NC-2009 IEQc5: Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control

  • NC_Schools_IEQc5_Type1_IndoorPollutant Diagram
  • A smorgasbord of requirements

    This credit requires compliance with a varied group of items that cumulatively help keep pollutants out of the indoor air. These requirements include self-closing doors on janitors' closets, MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filtration on mechanical equipment, and entryway trackoff systems.

    Compliance will require the coordination of team members—including the mechanical engineer, architect, plumbing engineer, and contractor—and also impact project design and operations. The basic requirements are:

    • Permanent entryway walk-off systems at least 10 feet long (up from 6 feet in previous versions of LEED) at all regularly used, exterior-to-interior entrances and entrances from covered parking garages. (Roll-out mats are acceptable only if maintained on a weekly basis.) 
    • Designated exhaust of all hazardous gas and chemical use areas—including garages, housekeeping, janitors’ closets, laundry areas, science labs, art rooms, workshops, copy and printing rooms, and prep rooms.
    • An exhaust rate of 0.5 CFM/SF, with no air recirculation, in hazardous gas and chemical use areas.
    • Self-closing doors on all spaces outlined above.
    • Deck-to-deck partitions or hard-lid ceilings on all spaces outlined above.
    • MERV 13 filtration for each ventilation system serving regularly occupied spacesRegularly occupied spaces are areas where one or more individuals normally spend time (more than one hour per person per day on average) seated or standing as they work, study, or perform other focused activities inside a building. with outdoor air.
  • Keep dirt out!

    In addition to tobacco smoke, covered in IEQp2, one of the greatest sources of indoor pollutants is the dirt and other contaminants brought into buildings on people’s shoes. This material is tracked through the building interior, increasing the need and frequency for cleaning, and the wear on interior finishes. Dust can also be introduced into ventilation systems and distributed throughout a building, negatively effecting indoor air quality. 

    Fairly straightforward, but some pitfalls

    While it takes a lot of coordination to meet the many credit requirements, this is generally a low-cost credit. The most significant impact may come if MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13-compatible air-handling equipment is not initially specified, as redesigning mechanical systems can be costly. In some situations, especially when using heat pumps, HVAC systems cannot accept MERV 13 filters because they are not able to draw air through such a thick filter.

    MERV 13 filtration results in an energy-use trade-off. While MERV 13 filters offer a greater level of air filtration and, consequently, increased indoor air quality, they also increase resistance to airflow and fan energy loads. If you can separate space conditioning from ventilation and use radiant systems for all or most of the space conditioning, you can minimize this energy penalty.

  • Multifamily and hotel

    Multifamily residential and hotel projects may have difficulty achieving this credit due to the MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filtration requirement. These projects often do not have base-building HVAC systems; they use PTACs instead, which generally cannot be fitted with MERV 13 filters. If a project has forced air systems and MERV-13 filtration is not used, then you cannot pursue or achieve this credit. Naturally ventilated buildings do not have to meet the MERV 13 filtration requirement, as air filtration will not be part of system design.

  • Containment requirement has been removed

    When LEED 2009 was launched, this credit included language calling for containment drains in laboratory spaces where chemicals are mixed. However, the requirement was vague and it wasn't clear how to document it. Fortunately, in the July 2010 LEED addenda issued by USGBC, this requirement was removed.

    FAQs for IEQc5

    Should track-off mats being used on the project to meet IEQc5 requirements be included in IEQc4.3 credit requirements?

    There is no definitive information from USGBC on this one way or another. It is recommended that project teams do their best to find low-emitting options for IEQc5, and that IEQc4.3 compliance is recommended.

    However, LEEDuser has heard that project teams have had success not including track-off mats, such as the type with grilles and small strips of carpeting. Also, mats that are removed for cleaning are not permanently installed and thus not subject to credit requirements. If used as track-off surfaces, carpet tiles should be certified, however, and are available with the requisite certifications.

    What is the definition of a high-volume copier?

    There is not an official glossary definition that LEEDuser is aware of. However, various references indicate that LEED views "high volume" as one or more printers in an area totaling more than 40,000 copies (20,000 double sided) per month. The number is based on "expected" use, not capacity. This definition can be found in LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #1938 issued 1/7/2008, for example, and although that Interpretation is not applicable to LEED 2009, the number 40,000 has appeared in enough places that we view it as a solid number.

    Do I need to provide dedicated exhaust for my printer or copier?

    If the copiers print less than 40,000 pages/month (20,000 pages double-sided) you do not need to install dedicated exhaust, self-closing doors and deck-to-deck partitions. Additionally, if you use printers that do not emit VOC’s or other harmful contaminants into the indoor environment, you can make a case for exemption.

    I do not have 10' of space inside my building entrance to install a walk-off system. Can I include one on the exterior? Can the shape be irregular?

    LEED Interpretation #10098, dated 8/1/2011, states that "The intent for the entryway system (grilles, grates, walk-off mats) is to capture dirt and dust. An exception to the 10 foot length and/or indoor location is acceptable provided your alternative solution meets this intent and is thoroughly justified."

    Project teams have been successful including exterior mats that are protected from the weather and regularly cleaned. LEEDuser has not heard of a project successfully gaining an exception to the 10-foot requirement, however. In situations where an irregular shaped mat makes sense, teams should consider whether people entering the building will travel at least 10 feet over a mat, and not be able to short-circuit it. A short narrative explaining the impediments and how your solution meets the standard established by the LEED Interpretation is recommended.

    What does ‘regularly used exterior entrance’ mean and how do I know which of my building entrances falls under this category?

    These entrances are those that are used by building occupants on a regular basis. If your project has unique circumstances where certain building entrances are not regularly used or do not serve building occupants, they may be excluded. For example, emergency exits that are not used as regular entrances can often be excluded.

    Are entryway mats required for a building entrance from another building?

    LEED Interpretation #5266 made on 05/30/2007 states that the requirements are applicable only to entrances from the outdoors.

    Can I use carpet tile as a track-off system? What about carpet?

    Yes, carpet tile applies per LEED Interpretation Ruling #10252. Some project teams have preferred to use carpet tile due to ease of maintenance and avoidance of trip hazards. The carpet tile must be specifically designed for entryway systems. Regular carpeting that is not designed for this purpose and does not have regular cleaning is not applicable.

    Our building has a green cleaning program and is earning an ID credit for it, based on the LEED-EBOM IEQc3 requiremets. Can we skip the exhaust requirements for our janitor rooms?

    LEEDuser has not seen an official ruling on this, but our expert consensus is no.

    One, replacing a physical control with a policy control is a bit of a downgrade. Two, 100% avoidance of hazardous chemicals in cleaning is unlikely. The green cleaning purchasing credit in EBOM, for example, considers 30% good enough to earn the credit. Also, the thresholds, categories, and standards referenced in that credit will only go so far in preventing use of any cleaning supplies that might generate gases or chemicals that should be exhausted.

Legend

  • Best Practices
  • Gotcha
  • Action Steps
  • Cost Tip

Pre-Design

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  • Identify programming requirements for special-use spaces such as high-volume copy rooms (40,000 pages or more per month), laboratories, art rooms, chemical storage, housekeeping areas, and other spaces that may expose occupants to hazardous materials. 

    • Remember that if you need additional ductwork for designated exhaust systems for these areas, you’ll need to allow space for it.
    • Include deck-to-deck partitions or hard-lid ceilings, and self-closing doors, in these spaces. 
    • Battery banks, such as uninterruptible power supplies (UPS), have to be segregated from other use areas.

  • Identify space requirements for entryway walk-off mats. Review the impact that the required ten-foot entryway systems will have on common areas, lobbies, and other interior spaces adjacent to building entries. Remember that the entryway systems have to be installed at all regularly used entrances from exterior spaces, including entrances from a covered parking garage into the building. 


  • The LEED Reference Guide states that entryway systems need to be on the interior of the building or in an interior vestibule. It is recommended that projects pursuing this credit with the intent of using an exterior entryway system (either permanent or rollout) consult the GBCI or your certification board via email to verify credit compliance. It is usually accepted that exterior walk-off systems are allowed if they are properly sheltered from weather; that would typically mean some kind of roof, but additional shelter may be warranted depending on local conditions.


  • Review the potential for using MERV 13 filtration on ventilation systems. Systems with low fan power or filtration size limits may not be able to accommodate MERV 13 filters. Also, many residential and hotel projects use PTACs, or similar packaged systems, which cannot accommodate MERV 13 filters. Any mechanical ventilation must be designed with MERV 13 filters in mind. 


  • If you can use radiant heating and cooling for space conditioning and separate that function from ventilation, you’ll be moving a lot less air and meeting the MERV 13 requirement won’t be nearly as big a deal, due to fewer and smaller ducts and filters.


  • Include mechanical engineers and design consultants for special-use spaces such as science labs early in the design process. 


  • This is usually a low-cost credit. However, the MERV 13 filtration requirement can increase operational costs for added energy use and more frequent filter changes. If your ventilation system is not typically sized to accommodate a MERV 13 filter, you may have to choose a new system or have one custom-designed, which can add cost. Customization may include resizing ductwork, increasing fan capacity to maintain air delivery despite the added resistance of MERV 13 filtration, or other modifications to system design

Schematic Design

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  • Design an adequate space for ten-foot entryway systems at all regularly accessed building entries. Evaluate all other building entrances—such as employee and service doors—for regular use, which may require entryway systems or roll-out mats.


  • Determine the type of entryway system that's best for your project. If you install permanent grates, grilles, or slotted entry systems, you will not be required to have a plan for cleaning, although those systems will still need periodic cleaning (less frequently than roll-off mats). However, if you decide to use rollout mats, you'll need to have a contract in place for weekly cleaning. The contract for weekly cleaning can be incorporated into any existing contract but must be clearly spelled out. 


  • While roll-off mats are acceptable, additional documentation (service contracts and schedules) is required to confirm that the mats will be cleaned on a weekly basis. They cost more up-front, but permanent entryway systems provide better performance, require less maintenance, and are easier to document for LEED compliance.


  • Entryway systems should be climate-specific. For example, regions with high rainfall may choose high void-volume mats—for trapping dirt below the mat surface and fast drying. In regions where mud and snow are a greater source of contaminants, open-loop entry mats may be more appropriate. 


  • Design in space for additional ductwork that might be needed to provide designated exhaust for all garages, high-volume copy rooms, janitors’ closets, science labs, workshops, art rooms, or any other spaces that may be used for mixing and storage of chemicals or hazardous materials. You need to design the exhaust system so that each space with hazardous material has negative pressure in respect to adjacent spaces. For each of these spaces, be sure to include self-closing doors, and deck-to-deck partitions or hard-lid ceilings. 


  • Strategies for space planning may include:

    • Stack common-use areas so that all janitors’ closets are located in the same place on each floor, then run a single exhaust duct vertically through the building for each exhaust fan to tie into.    
    • Add height to the deck-to-deck elevation to provide extra space above finished ceilings for ductwork.
    • Locate rooms identified as containing hazardous material adjacent to outside walls to reduce the need for more ductwork.

  • When planning for space allocation to meet credit requirements, consider strategies like merging exhaust systems into a single, main, designated exhaust, or stacking chemical use areas over each other on different floors to minimize ductwork. 


  • Provide adequate space for storage and containment of hazardous liquids. 


  • Hazardous storage containers should be located in a secure area outdoors and away from air intakes. 


  • Develop an outline of all the IEQc5 requirements that apply to your project, and confirm that the schematic design accommodates each one. 


  • Adding ductwork to meet credit requirements can add costs; incorporate space-planning strategies to minimize this issue. 

Design Development

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  • Once programming and space allocations have been determined, confirm that each of the relevant credit requirements is met, as detailed below.


  • Confirm that all mechanical ventilation systems can accommodate MERV 13 filtration on outdoor and make-up air supply. 


  • If roll-out mats are used, make selections appropriate to the climate. The following specifics are also recommended in the LEED Reference Guide: 

    • fire retardant ratings better than DOC-FF-1-70, such as NFPA-253, Class I and II   
    • electrostatic propensity levels < 2.5 kV 
    • a contract for weekly cleaning of roll-out mats (required).

  • Confirm that all mechanical ventilation systems can accommodate MERV 13 filtration on outdoor and make-up air supply. 


  • Confirm that chemical disposal areas meet local codes for separate drain lines or containment drains. 


  • Confirm that all chemical storage areas, high-volume copy rooms, etc. have:

    • deck-to-deck partition walls or hard-lid ceilings;
    • self-closing doors;
    • designated exhaust (no recirculation); and 
    • an exhaust rate of 0.5 CFM/SF, with a pressure differential in relation to surrounding spaces of at least 5 Pa (0.02 inches on water gauge), on average or, when doors are closed, 1 Pa (0.004 inches on water gauge), at a minimum.

  • Locate hazardous waste storage containers away from outdoor air intakes. 

Construction Documents

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  • Develop all required documentation for LEED submittal, including floor plans indicating locations and lengths of entryway systems, wall details (for deck-to-deck partitions), mechanical drawings showing locations of designated exhaust systems, and mechanical schedules specifying MERV 13 filtration. 


  • For all spaces that may contain hazardous gas (such as garages, janitors' closets, and labs), calculate exhaust rates to confirm adequate negative pressurization. The pressurization requirements are: 

    • an exhaust rate of 0.5 CFM/SF with a pressure differential in relation to surrounding spaces of at least 5 Pascals (Pa)—.02 inches on water gauge—on average;
    • and when doors are closed, 1 Pa—.004 inches on water gauge—at a minimum.

  • Include credit requirements in all appropriate specification sections. Include the general requirements in Division 1 and others in specialties or furnishings (for the entryway systems) and HVAC (for filtration and other mechanical requirements).


  • Projects that use their own maintenance staff for regular cleaning of rollout entryway systems must provide a cleaning schedule and narrative along with their documentation. 


  • Develop documentation customized for LEED submission—complete with LEED-related notes, callouts, and details—concurrently with the finalized construction documents. 


  • The contractor is the signatory for IEQc5, even though it's a design credit. Have the contractor review 100% of the construction documents to confirm compliance before completing the design submittal. Otherwise, the credit may have to be deferred until the construction submittal. 

Construction

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  • Use temporary ventilation systems instead of the permanent HVAC units during construction. This prevents contamination of new ductwork during the construction process. 


  • Use MERV 8 filtration on any permanent mechanical system equipment used during construction. This adds to construction management tasks and could easily be overlooked and lead to loss of the credit. (This requirement appears in the LEED Online credit form as of 10/09, even though it does not appear in the credit language or LEED Reference Guide.)


  • Make sure that compliance and coordination with this credit is called out in the IAQ management plan if your project is pursuing IEQc3.1: Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan—During Construction


  • Ventilation and exhaust systems and proper filtration should be included in the commissioning scope for the commissioning credits EAp1 and EAc3.  

Operations & Maintenance

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  • Provide appropriate training for maintaining entryway systems. If roll-out mats are used, maintain a weekly schedule for cleaning.


  • Provide adequate training and education for all O&M and cleaning staff in appropriate handling, use, storage, and disposal of hazardous liquids.


  • Provide appropriate resources and training for O&M personnel to maintain mechanical equipment with MERV 13 filters. 


  • Mechanical systems have to be commissioned to meet the commissioning prerequisite EAp1. The commissioning agent's scope should include confirming appropriate MERV ratings on filtration media and proper operation of designated exhaust systems. 

  • USGBC

    Excerpted from LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

    IEQ Credit 5: Indoor chemical and pollutant source control

    1 Point

    Intent

    To minimize building occupant exposure to potentially hazardous particulates and chemical pollutants.

    Requirements

    Design to minimize and control the entry of pollutants into buildings and later cross-contamination of regularly occupied areas through the following strategies:

    • Employ permanent entryway systems at least 10 feet (3 meters) long in the primary direction of travel to capture dirt and particulates entering the building at regularly used exterior entrances. Acceptable entryway systems include permanently installed grates, grill s and slotted systems that allow for cleaning underneath. Roll-out mats are acceptable only when maintained on a weekly basis by a contracted service organization.
    • Sufficiently exhaust each space where hazardous gases or chemicals may be present or used (e.g., garages, housekeeping and laundry areas, copying and printing rooms) to create negative pressure with respect to adjacent spaces when the doors to the room are closed. For each of these spaces, provide self-closing doors and deck-to-deck partitions or a hard-lid ceiling. The exhaust rate must be at least 0.50 cubic feet per minute (cfm) per square foot (0.15 cubic meters per minute per square meter) with no air recirculation. The pressure differential with the surrounding spaces must be at least 5 Pascals (Pa) (0.02 inches of water gauge) on average and 1 Pa (0.004 inches of water) at a minimum when the doors to the rooms are closed.
    • In mechanically ventilated buildings, each ventilation system that supplies outdoor air shall comply with the following:
      • Particle filters or air cleaning devices shall be provided to clean the outdoor air at any location prior to its introduction to occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space..
      • These filters or devices shall meet one of the following criteria:
        • Filtration media is rated at a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value.) of 13 or higher in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 52.2
        • Filtration media is Class F7 or higher, as defined by CEN Standard EN 779: 2002, Particulate air filters for general ventilation, Determination of the filtration performance
        • Filtration media has a minimum dust spot efficiency of 80% or higher and greater than 98% arrestance on a particle size of 3–10 µg.
      • Clean air filtration media shall be installed in all air systems after completion of construction and prior to occupancy.

    Potential Technologies & Strategies

    Design facility cleaning and maintenance areas with isolated exhaust systems for contaminants. Maintain physical isolation from the rest of the regularly occupied areas of the building. Install permanent architectural entryway systems such as grills or grates to prevent occupant-borne contaminants from entering the building. Install high-level filtration systems in air handling units processing both return air and outside supply air. Ensure that air handling units can accommodate required filter sizes and pressure drops.

Technical Guides

IEQ Space Matrix - 2nd Edition

This updated version of the spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated. Up to date, 2nd Edition.


IEQ Space Matrix - 1st Ed.

This spreadsheet categories dozens of specific space types according to how they should be applied under various IEQ credits. This document is essential if you have questions about how various unique space types should be treated.  This is the 1st edition.

Web Tools

Janitorial Products Pollution Prevention Project

The Janitorial Products Pollution Prevention Project is a governmental and nonprofit project that provides fact sheets, tools, and links.


Design Tools for Schools - U.S. EPA

According to the website, IAQIndoor air quality: The quality and attributes of indoor air affecting the health and comfort building occupants. IAQ encompasses available fresh air, contaminant levels, acoustics and noise levels, lighting quality, and other factors. Design Tools for Schools “provides both detailed guidance as well as links to other information resources to help design new schools as well as repair, renovate, and maintain existing facilities. Though its primary focus is on indoor air quality, it is also intended to encourage school districts to embrace the concept of designing High Performance Schools, an integrated, whole building approach to addressing a myriad of important—and sometimes competing—priorities, such as energy efficiency, indoor air quality, daylighting, materials efficiency, and safety, and doing so in the context of tight budgets and limited staff."

Publications

Keeping Pollutants Out: Entryway Design for Green Buildings

Environmental Building News feature article describing the benefits and design choices for entryway walk-off systems.


Air Filtration in Buildings

Environmental Building News feature article explaining the various types of air filters, how their performance is measured, and ways to optimize their effectiveness.


Air Filtration Can Make Breathing Easier

Facilitiesnet article covering the basics of air filtration, drawbacks and benefits, standard practices and basic concepts.


Air Filter, Inc. Table

Table of filtration efficiencies and their subsequent filtration properties and common applications. Good background on MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filtration.

Entryway Systems

A floor plan like this project example is required to document the presence of entryway track-off systems, length and location. Note that this sample shows six-foot entryway systems because the project predated LEED 2009. For LEED 2009, the systems need to be ten feet in length.

LEED Online Forms: NC-2009 IEQ

The following links take you to the public, informational versions of the dynamic LEED Online forms for each NC-2009 IEQ credit. You'll need to fill out the live versions of these forms on LEED Online for each credit you hope to earn.

Version 4 forms (newest):

Version 3 forms:

These links are posted by LEEDuser with USGBC's permission. USGBC has certain usage restrictions for these forms; for more information, visit LEED Online and click "Sample Forms Download."

Design Submittal

PencilDocumentation for this credit can be part of a Design Phase submittal.

294 Comments

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Brian Harris Principal TcaArchitecture Planning
Jul 07 2014
LEEDuser Member
61 Thumbs Up

Chemical/Hazardous Gas Area Separation

We have a project that has a garage which has storage, mechanical and other occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space. accessed through doors. The occupied spaces have closures on the doors but the storage and mechanical room do not. Does anyone know if we would be in compliance or should the storage room doors have closures on them?

if it makes a difference one cannot access any other area through the storage and mechanical room.

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David Gibney Technical Director for Sustainable Design, M+W Group Jul 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 75 Thumbs Up

HI Brian, if there are chemicals (or gases) stored or used in the mechanical or storage rooms then they must be fitted with self-closing doors. And these rooms must also have full-ht. partitions (or gyp. bd. ceilings) and be negatively pressurized, all per credit criteria.

David

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Brian Harris Principal, TcaArchitecture Planning Jul 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 61 Thumbs Up

Thanks David. There will be no chemicals or gases stored in the mechanical or storage room but they are adjacent to a garage that will have CO2Carbon dioxide. The doors to other occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space. already have closures but what I don't know is if the doors on the storage and mechanical need closures even though they are not occupied spaces.

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David Gibney Technical Director for Sustainable Design, M+W Group Jul 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 75 Thumbs Up

Good question. Reading the Ref. Guide fine print it states "where hazardous gases may be present....) If these spaces are next to a garage (a steady source of CO and solvent fumes) then this "presence" condition may exist in these two non-occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space.. I personally would include door closers to be safe. Plus, as you know it's desirable for storage and mechanical rooms to have self-closing doors for security reasons. Now, with that said, if the size of the mechanical room and storage room were proportionately small compared to the garage, and if you can assure that any "present" gases in these two non-occupied rooms are contained within full-ht. partitions or gyp. bd. ceiling, you might be able to make a successful argument that they are incidental to the garage, effectively parts of it. But before you go that route I would first consider submitting a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide, realizing the cost and time delay of the CIR may not make this process worthwhile.

My two bits.... Good luck Brian. David

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Jason Warner Project Manager TCA Architecture Planning
Jul 07 2014
Guest

Chemical/Hazardous Gas Area Separation

We have a project that has a garage which needs to have self-closing doors and deck to deck walls or hard lid to other areas. We have the deck to deck walls but we only have door closures on the doors to the other occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space. not on the doors for a storage and a mechanical room. Doe anyone know if they would be required?

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Ilana Judah Director of Sustainability FXFOWLE
Jun 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
298 Thumbs Up

Residential Building - Balconies

We are working on a multifamily residential building where many of the units have private terraces or balconies. In this instance, are walk-off mats required at each of the entrances to the balconies? If so, are they required to be 10 feet long? This would be a significant impact on the living/dining or bedroom design adjacent to the balconies.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Jun 30 2014 LEEDuser Expert 68 Thumbs Up

The credit doesn't apply to balconies.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Jun 30 2014 LEEDuser Expert 68 Thumbs Up

It's for regular building entrances from the outside. Presumably you have already walked off the dirt when you entered the building.

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David Gibney Technical Director for Sustainable Design, M+W Group Jul 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 75 Thumbs Up

Hi Ilana, Michelle is absolutely correct. And, just to be specific, it does pertain to (ground-level) terraces, enclosed or not. We had this confirmed this year.

David

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Allyson Pease
Jun 18 2014
Guest
3 Thumbs Up

Dishwashing Rooms and Exhaust

Does anyone know if dishwashing rooms need to meet the exhaust requirements listed in this credit?

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David Gibney Technical Director for Sustainable Design, M+W Group Jun 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 75 Thumbs Up

Hi Allyson, just my opinion, but I believe you should assume they do need to comply. Even if the project uses a "green" soap product (or other chemicals), as addressed in the LEEDuser narrative (above, last paragraph) a best intentions policy is a weak approach. With that said, I would think most rooms dedicated to washing dishes (or laundry) would want to exhaust directly outside to rid the air of the humidity, and in some cases, the latent heat. So, this may not be so difficult to achieve from the HVAC design/construction aspect. The required door closers and containment/partitioning are probably tougher conditions to meet, I would imagine.

Good luck to you. David

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Amari Roskelly Sustainability Coordinator Jacobs Engineering
Jun 12 2014
LEEDuser Member
6 Thumbs Up

Entryway Systems in Vestibules less than 10'

Good morning all! We are currently working on a dining facility with vestibules at the two main points of entry. However, each vestibule measures just over 5'x5' and contains a recessed entryway system that encompasses the entire vestibule space. Has anyone had any success achieving IEQc5's entryway system requirement with this condition? It seems like I've read that you can achieve that requirement if your system spans from wall to wall in that space but I'm unable to locate it at this time. We are going to include a narrative explaining our position and how we are attempting to comply with this credit. However, I wanted to reach out to my fellow LEED Users for additional advice. Thanks so much!

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David Gibney Technical Director for Sustainable Design, M+W Group Jun 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 75 Thumbs Up

Hi Amari, it seems your condition as described isn't in compliance. The reference guide states "...at least 10 feet long in the primary direction of travel...". If the design cannot be changed to meet this 10-ft distance in each vestibule, then I would have a carpet service company contracted to place 5-foot long carpets immediately after each vestibule, in the building interior. You could add 5 feet of exterior recessed mat systems, but they would need to be protected from the elements, and this may not be practical for several reasons.

If it makes you feel any better I've faced this situation before. The architect was a LEED AP and knew we were pursuing this credit. So frustrating!

Good luck. David

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Amari Roskelly Sustainability Coordinator , Jacobs Engineering Jun 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 6 Thumbs Up

Thanks so much David, I figured that would be the case but wanted to see if anyone else had experience in this matter. The credit terminology seems misleading. They state that if you can provide information that you meet the credit intent, then your condition will be evaluated on a case by case basis. However, I have been unable to locate a case that didn't require the full 10 feet. Thank you for your response and the advice!

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator Jun 23 2014 LEEDuser Expert 68 Thumbs Up

David's answer is your safest bet. Here is an interpretation that addresses splitting up the 10' or rationalizing an exception. However, any time you attempt an exception you are taking a risk.
http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?clearsmartf=true&keys=10098

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JP Rout Architect+Urban Planner JPA
May 22 2014
Guest
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Query on grates/grilles in factory building for LEED NC Project

We are working on a factory project for LEED NC Certification. Our query is specific to IEQ CR 5.0 for grates/grilles in all high traffic exterior entryways. As a factory there will be heavily loaded trucks/vehicles will regularly ploy on site from entry and exist points. Trucks will usually come with raw material and same time they will carry finished products worth tons of weight out of the site. Our concern is installation of entryway grates/grilles may not be feasible considering the amount of load the trucks will carry. There is quite possibility that the grates/grilles may not withstand the load and may lead to break down of grates/grills installed.

Our question is will it be possible that we could get an exemption in implementing grates/grilles in high traffic external entrances.

Apart from grates/grilles, project will provide roll-out mats at all moderate/secondary traffic entry points like reception entrance and workers entrances to building and factory, dedicated rooms for copier/printer/Xerox and chemical handling room with MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value.-13 filtration media in each AHU1.Air-handling units (AHUs) are mechanical indirect heating, ventilating, or air-conditioning systems in which the air is treated or handled by equipment located outside the rooms served, usually at a central location, and conveyed to and from the rooms by a fan and a system of distributing ducts. (NEEB, 1997 edition) 2.A type of heating and/or cooling distribution equipment that channels warm or cool air to different parts of a building. This process of channeling the conditioned air often involves drawing air over heating or cooling coils and forcing it from a central location through ducts or air-handling units. Air-handling units are hidden in the walls or ceilings, where they use steam or hot water to heat, or chilled water to cool the air inside the ductwork. to cater outdoor as well as return air.

Thanks in advance!

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David Gibney Technical Director for Sustainable Design, M+W Group May 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 75 Thumbs Up

Hi JP, I believe you would not be granted an exemption. Steel grates can be installed that will bear the same weight as a concrete slab. If needed the grate could rest on a slab (in a recessed pocket) if the costs of steel structure/support need to be avoided. I would, however, be concerned about the functionality of the grates when handcarts (with smaller diameter wheels) are used, if that is the case.

One other aspect to confirm is that the ventilation design is fully met (negative pressurization and no air remix, meaning direct exhaust to outside.) Also, don't forget the self-closing doors for these chemical storage/handling spaces. And deck-to-deck partitions or hard lid ceilings. Yikes! I think this is the most onerous of all LEED credits...

Good luck to you. David

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ADRIENN GELESZ LEED AP, ABUD Engineering Ltd. May 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 914 Thumbs Up

Good question. In case of parking garages you do not have to provide the grills and grates for the vehicular areas, just at the entry point of the occupants to the other areas of the building. However, parking areas are not permanent work place.
I would give it a try and submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for this issue.

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Lyle Axelarris Civil/Structural Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Design Alaska May 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 540 Thumbs Up

I can't find it now, but I seem to remember discussion on this forum about a similar situation where the project successfully installed the walk-off mats in between the warehouse area and the office area, essentially treating the warehouse as "exterior". This approach makes sense to me from a contaminant control perspective, if it is impossible to keep contaminants from vehicle traffic from entering the warehouse/industrial spaces. I am considering this approach on a project that has warehouse and office modules. Can someone please confirm that walk-off mats can be placed to "protect" all entrances into an office module if the warehouse module is impossible to "protect" (forklift traffic tracking in dirt), and the warehouse is occupied on extremely rare occasions? Thank you.

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group May 23 2014 LEEDuser Expert 8071 Thumbs Up

As long as you have walk off mats for entryways for pedestrians, and even as noted, between the factory side and the warehouse side, there should be no issue. You do not have to have grilles for vehicles.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator May 23 2014 LEEDuser Expert 68 Thumbs Up

I agree with Todd. The intent is to protect people in the occupied building from contaminants that come in on the feet of other people, not vehicles. Warehouse workers are people too. Protect regular pedestrian entries to occupied spacesOccupied Spaces are defined as enclosed spaces that can accommodate human activities. Occupied spaces are further classified as regularly occupied or non-regularly occupied spaces based on the duration of the occupancy, individual or multi-occupant based on the quantity of occupants, and densely or non-densely occupied spaces based upon the concentration of occupants in the space..

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Lyle Axelarris Civil/Structural Engineer, LEED AP BD+C, O+M, Design Alaska May 23 2014 LEEDuser Member 540 Thumbs Up

Michelle, does it make sense to you, to place walk-off mats between an office space module of a building and a "warehouse/storage" module of a building (which is rarely occupied)? Thank you.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator May 23 2014 LEEDuser Expert 68 Thumbs Up

If the warehouse is "dirty" and people are walking back and forth from the warehouse to the office, then yes there should be walk off mats. Think about how often a contractor or the cable guy comes to your house. I still want them putting on their booties or taking off their shoes when they come in.

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jack larson
May 22 2014
Guest
38 Thumbs Up

UNDERLAY underneath carpet tiles

acceptable entryway systems include permanently installed grates, grills, and slotted systems that allow for cleaning underneath. Roll out mats are acceptable only when maintained on a weekly basis by a contracted service organization

What we have on our project are two items for an entryway system at regularly used exterior entrances

1) An underlay
2) And on top of the underlay are carpet piles

Both items do capture dirt and allow for cleaning underneath. Not only that but we can definitely maintain it on a weekly basis by a contracted organization…… Can we qualify?

Again the underlay acts as a roll out mat, and the carpet tiles are the top layer. Underneath the carpet tiles is the underlay.

These 2 items are used mostly in big projects or hotelS…
Can someone please tell me if the above qualifies

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David Gibney Technical Director for Sustainable Design, M+W Group May 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 75 Thumbs Up

Hi Jack, frankly I don't think it would qualify. What you've described on the surface is standard carpet tile. I don't see how the underlay pertains in this condition. The USGBC allows roll out mats with proof of a service contract (if audited). The reason for this, I presume, is that these mats are more likely to be cleaned to a higher standard and when they become worn they will be replaced with new carpets by the service provider.

My opinion... sorry! David

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group May 23 2014 LEEDuser Expert 8071 Thumbs Up

There is carpet tile that has a weave that is considered and accepted as walk off mat. If you were to use that instead of a regular tile, i don;t see a reason for your method not being accepted.

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Michelle Halle Stern LEED Fellow, The Green Facilitator May 23 2014 LEEDuser Expert 68 Thumbs Up

There is an interpretation on this question. Basically if the carpet tile is specifically designed for entryways it can be used. http://www.usgbc.org/node/1732542?view=interpretations.

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John Covello LEED and Sustainability Manager Development Management Group
Apr 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
339 Thumbs Up

Shoe removal and storage space in place of walk off mats

Hello,

I am with a sustainable resort project in Thailand. Our project has designed shoe storage space in the front of each guest room instead of having walk off mats. LEED Homes 2008 EQ Credit 8: Contaminant control allows for this as option B in place of walk off mats. Could we use this as the basis of an exception for this credit?

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Joyce Kelly Consultant Architectural Fusion
Mar 26 2014
LEEDuser Member
36 Thumbs Up

Self-contained classroom pods = regularly used entrances?

Picture a University bldg. shaped to form a slot canyon to provide shaded access to the outdoors. Within the canyon, which includes doors to exit the courtyard, are a few small classroom pods. Does each classroom pod entrance require walk-off mats from the canyon courtyard?
There is also a pod on the roof, accessed directly from internal stairs. But it has an exit door, that may be used for re-entry. We believe re-entry is not "regularly used."

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David Gibney Technical Director for Sustainable Design, M+W Group Mar 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 75 Thumbs Up

Hi Joyce, I'm afraid that the classroom pods would require walk-off mats. I'm working on a factory project that has a cafeteria with exit doors out onto a patio. The patio itself is contained (fenced), meaning further egress from it isn't intended. We received Final Design Review comments last week from GBCI and they denied us this credit point. We may add walk off mats inside the cafeteria, TBD. I have read that placing part of the walk-off mat on the exterior of the door is allowed, provided it is protected from the elements and cleaned regularly. You may wish to explore this option if interior space is limited. Good luck. David

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Melissa Vernon Director of Sustainable Strategy, Interface Mar 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 566 Thumbs Up

Note: carpet tile designed for walk-off mats is an acceptable solution, so you can provide an interior walk-off mat that is a better aesthetic and functional product than a grate, grill, or roll-out mat.

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Raina Tilden Architect Liljewall Arkitekter
Mar 19 2014
Guest
47 Thumbs Up

Air Locks and Negative Pressure

The project I am working on consists of a huge machine shop on one side of a glass wall and offices on the other side of the glass wall. I am assuming that the dividing glass wall is "tight" and that the construction details at the roof, floor, etc will also be tight.

Providing the entire gigantic machine shop with negative pressure will cost a lot of energy.

We already have "air locks" between the office and machine shop spaces--i.e: one must pass through two doors when going between the spaces. If the air lock has self-closing doors and significant negative pressure compared to the office space, would that be a meaningful subsitute for negatively pressurizing the entire machine shop?

A more general question: what is the purpose of the negative pressure? Is the negative pressure meant to keep pollutants from leaking through the walls/floors/ceilings? Or is the negative pressure meant to keep pollutants in while the door is open? Or both?

If the meaning is just to keep pollutants on one side of an open door, I would think that the air lock solution would be reasonable?

Thanks in advance for your help and insight!

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David Gibney Technical Director for Sustainable Design, M+W Group Mar 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 75 Thumbs Up

Hi Raina, I'm not a mechanical engineer, but I doubt the LEED reviewer would accept this solution. In theory if you have positive pressurization in the machine shop and a negatively pressurized vestibule separating it from the office space, this vestibule would serve as a "vacuum", sucking up air from the machine shop. People entering this negatively-pressurized vestibule could then be subjected to potentially contaminated air from the machine shop. Here's an idea: if this vestibule was positively pressurized then one might be able to make the argument that it would be contaminant-free and thus the office space would not be subjected to bad air from the machine shop. You probably would need to have a significant pressure differential between the vestibule and the machine shop to convince the LEED reviewer that this would work, and it might even take a CFD model to prove to them the efficacyIn lighting, the ratio of light output (in lumens) to input power (in watts). Higher efficacy indicates higher efficiency. of this strategy. Also, depending on the door swing direction you might need to have stout door closers to overcome the positive pressurization in the vestibule, which can be difficult without using security grade doors. If you think this is a potentially viable design option, prior to doing it I would certainly submit a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide for pre-approval.

To answer your question, I believe the purpose of the negative pressurization is both.

My two bits.... Good luck! David

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Kent Liu
Mar 07 2014
Guest
32 Thumbs Up

Split units compliance

My project is a high-rise residential tower. The dwelling units satisfy the criteria as a natural ventilated space and are also installed with split unit air-conditioner for winter and summer.

How can my space comply with the MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 requirement?

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Mar 10 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6824 Thumbs Up

Kent - Great question.

The MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 requirement only applies to "mechanically ventilated buildings." Assuming you have a mechanical conditioned and naturally ventilated space, then MERV 6-8 would be acceptable for the split units.

If the unit is drawing outdoor air during in the winter and summer then MERV 13 filters would be required for this credit.

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Kent Liu Mar 10 2014 Guest 32 Thumbs Up

Thank you for the reply. However, the reference guide mentioned about MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 requirement "should be applied to process both return and outside air that is delivered as supply air."

Essentially, split units are delivering return air as supply air. Would I be at risk of losing this point if I only uses MERV 6-8 in this case?

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Karla Rangi Mar 20 2014 Guest 4 Thumbs Up

The requirement for MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filters for return air was removed in the Oct 2013 addendum: http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=100000426

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Charline Seytier CEO, Co-owner. LEED AP BD+C ThemaVerde, France
Mar 04 2014
LEEDuser Member
457 Thumbs Up

Rubber Grating

There's been discussions about rubber mats but we are dealing with a question concerning rubber grating that will come with a non-slip metal frame.

Per our understanding, being grates, no weekly maintenance will be required, would you agree?
Thanks for your help!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 04 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Charline, I agree with your understanding.

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Farah A.
Feb 16 2014
Guest
303 Thumbs Up

MERV for Filters

Are MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filtration media used for temporary or permanent air handlers?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Farah, I'd recommend reviewing the guidance above, and on IEQc3.1.

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Farah A. Feb 17 2014 Guest 303 Thumbs Up

All I need to know for the LEED BD+C Exam is that MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 8 filters are required for 3.1 DURING Construction, for temporary ventilation units?

And that MERV 13 is required for Credit 5.

I just re-read the reference guide and unfortunately I do not have access to all the information above, as I am not a subscribed member.

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Feb 18 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6824 Thumbs Up

Farah - that is correct.

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David Gibney Technical Director for Sustainable Design M+W Group
Jan 31 2014
LEEDuser Member
75 Thumbs Up

Terraces, balconies, porches and walk-off mats

I recall seeing a CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide a few years that addressed this issue but I'm unable to retrieve it at the Interpretations Database. Issue: we have an institutional cafeteria that has doors leading outside to a paved terrace/patio. I presume we need to provide walk-off mats for these entrances as well. Does anyone have specific experience with this condition? Note that the terrace/patio is fenced so there is no entrance/egress from adjacent surfaces (paved or vegetated).

Thanks for your input. David

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Helen Kessler President, HJKessler Associates Jan 31 2014 LEEDuser Member 209 Thumbs Up

Yes, you would need to provide walk-off mats at these entrances. We had a similar situation on a project.

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant Taitem Engineering
Jan 27 2014
LEEDuser Member
904 Thumbs Up

multifamily building

If i have a multifamily building with a common laundry room and say the housekeeping supplies will be kept in a separate janitorial storage closet elsewhere in the building, do both of these spaces need to meet exhaust requirements? Thanks!

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Feb 17 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6824 Thumbs Up

Yes both need to be separately ventilated. They are two separate requirements. The janitor closet for the housekeeping supplies and the laundry is probably because of the possibility of bleach or other chemicals being used.

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Scott West Mechanical Engineer Jacobs
Jan 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
60 Thumbs Up

EQc5 Negative Exhaust Rates

I'm trying to figure out the exhaust airflow rates required for chemical pollutant source rooms in a hospital (e.g. janitor's closets, copy rooms, etc.). The LEED credit requirements state: "The pressure differential with the surrounding spaces must be at least 5 Pascals (Pa) on average and 1 Pa at a minimum when the doors to the rooms are closed." This is a bit ambiguous, but I take this to mean that the average exhaust rate of these rooms must meet at least a 5 Pa pressure differential over their entire operating range but the instantaneous pressure differential can get as low as 1 Pa. This implies that LEED is giving allowance for spaces where the chemical use is variable and the exhaust fans have multi-speed control where they ramp up only when chemicals are in use.

Most of the exhaust air systems I work with for these types of spaces are simply equipped with constant volume fans however. So if the exhaust air volumes don't change, then it sounds like we must meet a 5 Pa pressure differential to meet the credit requirements. Is my interpretation correct? Has anyone had experience or LEED comments related to this specific issue? Thanks,

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Jan 15 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6824 Thumbs Up

Scott - correct - you should meet 5 Pa if the volumes don't change

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Jan 16 2014 LEEDuser Member 8032 Thumbs Up

I thought it applied to the measurements. I.e. over ten minutes of measurements at say a measurement every 5 seconds, the average of all measurements must be 5 Pa with a maximum deviation of 4 Pa. Yes, you design for 5 Pa.

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Jan 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6824 Thumbs Up

Jean,
In my experience LEED/GBCI has never asked for measured data for this credit. Have you had a LEED reviewer ask you to prove you're meeting the required differential pressure?

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Jan 24 2014 LEEDuser Expert 6824 Thumbs Up

Jean,
In my experience LEED/GBCI has never asked for measured data for this credit. Have you had a LEED reviewer ask you to prove you're meeting the required differential pressure?

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert Jan 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 8032 Thumbs Up

We've had projects, some with the submitting measured data and some with providing calculations, and to date have had no questions asked.

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FABIO VIERO Head of Sustainability Manens-Tifs s.p.a.
Nov 26 2013
LEEDuser Member
409 Thumbs Up

Housekeeping exhaust rate

We are developing a building which has a cleaning storage rooms and all the cleaning products are closed/sealed except for temporary use (1 use per day).
We want to persue the Ashrae 62.1-2007 by using table 6-4 (minimum exhaust rates).
My question is: Which is the Occupancy Category need to be used for this cleaning storage room.

Thanks in advance

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Michael Johnson Architect Chenevert Architects
Nov 11 2013
LEEDuser Member
618 Thumbs Up

exhaust from recycle storage room?

does the room that contains recycle storage bins need to be exhausted to the exterior?

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Dylan Connelly Mechanical Engineer, Integral Group Nov 11 2013 LEEDuser Expert 6824 Thumbs Up

Not required for this credit, but probably required for local code.

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David Gibney Technical Director for Sustainable Design M+W Group
Nov 05 2013
LEEDuser Member
75 Thumbs Up

MERV 13 filtration required? Need some opinions here...

In order to comply with LEED IEQc5, do we need to provide MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value.-13 filters for the supply air of a very large warehouse? The warehouse is expected to be “regularly” occupied. Currently the warehouse has roof mounted exhaust fans to reduce summer time over-heating, with louvers providing make-up air. There is no heating, cooling or air handling equipment needed, the building is naturally ventilated year-round with the exception of the exhaust air fans. It would not be practical to install MERV-13 filters behind the louvers, as the resistance to air flow is too great. The only option would be to install supply fans with filters and this would greatly increase the energy consumption of the building, as the airflow is huge. I'd appreciate your thoughts. Thanks. David

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Mara Baum Healthcare Sustainable Design Leader, LEED Fellow, HOK Nov 05 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7329 Thumbs Up

David, yes, you would need to provide MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filtration. As with many credits, there are trade offs that the team would to make decisions on. This may or may not be the most appropriate credit for your project to pursue.

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Renaud Gay Shanghai Pacific Energy Center Jun 04 2014 LEEDuser Member 88 Thumbs Up

Hi Mara,

I am in the same situation as David.
I Just checked the very last comment for this credit (page 4), "MERVMinimum efficiency reporting value. 13 filter and natural ventilation".
Tristan replied on his side that if there is no mechanically supplied air in the building then MERV 13 requirement would not applied.
I would have said the same. There are other requirements to meet in this credit. Does your statement come from a past project of yours?

Thank you, Renaud.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert
Oct 17 2013
LEEDuser Member
8032 Thumbs Up

Required Exhaust Rates - spaces with hazardous gases

Why does the requirement of 0.5 cfm/sf exist when IEQp1 requires 0.5 cfm/sf as the minimum exhaust rate from such spaces (ASHRAE 62.1-2007 Table 6-4)?

If you don't have at least 0.5 cfm/sf, you don't get certified.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 03 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Just guessing, but it was probably a redundancy that was written into LEED at some point. Someone wanted to make sure that "sufficiently exhausted" was defined.

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Jean Marais b.i.g. Bechtold DesignBuilder Expert
Oct 17 2013
LEEDuser Member
8032 Thumbs Up

entry way compliance for shops at street level of office block

We have small shops (less than 100m2) on the street level of our office building. Each shop has an entrance to the pedestrian. How can one comply to the 10ft entry way system?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 17 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Jean, there's no way out of the requirement, so you'll either need to do something creative with exterior/indoor systems, or let go of the credit. The LEED Retail rating systems don't offer a more relaxed approach to this requirement, which I think is a signal that you're stuck with it.

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator JALRW Eng. Group Inc.
Oct 02 2013
LEEDuser Member
2030 Thumbs Up

Entry Mats: Interior or Exterior?

Reading the reference guide, they say the following: "Incorporate permanent entryway system at all high-traffic exterior to interior access points to reduce...", also "employ permanent entryway system at least 10 feet long in the primary direction of travel..." not really sure if this implies, interior or exterior entry mats. It also says "Entryway systems must extend 10 feet from the building entrance intro the building interior" What is the correct interpretation?

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Todd Reed Daylight Designer, 7group Oct 02 2013 LEEDuser Expert 8071 Thumbs Up

10 feet total, exterior place matts should have some sort of cover/protection from the elements but don't need completely enclosed. So you can have 5 feet inside, and 5 feet outside.

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Catalina Caballero Sustainability Coordinator, JALRW Eng. Group Inc. Oct 02 2013 LEEDuser Member 2030 Thumbs Up

We recently saw a comment from a reviewer not saying that it was incorrect but just saying allowing it. Not really sure if all reviewers will give the same feedback though

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Mara Baum Healthcare Sustainable Design Leader, LEED Fellow, HOK Oct 02 2013 LEEDuser Expert 7329 Thumbs Up

Victor, what specifically was incorrect / not allowed?

Most projects use matts on the inteiror only, but I've had a few feet worth on the exterior when it's completely covered/protected.

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Mary Ostafi Sustainability Specialist, HOK Nov 21 2013 LEEDuser Member 190 Thumbs Up

It seems from the conversation above that it is feasible to split up the 10' length requirement between interior and exterior applications. Would it therefore be sufficient to combine a 6' permanently installed walk off matt in vestibules with a 6' roll up matt adjacent to the vestibule? Or, does the 10' need to be one continuous system??

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David Gibney Technical Director for Sustainable Design, M+W Group Nov 22 2013 LEEDuser Member 75 Thumbs Up

I concur with Mara and Todd's assessment. I did a project a few years ago and asked this same question regarding splitting inside/outside for 10-ft. The response was that the exterior portion had to be protected from the elements. I presume this would be more than a canopy overhead but some sort of side wall protection to deter leaves and dust etc., from accumulating on the exterior portion.

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sompoche sirichote Nov 25 2013 LEEDuser Member 190 Thumbs Up

I just got comment from GBCI that the entryway must be located inside the building.
Please see CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide 10098 below:
Inquiry

Where there are physical impediments to locating 10 ft of walk-off mats inside the building, is it acceptable to locate a portion of the mat or grate outside and then the remainder of the required 10 ft inside?

Ruling

The intent for the entryway system (grilles, grates, walk-off mats) is to capture dirt and dust. An exception to the 10 ft length and/or indoor location is acceptable provided your alternative solution meets this intent and is thoroughly justified. Applicable Internationally.

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