is handy, instead of getting adhesives and coatings approved before letting them on site. Once we have an interior, I'm trying to get them to strictly use approved coatings.

I've busted their chops telling them they can't be using this stuff once there is an interior (currently we are pouring footings). I've been looking for an alternative, but so farFloor-area ratio is the density of nonresidential land use, exclusive of parking, measured as the total nonresidential building floor area divided by the total buildable land area available for nonresidential structures. For example, on a site with 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of buildable land area, an FAR of 1.0 would be 10,000 square feet (930 square meters) of building floor area. On the same site, an FAR of 1.5 would be 15,000 square feet (1395 square meters), an FAR of 2.0 would be 20,000 square feet (1860 square meters), and an FAR of 0.5 would be 5,000 square feet (465 square meters). haven't found anything that complies with SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. and might be useful for this kind of marking. Can anyone recommend an alternative? Or a way to shoehorn this into SCAQMD compliance?

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer, Lile Engineering LLC Sep 27 2016 LEEDuser Member 3218 Thumbs Up

In a related question, a similar product they use is an inverted spray clear coating. The Contractor will snap a chalk line on concrete, then spray with a clear coating. If for some reason we could argue that this was a "Waterproof Concrete Masonry Sealer" which is allowed 400 g/L VOCs, then it would comply with SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.. Is there any possibility this would fly? There is no other SCAQMD category that it seems to fit in.

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Oct 13 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

1st question: As the paint in question seems to be outside of the air/vapour barrier, I would not be concerned, nor is it required to be reported for review. If it were used inside the building, it would need to comply with "aerosol coatings" or utilize the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. budget calculation. (see comments in descriptions at top of page, Birds eye view)

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer, Lile Engineering LLC Oct 13 2016 LEEDuser Member 3218 Thumbs Up

So handheld cans of spray paint are exempt! This is something I never understood before. It sounds like I can ignore this type of paint completely per LEED interpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 2486.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator, Bywater Woodworks, Inc. Mar 01 2017 Guest 244 Thumbs Up

That CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide says: "Note, that while not a new requirement, please consider that the Environmental Protection Agency does have a new standard in place for aerosol coatings, EPA 40 CFRCurrent facilities requirements: the implementation of the owner's project requirements, developed to confirm the owner's current operational needs and requirements. Parts 51 and 59: National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol Coatings (effective December 13, 2007).

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Harry Flamm Project Architect and Sustainability Coordinator Elkus Manfredi Architects
Sep 20 2016
LEEDuser Member
133 Thumbs Up

Hot link to South Coast website rule is broken

Just a minor note that the link for "SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County. Rule 1113" listed above, to the left under Organizations in the Resources menu, no longer goes to the appropriate South Coast page. They changed the site. It needs redirecting. Thanks.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Sep 20 2016 LEEDuser Expert 7053 Thumbs Up
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Harry Flamm Project Architect and Sustainability Coordinator, Elkus Manfredi Architects Sep 21 2016 LEEDuser Member 133 Thumbs Up

Thanks Jon, appreciated.

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debra lombard sustainable design consulatnt & construction administrator Bywater Woodworks, Inc.
Sep 16 2016
Guest
244 Thumbs Up

VOCs from treated wood used inside the weatherproofing

Project Location: United States

LEED NC v2009 Comml Bldg

Does LEED concern itself with VOCs from treated wood used inside the weatherproofing? If so, what are the VOCs limits for treated wood?
Also, does LEED restrict the use of any particular type of wood treatment for use on wood that will be within the envelope?

Thanks!

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer, Lile Engineering LLC Sep 27 2016 LEEDuser Member 3218 Thumbs Up

I'm not aware that LEED is concerned with this issue.

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Oct 13 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

Yes, according to Rule 1113, Wood Preservatives maximum VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. 350 g/l

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Lawrence Lile Chief Engineer, Lile Engineering LLC Oct 13 2016 LEEDuser Member 3218 Thumbs Up

But would the rule only apply to wood preservatives applied on site? and not to, say, treated wood manufactured elsewhere?

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Oct 13 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

A bit of a grey area, a few elements to consider:
1. If IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. testing is to be performed, treated wood could create a fail,
2. The wood preservative would be required to be provided for EQc4.4, to comply with NAUF requirements,

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Kerem Mavioglu
Sep 11 2016
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VOC Limit for anticorrosive paints

Is there any other restrictions for anti-corrosive paints other than 250 g/l VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit in Leed V4? Is it enough for a paint product to have lower VOC value than 250 g/l to be leed V4 compliant?

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Sep 13 2016 LEEDuser Expert 7053 Thumbs Up

Kerem—LEEDv4 credit requirements differ considerably from LEED-2009. See LEEDuser’s v4 forums, starting with the EQ credit for Low Emitting Materials: http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-v4/EQc2. Paints and coatings affect several other credits as well, such as the MR credit for Building Product Disclosure and Optimization – Material Ingredients (http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-v4/MRc4).

For more information on LEEDv4, see the LEED Credit Library, http://www.usgbc.org/credits.

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SOHA YAMANI LEED Projects Coordinator Sustainable Solutions
Aug 08 2016
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VOC product category

Project Location: Egypt

we are trying to identify a product to check its VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit, however, the supplier identified the product as Prefabricated Architectural Multi- Component and touch up from RULE 1107. COATING OF METAL PARTS AND PRODUCTS while LEED only states rule 1113 of SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT DISTRICT and we can't categorize the product under rule 1113 , so my question is can we follow the voc limit states in RULE 1107 of SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT DISTRICT ??

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Aug 09 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

What is the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content, that is the determining factor, irregardless, of the RULE.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Aug 09 2016 LEEDuser Expert 7053 Thumbs Up

Soha—Will the coating that you are researching be applied onsite, or will this coating be applied off-site in a factory or workshop?

I ask because SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.-1107 “does not apply to the coating of architectural components coated at the structure.” This suggests that the coating may be intended only for in-shop application.

Because IEQc4.2 limits the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content of paints and coatings used “inside of the weatherproofing system and applied ONSITE,” any onsite application and onsite touch-up of shop-applied coating should comply with the VOC limits specified in GS-11-1993, GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. -03-1997, SCAQMD-1113-2004, CARBThe California Air Resources Board, part of the state government, is charged with maintaining clean air. This agency is unique at the state level: California was the only state that had such an agency before the passage of the federal Clean Air Act, and was allowed to keep it.-2007, or the other, international standards cited in IEQc4.2 credit requirements.

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SOHA YAMANI LEED Projects Coordinator Sustainable Solutions
Jun 15 2016
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voc for Damp proofing paints under ground

Project Location: Egypt

Hi all ,
do damp proofing paints that are used to paint concrete foundations, retaining walls, and column necks are considered inside the building ? as they will be under back fill and under grade ? should the vocA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit be considered for it ?

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Jul 02 2016 LEEDuser Expert 7053 Thumbs Up

Soha—IEQc4.2 limits the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content of “paints and coatings used on the interior of the building (i.e., inside of the weatherproofing system and applied onsite).”

Your “damp proofing” appears to be part of the building’s exterior weatherproofing system. It is applied to the exterior sides of concrete walls and seems never to be exposed to air on the interior of the building.

Based upon these assumptions, this appears to be an exterior coating that would NOT be subject to IEQc4.2’s VOC limits.

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Anastasia Makarenko EcoStandard
Jun 10 2016
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444 Thumbs Up

n/a

Does anyone know whether the waterproofing sealer used under the raised flooring to protect concrete slab needs to comply with VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. requirements?
Thank you in advance.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Jul 02 2016 LEEDuser Expert 7053 Thumbs Up

Anastasia—IEQc4.2 limits the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content of “paints and coatings used on the interior of the building (i.e., inside of the weatherproofing system and applied onsite).”

Your “waterproof sealer” does not appear to be part of the building’s exterior weatherproofing system. Its purpose seems to be to protect the slab from water originating above the slab, inside the building. I presume that this coating will be applied to the slab and that it will be exposed to air on the interior of the building at least until the installation of the raised flooring. Even then, many raised floor systems are designed to permit air circulation underneath.

Based upon these assumptions, this appears to be an interior coating that would be subject to IEQc4.2’s VOC limits.

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Sean Kirk Construction Specialist Amec Foster Wheeler
Mar 20 2016
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Galvanize Repair

Project Location: United States

Hello,

My project contains interior galvanized steel which will need repairing during installation. We have found a galvanizing repair compound but are unsure if this compound should be considered a coating or not for Credit 4.2: Low Emitting Materials - Paints & Coatings. The requirement states "Anti-corrosive and anti-rust paints applied to interior ferrous metal
substrates: Do not exceed the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. content limit of 250g/L established in
Green Seal Standard GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. -03, Anti-Corrosive Paints, Second Edition,
January 7, 1997." Because our steel is already galvanized will it fall under ferrous metal?

Thank you

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Jun 12 2016 LEEDuser Expert 7053 Thumbs Up

Sean—Typically, we use galvanizing repair paint to recoat areas where the zinc surface of galvanized steel has been damage, removed, or weakened, exposing the ferrous substrate below. Since the repair paint protects the ferrous substrate from corrosion, it meets the Green Seal GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. -03 definition of “Anti-Corrosive Paint” and must comply with the 250g/L VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit.

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Rafal Schurma principal, visio | architects and consultants Apr 28 2017 Guest 3 Thumbs Up

Jon, you mentioned that you use galvanizing repair paint to recoat areas where the zinc surface of galvanized steel has been damage. Do you know any specific product for this purpous that complies with the 250g/L VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit? Most of aerosol zinc coatings have >600g/L.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE May 07 2017 LEEDuser Expert 7053 Thumbs Up

Rafal – For IEQc4.2, LEED NC-2009 cites GS-11-1993, GCA General Contractor (GC) manages, coordinates, and oversees building construction; may perform some construction tasks; and is responsible for hiring and managing subcontractors. -03-1997, and SCAQMDSouth Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is the air pollution control agency that regulates stationary air pollution sources in parts of southern California, including Orange County and most of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside County.-1113-2004. Each of these standards exempts aerosol coatings, which SCAQMD defines as “pressurized coating product containing pigments or resins that dispenses product ingredients by means of a propellant, and is packaged in a disposable can for hand-held application, or for use in specialized equipment for ground marking and traffic marking applications.” Therefore, aerosols are not regulated by IEQc4.2.

That said, aerosol paint applications can be highly volatile and difficult to control. Using these products on-site may add significant doses of VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. to the building, and should be avoided as much as possible. Control of these products should be addressed in the construction IAQ management planA construction IAQ management plan outlines measures to minimize contamination in a specific project building during construction and describes procedures to flush the building of contaminants prior to occupancy. for IEQc3.1 to avoid fouling the air quality tests for IEQc3.2.

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Devanand Ragbir Mechanical Engineer Devserv Ltd
Feb 01 2016
LEEDuser Member
158 Thumbs Up

VOC limts and basement parking

Hi
My project has 2 level of basement parking with the standard vehicular access and egress ramp. Thre are also exhuast fans .
Does the VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limit apply for the basement floor sealant.
Thanks

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Feb 01 2016 LEEDuser Expert 7053 Thumbs Up

By definition, parking garages are not conditioned space and not included in the Gross Floor AreaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.). If the garage is open to the outdoors at all times, or if it is enclosed and provided with ventilation only, it is exempt from IEQc4. Underground parking garages that are “inside the exterior moisture protection envelope,” but “not technically interior space,” are exempt from IEQc4 because they are “unconditioned, non-regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use..” See LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #1767: http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=1767.

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Anna Okviana Total Bangun Persada Jul 26 2016 Guest 55 Thumbs Up

Hi Jon, If i do not wrong to interprete LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #1767 it's try to answer the question, so the statement "an unconditioned, non-regularly occupied spaceAn area where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. The one-hour timeframe is continuous and should be based on the time a typical occupant uses the space. For spaces that are not used daily, the one-hour timeframe should be based on the time a typical occupant spends in the space when it is in use., is exempt from EQc4.1" is part of the question. And the ruling from USGBC is...

The project may exclude the adhesive in question since
1) the garage is open to the outdoors at all times and thus is not technically an interior space and ---> (so if i have 6 level of basement with the standard vehicular access and egress ramp, is it still defined as exterior space?)

2) the occupied areas of the building are separated from the garage by solid, impenetrable walls. Applicable Internationally.

In my case, i have 6 level of basement like typical office building. So are we must use IEQc4.2 for corner guard coating for column parking?

Thanks before

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Jul 26 2016 LEEDuser Expert 7053 Thumbs Up

Anna—Adhesives, sealantsA sealant has adhesive properties and is formulated primarily to fill, seal, or waterproof gaps or joints between 2 surfaces. Sealants include sealant primers and caulks. (SCAQMD Rule 1168. )Sealants are used on wood, fabric, paper, corrugated paperboard, plastic foam and other materials with tiny openings, often microscopic, that may absorb or discharge gas or fluid., and coatings used in basement parking areas are NOT applicable to IEQc4:

. . 1. LEED’s definition of Gross Floor AreaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) explicitly excludes “floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles,” so a parking garage is NOT interior space.

. . 2. IEQp1 Option1 requires compliance with ASHRAE-62.1-2007. ASHRAE-62.1 requires parking garages that are attached to buildings to “limit the entry of vehicular exhaust into occupiable spaces” by maintaining a pressure differential, by using an airlock or vestibule at entries from the garage, or by other means “to minimize migration of air from the attached parking garage into the adjacent occupiable spaces of the building.” Therefore, there should be a barrier separating the parking garage from the building. (Many building codes and life safety regulations also require solid separation.)

Products used in the garage, outside this barrier, DO NOT count toward IEQc4.1 and IEQc4.2.

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Anna Okviana Total Bangun Persada Jul 28 2016 Guest 55 Thumbs Up

Thank you Jon, i can understanding now

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ARDOR GREEN ARDOR ARCHITECTS Jun 05 2017 LEEDuser Member

Hi Jon,
We have a multilevel basement garage also, but there may be some full time occupied security booths within the space for handing out parking tickets. Sometimes this property owner uses free standing booths with small AC units internally. Other times security persons simply stand by a desk and manually hand parking tickets to folks parking. Also, I'm wondering about any maintenance offices that might be built within this space. Seems because they are regularly occupied and conditioned "sub-spaces" that they would need to comply with VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. limits. Thoughts?

Thanks very much,
Doug
Hanoi, Vietam

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John-David Hutchison, LEED AP BD+C, PMP Sustainability Consultant, CSV Architects Jun 12 2017 LEEDuser Expert 4456 Thumbs Up

In my opinion, the key rule is the “outside the envelope", so I would say it is not necessary to meet all of the criteria of IEQ, but I would suggest, for the benefit of the construction workers and future employees, that you do as much as you can.

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ARDOR GREEN ARDOR ARCHITECTS Jun 14 2017 LEEDuser Member

John-David,

Thanks very much for the reply. We're reviewing the epoxy floor coating options now, so that's our chance to go as low VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. as possible.

Thanks again, Doug

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Al Malik Diamla Arch. I-Ecogreen
Jan 05 2016
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71 Thumbs Up

Putty in Paints

Good day everyone. I just wanted to ask in what product type is the putty that is being used in painting to level the surface. Thanks for the response

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Jun 28 2017
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