NC-2009 IEQc5: Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control

  • NC_Schools_IEQc5_Type1_IndoorPollutant Diagram
  • A smorgasbord of requirements

    This credit requires compliance with a varied group of items that cumulatively help keep pollutants out of the indoor air. These requirements include self-closing doors on janitors' closets, MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13 filtration on mechanical equipment, and entryway trackoff systems.

    Compliance will require the coordination of team members—including the mechanical engineer, architect, plumbing engineer, and contractor—and also impact project design and operations. The basic requirements are:

    • Permanent entryway walk-off systems at least 10 feet long (up from 6 feet in previous versions of LEED) at all regularly used, exterior-to-interior entrances and entrances from covered parking garages. (Roll-out mats are acceptable only if maintained on a weekly basis.) 
    • Designated exhaust of all hazardous gas and chemical use areas—including garages, housekeeping, janitors’ closets, laundry areas, science labs, art rooms, workshops, copy and printing rooms, and prep rooms.
    • An exhaust rate of 0.5 CFM/SF, with no air recirculation, in hazardous gas and chemical use areas.
    • Self-closing doors on all spaces outlined above.
    • Deck-to-deck partitions or hard-lid ceilings on all spaces outlined above.
    • MERV 13 filtration for each ventilation system serving regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. with outdoor air.
  • Keep dirt out!

    In addition to tobacco smoke, covered in IEQp2, one of the greatest sources of indoor pollutants is the dirt and other contaminants brought into buildings on people’s shoes. This material is tracked through the building interior, increasing the need and frequency for cleaning, and the wear on interior finishes. Dust can also be introduced into ventilation systems and distributed throughout a building, negatively effecting indoor air quality. 

    Fairly straightforward, but some pitfalls

    While it takes a lot of coordination to meet the many credit requirements, this is generally a low-cost credit. The most significant impact may come if MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13-compatible air-handling equipment is not initially specified, as redesigning mechanical systems can be costly. In some situations, especially when using heat pumps, HVAC systems cannot accept MERV 13 filters because they are not able to draw air through such a thick filter.

    MERV 13 filtration results in an energy-use trade-off. While MERV 13 filters offer a greater level of air filtration and, consequently, increased indoor air quality, they also increase resistance to airflow and fan energy loads. If you can separate space conditioning from ventilation and use radiant systems for all or most of the space conditioning, you can minimize this energy penalty.

  • Multifamily and hotel

    Multifamily residential and hotel projects may have difficulty achieving this credit due to the MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13 filtration requirement. These projects often do not have base-building HVAC systems; they use PTACs instead, which generally cannot be fitted with MERV 13 filters. If a project has forced air systems and MERV-13 filtration is not used, then you cannot pursue or achieve this credit. Naturally ventilated buildings do not have to meet the MERV 13 filtration requirement, as air filtration will not be part of system design.

  • Containment requirement has been removed

    When LEED 2009 was launched, this credit included language calling for containment drains in laboratory spaces where chemicals are mixed. However, the requirement was vague and it wasn't clear how to document it. Fortunately, in the July 2010 LEED addenda issued by USGBC, this requirement was removed.

    FAQs for IEQc5

    Should track-off mats being used on the project to meet IEQc5 requirements be included in IEQc4.3 credit requirements?

    There is no definitive information from USGBC on this one way or another. It is recommended that project teams do their best to find low-emitting options for IEQc5, and that IEQc4.3 compliance is recommended.

    However, LEEDuser has heard that project teams have had success not including track-off mats, such as the type with grilles and small strips of carpeting. Also, mats that are removed for cleaning are not permanently installed and thus not subject to credit requirements. If used as track-off surfaces, carpet tiles should be certified, however, and are available with the requisite certifications.

    What is the definition of a high-volume copier?

    There is not an official glossary definition that LEEDuser is aware of. However, various references indicate that LEED views "high volume" as one or more printers in an area totaling more than 40,000 copies (20,000 double sided) per month. The number is based on "expected" use, not capacity. This definition can be found in LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #1938 issued 1/7/2008, for example, and although that Interpretation is not applicable to LEED 2009, the number 40,000 has appeared in enough places that we view it as a solid number.

    Do I need to provide dedicated exhaust for my printer or copier?

    If the copiers print less than 40,000 pages/month (20,000 pages double-sided) you do not need to install dedicated exhaust, self-closing doors and deck-to-deck partitions. Additionally, if you use printers that do not emit VOC’s or other harmful contaminants into the indoor environment, you can make a case for exemption.

    I do not have 10' of space inside my building entrance to install a walk-off system. Can I include one on the exterior? Can the shape be irregular?

    LEED Interpretation #10098, dated 8/1/2011, states that "The intent for the entryway system (grilles, grates, walk-off mats) is to capture dirt and dust. An exception to the 10 foot length and/or indoor location is acceptable provided your alternative solution meets this intent and is thoroughly justified."

    Project teams have been successful including exterior mats that are protected from the weather and regularly cleaned. LEEDuser has not heard of a project successfully gaining an exception to the 10-foot requirement, however. In situations where an irregular shaped mat makes sense, teams should consider whether people entering the building will travel at least 10 feet over a mat, and not be able to short-circuit it. A short narrative explaining the impediments and how your solution meets the standard established by the LEED Interpretation is recommended.

    What does ‘regularly used exterior entrance’ mean and how do I know which of my building entrances falls under this category?

    These entrances are those that are used by building occupants on a regular basis. If your project has unique circumstances where certain building entrances are not regularly used or do not serve building occupants, they may be excluded. For example, emergency exits that are not used as regular entrances can often be excluded.

    Are entryway mats required for a building entrance from another building?

    LEED Interpretation #5266 made on 05/30/2007 states that the requirements are applicable only to entrances from the outdoors.

    Can I use carpet tile as a track-off system? What about carpet?

    Yes, carpet tile applies per LEED Interpretation Ruling #10252. Some project teams have preferred to use carpet tile due to ease of maintenance and avoidance of trip hazards. The carpet tile must be specifically designed for entryway systems. Regular carpeting that is not designed for this purpose and does not have regular cleaning is not applicable.

    Our building has a green cleaning program and is earning an ID credit for it, based on the LEED-EBOM IEQc3 requiremets. Can we skip the exhaust requirements for our janitor rooms?

    LEEDuser has not seen an official ruling on this, but our expert consensus is no.

    One, replacing a physical control with a policy control is a bit of a downgrade. Two, 100% avoidance of hazardous chemicals in cleaning is unlikely. The green cleaning purchasing credit in EBOM, for example, considers 30% good enough to earn the credit. Also, the thresholds, categories, and standards referenced in that credit will only go so far in preventing use of any cleaning supplies that might generate gases or chemicals that should be exhausted.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Identify programming requirements for special-use spaces such as high-volume copy rooms (40,000 pages or more per month), laboratories, art rooms, chemical storage, housekeeping areas, and other spaces that may expose occupants to hazardous materials. 

    • Remember that if you need additional ductwork for designated exhaust systems for these areas, you’ll need to allow space for it.
    • Include deck-to-deck partitions or hard-lid ceilings, and self-closing doors, in these spaces. 
    • Battery banks, such as uninterruptible power supplies (UPS), have to be segregated from other use areas.

  • Identify space requirements for entryway walk-off mats. Review the impact that the required ten-foot entryway systems will have on common areas, lobbies, and other interior spaces adjacent to building entries. Remember that the entryway systems have to be installed at all regularly used entrances from exterior spaces, including entrances from a covered parking garage into the building. 


  • The LEED Reference Guide states that entryway systems need to be on the interior of the building or in an interior vestibule. It is recommended that projects pursuing this credit with the intent of using an exterior entryway system (either permanent or rollout) consult the GBCI or your certification board via email to verify credit compliance. It is usually accepted that exterior walk-off systems are allowed if they are properly sheltered from weather; that would typically mean some kind of roof, but additional shelter may be warranted depending on local conditions.


  • Review the potential for using MERV 13 filtration on ventilation systems. Systems with low fan power or filtration size limits may not be able to accommodate MERV 13 filters. Also, many residential and hotel projects use PTACs, or similar packaged systems, which cannot accommodate MERV 13 filters. Any mechanical ventilation must be designed with MERV 13 filters in mind. 


  • If you can use radiant heating and cooling for space conditioning and separate that function from ventilation, you’ll be moving a lot less air and meeting the MERV 13 requirement won’t be nearly as big a deal, due to fewer and smaller ducts and filters.


  • Include mechanical engineers and design consultants for special-use spaces such as science labs early in the design process. 


  • This is usually a low-cost credit. However, the MERV 13 filtration requirement can increase operational costs for added energy use and more frequent filter changes. If your ventilation system is not typically sized to accommodate a MERV 13 filter, you may have to choose a new system or have one custom-designed, which can add cost. Customization may include resizing ductwork, increasing fan capacity to maintain air delivery despite the added resistance of MERV 13 filtration, or other modifications to system design

Schematic Design

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  • Design an adequate space for ten-foot entryway systems at all regularly accessed building entries. Evaluate all other building entrances—such as employee and service doors—for regular use, which may require entryway systems or roll-out mats.


  • Determine the type of entryway system that's best for your project. If you install permanent grates, grilles, or slotted entry systems, you will not be required to have a plan for cleaning, although those systems will still need periodic cleaning (less frequently than roll-off mats). However, if you decide to use rollout mats, you'll need to have a contract in place for weekly cleaning. The contract for weekly cleaning can be incorporated into any existing contract but must be clearly spelled out. 


  • While roll-off mats are acceptable, additional documentation (service contracts and schedules) is required to confirm that the mats will be cleaned on a weekly basis. They cost more up-front, but permanent entryway systems provide better performance, require less maintenance, and are easier to document for LEED compliance.


  • Entryway systems should be climate-specific. For example, regions with high rainfall may choose high void-volume mats—for trapping dirt below the mat surface and fast drying. In regions where mud and snow are a greater source of contaminants, open-loop entry mats may be more appropriate. 


  • Design in space for additional ductwork that might be needed to provide designated exhaust for all garages, high-volume copy rooms, janitors’ closets, science labs, workshops, art rooms, or any other spaces that may be used for mixing and storage of chemicals or hazardous materials. You need to design the exhaust system so that each space with hazardous material has negative pressure in respect to adjacent spaces. For each of these spaces, be sure to include self-closing doors, and deck-to-deck partitions or hard-lid ceilings. 


  • Strategies for space planning may include:

    • Stack common-use areas so that all janitors’ closets are located in the same place on each floor, then run a single exhaust duct vertically through the building for each exhaust fan to tie into.    
    • Add height to the deck-to-deck elevation to provide extra space above finished ceilings for ductwork.
    • Locate rooms identified as containing hazardous material adjacent to outside walls to reduce the need for more ductwork.

  • When planning for space allocation to meet credit requirements, consider strategies like merging exhaust systems into a single, main, designated exhaust, or stacking chemical use areas over each other on different floors to minimize ductwork. 


  • Provide adequate space for storage and containment of hazardous liquids. 


  • Hazardous storage containers should be located in a secure area outdoors and away from air intakes. 


  • Develop an outline of all the IEQc5 requirements that apply to your project, and confirm that the schematic design accommodates each one. 


  • Adding ductwork to meet credit requirements can add costs; incorporate space-planning strategies to minimize this issue. 

Design Development

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  • Once programming and space allocations have been determined, confirm that each of the relevant credit requirements is met, as detailed below.


  • Confirm that all mechanical ventilation systems can accommodate MERV 13 filtration on outdoor and make-up air supply. 


  • If roll-out mats are used, make selections appropriate to the climate. The following specifics are also recommended in the LEED Reference Guide: 

    • fire retardant ratings better than DOC-FF-1-70, such as NFPA-253, Class I and II   
    • electrostatic propensity levels < 2.5 kV 
    • a contract for weekly cleaning of roll-out mats (required).

  • Confirm that all mechanical ventilation systems can accommodate MERV 13 filtration on outdoor and make-up air supply. 


  • Confirm that chemical disposal areas meet local codes for separate drain lines or containment drains. 


  • Confirm that all chemical storage areas, high-volume copy rooms, etc. have:

    • deck-to-deck partition walls or hard-lid ceilings;
    • self-closing doors;
    • designated exhaust (no recirculation); and 
    • an exhaust rate of 0.5 CFM/SF, with a pressure differential in relation to surrounding spaces of at least 5 Pa (0.02 inches on water gauge), on average or, when doors are closed, 1 Pa (0.004 inches on water gauge), at a minimum.

  • Locate hazardous waste storage containers away from outdoor air intakes. 

Construction Documents

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  • Develop all required documentation for LEED submittal, including floor plans indicating locations and lengths of entryway systems, wall details (for deck-to-deck partitions), mechanical drawings showing locations of designated exhaust systems, and mechanical schedules specifying MERV 13 filtration. 


  • For all spaces that may contain hazardous gas (such as garages, janitors' closets, and labs), calculate exhaust rates to confirm adequate negative pressurization. The pressurization requirements are: 

    • an exhaust rate of 0.5 CFM/SF with a pressure differential in relation to surrounding spaces of at least 5 Pascals (Pa)—.02 inches on water gauge—on average;
    • and when doors are closed, 1 Pa—.004 inches on water gauge—at a minimum.

  • Include credit requirements in all appropriate specification sections. Include the general requirements in Division 1 and others in specialties or furnishings (for the entryway systems) and HVAC (for filtration and other mechanical requirements).


  • Projects that use their own maintenance staff for regular cleaning of rollout entryway systems must provide a cleaning schedule and narrative along with their documentation. 


  • Develop documentation customized for LEED submission—complete with LEED-related notes, callouts, and details—concurrently with the finalized construction documents. 


  • The contractor is the signatory for IEQc5, even though it's a design credit. Have the contractor review 100% of the construction documents to confirm compliance before completing the design submittal. Otherwise, the credit may have to be deferred until the construction submittal. 

Construction

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  • Use temporary ventilation systems instead of the permanent HVAC units during construction. This prevents contamination of new ductwork during the construction process. 


  • Use MERV 8 filtration on any permanent mechanical system equipment used during construction. This adds to construction management tasks and could easily be overlooked and lead to loss of the credit. (This requirement appears in the LEED Online credit form as of 10/09, even though it does not appear in the credit language or LEED Reference Guide.)


  • Make sure that compliance and coordination with this credit is called out in the IAQ management plan if your project is pursuing IEQc3.1: Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan—During Construction


  • Ventilation and exhaust systems and proper filtration should be included in the commissioning scope for the commissioning credits EAp1 and EAc3.  

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Provide appropriate training for maintaining entryway systems. If roll-out mats are used, maintain a weekly schedule for cleaning.


  • Provide adequate training and education for all O&M and cleaning staff in appropriate handling, use, storage, and disposal of hazardous liquids.


  • Provide appropriate resources and training for O&M personnel to maintain mechanical equipment with MERV 13 filters. 


  • Mechanical systems have to be commissioned to meet the commissioning prerequisite EAp1. The commissioning agent's scope should include confirming appropriate MERV ratings on filtration media and proper operation of designated exhaust systems. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    IEQ Credit 5: Indoor chemical and pollutant source control

    1 Point

    Intent

    To minimize building occupant exposure to potentially hazardous particulates and chemical pollutants.

    Requirements

    Design to minimize and control the entry of pollutants into buildings and later cross-contamination of regularly occupied areas through the following strategies:

    • Employ permanent entryway systems at least 10 feet (3 meters) long in the primary direction of travel to capture dirt and particulates entering the building at regularly used exterior entrances. Acceptable entryway systems include permanently installed grates, grill s and slotted systems that allow for cleaning underneath. Roll-out mats are acceptable only when maintained on a weekly basis by a contracted service organization.
    • Sufficiently exhaust each space where hazardous gases or chemicals may be present or used (e.g., garages, housekeeping and laundry areas, copying and printing rooms) to create negative pressure with respect to adjacent spaces when the doors to the room are closed. For each of these spaces, provide self-closing doors and deck-to-deck partitions or a hard-lid ceiling. The exhaust rate must be at least 0.50 cubic feet per minute (cfm) per square foot (0.15 cubic meters per minute per square meter) with no air recirculation. The pressure differential with the surrounding spaces must be at least 5 Pascals (Pa) (0.02 inches of water gauge) on average and 1 Pa (0.004 inches of water) at a minimum when the doors to the rooms are closed.
    • In mechanically ventilated buildings, each ventilation system that supplies outdoor air shall comply with the following:
      • Particle filters or air cleaning devices shall be provided to clean the outdoor air at any location prior to its introduction to occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space..
      • These filters or devices shall meet one of the following criteria:
        • Filtration media is rated at a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. ) of 13 or higher in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 52.2
        • Filtration media is Class F7 or higher, as defined by CEN Standard EN 779: 2002, Particulate air filters for general ventilation, Determination of the filtration performance
        • [East Asia ACP: Filtration Media]
        • Filtration media has a minimum dust spot efficiency of 80% or higher and greater than 98% arrestance on a particle size of 3–10 µg.
      • Clean air filtration media shall be installed in all air systems after completion of construction and prior to occupancy.

      Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

      East Asia ACP: Filtration Media

      Projects in East Asia may use filtration media classified as high efficiency (高中效过滤器) or higher as defined by Chinese standard GB/T 14295-2008 (空气过滤器).

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Design facility cleaning and maintenance areas with isolated exhaust systems for contaminants. Maintain physical isolation from the rest of the regularly occupied areas of the building. Install permanent architectural entryway systems such as grills or grates to prevent occupant-borne contaminants from entering the building. Install high-level filtration systems in air handling units processing both return air and outside supply air. Ensure that air handling units can accommodate required filter sizes and pressure drops.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

Web Tools

Janitorial Products Pollution Prevention Project

The Janitorial Products Pollution Prevention Project is a governmental and nonprofit project that provides fact sheets, tools, and links.


Design Tools for Schools - U.S. EPA

According to the website, IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Design Tools for Schools “provides both detailed guidance as well as links to other information resources to help design new schools as well as repair, renovate, and maintain existing facilities. Though its primary focus is on indoor air quality, it is also intended to encourage school districts to embrace the concept of designing High Performance Schools, an integrated, whole building approach to addressing a myriad of important—and sometimes competing—priorities, such as energy efficiency, indoor air quality, daylighting, materials efficiency, and safety, and doing so in the context of tight budgets and limited staff."

Publications

Keeping Pollutants Out: Entryway Design for Green Buildings

Environmental Building News feature article describing the benefits and design choices for entryway walk-off systems.


Air Filtration in Buildings

Environmental Building News feature article explaining the various types of air filters, how their performance is measured, and ways to optimize their effectiveness.


Air Filtration Can Make Breathing Easier

Facilitiesnet article covering the basics of air filtration, drawbacks and benefits, standard practices and basic concepts.


Air Filter, Inc. Table

Table of filtration efficiencies and their subsequent filtration properties and common applications. Good background on MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13 filtration.

Entryway Systems

A floor plan like this project example is required to document the presence of entryway track-off systems, length and location. Note that this sample shows six-foot entryway systems because the project predated LEED 2009. For LEED 2009, the systems need to be ten feet in length.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 IEQ

Sample LEED Online forms for all rating systems and versions are available on the USGBC website.

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

425 Comments

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ethen mcmanus
May 15 2016
Guest
50 Thumbs Up

MERV 13 filters

The third bullet of IEQ 5 states the following:

In mechanically ventilated buildings, each ventilation system that supplies outdoor air shall comply with the
following:
– Particle filters or air cleaning devices shall be provided to clean the outdoor air at any location prior to its introduction to occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space..
– These filters or devices shall be rated a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. ) of 13 or higher in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 52.2.

We have several AHUs (Air handling units) located on the roof of our building, and many FCUs (Fan Coil units) installed and located inside of our building. My understanding of the above is that we have to have MERV 13 filters only for the AHUs as they supplies outdoor air, and not the FCUs. Could someone please confirm?

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International May 16 2016 LEEDuser Member 3783 Thumbs Up

That is correct. Compliant filters are required on the AHUs, not on the FCUs.

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Anastasia Makarenko EcoStandard
Apr 28 2016
Guest
130 Thumbs Up

n/a

Dear all,
does anybody know if we should consider microbiology laboratory premises as a pollutant source for this credit?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Apr 28 2016 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

I would. I generally include any type of lab in this credit.

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Joyce Kelly Consultant, Architectural Fusion May 04 2016 LEEDuser Member 253 Thumbs Up

Hmmm... working on Environment & Natural Resources building with "teaching labs" that consist of lecture style arangement of furniture: chairs and tables lined up to face a presentation wall. No sinks, no fume hoods, no storage of chemicals of any kind. Pretty sure this is a classroom labelled "lab" because that word holds more appeal to these students. Guess I'd better clarify this in my narrative.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator May 04 2016 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

That sounds like the right approach. The word lab will raise a flag.

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Avery Colter Certified Energy Analyst Fard Engineers
Apr 26 2016
Guest
6 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE HVAC Apps Handbook Equation, Table 2, and Walls

Project Location: United States

I have a laundry room in a building which has no interior doors to other inhabited interior spaces, only an exterior door and exterior windows. A reviewer referred me to an equation in Section 53.5 of the 2011 ASHRAE HVAC Applications Handbook. I have the 2015 Handbook here, and an equation there in Section 53.7, adjusted for units, has the differential pressure in Pascals at the square of CFM of airflow divided by 27552 times the square of the leakage area in SF. To achieve 5 Pa, this means 371.16 CFM per square foot of leakage area. Table 2 lists exterior, stairwell and elevator shaft walls, but not interior walls to other types of spaces. Should I use the exterior wall numbers for interior walls not adjacent to stairwells or elevator shafts? And should I use the loose, average or tight numbers in Table 2?

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group May 05 2016 LEEDuser Expert 8837 Thumbs Up

I've never been asked to do the leakage for the SF of a wall. Just for the door. If you have windows then the window as well. The calculation is typically for the linear feet around the perimeter of the window/door rather than the sqft.

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Avery Colter Certified Energy Analyst Fard Engineers
Apr 25 2016
Guest
6 Thumbs Up

ASHRAE HVAC Apps Handbook Equation, Table 2, and Walls

Project Location: United States

OK, so a reviewer directed me to the 2011 ASHRAE HVAC Applications Handbook. I have the 2015 Handbook, and there in Section 53.7 is an equation which, adjusted for units, has differential Pa at CFM^2 / (27552 * SF^2). There is a Table 2 which lists leakage area ratios for walls and floors. I will assume a ceiling is like to a floor for this purpose. For walls, only exterior, stairwell and elevator shaft walls are listed in this table, and so I find it odd that this whole thing is being used mainly to determine underpressurization wrt an adjacent inhabited space. So should one consider interior walls not adjacent to stairwells or elevator shafts as like to exterior walls, and should one be using the loose, average, or tight ratios?

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Rita Haberman Brightworks
Apr 18 2016
LEEDuser Member
138 Thumbs Up

Residential Requirements

Hi all,

I am working on a graduate housing project that is all residential, and some apartments have doors directly to the outdoors. What are the walk-off mat alternate requirements in this case? We will provide walk-off mats to all other entries/corridors and it is only a few apartments that will need to meet an alternate compliance path.

My other question is can walk-off mats be an L-shape, such as leading in to a doorway on the right? We are looking into this because part of the corridor is exposed, so we need to push back the walk-off mat. It might not be 10' long unless we can use this L-shape option.

Thank you.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Apr 18 2016 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

I'm not aware of an alternate compliance path unless you think you can justify LEED Homes criteria below. As for the L-shape, that should be acceptable IF you have 10' along the path of travel including cutting the corner if that is likely.

8.2 Indoor contaminant control (1 point each, maximum 2 points). Select from the following measures:
a. Design and install permanent walk-off mats at each entry that are at least 4 feet in length and allow accessibility for cleaning (e.g., grating with catch basin).
b. Design a shoe removal and storage space near the primary entryway, separated from living areas. This space may not have wall-to-wall carpeting, and it must be large enough to accommodate a bench and at least two pairs of shoes per bedroom.
c. Install a central vacuum system with exhaust to the outdoors. Ensure that the exhaust is not near any ventilation air intake.

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Rita Haberman Brightworks Apr 20 2016 LEEDuser Member 138 Thumbs Up

Thanks, Michelle. We were also looking into the LEED for Homes requirement. I asked this question to LEED Coach also and apparently individual residences are not considered high traffic areas so we would not have to include walk-off mats!

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Bomin Kim Architect / Sustainability Coordinator Sasaki Associates
Apr 12 2016
LEEDuser Member
10 Thumbs Up

recessed walk off mat

We are specifying a recessed walk off mat for the building in the vestibule (8' long). I remember that if the walk off mat is 10', a point is granted. Do you know if the walk of mat needs to be recessed, or can we add a loose floor mat just inside the vestibule so the total length would be 8' + 2'? Or does the mat have to be recessed.
Thanks!

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Apr 12 2016 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

That should be fine, but you will need to demonstrate a weekly cleaning contract for the loose mat.

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Renee Shirey
Apr 06 2016
LEEDuser Member
3686 Thumbs Up

washer/dryer - what is actual issue, the exhaust or chemicals?

Project Location: United States

We have a project that has a washer & dryer in the corner of a building services room, for periodic/sporadic use. If the dryer vents directly out of the building (exterior wall) does this resolve the exhaust issue? Or is the requirement for dedicated exhaust actually related to the use of detergents? If the dryer vented outside, and it could be confirmed by the client that they would only use "green" cleaning agents, does this remove the requirements for this credit for this room? It is not clear what the actual issue is with "laundry rooms".

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Apr 06 2016 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

Laundry rooms are on the list due to cleaning supplies and exhaust, so I would say that exhausting the dryer would not be sufficient. If it's a hardship to meet the credit requirements for this project I would argue your case in the special circumstances or submit a CIR, but make sure you aren't storing cleaning supplies (bleach etc) in that room.

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Raj G
Mar 30 2016
Guest
2 Thumbs Up

IEQ Credit 5 - Supply Air Recirculation

In our project, we have a janitor room adjacent to a toilet and these both rooms have exhaust duct which are combined together & exhausted directly to outside without re circulation.

But, we have common a fan coil unit to these rooms (i.e, supply air is going to both rooms & return air is taking from both room). Also,fresh air is provided to these room via FCU (in false ceiling) and both rooms are negatively pressurized.

Our concern is that return air from janitor room is going to FCU & this same FCU is serving toilet also. Will this affect our IEQc5 credit ?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Mar 30 2016 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

Recirculation is not allowed for this credit.

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Apr 09 2016 LEEDuser Expert 8837 Thumbs Up

Why not just duct the return for the fan coil unit into the hallway. Then you wouldn't have the recirculation issue.

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Panda Aumpansub Energy Solutions Leader Havtech, Inc.
Mar 01 2016
LEEDuser Member
4 Thumbs Up

Garage Space - Negatively Pressurized Rooms

Project Location: United States

Hello there,

For garage spaces that are designed for CO/NO₂ monitoring and have a neutral (Exhaust air – Supply air = 0) pressurization.
Please clarify how the average pressure differential with the surrounding spaces should be calculated.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Mar 02 2016 LEEDuser Member 10501 Thumbs Up

In this case, you don't under pressure the garage space (often it is open to outside via the ramp, so it's impossible anyway). You must overpressurise the connected spaces so that the calculation of the airflow from a connected space (which is supplied more air than extracted) to the garage across cracks, grills and door undercuts shows a pressure difference as required by LEED. In the construction phase, you could even measure it.

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Ciaran McCabe
Feb 09 2016
LEEDuser Member
275 Thumbs Up

Printers

What happens if the printers are situated with the open plan office - not a dedicated room. Does the printer need to be a particular spec ?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Feb 10 2016 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

Typical desktop printers don't require any special treatment. Printers with 40,000 copies per month or more must be physically isolated in a room with negative pressure relative to surrounding areas per requirements listed in the credit language.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K
Feb 08 2016
LEEDuser Member
575 Thumbs Up

dedicated exhaust

Project Location: Poland

I would like to make sure what does "dedicated/designated exhaust" mean. Can all hazardous gas and chemical use areas have one exhaust system combined with the exhaust from toilets or does every kind of spece (eg. copy rooms, janitor room) have to have a separate system and fan?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Feb 08 2016 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

Dylan should confirm, but yes you can combine the exhaust with toilets. I'm less certain about whether you can also combine one hazardous/chemical use with another.

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Feb 12 2016 LEEDuser Expert 8837 Thumbs Up

Yes you can combine the exhaust systems.

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Ahmed Mosa Sustainability Consultant - Sustainable Design Researcher P&T Architects and Engineers
Feb 03 2016
LEEDuser Member
433 Thumbs Up

Entryway systems length - Why 10 Feet not 9?

Why Entryway systems are at least 10 feet not 9 or 8?

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Feb 03 2016 LEEDuser Expert 8837 Thumbs Up

10 is a proxy for 2 full steps per shoe from an average person. Eg. Left... right... left... right.. off

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Charles Nepps Charles Nepps Consulting Feb 03 2016 LEEDuser Member 1169 Thumbs Up

I always wondered what was magical about 10' as well. I did some looking online to see if there is any research has been done, and found some conducted by a mat manufacturer, but nothing suggesting 10' is optimal. Another site said about 52% of debris on shoes is eliminated in 10' (depending on composition of mat) and 100% in 30'. I'm assuming LEED adopted 10' as a reasonable distance and, as Dylan points out, is typically the distance of 2 full strides. I think the most effective mat is the one that comes with a sign that say "Wipe Your Feet!"....just like mom raised us to do. )

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Feb 03 2016 LEEDuser Expert 4655 Thumbs Up

A little history:

Neither LEED versions 2.0 nor 2.1 specified a minimum walk-off distance, but a 2003 LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. dictated, “the length should ensure that all foot traffic will encounter the entryway system.” In 2005, LEEDv2.2 set the minimum length at 6-feet (1.8 m). That was only about enough for “left-right” and little more than what many commercial properties provided for conventional, non-green buildings.

Ultimately, EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.-2008 & LEED-2009 increased the minimum to 10-feet (3 m), presumably for the reason that Dylan cites.

I have seen references that cite various percentages of dirt removal at various distances for various mat types. These numbers may have come from some kind of empirical research, but I have never been able to find a primary source for any of this data. However, it is intuitive that more mat is better than less.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Feb 04 2016 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

Dylan's wipe each foot twice explanation is the same I have heard from Steve Ashkin.

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Anastasia Makarenko EcoStandard
Jan 25 2016
Guest
130 Thumbs Up

revolving doors

Dear all,
could you please help me with the following question - on our project we have revolving doors with entryway systems installed, its diameter is 2,8 m. Entering way length through this door seems to be longer that 2,8 meters - i guess it would be approximately 3,5-3,7 m. Do we need to extend our entryway systems up to 3 meters? Will providing a narrative explaining my position work? I'm not quite sure about it, hope anyone could help me. Thanks in advance.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Jan 25 2016 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

This interpretation should help. It is ok to have your entry within the revolving door if the length is sufficient.

http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?clearsmartf=true&keys=2455

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant Taitem Engineering
Oct 13 2015
Guest
1707 Thumbs Up

pressure differential

How are people proving the differential pressure of applicable spaces in credit documentation? What tool is being used to determine the pressure differential, obviously not all projects will be doing blower door testing.

Thanks!
Courtney

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Oct 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert 8837 Thumbs Up

They don't actually require you show your work - you just check that you comply. There is an equation you can use to do the calculation for yourself. It is in the comments below.

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Deborah Locklair
Oct 09 2015
Guest
56 Thumbs Up

IEQc5 Walk-off mats and low volume printers clarification needed

Project Location: United States

We have a mixed use building major renovation on a Government site. There are shops and maintenance areas, some that have unique exhaust systems. Our designer has addressed these requirements. There are also a number of meeting rooms, office space of varying size from single senior staff as well as rooms with anywhere from 3 to 30 staff. No contract information was provided regarding walk-off mats or printers. During design, our client provided the following:
Walk-off mats:
1. Our client determined that our recessed walk-off grills should not be longer than 6 ft. To meet the requirement for this credit, can we add 4 ft of roll-off mats?
2. Additionally, the documentation requirements are that we provide the maintenance requirements for the roll-off mats (i.e. a minimum of weekly cleaning). Do we also have to provide documentation from our client that they have a contract to clean the mats weekly?

Low-volume printers:
1. Client indicates they will install low volume, convenience printers in areas designated for office workers supporting shops in our building and other shops in a industrial type area. These printers would be purchased under a separate contract. No further guidance was provided. Our designer has provided suggested locations in his design, providing one convenience printer per every 15-30 desks, but this is not part of his design requirements. The client has approved his design which shows the suggested convenience printer locations. Do we need to wait for the client to purchase printers or use the suggested locations provided in design?

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Oct 09 2015 LEEDuser Expert 8837 Thumbs Up

Regarding low-volume printers - no you don't need to wait for them to be purchased. LEED is a design tool and you are indicating your design intentA written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project. on most credits.

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Deborah Locklair Oct 09 2015 Guest 56 Thumbs Up

That answer sure does make my life easier, thanks!

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John Covello LEED AP BD+C, EBOM, LEED and Sustainability Manager Development Management Group
Oct 07 2015
LEEDuser Member
689 Thumbs Up

Open Air Lobby/Drop off

Project Location: Thailand

Hello,

I am working on a project in SE Asia. As with many resorts in SE Asia the lobby is sheltered but open to the exterior of the building. Does this count as the building interior or would entry way mats have to be placed at the interior of entrances to fully enclosed spaces?

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Michael Smithing Director - Green Building Advisory, Colliers International Oct 07 2015 LEEDuser Member 3783 Thumbs Up

The intent of the requirement is to remove contaminants from shoes before they are tracked into enclosed spaces and create indoor air quality issues. Typically these need to be inside the building, and precedent indicates that review teams take a quite strict view of the requirement for mats to be inside the building, although limited exceptions are made for renovated buildings.

That said, the regulations were not created with SE Asian architectural design in mind, and depending on the design, location and use of the property it may be possible to convince the review team that the credit intent is satisfied by placing mats at the entrance to the sheltered lobby. For example, It appears unlikely that this solution would be acceptable for an office building lobby in Bangkok where air pollution is high and dust will contaminate the lobby, while it may be acceptable at a remote island hotel where sand should be removed at the building entrance.

In any event, I would recommend submitting a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide to confirm the strategy if achieving the credit is important to your certification strategy.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Oct 07 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4655 Thumbs Up

LI#5219 addresses an issue similar to yours: http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=5219. Just as your question suggests, this ruling exempts open-air spaces, but requires walk-off provisions at entries into enclosed spaces.

However, because IEQc5 criteria have changed slightly since LEEDv2.2, portions of this interpretation may not be applicable to LEED-2009. To be safe, you may choose to request an interpretation from the USGBC citing LI#5219 and inquiring how this ruling might apply to your project’s specific conditions.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K Nov 17 2015 LEEDuser Member 575 Thumbs Up

Hi John,
Did you get any feedback from USGBC regarding this subject? In our project there is a dining room which is connected to an outside terrace. The terrace has a roof and a short surrounding wall and people can access it only from the inside. My case is in some way similar to yours and I would like to confirm if this kind of entrance between the terrace and the dining room need a 10feet long entryway mat?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Nov 17 2015 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

Balconies accessed only from the interior don't need entryway mats. I would apply that to a terrace as well.

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Margaret Manuel Tetra Tech Nov 17 2015 LEEDuser Member 122 Thumbs Up

Agata - We had a similar design, a dining room which is connected to an outside terrace. The terrace has an open grid/ trellis roof and a short surrounding wall with trellis. Similar scenario, people can access it only from the inside. However, there are gates for emergency egress. We did not provide a 10feet long entryway mat in this area and were awarded the credit. The USGBC reviewer questioned it, but we indicated these doorways would be exempt from the requirements of this credit as emergency exits or non-regularly used/available building entries.

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VEL MUTHU
Sep 29 2015
Guest
83 Thumbs Up

CONFUSED WITH FILTER RATING REQUIREMENT.

Hi,

I am working on a project where the design scheme follows las described below.
There are ERU’s which supplies the fresh air to AHU’s and FCU’s in the project. These AHU’s and FCU’s will take the fresh and will mix with the return air to serve the rooms.
1. With this arrangement do I need to consider MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13 filter in all my AHU’s FCU’s and ERU’s to comply with the credit requirement?
2. LEED 2009 BD+C supplemental update says’ Particle filters or air cleaning devices shall be provided to clean the outdoor air at any location prior to its introduction to occupied spaces’ which means installing MERV 13 in the ERU’s which supply the fresh air in to the building alone is sufficient to meet the credit requirement. Am I correct?
3. Considering MERV13 in all the FCU’s is possible? I have not seen any such FCU’s with MERV13 filters.
4. LEED 2009 BD+C supplemental update says’ Clean air filtration media shall be installed in all air systems after completion of construction and prior to occupancy’. Prior to occupancy, if we provide MERV-13 in all the ERU’s and AHU’s and MERV-6 in all the FCU’s. will this comply the credit requirement?
5. In this, project, there are many rooms i.e. retail areas, storage rooms, Janitor rooms etc. which will be considered for the exhaust requirement. If I provide a single exhaust for all these rooms and throw the exhaust air out of the building without mixing with air from any other regularly occupied room’s will I comply with the requirement?
Your response will help me a lot.
Thanks.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Sep 30 2015 LEEDuser Member 10501 Thumbs Up

As far as my memory goes, the bottom line is that you need to filter all air that you bring into the building from outside through MERV13 filters if that air can end up in an occupied space.

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CATALINA CABALLERO SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Sep 16 2015
LEEDuser Member
4474 Thumbs Up

Pharmacy, detox and dirty linen rooms in rehab facility

Is medical supply room or pharmacy or detox rooms or dirty linens rooms to be included in this calculation?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Sep 17 2015 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

I always include soiled utility, but it's somewhat of a judgement call. I would make the decision based on whether there is anything volatile in the room that could end up in the air, either as a chemical, particulate, or a smell.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Sep 17 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4655 Thumbs Up

You may find ASHRAE-170, Ventilation of Heath Care Facilities, to be a useful standard. It recommends ventilation parameters for various health care functions. These parameters primarily address odor and infection control, but they may provide insight for handling IEQc5.

For example, the 2013 edition recommends that soiled linen and decontamination rooms be under negative pressure, with all room air exhausting directly outdoors. Therefore, if you determined that the contaminants in these rooms meet IEQc5’s criteria, you could enclose and exhaust these rooms to meet the credit requirements.

By contrast, ASHRAE-170 recommends that most types of pharmacies be under positive pressure, so IEQc5’s negative pressure differentials would be inappropriate. ASHRAE-170 sets no requirements for medication rooms, but I have seen other standards that treat them the same as pharmacies.

Some jurisdictions have adopted ASHRAE-170 or similar standards as Code. Check local regulations.

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS. INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ
Sep 14 2015
LEEDuser Member
953 Thumbs Up

Post construction HVAC modifications

Hi,
We have a building in the construction review response instance. We are responding every comment, but we want to get more points to achieve Silver Certification. One of the credits we are considering to attempt for is the IEQ-C5, but our building already is constructed so we would have to make some changes in the HVAC project and construction itself, for instance to change intake air filters to MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13 and we will have to include some exhaust systems in some specific spaces as the credit asks for.
Is it possible, after construction submittal, to make this changes and earn the credit?,
Thank you,

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Helen Kessler President, HJKessler Associates Sep 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 600 Thumbs Up

You can apply for a new credit after the first construction review. However, this one could be challenging. It has a lot of parts, as you know, so you would need to make sure that you meet each requirement. It could also be expensive if you need to add exhaust, deck to deck partitions and self-closing doors, not to mention the MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13 filter banks. If you don't meet all of the requirements on the first try, I believe that you would need to file an appeal if you still want the credit.

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Renee Shirey Sep 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 3686 Thumbs Up

I agree with Helen that this might be a challenging credit to do after the fact. Keep in mind that the addition of MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. filters, etc. may have a negative effect on your energy efficiency - so make sure you wouldn't lose any points in EAp2/EAc1 in an effort to gain a point somewhere else. If you haven't already looked into it, I would consider talking to the client about EAc6 Green Power. It wouldn't require any construction changes, and depending on how efficient your building is, can be less expensive than you may think.

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PAULA HERNANDEZ MRS., INGENIERO MARIO PEDRO HERNANDEZ Sep 15 2015 LEEDuser Member 953 Thumbs Up

Thank you Helen and Renee, I was thinking the same thing.

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SAMY Chamy Enginneer T&T Green
Aug 31 2015
Guest
306 Thumbs Up

How to Get this credit For VRF System

Project Location: India

Hai:-

Our project is sewing factory we already provide entryway mate and Exhaust as required, VRF system is used for A/c

1.Is it enough to attend this credit

2. Is MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13 Filter is mandatory to attend this credit

3.Kindly tell what are the things are mandatory to get this credit

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Aug 31 2015 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

Yes MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13 filters are required. The other mandatory requirements may be found at http://www.leeduser.com/credit/NC-2009/IEQc5?page=0#lang-tab

I found this article regarding VRF and LEED, with the caveat that I am not endorsing it.
http://news.mehvac.com/WhitePapers/Installing_VRF_White_Paper.pdf

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SAMY Chamy Enginneer, T&T Green Sep 08 2015 Guest 306 Thumbs Up

1.How we achieve this credit when we use VRF
2.Is there any alternate compliance path or CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide related to this issue
3.Other than MERVMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 13 we do all other mandatory things listed in LEED
ref guide
4.Kindly give some tips to get this credit

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Sep 08 2015 LEEDuser Expert 8837 Thumbs Up

MervMinimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating is an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) measurement scale which rates the effectiveness of air filters. 8 filters on the fan coil units. Merv 13 on your outside air unit or intakes. If you are ventilating by natural ventilation then your proabably can't get this credit. With a dedicated outside air unit this is easy.

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SAMY Chamy Enginneer, T&T Green Sep 16 2015 Guest 306 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your support,

1.It is ok for A/c Areas and what we attend for Ventilated areas (mechanical Ventilation include fresh air, Exhaust,)
2.How we attend this credit with Evaporative cooling

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SAMY Chamy Enginneer, T&T Green Sep 21 2015 Guest 306 Thumbs Up

Awaiting for your reply

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Charles Nepps Charles Nepps Consulting
Aug 21 2015
LEEDuser Member
1169 Thumbs Up

Janitor Closets

Do all janitor closets on a project need to meet the requirements of the credit, or can you exempt some closets by having a policy of only storing cleaning supplies in certain designated rooms?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Aug 21 2015 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

You may have a tough time making that argument. You would need to make a case that cleaners are not mixed or disposed of in that janitor closet. The bottom line is, is there potential exposure to occupants from activities in that room?

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Aaron Levine Architectural Designer Sagan Piechota Architecture
Aug 14 2015
LEEDuser Member
32 Thumbs Up

Walk-Off on exterior and interior

Project Location: United States

An earlier comment said that, "LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #10098 seems to be saying that, if your entry system is at the exterior &/or less than 10 feet long, you will need to write a darned good justification explaining how your alternative approach is every bit as good as (and better than) the prescribed 10-foot indoor system".

What about providing half of the walk-off on the exterior through a grate or scored paving for larger particulates that you never want entering the building, and the other half as a finishing area/mat to clean the particulates that were not already taken off just outside the entrance? This method is advocated by the Living Building Challenge and seems to make sense from both a maintenance and cleanliness point of view.

If provided with documentation of this half-exterior / half-interior walk-off system, would this justify the alternative approach for the #10098 exception?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Aug 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

It's worth a try with plenty of support including precedent with LBC. The worst that can happen is the reviewers could reject it. It sounds like you don't plan to put a 10' mat inside regardless.

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Aaron Levine Architectural Designer, Sagan Piechota Architecture Aug 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 32 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the reply, Michelle. Do you know of projects with alternative walk-off systems that have been granted this exception for reference?

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Aug 14 2015 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

I am not aware of any specific projects. Document any research that shows the benefit of a grate outside versus having a 10' entryway on the inside. Are you sure you can't install a 10' rollout mat on the inside and contract for weekly cleaning? Or a combination of grate and rollout mat indoors, I would is acceptable.

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Aaron Levine Architectural Designer, Sagan Piechota Architecture Aug 17 2015 LEEDuser Member 32 Thumbs Up

Yeah, it's not really an option for our project.

On a related note, do you have any guidance on how scored stone can act as a substitute for grating as a part of the walk-of distance? We have stone at our entry way and rather than inserting a grate would prefer to keep our material the same. Thanks again!

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Aug 18 2015 LEEDuser Expert 926 Thumbs Up

Go back to the credit intent, which is to source control fo indoor contaminants to prevent occupant exposure. 80% of contaminants, specifically particulates, come into a building from feet upon entry. You are clearly attempting something that departs significantly from the credit requirements. In this case I recommend you design the best possible solution that addresses the intent, fully justify how your solution meets the credit intent, and wait to see what the reviewers say. This argument will be much stronger if you find research, examples, or expert opions. Focus less on whether what you do will be acceptable to reviewers, and more on the best solution to protect building occupants.

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Aaron Levine Architectural Designer, Sagan Piechota Architecture Aug 18 2015 LEEDuser Member 32 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your comments! We are not attempting to depart from the credit requirements as they relate to keeping dirt out of a building and building air, which is the intent.

We are simply trying to understand the logic behind the method for achieving this result, as we have found varied recommendations for walk-off surfaces that deviate from LEED, such as those recommended by the Living Building Challenge (LBC) under their "Health and Happiness" petal. It's helpful to know what is/is not possible before bringing our recommendations to the client.

Thanks again, Michelle!

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Aug 20 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4655 Thumbs Up

Why not?

To use an alternate compliance path, LEEDonline requires a narrative to justify the approach. The first step to ANY such narrative should be to address WHY the prescribed approach is “not an option.” Next, describe the alternative used, and finally, provide “justification that this path meets the credit intent and requirements.” As Michelle suggests, provide research, empirical data, or other evidence comparing your strategy to the prescribed approach.

I have not sought this path, but I have used the outline above to draft “darned good” justifications for other credits.

If you choose to pursue an alternative approach, you may wish to submit a formal inquiry describing your proposal prior to implementation to confirm that it is acceptable.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Aug 19 2015 LEEDuser Expert 4655 Thumbs Up

To best understand LI#10098, read it in its entirety, as well as the related IEQc5 Rulings that it supersedes: http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=10098. Recognize that LI#10098 applies only under extraordinary circumstances such as existing conditions that restrict the available space. (See the July 23 post farther down this page.) If your project has constraints that preclude the required mat, these may be your “WHY.”

The link above includes several older, more flexible rulings that once allowed configurations similar to what you describe. These strategies may still be acceptable if you first meet the “physical impediments” criteria in LI#10098.

Also at the link above, LI#6093 is an ancient Ruling, not applicable to LEED-2009, but it describes three criteria for evaluating entry systems that may still be relevant when comparing strategies. (Beware: Parts of this Ruling are seriously outdated.) LEEDv4 also emphasizes cleanability.

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May 27 2016
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